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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00218
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: June 20, 1976
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00218

Full Text



Vol. 6 Nc


S, rs. Andrea. Talbutt,
Research Institut for
o0 Study. of Mah i
1. 162,' East 78th Street,
Nc "York, N.Y. 1<:'LI2l,
Ph Lehidgh 5 8448.
TT' .S -..A.


PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE TAPIA HOUSE PUBLISHING CO. LTD., 91 TUNAPUNA RD.. TUNAPUNA TEL : 662-5126.


ANGELA CROPPER JEREMY MAH, ALLAN HARRIS, C e- i v-RA DENNIS PAN I I1N,
AROUCA NARIVA P.O.S. CENTRAL ST AUGUSTINE DIEGO MARTIN EAST


II


SO Dr. Williams intends
to come out of retire-
ment in 1981 to contest
the General Elections
that year. /
This is what seems
indicated by two things
last week. One wastihis
reported remark that the
1976 elections provide no
contest for the PNM, and
that he himself was pre-
paring for 1981.
Tie second was the
passage in this last all-
clearing Parliamentary
sitting of the legislation
guaranteeing a generous
pension for the Prime
Minister, among others.
Give that to the Doc-
tor: he always had an
eye on the 1980s. From
as far back as the late
1960s, his Government
was promising full em-
ployment by 1983,
Then 1970 intervened
to emphasise the point
that the youth of the
country are not prepared
to wait that long for
something to run.
So that promise was
quietly dropped. And


after the turmoil of the
early 1970s, climaxing in
"Williams' attempted "re-
turn to private life" ploy,
of September 1973, it wr s
oil that become the b'.g
harbinger of better times
and bringer of jobs.
Nobody believes any-
one that Dr. Williams
will go into anything like
"voluntary" retirement.
He will have to be forced,
politically, into retire-
rment, and that is what
will be the result of this
year's elections.
The big noise coming
recently from PNM politi-
cal circles has been the
open play being made
by the Doctor for youth.
And women.
He now wants youth.
on his Party ticket. And
last Sunday it seemed he
got the PNM belatedly to
take the point.
In 1971 he could
muster only the hapless
Patrick Manning, then 26
years old, whom he
brought in, avowedly for
training.
Manning was then


Fraud in PNM
(POLITICAL INTELLIGENCE BUREAU)
A FRAUD involving $22,000 and a PNM car raffle
run by the PNM last year has been the subject of a
high-level Party inquiry at Balisier House.
The Party raffle, probably to raise funds for the
PNM election campaign, was drawn on January 24,
1976.
But when income from the raffle tickets sold
was totted up, at least $22,000 was found missing!
The PNM executive called for an audit of the
whole business. And a three-man team, including
PNM Chairman Senator Francis Prevatt, was also
appointed to investigate the fraud.
The' audit has since been turned in to the
investigation committee.
A clerk at Balisier House, who is also a member
of the Party, has been suspended since the fraud was
discovered. But the investigating committee has not
yet submitted its final report.


touted as "educated"
youth, as distinct from
"drop out"' youth,' as
Wilii .is then put it.
Manning, then, to his
credit. had finished
scliooling and "qualified".
It is not clear whether
Manning benefited as
much from hiy later
schooling at the hands of
Dr. Williams and his
government over these
last tive years.
Manning has neither
shown talent nor been
given responsibility of
anv kind where he could
show what he ha been
learning.
Now nIK must, like the
rest of them. follow
in the long line to the
Doctor's office to deliver
his undated letter of
resignation- if, that is,
he wants to go through
with the Parliamentary
thing again.

MILLSTONES

For, as far as attracting
new talent is concerned,
whether young or female,
the party can never live
down the monstrous
image.it has steadily beelT
acquiring especially since
1973.
No doubt about it: the
PNM is now the Doctor's
"lock, stock and barrel".
It is hiss now more
than ever. It seems that
even a little rebellion in
the party can't come
about unless it is engi-
neered by the Political
Leader himself.
This is what acute
political minds early
pounced upon: the affair
which started with the
attack on the party
"millstones", singling out


Simonette in particular,
then Simonette's reply,
then Hudson-Phillips' two
letters could really have
been planned from start
to finish by Williams.
According to this view,
he had intention to get
rid neither of Simonette


Fri. June 18




Sat. June 19
Sun. June 20






Tue. June 22


Wed. June 23


Rio Claro Market
Gopaul Ave. and
Diego Main Road
Cap de Ville

Souri Vge., Lopinot
Parainin Village,
Ma raval
Valley Line,
Ba rrackpore
Ma telot
Sans Souci

Seminar for Cadres,
Tapia House, Tunap

Shopping Centre,
Tunapuna-
Sorzano & King
Sts. Arima


TNu. June 24 Temple St., Arima

Fri. June 25 E.M.R. Arouca


Sun. June 27


Fourth Assembly of
National Conventiol
Lions Civic Centre, 5


Fernando
Tue. June 21) Kirpalani's Corner,
A rim a
Fri. July 2 Charlotteville
Belle Garden

Sat. July 3 Delaford

Sun. July 4 Council of Reps.
Port of Spain Centre


nor of Hudson-Phillips.
In any case, for all his
seemingi:defiant bluster,
the ,former Attorney
Geneal of the sedition
and mutiny trials, could
not resist a last-minute
,call by Williams to patch
things up.


5.30 p.m.

6.30 p.m.
6.00 p.m.

5.00 p.m.

9.00 p.m.

6.00 p.m.
3.00 p.m.
4.00 p.m.


tuna 7.00 p.m.


6.30 p.m.

7.30 p.m.

7.30 p.m.

7.00 p.m.

the
I,
San
10.30 a.m.

7.00 p.m.

(to be announced)
( be announced)


(tso be announced)


SUtli'AY IITNE 20, -1976?


-~aTAPIpAi~ ~B


,L---- _CI







PAGE 2 TAPIA


SUNDAY JUNE 20. 1976


Poz:wjww~


RAIN failed to
dampen spirits at
Tapia Tunapuna's
"Super Sunday
Something" held at


the Tapia House
grounds Tunapuna
last Sunday.
A large crowd
defied the threat of


the weather and
turned out for a big
occasion that ended at
midnight after some
ten hours of music,


games, daticing and
political rapping.
By mid-afternoon
a gaily attired crowd
was already thronging


Keith Smith can be seen during his
moving address about "the Tapia
dream", whilst Gloria Henry gesticulates
during her debut at the Tapia House.


T.AP.


Part
of
the
large
crowd
enjoying
the
evening.


!. Junior Wiltshire displaying
his amazing huckstering
ability.
.. *


the Tapia House, the
bar set up in the old
Moonlight Theatre
and many were at all
fours tables.
Lever Bros Gay
Flamingoes and
Blackpool Hilltones
played music for
early arrivals.
As usual the turn-
over of phulori,
channa and mini-roti
was heavy.
Bhoe Tewarie, the
Tapia candidate for
St. Augustine, com-
pered the political side
of the days'
proceedings.
After welcoming
the folk from Tuna-
puna and elsewhere,
Tewarie introduced
some of the Tapia
candidates and
campaigners in
the Tunapuna
region.

Making a disting-
uished debut on a
platform at Tapia
House was Arima
candidate Gloria
Henry.
Ms. Henry took
the opportunity
herself to introduce
one of the cam-
paigners in her
constituency,
Victoria Fraser.
The last of the
political addresses
was delivered by
Keith Smith who
dealt movingly with
issues of "the Tapia
dream" as he saw it.
Among highlights
of the day's enter-
tainment and "fun
raising" was the
"auction" of a four-
pound chicken.
Diego Martin West
Tapia candidate
Junior Winthrop
Wiltshire gave an
astonishing display
of huckstering
dynamism that kept
the large crowd eager
with excitement as
"bids" as high as
$100 were made for
the roasted capon
he held aloft in a
plastic polythene
bag.
And then there
were the Beena
Mohammed Melody
Makers who gave a
half hour perfor-
mance.
Yet another high-
light was the singing
by Buntin Joseph,
the Tapia candidate
for Toco-Manzanilla,
of two political
calypsoes composed
by himself.
By the time that
ended, the Blackpool
Hilltones were
entertaining pan
music lovers while


i






SUNDAY JJNE 20, 1975


TAPIA PAGE 3


A lone




fighter J




for o.F


0 0

ju s t i c e Paramount Building the efforts of the OWTU proved insufficient to help the cause of
Ulric Rogers.



looks to the Ombudsman


By RA OUL PANTIN
ULRIC ROGERS was 37
years old when he- was
fired from Texaco Trini-
dad Inc. on July 3, 1962.
Fourteen years later, at
51, Rogers is talking
about the Ombudsman
provided for in the Re-
publican Constitution.
"I feel if I keep my
case alive, I could go to
the Ombudsman and try
to get justice. What you
think, boy?"
Justice is the hardest
thing to get in Trinidad!
Especially for men like
Ulric Rogers. Just, an
ordinary man. He learnt
his skill as a refinery
operator with Shell in
Curacao. In 1955 he came
home to work with what
was to become Texaco
Trinidad Inc.
It was as a junior
refinery operator with
Texaco that on July 2,


Trinidad & Tobago
Caricom countries
Other Caribbean
U.S./Canada
E.E.C. (incl. U.K.)


U.S.
U.S.
Stg.


1962, Rogers got a warn-
ing notice of "unsatis-
factory conduct" and on
July 3 he was out of a
work.
To this day, Rogers
says his dismissal was
unjust. "I had an agree-
ment with my boss to
work one hour overtime
every day." For which he
was to get leave in lieu.
But the boss denied the
agreement; Rogers got
angry; he appealed to the
OWTU shop steward on
plant then.
To Rogers, the shop
steward 'began to take
the company side. He
disagreed with the shop
steward and that made
the boss more vex.
So angered by what to
him was a straight case
of a broken agreement,
Rogers sought to have
other workers on the
plant sign a petition to


$18.00 per year
30.00
$25.00
$30.00
114.00


the OWTU executiveffor
removal of the shop
steward.
The next day, Rogers
was out of a job. He was
paid up to the date of his
dismissal ($92.85 a week)
and one week's extra pay
in lieu of notice.
Most men would give
it up and look for
another job.
Well, Rogers has done
that too. Applied to
TRINTOC and all. But
he also says "Texaco has
blackballed me all over
Trinidad".
In at least two cases
where he applied for
jobs, friends with those
companies told him
straight- "Forget it.
Texaco don't want you
to work, boy."
Another friend told
him once: "Is better you
go away and then come
back so you wouldn't
have to use Texaco as a
reference."
Go where?
"This is my country,
man!" Rogers says. "You
mean to say they could
stop you from working
in your own country?
What kind of stupidness
is that?"
And so, with a deter-
mination that could only
be fuelled by a strong
sense of outrage at
personal injustice, Rogers
has taken his case from
pillar to post over the
last 14 years.
First to take up the
case was the OWTU. By
an odd coincidence,
President General George
Weekes had taken over
leadership of the union


on June 25, 1962 one
week before Rogers was
fired.
The case went back
and forth, forth and back
between company and
union. Then it went
before the Review Board
Tribunal (later to become
the Industrial Court).

JUSTIFIED

The Board upheld the,
company's action as
"justified" because Rogers
was known to have
created problems before.
But the Board didn't say
what those problems
were.
Even so, the Board
also held that firing
Rogers under the circum-
stances was not "the
only alternative left open
to the company."
The OWTU decided to-
drop the case. Rogers
said no and persisted. Two
months later, in Novem-
ber 1964, the Union's
annual conference of
delegates instructed the
executive to re-open the
case.
The company balked
at the idea. The Union, it
said, had already agreed
to drop the matter.
Go to the High Court,
the OWTU told Rogers.
He went. Jack Kelshall
argued his case. But the
High Court saidtthe case
was "statute barred" -
the court could not deal
with a matter so old.
Rogers went to the
Industrial Court. The
Industrial Court ruled
that the OWTU had
already closed the case.


Rogers turned next to
the Ihternational Labour
Office (ILO) in Geneva.
The ILO told him, take
it up with your local
authorities.
He wrote the Prime
Minister, who replied;
saying the matter would
be .passed on to the rele-
vant authority. But
nothing happened.
He drew up a properly
worded petition to the
Governor General. The
Governor General was
sympathetic but there
was nothing he could do,
really.
All that time, without
a real job, Rogers got
some help from old
friends (the late Donald
Pierre in particular) to
get his six children
through school. But his
family life has suffered,
of course.

A big man without a
job to mind his children!
In a moment of weakness,
Rogers says: "Well my
life finished. Thank God I
educated my children."
He isn't finished with
his casetthough. In 1973
when the Inter-Religious
Organisation (IRO) was
making headlines, Rogers
saw another chance for
justice.
He wrote the IRO a
long letter about his case.
They replied. There was
nothing they could do
either.
He's been to see
Attorney General Basil
Pitt. Pitt, Rogers says,
has told him straight:
"This is the worst thing
I've ever seen but I can-
not open it up because if
I do, I'll have to open up
all the other cases."
Implying that Rogers isn't
alone, just terribly deter-
mined.
Now he's looking at
that Ombudsman. And
drafting a letter to
Texaco's head office in
New York. Ulric Rogers


Our coverage of

THE REGION

is unsurpassed anywhere

for focus and point.

'Keep abreast of the

real currents in the

Caribbean Sea.
OWING to the recent increase in the postal
rates, the Tapia House Publishing Co., Ltd., has
found it necessary to increase the subscription
rates for TAPIA.
The new rates are as follows:


Surface rates and rates for other countries on
request The new rates are effective February 1, 1976.
Tapia, 82, St. Vincent St Tunapuna, Trinidad &
Tobago, W.I. Telephone 662-5126. & 62-25241.


J.C Sealy


S THE BOOKSHOP

For the better type of book
111 FRED E RICK STREET PORT-OF-SPAIN






PAGE 4 TAPIA


Will i


they


have to


come


to town


from


Matelot again?


Norman Lincoln


Buntin Joseph
Tapia Candidate
Toco-Manzanilla
THE 500 souls who live
in and around. Matelot,-
stuck way out there on
Trinidad's -north-eastern
tip, have achieved a kind
of record over the last
few years.
They have trudged to
Port-of-Spain three times
in the last three years to
make noise about their
problems. They is people
too! And on two of
those occasions, they
actually talked directly
to the -Prime Minister
about the horrors they
were getting.
They might as well
have talked to a wall.
But the remaining 10-
mile strip of winding
road between Sans Souci
_and Matelot is a death
trap. Two weekends ago
a bus carrying PNM sup-
porters back from a spree
on the beach flipped off
a bridge on that road.
"So far", Norman
Lincoln, 57-year-old
President of the Matelot
Village Council, "they
fixed up the road from
Cumana -to Sans Souci."'


Lincoln says other
work on the road has
begun. But at snail's
pace. And the reason
given, he says, is a bridge
that is too weak to take
barber green vehicles.
Lincoln describes that as
"a poor excuse".
The roads got a little
touch up when Williams
dropped in on April 7
this year to turn on lights
for the village. Lincoln
wants to come back to
Port-of-Spain to talk
about that, among other
things.
"Many people aren't
connected yet", he says.
"And we want to pay our
bills probably into police
stations in the area and
save us the trouble of
going into town".

PRIMITIVE

Matelot remains a com-
munity living off fishing
and agriculture.
Both remain in a primi-
tive state.
"There's been no im-
provement over the years",
Lincoln says. The roads
remain neglected, the
fishermen are still with-
out marketing facilities.
So the fish goes to
waste.
This is Lincoln's last
year as President of the
Matelot Village Council.
And he's setting a
pattern that is already
becoming a way of life
in the village. Lincoln is
also a builder. He's just
put up a new hall in the
Village (where a side that
came in by boat from
Las Cuevas was engaging
Matelot in an All Fours
competition).
Thrown up against
themselves, the people
of Matelot are scrunting
,but eking out ways to
live. A little kitchen
garden here. Even selling
fishing lines (what's the
point of catching fish?).
Young people in the
village? "They have noth-
ing to do", Lincoln says.
They just drift -- like
so many other young
people all over the coun-
try now.


SUNDAY JUNE 20, 1976
S- --
;g_2i._iMK .- -" *-, ..
__--.-. -


This broken bridge highlights the plight of Matelol Washed away by the river
last year it remains unfixed, thereby forcing the villagers to use a raft.














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SUNDAY JUNE 20, 1976


THIS OIL MONEY


MAKING... BUT


ARE


Tapia Economics Committee
THE FAILURE of the
present regime in every
department of state is
perhaps nowhere better
illustrated than in the
area of employment and
income distribution.
It is more than ten
years now that the Cer~
tral Statistical Office has
attempted to collect
statistics systematically
on the state of employ-
ment or rather the state
of unemployment in the
country, and 1975 is a
good- year for a review
since so many things were
to have been achieved by
then.
We were to be close to
achieving the target of
70% enrolment in secon-
dary education for all
children between 11 and
14.
We were to have reduced
fpod imports to a much
lower percentage of total
imports with a diversified
agriculture catering to a
reorientated local demand.
We were to have food
processing industries pre-
paring our mangoes,
pomme citre, paw paw,
cassava, sweet potato,
pomerac etc. for export.
We were to have a
dynamic farming com-
munity earning decent
incomes in agriculture,
and attracting people
back to the land.
By his own admission,
the Prime Minister has
told us how his govern-
ment h*s failed. He
produced the statistics to
show that not only is
employment in agricul-
ture falling but no young
people are going into
agriculture.


THE


He is still asking him-
self why. And the answer
is so simple. The PNM
was never interested in
agriculture.
You cannot develop
a sophisticated agriculture
catering for local needs if
you have a colonial orien-
tation.
If the Government can-
not show the leadership
in eliminating useless
imports of food, because
it is afraid of the buy
and sell Chamber men,
there is no way local food
and fruit industry can
develop to help create
the full employment we
were to have by 1980.,
There has been no
downward change in the
percentage of food im-
ports under the PNM.

BRIBERY

With the elections
around the corner and the
record so clear for all to
see, the Doctor is trying
to perform magic: mobil-
ising financial\ resources,
creating apprenticeship
schemes, pulling out end-
less projects from off the
shelf to create jobs or
creating the feeling of
jobs for all before polling
day.
It is a case of open
bribery new: if you are
lucky to be working in
the Ministry of Works
nowadays, you could
clear a good $1,600 a
month with overtime.
But what is the real
record on jobs? Between
1963 and 1974, the
potential labour force
grew by 27%. The poten-
tial labour force consists
simply of those people


NEW


WHERE



JOBS?


15 years of age not
attending school.
For the same period,
the actual labour force,
i.e. those 15 years work-
ing or willing to work,
grew by 22% from
323,000 to 394,000.
The numberof persons
with jobs however, grew
by barely 20%, showing
the increasing inability of
the job market to keep
pace with the rate of
growth of the labour
.force.

FEWER JOBS

In fact the number
with jobs was more or
less the same between
1970 and 1973. But that
is not the whole of the
story and the official
statistics do not give the
full implications.
There were fewer jobs
relatively in 1974 as com-
pared with 1963., But
there were also fewer
people relatively looking
for work in 1974 and thus
liable to be picked up in
the official count as
members of the labour
force.

BEGGING

There are two factors
responsible for this. First,
a larger percentage of
people stay on in the
education system now
than in 1963, thus reduc-
ing the potential labour
force over 15 years of
age.
Secondly, and more
important, having recog-
nised the futility of look-
ing for work, many people
just do not look and thus
in the officialese would
not be recorded as mem-
bers of the labour force.
This does not mean that
they do not want to work
or will not work. It is
really cheaper to live by
begging than to waste
money travelling from
district to'district to find
out there is no work.
These two factors
explain why the unem-
ployment rate has re-
mained at the official
level of 15 17% even
though there are more
people who would have
worked.
We should note that
the potential labour force
would have been greater
had it not been for the
massive emigration over
the last 10 years.
We estimated that it-
would have grown by


about 35% and not 27%
without this large exodus.
This flow is a serious
waste to the country
since over 80% of those
emigrating would have
carried skills scarce in
Trinidad and Tobago and
adding to the transfers of
resources this country has
been making to the richer
North Atlantic com-
munity through the
multinationals.
The lack of skilled and
professional manpower is
creating grave hardships
for some sectors e.g.
construction and health
- thus reducing the pos-
sible contribution of
these sectors, to growth
in incomes, employment
and welfare.
Unemployment rose
from 45,000 in 1963 to
almost 65,000 in 1974,
and if one takes account
of the large number of
seriously underemployed,
the figure for 1976 must
be well near 100,000
unemployed.


ALL


KIRPALANI'S

Is


and BASIC

Wo've got what you
need at minimum costO










S KIRPALANIS NATIONWIDE


TAPIA PAGE 5
The statistics show
that 17 20% of those
EMPLOYED, work less
than 33 hours per week,
and these are not the
Special Works People.
Besides the under-
employed, we also have
the overworked compo-
nent in the labour force.
These are primarily self-
employed who have to
make ends meet some-
how.
They are underem-
ployed relative to their
potential contribution to
the economy but over-
worked with respect to
the number of hours
they have to put out to
get some bread.
The situation is bad
and will get worse. In
spite of all the abra ca
dabra on Radio, TV
hookup, the symposium
a n d announcements
about financial resources,
iron, steel, smelter, oil
and food, the jobs are
not being created.
To make matters
worse for PNM politics,
Canada and the United
States are closing their
doors, with their "high"
unemployment of seven
per cent.
Thus everybody will
now have to remain
home to deal with the
iniquitous and corrupt
regime. Happily it would
also give us the chance to
harness our resources, to
break with the past and
.make a new start in true
independence. sa Page 10o







SUNDAY
PAGE 6 TAPIA


I HA VE NEVER FELT THAT I WANTED A
PERMANENT PLACE IN THE UNIVERSITY.
NOT THAT THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST
INDIES HAS NOT BEEN FOR ME A SOUR CE OF
JOY AND ENLIGHTENMENT AS MUCH AS IT


HAS BEEN A SOURCE OF PAIN. BUT IHASTEN
TO ADD THAT THE UWI IS A BETTER UWI-
VERSITY FOR A WEST INDIAN THAN ANY
OTHER UNIVERSITY THAT I KNOW .

y


-, '


TAPIA Secretary Lloyd Best recently announced
his resignation from the post of Economics Lecturer
at the UWI, St. Augustine, thus ending an over
w year connection with the university.
As a man who is known throughout the
region within and outside of academic circles,
Lloyd Best's resignation attracted wide interest.
Two weeks ago, in an interview given to
Sunday Guardian News Editor Therese Mills,
Lloyd Best took the opportunity to dispel certain
rumours about why he quit the UWI and to reflect
aloud on his long stay at the UWI. The interview is
published in full below for the first time.

QUESTION: NOW THAT YOU HAVE
ACTUALLY RESIGNED FROM THE UNIVER-
SITY, IT IS BEING SAID THAT YOU WERE
FORCED TO RESIGN BECAUSE OF YOUR
POLITICAL ACTIVITIES, BUT THAT, IN ANY
EVENT, YOU REALLY HAVE NOTHING TO
LOSE SINCE YOU COULD ALWAYS GO BACK
TO THE UNIVERSITY IF YOU SO WISHED.
WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO SAY ABOUT THIS?


--6k


~J, ~-.



"-,... .*





~ ~


BEST: Now it is not at all true that I have
had tO leave the University by force. The
Regulations in the. celebrated Blue Book are
very clear on the point. Lecturers are
allowed to take part in politics openly, to
serve on Boards of Public Corporations, and
if they so wish, to run for elected office.,
They are also entitled to take Campaign
Leave for up to one month. If they win,
then and only then, need they resign. My
own position is quite different however,
from that of many other people in the
University who are participating in party
politics and may well be running in the
upcoming general elections. Last September
29, I wrote to the University making it
clear in advance that I was going to resign
not later than the close of the Academic
Year 1975-76 which, at the time, I thought
fell at the end of July. It turned out that,
with Termination Leave, the Year ends in
September so that the University accepted
my resignation from September 30 of 1976.
I shall be going on Campaign Leave on
May 25, prior to my actual resignation date.
This Campaign leave is no-pay leave in the
sense that it is to be offset against other
leave; it does have a financial cost. My
University pay will in effect come to an
end on the 31 st of August.


In all of 18 years, I have never
once become involved in this
feverish haranguing of students
on campus.

Let me also straighten out the question
of salary just for the record, so many
figures are being quoted on the question. My
gross pay is $2,698 per month while the
standard wage which we pay our graduates
in Tapia is $400 per month for full-time
work.
So what my resignation will cost will
depend' on whether Parliament manages to.
arrange to top up my Tapia pay. There is
certainly no question of returning to the
University- even if I do now enjoy what is
called a contract on "indefinite tenure".
All that indefinite tenure means is that
a lecturer has been assessed by the appropri-
ate Committee so that his or her contract
never again comes up for consideration and
renewal unless he or she commits the sin of
moral turpitude, whatever that may mean.
He has his job forever. But once he
resigns that is a different matter.
If I wanted to go back to the University
of the West Indies I would have to re-apply
again just like anybody else and of course
they could start me with tenure or they
could start me at .any level they wished just
as any person who applies; or they could
turn down my application.

QUESTION: COULD YOUEXPLAIN WHAT
KIND OF PRIVILEGE THIS "TENURE" IS, AND
HOW A UNIVERSITY LECTURER CAN GO
ABOUT GETTING SUCH FA VOURABLE TERMS
OF EMPLOYMENT?
Best: Any level of appointment to the
university can -be made on a three year


'.1,
I' ,


~ sT~L "Br p -- M MEPb MBOOMr-lra I -








-'WlN0 197 AG 7 .. I


contract. So you can have a professor who
has a three year contract or even a one year
contract. You can have a lecturer whose con-
tract comes up every year. I
There is, however, what is regarded as
the "career grade" which is when you reach
those levels of the university where they are
satisfied that you have a permanent place. A
Committee evaluates your work and decides
whether to give you tenure. Normally it
follows that most of the people who achieve
tenure, pretty rapidly thereafter move up
into the higher echelons of the university -
that is to say; they become senior lecturers
and professors and so on.
I have been accused of creating a traffic
jam because I have not allowed that to
happen to me. For two reasons. One is that
I have never really been satisfied with the
university as an institution in which I could
make- a career. Certainly I have been at odds
with the house rules at UWI from the very
start. I have always been mystified by the
rules of appointment, promotion and selec-
tion. I have been pained by the legacy of
colonial curricula that we have inherited and
have moved only very slowly to change.
I- have been mortified by the low
priority that is given to the substance of
research and teaching and work as against
the virtually unbridled success which* is
achieved in the university by every manner
of charlatanry and clowning and window
dressing.
I am satisfied that intellectual
standards in UWI are higher than
most universities though certain
technical standards may be
patchier. .

So that I have never felt that I wanted
a permanent place in the university.
Not that the University of the West
Indies has not been for me a source of joy
and enlightenment as much as it has been a
source of pain. But I hasten to add that the
UWI is a better university for a West Indian
than any other university that I know and I
have been educated at Cambridge and
Oxford, I have 'worked at the University of
Paris, McGill University, in Puerto Rico, in
the University of Bordeaux (Martinique
Branch) and so on, and I am satisfied that
certainly-intellectual standards in UWI are
higher than most universities though certain
technical standards may be patchier.
Perhaps the sense of philosophical
direction of the university, is less well
defined, inevitably because we have been a
colony all our lives. I also hasten to add that
despite all the chicanery that goes on in the
university I don't think this is any way
unique or exceptional.
I am not at all concerned to denounce,
criticise the university. Universities every-
where are very peculiar institutions with
every kind of low politics and, in any event,
universities throughout history and through--
out the civilisation have seldom been the
main 'centres of creative and innovative
thought and work. Most serious new work
takes place outside of the university, in
what I call private academies. Certainly a
vast amount of the crucial scholarship say in
19th century came from people in industry,
working on their private account, members
of Parliament, political people and so on.
What the university does is to provide a
whole set of arrangements which make
serious intellectual work possible and which
are absolutely vital for the conduct of
serious intellectual work. They have students,
they have libraries, they have centres for
research and so on and I don't think for a
moment that we can do without them.
I think we have to be critical of them,
to understand their limitations, but we have
to see that they are essential to the work
that we have to do without themselves being
able to do it all. They are a pole around
which we can drape a whole lot of activities.
The contributions made by Marx, Rousseau,
for example, could not have been made if


they were merely academics operating in
the university world.
Speculative thought needs a very
private world, which is not afraid of failure,
which promotes a kind of irreverence which
you cannot find in the university. In the
university, because of the needs of teaching
and the needs of organisation, especially
when the university becomes la.,e. there
Does exist irreverence, of course- but it
becomes a ritual irreverence -vasi. numbers
of students and faculty people parroting
what they think is new but whi is 'soften
much more orthodox than radical
Only yesterday at St. Auu .ne we
were all on to Black Power but *'day the
in-thing is Marxism in its 57 va'-.eiies and
doubtless tomorrow it will be nothingg
else. But frankly, there is nothing radical
and little relevant in- these easy props to the
impoverished imagination.


Not all academics are intellec-
tuals, nor are all intellectuals
academics. .


That it is why it is absolutely necessary
to draw a distinction between academic,.
who are the people who work at the uni-
versity and intellectuals who may or may
not work there. Academics work in the
university but not all academics are intel.
lectuals. Nor are all intellectuals academics.
It is important to grasp this because in
Trinidad and Tobago there is a lot of confu-
sion about the university because people
'both outside and inside behave as if the
university exhausts the pool of intellectuals
and this is a completely erroneous position.
There are intellectuals everywhere
because intellectuals are those who maintain
their interest in speculation and documenta-
tion. It is a way of seeing, a window through
which you habitually perceive the world,
and it really brings you to the philosophical
reaches of human endeavour as distinct
from the mere technical preoccupations. In
-the university you have vast numbers of
Faculty people who' are simply mechanics
or straight technicians peddling politics
doctrine.
In the old days, when we awarded a
Doctorate in Philosophy, it was expected
that the people who accepted the Degree
would be perpetually operating in the phil-
osophical sphere which is to say, on the
frontiers of meaning. We do need people
who are concerned in that way though, on
that account, they are' not necessarily
better or worse than anybody else. You
should find them everywhere, in the Church
certainly, in the Trades Unions, in the
Public Service, in the political parties, the
Press, as well as in the creative and artistic
fields. Intellectuals are not on Campus alone;
campus is merely a focus of intellectual
speculation. It assembles certain crucial
resources in a central place. Part of the
confusion flows from another definition
which regards intellectuals as all those
people who have managed to achieve some
higher education and who,.in the nature of
the case, are in an important sense,.bearers
of the virus which is metropolitan culture.


One of the great fears in countries such as
Trinidad & Tobago, is that this educated
class of brokers, between the metropolitan
and the home-grown culture may exploit its
peculiar position of vantage. People are
therefore hostile to intellectuals in this
sense and when there is also the miscon-
ception that the University is somehow
the home of all the intellectuals, then the
Campus is seen as a source of subversion and


it immediately becomes an over-sensitive
spot in the politics of the country. Which is
not to say that the Campus has not been a
highly sensitive area in, our political life
owing largely to the revolt of the youth;
or that the University should not be a valid
focus of dissent and irreverence precisely
because of its special relationship with the
intellectual classes. But that is a different
thing from making a bogey out of the
academic world forwant of a clear definition
of the part it must play with the other
institutions in the decolonisation of national
life and in the maintenance of a humane and
democratifcWest Indian nation.

QUESTION: WHAT HAVE YOU PERSON-
ALLY DONE TO BRING YOUR OWN ACTIVITIES
IN LINE WITH YOUR PHILOSOPHY?

Best: I have not accepted promotion.
Nor have I ever been a Dean or Head of a
Department or taken part in any of the
administration. I have not been to a single
meeting of the faculty committees, or
anything other than departmental meetings
which were concerned with my immediate
work.
You see I think that there is a conflict
between my own preoccupations as an
intellectual and a career in the university as
a valid academic.. I am a polemicist, a
publicist, dealing in the world of controversy.
I am in the world of speculative thought
that cannot be subject to the dictates of
evidence in the way that the values of the
university now dictates. And therefore I have
always sought to establish my own private
academies which have a relationship with
the university world but are not part of it.
And let me say that I could not have
succeeded in establishing New World or even
Tapia unless other men in the university
appreciated what I was doing, thought it to
be valid, continued to do their own thing
and allowed me to do mine. so I am not
saying that an academic career in the univer-
sity is not a valid thing. I am saying that it is
not my thing, and over the years, I have
become involved in establishing a movement
which is now called the New World Move-
ment which is really an association of young
intellectuals who had or have a relationship-
with UWI and though they are now in other
parts of the world maintain this vital umblical
connection.
We in Tapia and New World
understand the futile world of
dependence on a single leader;
and if the UWl has any part to
play in our politics, it has been
to provide us with the means of
that understanding.

We once established a quarterly journal
and then we started to publish a whole lot
of pamphlets and tracts and now we have
the Tapia newspaper, and we have had in
other parts of the Caribbean many sister
newspapers. And perhaps in all this there
are two statements which set out my posi-
tion. One is a thing called "Independent
Thought and Caribbean Freedom." and the
other was a polemic called "From Chaguara-
mas to Slavery" which was an early attempt
to diagnose the failings of the national inde-
pendence movement in Trinidad and Tobago
after the middle 1950's and all I was trying
to say in these pieces was that the arrange-
ments Trinidad and Tobago had put in
place at the time of independence, and by
extension, in the other Caribbean countries,
were hostile to the formulation of indepen-
dent Caribbean speculation, which we badly
need in order to build a basis for a free
natioii.
What has happened over the course of
the 18 years that I have been at UWI is that
our concern with these questions has been
expressed in new forms of organisation. So
we started with a group in Mona became a
large Caribbean organisation stretcl- ing to
Con't )n Pg. 8


There are a lot of people, who, by
their experience on campus, have
come to share the Tapia vision of
what is possible in the West
Indies.


.1 -I --p~- I---III1~1~~ Ipl_-


1 20, 1976


TA4PIA PG







P A G EI 8i TIA Pl S J 2 0 1 9 7 6


From Pg. 7
North American universities' and now we
have reached the stage where we are a
political party in Trinidad and Tobago.
This has developed step by step over
the years. I never decided to go into politics
or to form a party. What has happened is
that doing this kind of things leads in certain
directions and we are simply going where it
leads. I hope that by maintaining a distance
from the centre. of activities at the univer-
sity...
I can only hope that by maintaining a
certain distance from the academic and
administrative corridors of the University,
my own position in the Movement has won
its own particular moral coherence, has
achieved the integrity without which it
cannot find the inner strength and the con-
fidence to survive and endure. I am wary of
the concept of integrity as simply a Victorian
book of etiquette; each individual has to fit
the parts together in a way that responds
honestly to his or her own particular life-
chances and of course, his or her own
peculiar strength and weakness. Only yester-
day, a passer-by remarked to me that he
would much prefer to see me remain a
professor. But for years now that has ceased
to be morally possible for me because my
whole being is attuned to the world of
controversy. It is true that it all happened
out of the accident of the timing of my first
job at Mona at the age of 23 and at the
moment when the West Indies Federation
was established and the youth were forced
to take historic position. I certainly became
a polemicist by accident but now I could
not ever revert to being an academic because
academics have to understand things after
they happen when the evidence is yery clear
and abundant. Politicians, pamphleteers and
public men must seize the future while it is
still the present. Insight not evidence becomes
the crucial ingredient of valid work and
insight then becomes a way of life with all
the perils of playing prophet.,

QUESTION: HOW DO YOU THEN EVALU-
ATE YOUR YEARS OF ASSOCIATION WITH
UWI?

I certainly met teachers and scholars
there. I always tease Lloyd Braithwaite who
is now the Pro Vice Chancellor in St.
Augustine about this and he blushes and
charges me with campaigning when I insist
that I learnt,a great deal at UWI from him.
I have been lucky to have come under the
influence of a long line of what-I think are
really great teachers. The first was C.V.
Gocking who taught me at QRC and it was
really the most enchanting experience of my
career. He taught us English History and the
Industrial Revolution and that is what first
gave me a radical conscience in the sense
that he taught about the exploitation of the
poor in the factories and mines. He is one
of those teachers who, like all great teachers,
teach without too much formal teaching,
simply by ole talk and conversation.
I have also learnt a great deal from
William Demas in exactly the same way. He
taught me French for a brief period at QRC.
But he taught me a great deal more simply
by ole talk. He taught me about music,
about books, about economics. In fact I
went to Cambridge because he was there
largely out of hero worship.
Then I followed him to Oxford. When
I left and went to Jamaica, I met Lloyd
Braithwaite, who was really the richest of all
the scholars at UWI. He was a man of books
and he taught me books. He cited such a
vast world of references that you simply had
to go to the library and read out of a sense
of inadequacy and ignorance.
Of course then James came to Mona in
1960 and it really was a romance. James has
a tremendous impact on the young imagina-
tion. He is such a romantic, and is not at all
a systematic thinker. He is magisterial, is
always lucid, always incisive and the sheer


TAPIA HOUSE, 1969 "I HAVE ALWAYS SOUGHT TO
ESTABLISH MY OWN PRIVATE ACADEMIES WHICH
HAVE A RELATIONSHIP WITH THE UNIVERSITY
WORLD BUT ARE NOT PART OF IT".

beauty of the formulation or the largeness
of the vision really captivates the dream of
the young. He turned me on and I have been
turned on forever after.
The combination of what Gocking
taught us about the poor people in the indus-
trial revolution -and what James taught us
about the possibilities for humanity
are in fact the essential ingredients of Tapia
and the New World Movement. They are the
joint fathers of the Movement although
Gocking ,is now close to us' while 'James is
very hostile to us. It just goes to show that
the act of creation invariably is a contradic-
tion. The thing about great teachers is that
they remain your audience ever after, and
whenever I write or say something, I am
always wondering what James or Gocking
will think about it.
Both New World and Tapia have con-
tained a large number of people whom I
have taught or come in contact with at UWI.
It is however totally wrong to say that
Tapia is a bunch of intellectuals in the sense
that we have more educated people or uni-
versity people than anybody else. Tapia
does not- depend on the campus because
Tapia has always been an organisation,
rooted in the grass of Tunapuna. But there
is a sense in which there is a vital connection
between Tapia and the University.
When people say Tapia is an intellectual
movement, what they really mean is that'we
are not inviting our people to buy any cat
in bag. We insist on political education.
We are confident that our people have
the political instincts, that Trinidad &
Tobago has the divine spark to recognize on
which side our nation's bread is buttered.
Whatever Tapia does, we try, I suppose
we often try and fail, to persuade by argu-
ment and analysis and by a full articulation
of position. If you are interested in a partici-
patory democracy, this seems the only kind
of respect you could have for people. The
other important sense in which Tapia is
connected with the University world is of
course that there are a lot of people who,
by their experience on campus, have come
to share this vision of what is possible for
Trinidad and Tobago and the entire West
Indies. I find that the only way that people
can really be persuaded by their teachers is


not by any invitation to indulge in demon-
strations in the court-yard but by equipping
them with the tools and therefore with the
competence to master their world and
these tools include a civic view as well as a
technical command.
On campus, students are often caught
up in the glamour of the platform and are
strongly attracted to platform manipulators.
But if teaching has equipped them to stand
up and fight, when they finally leave, you
can certainly get them to take on hard com-
munity work.
In all- of 18 years, I have never once
become involved in this feverish haranguing
of students on campus, not even during all
the recent commotions at St. Augustine.
I vividly recall October 1968 when I
had just come home after 15 years effectively
away, the Rodney crisis broke and Granger
invited me to speak in the Square. I told
him I preferred to speak on campus where
next day, I was roundly denounced for
having taken the emotion out of the occasion
as if that was not my meet, right and
bounden duty.


QUESTION: BUT DO YOU THINK THAT
CROWD EXCITEMENT IS THE SALT OF
POLITICS?

Best: This business of crowd manipula-
tion throws up all kinds of entertainers and
clowns for a brief season of madness but a
mature and free people can only be won to
political dedication and enduring commit-
ment by an entertainment and an excite-
ment based on comprehension and clarity.
The rhetoric and the-magic in the square
must charm and enchant but it also must
educate, inform and instruct so that the
magical connection between leaders and led
must develop step by step.
As real enlightenment grows over time,
it creates in the process a vast fund of trust.
The search for immediate deliverance which
is said to be charismatic politics is merely
the illusion bred by an impotence, a lack of
power and of self-confidence. The attempt,
to invent charismatic leaders by grabbing a
microphone on campus or indeed, by all
the superficial devices of hiding or finding
your dashiki or by remembering that the W
is silent is doomed to futility. Easy come,
easy go.
Charisma lies always in the eye of the
beholder and where valid, it always changes
the rules. A charismatic leadership which is
not mere charlatanry must by its nature be
uncharismatic until a personal equation
between leaders -and led has been firmly
established by trust. When for some reason,
people perceive that such an equation has
been established, it is then that the style and
the dress and the image of the leader become
a valid standard in the, eyes of the followers.
That is how charisma necessarily changes the
rules.
Once it dawns on people that the rules
have been changed, it is then that the magic
becomes real and therefore enduring. If the
academics had been doing more work and
playing less politics all along on campus,
perhaps the confusions about charismatic
politics would long ago have been dispelled.
But perhaps the most important thing about
charismatic politics is our continuing obses-
sion with deliverance by a single Doctor.
Precisely because we in the New World and
Tapia Movement have built a team of compe-
tent, confident people, we have long since
abandoned that scene of dread. We have left
the desert world of impotence and made the
-crossing into the greener pastures of wide-
spread participation. We understand the
futile world of dependence on ,a single
leader; and if you really understand that
world, that is when you are really able to
change it. And if the University has had any
part to play in our politics, it has been to
provide us with such means of understand-
ing.


I I I III ~~~~sJ ~I L i -~S~IB~I


PAGE 8TAI


SUNDAY JUNE 20, 1976





SUN DA Y J UUINL2U."4 /r0


YOUTH is not a question of age; it's a
state of mind. That's how Arnold Hood,
25-year-old Tapia candidate Jor the La
Brea constituency, chooses to see it.
Hood was invited by the St.
Patrick Assembly of Youth (SPA Y) to
give the feature address at their May
29 "Youth Festival'" The substance
of his address follows.
'WE ARE young-but once. "Who
are the "young" for our purposes?
I know that in SPAY people
fade out of youth work by 30; the
national -statistics show that 75%
of the population in Trinidad and
Tobago is under 35 years of age so
that on the democratic principle
of majority rule, we may' plump
for 35 as being the "ceiling age"
for youth. The Jaycees regard
anyone up to 40 as young.
Our chronological limit seems
set, therefore, somewhere between
30 and 40 years of age. I, h6w-
ever, set no such arbitrary limits
to youth as I regard "age" simply
as an attitude to life.
Young for me would there-
fore embrace those 30, 40 even 70
year. olds who possess the vision
to see changes necessary in their
given environment, the will to
declare the need for such change
and the vitality to work towards
implementing such change.
In simple teims, I consider
youth or the young as being
symbolic of and synonymous
with change.
"To be young today", we
are told, "is not only to enjoy
many advantages and comforts
unknown to former generations
but to suffer many trials and to
cope with many problems which
did not .plague our forefathers".--
Our advantages and comforts
include better and wider educa-
tional facilities, improved com-
munication and-transport systems,
a higher standard of living, and
the computer, to name a few.
And what of the trials and
problems? We are saddled with
political, economic and social
problems, a system of justice
which seems to us quite unjust, a
"generation or communication
gap" between ourselves and our


says


parents and a "double standard"
between the two sexes.
Air-pollution, water-pollution
racial tension, class discrimination,
mis-directed education all buffet
and blow our minds.
It is with such problems that
the young must wrestle; -it is in
these that change is necessary. It
must be our goal "to make the
future so attractive that older
people will wish they were going
to be there".
Preparation for such a task is
vital; certain personal qualities
are indispensable towards success-
ful realisation of this ideal. Top-
most among these "personal
qualities" must be: (a) maturity --
a quality attainable only through
sustained self-discipline and self-
responsibility; (b) independence
(c) a balanced and deep-rooted
sense of values and (d) the persis-


tent, relentless pursuit of excel-.
lence in whatever we do. ,
What type of change do the
youths of Trinidad and Tobago
want? And are they satisfactorily-
prepared to undertake the chal-
lenges?
It seems obvious to me that
we are prepared to shoulder ,our
burdens; that we are prepared "to
take up our beds and walk" in
every sphere of endeavour.
We have shown this in agricul-
ture e.g. the Memphis Co-op under
Aldwyn Primus or SPAY's own
agricultural project at Sudama
which unfortunately was torpe-
doed by Government's non-assist-
ance.
We have demonstrated this in
business enterprises like co-
operatives and the "drag-brother"
leather industry. We are the main
participants in cultural programmes.
We are deeply involved in
civic, social and welfare campaigns
and causes. We are ready, willing
and able, We are prepared.
Youths in Trinidad and
Tobago earnestly want a change
in the political, economic and
social structure of this country.
We want to see politics work in
the interest of the mosses not
merely the classes; we want the
majority to benefit not simply a
minority.
We desire to see'employment
given as a right to all, not a
privilege to a few. We wish to see
the national cake spread more
equitably over-the entire citizenry
rather than allow the feast for the


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you want to know about tennis its history, equipment
playing technique, rules and etiquette, major-results of
tournaments and championships, tennis greats, and glossary of
terms. There are photos of famous players, many in action,
fascinating pictures of the early days of tennis, detailed
photos of equipment, sequence shots demonstrating techniques
and much more. Numerous tables give you the most informa-
tive record of tennis competition results ever presented.

THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TENNIS: EDITED BY MAX
ROBERTSON $45.00....

This superbly illustrated and authoritative book will delight
anyone interested in tennis, whether as player or spectator. It
contains a wealth of information on many aspects of the
game. An imposing team of contributors from all over the
world has helped to make this an unusually comprehensive
work The illustrations include 24 pages of full-colour ard
more than 250 black-and-white photographs and line drawings,
many of which were specially commissioned for this book.




Stephens


-- -- -- --- --


I t-iritA J-7n y


minority and famine for the
many as obtains presently.
Before this month no one
under 21 had the right to vote
although such a person paid taxes,
licence fees, duties and other
imposts long before that age.
One could not be a Senator
before age 30.
One still cannot negotiate a
loan from the-bank on one's own
if under 21.
You pay higher insurance
premiums on your car if you are
under 25; a cinema recently debar-
red an 18-year-old married couple
from seeing a popular film.
All the key jobs go to persons
35 and over; seniority rather than
merit is the normal basis for pro-
motion etc. etc. etc.
Young people, the broadest
base in this country are being
kept in. check, fettered by a re-
morseless, antiquated system of
artificial constraints.
OLD ORDER

But the tide in the affairs of
men which leads on to great
success occurs almost invariably
in the flood of youth.
So what a terrible price must
this country be paying for its
ostrich-like behaviour!
The results are quite visible
even to those blinded by other
considerations.Drug abuse, sexual
permissiveness, completely altered
habits of self-care, protest songs
and calypsoes, anti-hero heroes,
weird threads, dread-locks all
bespeak a society in the throes of
a revolution the passing away
of an old order, if not the birth
of a new!
Brothers and Sisters, societies
are always indulgent towards the
young, but there are limits to
permissiveness.
The old political order seems
destined to give way to a new arnd,
as responsible young people, every-
one here present must seize his/
her opportunity to contribute
towards effecting this.
I have no doubt where your
efforts will be directed.





SUNDAY JUNE 20, 1976


PAGE 10 TAPIA


20 years of PNM




industry, still no jobs


THE Government's bank-
rupt agricultural policy is
of course one reason why
they failed to provide
more jobs.
The PNM's commit-
ment to agriculture was
always half-hearted. They
lacked the nerve to break
up the strangle-hold of
the merchant class on
food supplies in this
country
It explains the absurd-
ity lately defended by
Williams of apples, and
pears in abundance in
Trinidad and Tobago
around Xmas time and
not a table guava, not a
mamicipot, not a pomerac.
Piecemeal measures
have never worked in


agriculture. There must
be a package and the
PNM could never see that
taking agriculture and
putting funds in the
Agricultural Development
Bank would not stimulate
agricultural production
and create jobs if the
other complimentary
measures like providing
subsidies, organising mar-
keting, eliminating im-
ports and so on were not
taken.
Another major reason
has been their policy of
industrialisation by invi-
tation.
They had proud dreams
of iobs in manufacturing
encouraged through tax


TAPIA'S PROPOSALS TO CREATE JOB OPPORTUNITIES
AND
TO ELIMINATE THE GAP BETWEEN HAVES AND HAVE-NOTS

LOCALISA TION
Tapia intends to take control over the life-line
industries in the country, with the participation of
unions, co-operatives, the Municipal and the
Central Governments in order to anchor economic
power in the hands of the multitude of little
people.

INCOMES
There will be a minimum wage floor but
there will also be a ceiling on high incomes with-
out endangering the incentives that they give to
hard work. Tapia's welfare sector with subsidized
housing, public transport, school books and School
meals, water supplies, library services, sporting and
recreational facilities would improve real incomes
and enhance the quality of life.

A GRICUL TURE
Tapia will recognize the agricultural sector,
through subsidies, agricultural credit, drastic land
reform, efficient agricultural marketing, food pro-
cessing, the elimination of imports in the context
of a CARICOM Agricultural Plan.
The effects of these measures would lead to a
substantial increase in incomes in the agricultural
sector and provide the economic motivation for
people to return to agriculture.

CONSTRUCTION
Tapia intends to build in the first instance
two cities, on the sands of Wallerfield and in the
Couva Area near to Montserrat hills. We also intend
to build about ten thousand (10,000) houses a
year.
Such projects not only would generate much
employment directly but would also create jobs in
the sectors providing inputs into the Construction
sector.


The absolutely vicious
ingratitude and lack of
perspective with respect
to housing construction
has also robbed the PNM
of an opportunity to
create jobs in the con-
struction sector even
though 60% of the popu-
lation is living in sub-
standard homes, in the
main houses with less
than four sq. ft. per
person, no running water,
no decent toilet facilities.
The Special Works
approach can never solve
these problems and the


result has simply been
stagnation in the welfare
of the mass of little
people.
Income distribution
has become worse with
a new elite vaunting its
privileges and pleasures
for the starving and
deprived masses to see.
Over 30% of the popu-
lation lives below the
poverty line. The pro-
blems of unemployment,
income inequality and
poverty are linked one
with the other and our
proposals in Tapia for


economic and social re-
organisation go to their
very roots.
Our policy is as clear
a as it is consistent.
The measures outlined
below, are the result of
in-depth analysis of the
economic and social life
of this country and are
in keeping with our motto
of "Building from the
Earth up."


LaidIow's

Hardware
Eastern Main Rd., Laventille
(Near to Trotman street)

FOR
GRASS ROOTS PRICES
IN
HARDWARE

Galvanise, Cement,
Blocks, Tiles,
Pipe-fitting,
Points
etc, etc.


UNCLE I

SAM BAR1
AN OASIS
IN
DOWNTOWN GRANDE


holidays, tariff walls, and
other concessions to
foreign and sometimes
local capitalist.
Between 1964 and
1973, jobs in this sector
that includes Mining and
Quarrying increased from
58,700-to 63,500.
Less than 5,000 new
jobs over ten years, an
increase of only 8.2% as
compared with a total
labour force growth of
22%.
The tragedy of indus-
trialisation by invitation
was that it only created
few jobs directly, but
indirectly killed off the
entire class of small
craftsmen and artisans.
The moulders and
tinkers who were far
more numerous than
those who have replaced
them in the finishing
touch, screw driver in-
dustries screwing up the
people of this country by
the rip-off they are
making.
From locally assembled
tomato ketchup to locally
assembled cars, it is
endless machines and no
jobs.


I"a L~--r--l -, s


OPENED

SINCE 1901


PIONEER


PHARMACY
SERVING


GRANDE
WITH DISTINCTION
W.M. COCKBURN. PROPRIETOR
. EASTERN MAIN ROAD, S/GRANDE
Tel: 668-2523





SUNDAY JUNE 20, 1976


the'DJ played for
lovers of his kinda
.music. Democracy
reigned.
It was, however,


DJ Cool who carried
the dancers till
midnight with -
popular sounds boom-
ing from his hi fi


boxes. By day DJ
Cool goes by the
moniker of Ian
Pierre.
The "Super Sunday


Something" was the
climax of a weekend
of Tapia socialising
and politicking.
Friday night saw


another large,
gathering at fund-
raising barbecue
dinner and dance at
the UWI Experimen-
tal Farm.


.4



-~ I

~ I -
- 'Y Y*.


ght can be seen Victoria Fraser,
e crowd wails to the D J. (centre),
Laughlin looking on above.


Yes, we're also into



publishing and printing...


Freedom and Responsibility ...... Lloyd Best
The Political Alternative ......... "
Prospects for Our Nation ........ ..
Whose Republic? ............ ..
The Afro American Condition.. ".
Honourable Senators ............. "
Letter to C.L.R. James 1964 .... .. "
Democracy or Oligarchy ........... C.V. Gocking
* Grenada Independence Myth or Reality.
(International Relations Institute, U.W.1.)
* Readings in the Political Economy of
the Caribbean (New World).


And


* MANJAK
* LIBERATION
* NEW BEGINNING


we


Why Did PNM Fail? ......... Augustus
RamrekersinAi
Another View of Tapia Method Lloyd Taylor
The Inside Story of Tapia ..... .Lennox Grant
The Machinery of Government .Denis Solomon
Black Power in Human Song .. Syl Lowhar
We are in a State . ..... .Ivan Laughlin
A Clear Danger .. . .. ..... Michael Harris


Social Stratification in Trinidad. (l.S.E.R)
"Revo" poems bv Malik.
"Cheers" by Yvonne Jack.
The Dynamics of West-Indian Ecolnomic Integration (ISER)


for you too


662-5126, 82-84 S;. Vincent St. Tunapuna.


Call Lennox[Grant


can do a job


II~RI~OI~PYI~ ~TPPI~J~ I --I- -- I--I ~P- ~L~ Is ICr~lSIB~L~ CI r


---IL-CI.~-e~31111IPIIIPIII, ----.~- -- --


TPAPAC-E I,


1-1





K


of the Tapia


House


Movement


at Lions


Civic


San


Centre


Fernando


, After ole


mas is


new politics


/
A


Fourth Assembly of the

National
Convention


a-~e--~i~-~i~s~i~61 ~PL 19~1~slC" r I II-~


ISunday Jun,,e,27 1197