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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00214
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: May 23, 1976
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00214

Full Text

Vol.6 No. 21


p,.,-rea ti-tt foT


,p A0
A6P i0h. ,Ir 'f*-B 4

5I


SUNDAY MAY,23, 1976



l iND-D


PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE TAPIA HOUSF PUBLISHING CO. LTD., 91 TUNAPUNA RI)., TUNAPUNA TEL: 662-5126.


'DIRTY TR CKS"


CHARGING that the
government is using the
police to sabotage their
campaign, Tapia cadres
in the Diego Martin'
West threatened last
week to hold an angry
"protest demorn:tratina
of some kind" against

Calmrpaignfrs


on in


Tobago
THE Tapia campaign in
Tobago has begun.
Last weekend Tapia-
men Ivan Laughlin and
Billy Montague travelled
the length and breadth,
of the "sister" island
and saw to the planting
of the Tapia flag.
The previous weekend
a Tapia. team including
Robert Maxwell and
Orson Farrier had made
a sweep, selling papers
and distributing litera-
ture.
Reports are that
Tobago is far from being
just two "safe" seats for
any of the two parties
which claim to be
entrenched there the
DAC and the PNM.
And this weekend
Ivan Laughlin returns
to Tobago, this time
accompanied ,by Tapia
Secretary Lloyd Best.
Best and Laughlin
did not disclose details
of their mission, but
TAPIA understands that
much anxiety is being
produced in Tobago
political circles by the
sight of Tapia footprints
in the sands of "Crusoe's
Isle."


the refusal of the Com-
missioner of Police
refusal to allow them
to hold a public meeting
on Friday, May 14.
The Tapia campaigners
had written to Commis-
sioner May informing
him of their intention
to hold two public
meeting in Petit Valley
at 5.30 p.m. and 7 p.m.
The reply from May
raised quizzical eyebrows
in Tapia circles.
"I cannot permit you
to hold a public meet-
ing atMorneCoco Road
near Morne Coco Tavern
at 5.30 p.m. and near
the bus terminus at 7
p.m. on Friday May/14,
1976, as a permit has
already been issued to
another organisation to
hold a public meeting at
this location on the said
date and at the said
time."

APPLICATION

Tapia Administrative
Secretary Allan flarris,.
through whose office
these applications are
routed, said it was the
first time in his memory
that the police refused
permission on such
grounds.
Balked in their
attempts to talk to the
people of the area that
evening, the Tapia Diego
Martin cadres decided
to go and see which
other "organisation"
got the privilege instead.
According to Tapia-
man Dennis Pantin: "We
drove up and down the .
area, but we saw no
public meeting held by
nobody at all anywhere
in the area.
"Somebody is bring-


ing Watergate-style dirty
tricks in this election
campaign,-and using the
police as pawns in the
process. But it will end
worse than Watergate if
this kind of thing

Pantin said that at a
House near to the site of
where the first Tapia
meeting was to have
been held, there was a
meeting of PNM Youth
League members.

"LEGAL"

He laughed to scorn a
suggestion that the Tapia
meeting had been prohi-
bited so as to prevent
the loudspeaker disturb-
ing the PNM Youth
Leaguers in their indoor
talks.
Pantin and other
Tapia campaigners in
the area speculated that
the device used to
prevent the Tapia meet-
ing taking ,place wouldd
be "the start of some-
thing new" in the gov-
erminent's campaign to
frustrate the develop-
ment and progress of
valid opposition by
"legal" means.
They suspected, how-
ever, that its success
would depend on collu-
sion. with the police.


REPORTS


SAY


It's the same


team again-

FROM OUR POLITICAL INTELLIGENCE BUREAU
THE SAME PNM team that "won" a 28 per cent
majority) in the 1971 elections is going to be running
again in 1976.
Minus of course Opposition Leader Roy Richard-
sonarid Dr. Horace Charles, both of them PNM MPs
who crossed the floor not too long after all 36 seats
in the House of Representatives was occupied by the
ruling Party in 1971.
But the PNM team,in 1976 is also going to include
fonner Attorney General Karl Hudson-Phillips -who
has been nominated and is fixed to run in his
Diego Martin East constituency.
The open row between Hudson-Phillips and PNM
Political Leader Eric Williams is apparently being
suppressed for th'e elections.
Only some strange event not to be discounted
in PNM- circles can stop Hudson-Phillips from
running for the PNM in Diego Martin East.
And where is Williams running?
That's still a matter of "suspense" within his
owvn Par;ty. Williaims has been nominated by three
constituencies Port-of-Spain South. (recently
.expanded to include "safe" Woodbrook), Diego
Martin West and Point Fortin.
But the Political Leader is yet to tell his Party,
including his closest confidants, which constituency
he's going to take come Polling Day.
There may be one or two insignificant changes
in other constituencies but the PNM has attracted
no new (and certainly no young) talent to its 1976
bandwagon.
Why not in country with so much young talent
around?
That's a question to be answered on election
day.


gel pl/ys fot we

kind people

SEL DUNCAN and DJ Cool.
The -names reflect- the spectrtun of musical
tastes in this country. The old and the young. The
"hold-on" and the "leggo" dances.
That is the kind of organisation the Tapia House
Movement is: we kinda people in all their rich
variety.
And "we kinda people" will this weekend be
dancing to the music of Sel Duncan at the SWWTU
Hall in Port-of-Spain.
Described as Tapia's "First Annual Semi-Formal
Dance," the fete comes oTf on Saturday, May 22.
Tickets at $5 each at press time \\ere still avail-
able at the various Tapia houses and froim all kinda
Tapia people.


Should the PM

wear dashiki?Page 3


What well dPAGE
What we'll do TWO


30 Cents


-- -- I


,WA





_ _


In 1965, the Government created WASA, to take over all responsibility for the collection,
distribution, control and taxing of water. Even the powers of the Local Health Authorities and
Central Board of Health were. transferred to WASA.


Government established no System of financial control for WASA:

the Commission of Enquiry stated "we find a public utility being formed and
utilizing public funds but for which no accounting system was established
and for which very little accounting records existed." Small wonder then
that WASA is corrupt from top to bottom.
Government made no effort to ensure that management and staff would be technic-
ally competent:


WASA cannot be controlled by the public.

Only the Minister of Public Utilities has authority over WASA. He has failed to take
any action on the detailed Report of the Commission of Enquiry or on the reports
of the Auditor General.


WASA's incompetence is dangerous:


WASA has been drawing 60% of our water supplies from our ground water RESERVES,
while letting much of the surface water cause floods or run away to the sea. Ground
water should only be used in emergencies;

WASA is run by six part-time "Commissioners", appointed by the Governor
General on the advice of the government. Party loyalties influence the choice
of Commissioners. WASA's staff does not come under the control of either the
Civil Service Commission or the Statutory Bodies Commission: the Technical
Director was even able to write his own job specification, on which his
appointment is a based.

WASA's Director of Personnel admitted that he had no way of even knowing
many people are employed by WASA.
WATER IS TOO IMPORTANT TO BE LEFT IN THE HANDS OF A SINGLE VAST AGENCY,
INCOMPETENT AND CORRUPT, OPERATING BEYOND THE REACH OF PUBLIC SUPERVISION.


A Tapia government will accept responsibility to provide all our citizens with wholesome
pipe-borne water eventually. In the-short term. TAPIA. will provide IMMEDIATE RFTI.EF.
1. TAPIA willishare equally the water that is available now. (No favouritism; all citizens
have equal rights, wherever they may happen to live).

2. TAPIA will construct community storage tanks at the highest point in each district
(WASA never discovered that water runs down naturally but has to be pumped up!)
Truck borne water will keep drums filled in other areas, where necessary, on a regular
basis.
3. TAPIA will construct storage tanks for all schools, hospitals and large public build-
ings.
4. TAPIA will install stand-by generators at all pumping stations so that water will not
be cut off every time T&TEC has a blackout.

5. TAPIA will identify all local sources of water, however small, and pipe them into
the community's water supply.
LONG TERM
1. TAPIA WILL speed up construction on the.CaroniArenaand the iowe. Navet Pro-
ject (already 4 years behind schedule). Even with both in full production, however,
the estimated shortfall by 1980 is 29 million gallons daily.

2. TAPIA WILL launch several other projects, starting with the North Oropouche
River, to increase the supply.

3. TAPIA WILL require all new building developments and all big industrial users of
water to construct their own water storage facilities.
4. TAPIA WILL launch a programme for recycling waste water for industrial; and
agricultural purposes.

5. TAPIA WILL impose heavy penalties for WATER POLLUTION. Legislation exists
now but big firms have been allowed to dump their industrial waste freely and
smaller enterprises have polluted out streams with chicken entails etc.,

6. TAPIA WILL regulate the development of land so as to prevent the rapid run off of
surface water.

TAPIA WILL PLACE RESPONSIBILITY FOR CARRYING OUT THESE POLICIES IN
THE HANDS OF STRONG LOCAL GOVERNMENT AUTHORITIES EQUIPPED WITH
MONEY AND TECHNICAL EXPERTISE AND SUPERVISED BY PEOPLE OF THE
COMMUNITY.


I ,,-,- -1--- ~ I


SVWATER


A-Uhl 9 IJIUjIbljU u Al im j"w^"^


MMU





TAPIA PAGE 3


SUNDAY MAY 23, 1976




Should the Prime
^^it PrVwl~lfii^^*** ^


Minister wea




du ree




and dashiki?-













Allan
speaking
SAssembly
.T- apia
*. House


late, the odds were
heavily against us".
The population realized
that the Government was
ruling on behalf of the
few, not the many.
But Williams was still
in a position to strengthen
his grip even further.
Hence there were the
States of Emergency in
1970 and 1971, the
Public Order Bill in 1970;
and various pieces of
repressive legislation, cli-
maxing in the 1976 Re-
publican Constitution.
What it meant, Harris
said, was that this 1976
election was the last
chance we had to free
ourselves from the
shackles of one-man
republic.

PARTICIPATION

But to seize the time
there was need, first, to
get rid of the notion that
only some special group
of chosen few can save
us.
"We will be saved,"
Harris affirmed, "only by
the concerted efforts of
all of us."
He was warming to his
major theme. He summed
it up: "The word is parti-
cipation!"
There were three ,ele-
ments to the new order
of "participatory dem-
ocracy" which Tapia has
been espousing.


Unconventional ppli-
tics;
Constitution Reform;
and
Economic Reorgan-
isatiori.
Returning to the elec-
tions, Harris declared:
"The choices in '76,
therefore, are between
Williams' one-man republic
or a democratic, partici-
patory, municipal repub-
lic."
The Tapia man admit-
ted, though, that there
was mucn confusion
about. A look at the
political 'scene revealed
"comings and goings, fun
and games, hide and
seek.
PIERROT GRENADE

"A little 'while ago we
were being told that LAP
would hit PNM 'BAP'.
Aad then we. read that
Pierrot Grenade falls into
somebody's LAP.
"Twenty years of PNM
is enough, everybody is
saying that. But how to
make sense of the polities
in 1976, that is the
problem."
He said that those
people who -aspired to
office were responsible
for showing the way out.
Harris gave his recoin-
mendation: "choose a
side!
"Tapia stands with all
those, big and small, rich
and poor,' African and
Indian and mixed, town
dweller or countryfolk -
all those who yearnfor a
new day, for equity, for
justice and for fair play!"


SHOULD the Prime Min-
ister wear dungarees and
dashiki?
The question was pro-
voked last week Wednes-
day night whenTapiaman
Allan Harris, kicking off
the campaign in west and
central Port-of-Spain. told
an audience at Adam
Smith Square, Wood-
brook.
"We in Tapia are shirt-
and-pants or dungaree and
dashiki people. Our only
claim is to have an
.insight into the possibili-
ties of change in Trinidad
and Tobago. But Tapia
is an organisation of
ordinary men and
women."
Harris was in the pro-
cess of showing how it
was partly because ot a
prejudice against "ordi-
nary people" in politics
that we in Trinidad and
Tobago had got ourselves
in this mess. And that
was why, too, we have
found it so hard to get
out of it.
"It has been the view
of people in this coun-
try," Harris said, "that


only a chosen few, the
gifted, those with charis-
ma, or the gift of grace
or with special attributes,
are capable of the tasks of
government and that
everybody else, especially
the poorer less well
'educated and less fortu-
nate of us, must be the
passive recipients of the
largesse and good works
of the chosen few."

Describing the results
of this attitude, th* Tapia
Administrative Secretary
recalled the adulation of


Eric Williams in 1956, on
account of which the
country "gave Williams
full powers and trusted
,him to do the job."
So that when the 1962
Constitution created one-
man government "we
took no heed, because we
were inexperienced in the
ways of power."
Then Harris explained
how Williams proceeded
to consolidate his hold
on power to the extent
that "when we sought to
organise opposition, we
found that it was too


Citizens Advice Bureau


Now Open


Tapia P.O.S Centre
Cipriani Boulevard Phone: 62-25241


Our coverage of

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is unsurpassed anywhere

for focus and point.

Keep abreast of the

real currents in the

Caribbean Sea.
OWING to the recent increase in the postal
rates, the Tapia House Publishing Co., Ltd., has
found it necessary to increase the subscription
rates for TAPIA.
The new rates are as follows:


Trinidad & Tobago
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Other Caribbean
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E.E.C. (incl. U.K.)


U.S.
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Stg.


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Surface rates and rates for other countries on
request The new rates are effective February 1, 197Ti.
Tapia, 82, St. Vincent St. Tunapuna, Trinidad. &
Tobago, W.I. Telephone 662-5126. & 62-25241.





SUNDAY MAY 23, 1976


PAGE 4 TAPIA


FROM S1 jTIE'S
'THE STEELBANDMAN'

The world is going crazy about pan
Brotherman get hold
Check out people like Amral Khan.

I say check out England, Japan, Germany
The steelband making big money
So how come the panmen dying in poverty?

(CHORUS)
Minister Steelbandman, take stock
Plan or is bad luck
For you see
What's the fate of Big Brother Spree.



KAISO'S




ALIVE


A,,









Superior is sure he'll get by with his National Kaiso Tent with or without a little help from his friends. Here he shakes hands
with funny-girl newcomer at the Professionals Tent in '76, Calypso Twiggy.


AND WELL- ALL THANKS


RAOUL PANJTI7

BEGINNER looks 70 but
when he hits the stage,
old jacket flapping at his
sides, and the small band
goes into a basic calypso
beat, the old man is off,
dancing and, singing an
old-time piece "Louise"

Darling doo doo
why yot gone and make
meh blue?


Every time ah turn on de
bed
ah kiss meh pillow for you
The ,crowd loves it.
They pick up the chorus
and Beginner couldn't be
happier, bouncing from
side to side on the small
-stage, singing kaiso. .
But it was hardly a
"crowd" really. The
National 'Kaiso Theatre
(its official name) has
been running for five


weeks now, and last
Friday night there were
no more than 50 to 60
people sitting there in
Legion Hall watching
the show.
APPROVAL

NJAC was there with
a small side of about 10.
When the singers were on
stage, the NJAC drum-
mers thumped their
appreciation. And there
was the old calypso tent
shout of approval: "Kaiso!
Kaiso-!"
Lord Superior, Rio
Claro-born and dead
serious about making
this Theatre work, says
come hell or high water,
he's going to wait it out
until "all those calypso
fans, three-four thousand
people who fill up the
Tents every Carnival"
start drifting down -to
the Kaiso Theatre.
"Do I think I'm going
to make it?" Supie says.
"I AM going to make it."
Supie thinks people
don't have much of a
choice but to begin taking
in the Kaiso Theatre.
Entertainment in Port-of-
Spain any weekend isn't
that much really.
"After you see some
. Chinee kick up ,some
Chinee at National Cinema


TO SUPIE


Two every weekend, you
have to get bored",
Supie says. And the
Kaiso Theatre, open
every weekend, runs as
long a show as the
cinemas 8.45 to 1.1.30
p.m.
Chalkdust was origin-
ally supposed to be with
Supie on this idea of
calypso outside the tradi-
tional season.

RITUAL

Supie says: -"Chalkie
doesn't believe in it. He
thinks calypso is a
Carnival ritual." Supie
thinks: "Calypso is bigger
than Carnival."
It's difficult to get
people to believe in what
he's trying to do, Supie
says.But more and more
people are trickling in
every weekend. Maybe
the trickle will become a
fl oqod
That Friday night,
Mudada sang his two '76
Carnival calypsoes, "Pan
Lesson and "No Use".
Organiser did another
variation on his Funky
Daughter and Fight
Them ('"today for Shadow,
tomorrow for me.") The


Mr. Panday said he

had just discovered
that there were
workers in the coun-


try worse


off than


Carlton Francis dancers
did their best with a
dance choreographed to
Sparrow's Slave. The
band, smaller than the
usual Calypso tent
orchestra, did damn well.
And Superior, did a
number of songs, includ-
ing Mr. Steelbandman
which marks the inglori-
ous death of steelband
pioneer, Winston 'Spree'
Simon: See above.


'ELECTION
FEVER -
MATELOT
KETCHES

ON
Recently we observed a
hasty effort by the
Ministry of Works to fix
the roads with gravel and
dirt as a window-dressing
in preparation for the
visit of the Prime Min-
ister and other VIP's.
While for months and
years, no concern has
been shown for villagers,
including- pregnant wo-
men and senior citizens,
some of whom must
travel ,his road everyday.
ihrthe past two weeks
we have seen a fantastic
effort to repair and paint
bridges, to tractor some
of the worst stretches of
pot holes and to erect
warning signs at land-
slide locations. We have
sl(' 11 SecI u(S 11114(Much
overtime work taking
place iii tiNs region with
licclic activity f ,' en on,
Saturdays and Sundays.
We wisli that slichi
application hv lthe aitlhori
lies 11 /hc inlterest ofl
villagers of this area,
could continue long
after the visit of the
Prime Minister is over.


KIRPALANI'S


IS





















and BASIC

We've got what you
nd at minimum cost,










K 'KIRPALANI'S NATIONWIDE


the sugar workers.

(Express May 5)





SUNDAY'MAY 23, 1976


Days of


turm oil


in


AS political violence
continues to explode in
Jamaica, raising spectres
of furtherholocausts and
even civil war, there has
appeared in the Kings-
ton bookstores a topical
collection of essays by
a group of UWI aca-
demics, which attempts
to answer the questions
WHY? and WHAT IN-
STEAD?
Entitled "Power and
Change in Jamaica", the-
500-page book contain-
ing 17 essays is a joint
publication of the
Department of Govern-
ment and the Extra-
Mural Centre, Mona,
UWI.
The collection has
been described by the
publishers as "a collec-
tion of research papers
and commentary by
Jamaica-based UWI
social scientists who are
-increasingly responding
to the need to project
their work and ideas
beyond the confines of
the classroom."

ESSAYS

Editors are Political
Scientist Carl Stone and
Extra-Mural T u t o r
Aggrey Brown both of
whom have authored
essays in the collection.
Other contributors
include: Sociologist Don
Robotham; Political
Scientists Peter Phillips,
Rupert Lewis, Ralph
Gonsalves and Shirley
Romain; Economists
Claremont Kirton and
Donald J. Harris; and
1Management Studies
Graduate Student Stanley
Reid.
"Power and Change
in Jamaica" is divided
into two parts "Poli-


Jamaica


Their protest
march blocked -
students sit
quietly at the
roadside as their
leaders argue with
police






No go, no
way .. the police
insist.


Current political violence in Jamaica recalls the "Rodney Crisis" of October
1968 when historian Walter Rodney was debarred from returning to Jamaica
after attending.the Black Writers Conference in Montreal. UWI students at
Mona and many people in Kingston demonstrated against the Rodney
debarment and were set upon by the police. Much violence ensued. In this
picture Jamaican police armed with tear gas and cattle prods chase students.


FLASHBACK. OCTOBER, '6 8


uiujti ~ moo'
Jf~t


rV.
:- ^
.1 \


tical Economy" and
"Policies and Challenges
for Change."
The second section
should provide most
controversial perspec-
tives on present-day
issues in Jamaica.
-According, to the pub-
lishers it "concentrates
on policy issues that
bear directly on many
of the more important
policy initiatives of the
present PNP Govern-
ment"
The present Manley
Government which has
claimed to be moving


The Guild President
talks with the
police





RALPH GON-
SALVES, GUILD
PRESIDENT, (ABOVE
LEFT) ADDRESSES
THE STUDENTS
IN A "RODNEY
CRISIS" DEMON-
STRATION. NOW
A POLITICAL
SCIENTIST AT
MONA, GON-
SALVES IS ONE
OF THE CONTRI-
BUTORS TO
"POWER AND
CHANGE IN
JAMAICA".
ANOTHER CON-
TRIBUTOR WHO
WAS ALSO A
STUDENT AT THE
TIME OF RODNEY.
IS ECONOMIST
CLAREMONT
KIRTON (LEFT).


towards "socialism" will,
in this collection of
essays, come under the
critical scrutiny of
writers who avowedly
"share a largely socialist
view of development in
the country."
The authors' modest
hope is that the essays
"will -attract a fair
amount of controversy
and debate."


New book probes power

and change


PARRIS CONSTRUCTION
26a Raminar St. Morvant
FOR BUILDINGS OF ALL TYPES
From
Foundation -to Fixtures
(C;ll. 62-44698
ASK FOR.MR. I'ARRIS


J.C Sealy



B THE BOOKSHOP

For all types of Books


111 FREDRICK STREET PORT-OF-SPAIN


READ.


JOIN THE


WORLD


OF '


SStephens
Salutes National Bookweek 17-22 May. 1976
Port-of-Spain & San tF'n ndo


TAPIA-PG5





SUNDAY MAY 23, 1976


PAGE 6 TAPI1A


Israel:




Now the



enemy's






within


Fund-raising
for Israel in
New York.
Since the Arabs
flexed their
oil muscle, Israel
can no longer
depend on
automatic
Western support.


rir
American Jews protest the UN appearance of Arab Palestinian leader Arafat. Zionism always dreamed of a Jewish Homeland.


IN A speech delivered
in Israel in September
1971, on the anniversary
of the 1956 Suez war,
Moshe Dayan, the legen-
dary Israeli general and
ex-minister of defense
said:
Today we are in a bad
situation; a flag is raised
now in the country by
itself not a bad flag-the
flag of social reform ..
(But) it is impossible to
raise both flags at the same
time.
Israel cannot support two
flags-the flag of war and
the flag. of all those
reforms and improvements
for the workers and young
and hot soyoungPanthers.
Those two flags cannot
exist together in the State
of Israel. Those flags
are contradictory..."
The State of Israel,
born waving the flag of
war, has sustained itself





Israeli border
guards. Sur-
rounded by hostile
nations, Israel has
had to keep a
state of constant
military prepared-
ness.


and expanded to many
times its original size
under the flag of war and
today is reaping the whirl-
wind sown at the time of
its birth.

ZIONIST

Nahum Goldmann,
President of the World
Jewish Congress and
former President of the
World Zionist organisa-
tion wrote earlier this
year that, "from a general
point of view, the Zionist
demand for a Jewish state
was in. full contradiction
with all the principles of
modern history and inter-
national law."
Goldmann adds: "In
fact the implementation
of the Zionist idea started
on the wrong foot. Before
the vote was taken at the


United Nations in 1947,
there had been no real
attempt to convince the
Arabs that a Jewish state
- in their midst, created
with their acquiesence,
could bring a highly con-
structive period to the
Middle East and to them-
selves.
"We thought that' by
winning over the Jewish
people and the big
Western powers, the im-
plementation of Zionism
would be ensured."
Finally Goldmann
states: "Thus, Israel came
into existence engaged in
a defensive war against
the Arabs. This State of
war, which has continued
until today, inevitably
forced Israel to concen-
trate its great moral and
intellectual resources on
,-dfending its 'existence


an( securing its- survival,
and led it to abandon or
rathe: neglect, the great
historical, moral and
-spiritual aspects of the
restoration of a Jewish
state."
For Goldmann, one of
the acknowledged fathers
of the State of Israel, to
make the admission that
Israel was the creation of
Western superpower im-'
perialism, created more-
over contrary to every
known-principle of inter-
national law and justice
is significant enough.

HISTORY

Yet it is possible to
obtain a view of Israeli
History which suggests
that there was never any
intention to acknowledge
the rights or existence of
the Arabs in Palestine and
that from the start the
Israelis have pursued a
policy of systematic re-
pression of and discrimi-
nation against the Pales-
tinians with a view to
driving them out of their
homeland and ensuring an
exclusively Jewish state.
It is impossible to
understand this without
some reference to the
nature and goals of the
Zionist movement.
Zionism originated in
Europe and was the res-
ponse of the European
Jews to the conditions


affecting their lives, part-
icularly in Russ;a where
many Jews were deprived
of not only their liveli-
hoods but also th.ir lives.
Out of the repression
and discrimination was
the Zionist movement
born. And from the time
of its founding Congress
in 1897 the major aim of
the movement was to
found an exclusively
Jewish Homeland, where
the Jews of the diaspora
could live insulated from
the animosity which had
plagued them as members
of a minority in other
lands.
From the very start
the Zionist movement
looked towards Palestine
as the place in which
they could .found their
Homeland.. Indeed, even
before the Zionist move-
ment began, Jewish colon-
ization of Palestine had
been going on under the
sponsorship of Baron
Edmund de Rothschild.
HOMELAND

The primary goal of
Zionist foreign policy was
given its most important
advance on November 2,
1917, when the British
Government made public
the Balfour declaration,
recognizing the right of
the Zionists to establish a
homeland in Palestine. In
1917 there were some
700,000 Arabs in Pales-
tine and less than 50,000
Jews.
From 1917 onwards
the Zionist movement
proceeded with its colon-
ization plans ,with great
fervour and adopted
measures which left no
doubt that they were not
interested in anything
less than Jewish exclusiv-
ity in Palestine.
In the thirty -years
between 1917 and 1948
the Jewish population in
Palestine increased from
less than 50,000 to some
600,000 inhabitants.
From the start this
massive programme of
colonization proceeded
under three slogans. All



"

--,-',





The last 1973
war shattered
the myth of
Israeli military
superiority over
the Arabs.






J ISTL / MA- 23, 1976

MICHAEL HARR. TAPIA SHA W MINISTER
FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
CONTINUES HIS SERIES -
THE FIRST OF TWO ARTICLES ON ISRAEL.


TAPIA PAGE 7


of which today are still
visible and account for
the turmoil which is now
racking Israel.
The first of these slo-
gans was "Kibush Hakarka"
or Conquest of the Land.
In reality this meant the
purchase of as much land
as possible from the
Palestinians and the re-
moval of the peasant
from the land. To this
day it is still illegal for a
Jew to sell land to a non-
Jew

BOYCOTT

The second slogan was
"Kibush Ha'avoda" or
Conquest of Labour. This
meant that as far as
possible Jewish enter-
prises could only hire
Jewish workers. In short a
virtual boycott of Arab
Labour.
The third slogan was
'"T'ozteret Ha'aretz" or
Produce of the Land. In
practice this meant a
strict boycott of Arab-
produced goods. Jews
were to buy only from
Jewish-run farms and
stores etc.
To fully comprehend
the vicious reality behind
these slogans,,ne has only
to quote thle words of
David Hacohien, a leader
of the Mapai ruling Party
and for many years a
member of the Knesset.
Speaking of his days as
a student in Londori and
a member of the socialist
student movement he
writes:

"' had to fight my friends
on the issue of Jewish
socialism, to defend the
fact that I would not
accept Arabs in my Trade
Union, to defend preach-
ing to housewives that
they not buy at Arab
stores, to defend the fact
that we stood guard at
orchards to prevent Arab
workers from getting jobs


there To pour kero-
gene on Arab tomatoes to
attack Jewish housewives
in the markets and to
smash Arab eggs they had
bought. ."

! Today these policies,
tldnly veiled, continue.
With each of the wars
Israel has increased the
amount of land ur.der its
control. Yet this fact
itself has meant that
always it is necessary to
renew the process of
colonization' of the land
and displacement of the
existing population.
It has also meant,
that Israel has had con-
stantly to live with a
subject population in her
midst, and a ring of
antagonistic n a t i o n s
around her. Thus her
preoccupation has had to
be on maintaining a con-
stant state of military
preparedness.

GENERATION

This fact has limited
Israel's ability to deal'
effectively with the
domestic economic and
social concerns of her
population, what Dayian
called "the flag of social
reform".
For a long time, how-
ever, the intense religious
and nationalistic fervour
of the Jews in Israel
allied with the euphoria of
her successive military
victories over the Arabs
was an effective substitute
for national, development.
Today all this has been
drastically changed.
In the first place, with-
in Israel there has grown
up a young generation to
whom the travails of the
Jews in Europe and even
of the Holocaust is but
history. Their preoccupa-
tion is not with the past
but with the present and
future of Israel.
In addition, the last
war in 1973 shattered
Israeli complacency about
her military superiority
over the Arab world.


*" SUPPORT

Moreover it has become
quite clear that with the
Arab's new-found strength
in terms of their use of
oil as a weapon in inter-
national policy, that the
almost automatic sup-
port which Israel *as
wont to receive from
Western nations is npw
no longer assured.
Finally but most im-
portant is the revolt
within Israeli occupied
territories of the subject
Arabs together with the
revolt of Israeli Arabs as
well .as Israeli Jews over
S the conditions of their
S life in Israel.


On all fronts Israel is 'YWIF
now faced with really
serious problems which at
the very least will stretch
- its capacity to maintain
its integrity and at the
extreme will force it to
radically change the en-
tire policy adopted from
even before the birth of
the nation. a To be cont'd.


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4ft~P~






PAGE 8 TAPIA


THE


THE United States is
trimming its sails to meet
a new "wind of change"
in Africa.
This is how the deve-
loping American policy
towards Africa designed
by the Ford Administra-
tion and administered by
globe-trotting Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger,
is read by Cheddi Jagan,
Leader of Guyana's
People's Progressive Party.
Dr. Jagan, noted Mos-
cow-leaning Marxist poli-
tician and commentator
on world affairs, has spelt
out this view in a state-
ment entitled "Straight
Talk. Beware New
Greeks Bearing Gifts"
submitted to TAPIA last
week.
"Imperialism is fright-
ened," writes Jagan.
"Thus the hasty trip of
Henry J K'issir, US
Sectetary of .State to
Africa. Again it's the
same message-make con-
cessions now before it's
too late."
The concessions are
what Jagan terms "the
gifts" being brought by
the "new Greeks" the
American imperialists of
whom he warns Africa to
be wary.

CONCESSIONS"

He describes the Kis-
singer "concessions":
"Kissinger has stated that
the Smith regime should
prepare for majority rule
in two years.
"He would also try to
get the US Congress to
stop its purchase of
chrome from Rhodesia
(it is to be noted that the
chrome purchase was
resumed and the embargo
on Rhodesia broken with
Kissinger in office).
"And for the Sahelian
Africain states, he has
promised a large aid
scheme to fight famine
and the encroachment of
the desert."
Reviewing US policy
on Africa from the days
in 1957 of the Richard-
Nixon Vice Presidency
under the Eisenhower
Administration, J a g a n
shows that it used to
be one that emphasised
"containment of com-
munism".
Then, as doubt arose in
US minds about the
ability of the remaining
colonial powers to. stem
the tide of' African
nationalism, the Ameri-
cans began to hedge their
bets, playing both sides.
In support of his
argument that the Ameri-
So, can impeialists are now


HUSTLE


KISSINGER



DOING



IN AFRICA


TOPPLED PORTUGUESE STATUE in Huambo marked historic victory for
Anqolon masses.


embarking on strategies
once used by the British,
Dr. Jagan gives the follow-
ing documentation:
ACCORDING to the New
York Times of September
25, 1975: 'rom the time
Patrice Lumumba was assassi-
nated, through the short
career of Moise Tshombe,
until GeneralMobutu came to
power, a number of authori-
tative sources related to the
CIA has maintained its largest
African station in Zaire."
The article continued:
At about the same time, the
early '60's, the sources said,
President Kennedydetemuined
that Portugal, an American
ally in NATO, could not
sustain control over her
African colonies indefinitely
and that contact must be
made with future revolu-
tionary leaders.

LEADERS

"In 1962, on the advice of
the CIA among others, Mr.
Holden Roberto, the brother-
in-law of General Mobutu,
was elected as a future leader
ofAngola."
On December 19, 1975,
the sameNew York Times
wrote: "the group (the
administration's high-level
intelligence review panel,
known as the 40 Committee)
agreed to permit the CIA to
provide $300,000 clandestinely_
to Holden Roberto, the
leader ofone of three factions
now seeking control of
Angola.
"'At the time, Mr. Roberto,
whose links with the CIA
began in 1961, was on a
$10,000 a year agency
retainer for 'intelligence col-
lection', the officials said ..
I think it's very important",
one well-informed official
acknowledged. "That money
gave him a lot of extra


muscle. He'd .been sitting
in Kinshasa for nearly 10
years and all of a sudden he's
got a lot of bread he's
beginning to do things. "
The US .. imperialists
want leaders like Holden
Roberto of the FNLA and
Jonas Savimbi of UNITA
of Angola.
Savimbi told the
Financial Mail (May 1975)
of South Africa that the
problem of apatheid is a
"South African problem.
People do not understand the
situation when they say that
Vorster is cheating them .
I hope that future leaders of
Angola will co-operate with.
South Africa... We support
completely the. atmosphere
of detente..."
On the question of


Angola's economic policies
he stated that he con-
sidered that 'Nationalisa-
tion is a disease. The foreign
companies are manned by
experts who have the-know-
how to develop our petroleum,
diamond, an' copper indus-
tries State participation,
yes. Nationalisation, no."

The main reason for
supporting Savimbi and
Roberto, the brother-in-
law of Mobutu of Zaire
(where the CIA had
maintained its largest
African station) was to
preserve American busi-
ness interests, particularly
in Southern Africa.
US imperialism's main
reliance was on the "big


stick." But Vietnam and
particularly Angola have
shown that with the
changed world balnce of
forces, aid from the
world socialist community,
headed by th.e Soviet
Union, and the determina-
tion of liberation fighters
to struggle, the national
liberation revolution can-
not be contained or
stopped.
US imperialists are
obviously learning from
their more crafty and
experienced allies, the
British.

MODERATE

Kissinger knows that in
countries like Cuba,
Vietnam, Guinea-Bissau
and Mozambique, where
political power was
obtained through armed
struggle countering im-
perialist violence with
revolutionary violence,
socio-economic transfor-
mations are much more
rapid and complete.
In Rhodesia, where
time is running out for
colonialism and fascism,
the imperialists are hop-
ing to put the more
moderate elements in
office, -keep out Soviet
and Cuban influence, and
maintain their investments
and power.
No wonder Kissinger
was embraced by Zambia's
President K en neth
Kaunda, who on January
28, during the Angolan
crisis, made an indirect
attack on Soviet and
Cuban aid to Angola by
speaking of a "plundering
tiger, with its deadly cubs,
coming in through the
back door."
His controlled press
accused the Soviet
embassy in Lusaka of
being behind the student
demonstrations and pro-
tests over food prices.
Africans would do well to
beware the "new Greeks"
bearing gifts.


MAX SENHOUSE
110 Eastern Main Road 662-4087

Knows The Way to The
Magic Kingdom of
Furniture At Family
Prices


Ruby 3 PC Living Room Set


CASH OR TERMS


PRICE $825

DOWN $250


MTH. $ 45


is-'
4'
.- _
%:.


--C ~


SUNDAY MAY 23, 19 7/




SUNDAY MAY 23, 1976


Merry


Christmas


in


at


TTT


and a bright


and


prosperous New Year


A TWO-WEEK pay
"bonus" which 610
employees got last
Christmas was finally
paid to TTT workers
two Fridays ago and
personally announced
by Board Chairman
Jimmy Bain at a formal
ceremony to introduce
workers to the Board.
Bain offered no
explanation for the
absence of Board mem-
ber Esmond Ramesar
who resigned on April
28 because he couldn't
take the Chairman's one-
man way of doing things.
The "bonus", Bain
said cheerily, was -"a
mark of appreciation
for the good work which
you did during 1975."
In fact, the TTT
workers felt they should
have got the money,
like their 610 colleagues,
since Christmas gone.
But nobody was com-
plaining really. Two
weeks' extra pay is two
weeks ex:ra -^y.


assuring the workers -
who are scrunting at
just a higher level than
everybody else that
they couldn't get "rich"
by "striking, sicking out
and going slow".
All of which TTT
workers have tried in
the last couple years in
order to iron out press-
ing problems, including
a lot of frustration
among talented people.


and the general pub-
-lic that its General
Council members are
sick, fed-up, and
frustrated with the


Bain also used the
occasion to paint a
"rich" future for the
TTT workers. He used
the word "rich" four
times in two paragraphs,


The Executive of the
Postmen's Union
would like through
this medium to in-
form all authorities


Dear Editor,
I wonder how many participants and observers
of the recently concluded National Symposium on
the Mobilisation of Domestic Financial Resources
realized the true significance of the exercise.
Called together in one common forum were
representatives of all variety of interest groups from
businessmen, industrialists, university .-professors,
mair'facturers, civil servants, professionals and trade
unic.iists to government ministers.,
This was indeed a MACO SENATE. The country
was given quite by accident a glimpse of the impor-


These problems have
been de-fused but not
resolved.
Will a two-week pay
"bonus" and the offer
to get "rich" make the
magic? Bain is certainly
of that belief. He
expected, he told the
workers at the cere-
-mony, that as of now
there would be "a new
era in a labour/manage-
ment relations at TTT."


mischieviousness prac-
ticed in high places
against Postmen and
does not hold itself
responsible for any


Laidlow's

Hardware
Eastern Main Rd., Laventitle
(Near to Trotman street)
FOR
GRASS ROOTS PRICES
IN
HARDWARE
Galvanise, Cement,
Blocks, Tiles,
Pipe-fitting, -
Points
etc, etc.


industrial action
taken.
IVAN HENRY
PRESIDENT GENERAL
POSTMEN'S UNION


tance and effectiveness that a Maco Senate can have in
influencing the actions of the elected Government.
Imagine therefore if all the interest groups
represented at the Symposium and more, were able
to share such a forum, not just for two days
or two weekends but every day.
Then and only then will we be able to fully and
permanently mobilise our domestic -financial and
human resources with common purpose.
We will have a MACO SENATE even if it has to
happen by accident.
CM.F. GUILLAUME


Yes, we're also into



publishing and printing...


Freedom and Responsibility ...... Lloyd Best
The Political Alternative ......... "
Prospects for Our Nation .......... "
Whose Republic? ............ ..
The Afro American Condition .... ..
Honourable Senators .......... "
Letter to C.L.R. James 1964 ........
Democracy or Oligarchy .......... C.V. Gocking
* Grenada Independence Myth or Reality.
(International Relations Institute, U.W.I.)
* Readings in the Political Economy of
the Caribbean (New World).


And


Why Did PNM Fail? ......... Augustus
Ramrekersinih
Another View of Tapia Method Lloyd Taylor
The Inside Story of Tapia ..... .Lennox Grant
The Machinery of Government .Denis Solomon
Black Power in Human Song Syl Lowhar
We are in a State ............. Ivan Laughlin
A Clear Danger ............ Michael Harris


* MANJAK
* LIBERATION
* NEW BEGINNING


we


Social Stratification in Trinidad, (I.S.E.R)
"Revo" poems bv Malik.
"Cheers" by Yvonne Jack.
The Dynamics of West Indian Economic Integration (ISER)


can do a job


. Call AllanHarris


r you too

662-5126, 82-84 St. Vincent St, Tunapuna.
62-25241, Cipriani Blv'd P.O.S.


A MACO SENATE BY ANY MEANS


--


TPAPAGE 9


QUTA


mdy






SUNDAY MAY 23, 1976


PAGE 10 TAPIA


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------I ~


S ...#4T~>~<'~ 3V1
Vt
5.4' A:


FOR THE hill com-
munities of Arouca,
life in agriculture has
been one long hard
grind
Especially for those
who form the villages
of Laurel Hill and
Lopinot Independent
by nature, small farm-
ers by tradition, they
have tried to scratch
out a living from the
land.
It has brought few
rewards to these people
and these communities
over time.
There are those who
have been doing small
farming on the lower
slopes of the hills,
planting a little peas,
corn and tomatoes here
and there.

REPOSSES

For years they have
been bringing out their
produce on their heads
and shoulders, as the
cart tracks in the area
do not allow for the
use of trucks or jitneys.
These people have
no rights to the land
they are squatters.
No extension officer
findshis way there.
And none of the soft
loans from the govern-
ment's Agricultural
Development Bank
finds its way into their
pockets.
They have no col-
lateral, anu the Bank
can't repossess a
tomato.
Some used to be
small sugar cane farm-,
ers on the flats at the
foot of the hills.
Now this area is
controlled by the
Orange Grove National
Sugar Co., who are
now claiming that
sugar is uneconomic


* *" '.SSL


:7a


Do someth;ng about it






SUNDAY MAY 23, 1976


Register and vote


there as the land is
marginal for sugar cane.
The fear among the
people there is that
these lands are now
earmarked for housing
by OG, and that those
who live on its fringes
will be given the shaft
in the near future.
These villages are
like rural agricultural
communities all over
the country.
A government which
was serious about Trini-
dad and Tobago feed-
ing itself, about
reducing our massive
food import bill would
long ago have corrected
such outrages.

CONCEPT

It is clear that the
people who have stayed
with the land over the
years in the face of
increasing poverty,
have now to be organ-
ised to be the back-
bone of any programme
to feed ourselves.
This means enunci-
ating a very clear
policy on land holdings,
on the distribution of
land between housing
and agriculture, and
on giving farmers some
security of tenure.
It means providing
them with the exten-
sion, marketing and
other technical services
which they require.
It requires a new
concept and a new
thrust in agricultural
development financing.
It means, in short,
making agriculture
pay.
And so giving all our
communities 1 i k e
Laurel Hill and Lopi-
not a chance to share
in the wealth -of the
country.


4.


The pictures on these
pages tell the story of
life in this country.
These pictures
express better than
words ever could,
the position
people have found
themselves in after
twenty years of the
present government,
Top left shows
the state of the roads
that we all have to
cope with, including
children.
Centre left is but
a small example of
the state of housing,
that people have
to contend with.
At bottom left, a
squattes shack
not only exposes the
housing problem
but also that of land
tenure.
Top right shows
a mother and child
trying to cope
with the whole
question of water.
Residents would
not disclose to us
who is the owner
of the house pictured
at bottom-right
The only clue they
gave was that he
was both the owner
of two Mercedes
Benz and a government
minister.


C.


I



~


TAPIA PG.1


1- _J















































HOOD PLANS


BOOST FOR



PITCH LAKE


THE TAPIA candidate
for La Brea, Arnold
Hood, has called for an
end to "the scorn which
the present government
is heaping on the world-
famed Pitch Lake."-
In a 10-page plan
entitled "Manifesto for
La Brea" presented to
constituents of La Brea
last week, the Tapiaman
spelt out proposals for
making the most of the
Pitch Lake's industrial
and tourist possibilities.
"The lake is impor-
tant both as a historical
site and geographical
curiosity as well as a
revenue-earner, and both
of these aspects must be
serviced," he said.
He called for road
signs near the Point D'Or
Junction pointing the
way to the Lake.
Using either Pitch
Lake asphalt or some
amalgam including it,
the "Stretch" should be
paved, Hood added.
In the Hood plan the
wild lakeside vegetation
would give way to proper
landscaping.
Tapia houses would
be set down to dispense
literature on, the history
geography and geology


of the lake, together
with refreshment.
At these points, too,
would the trained guides
be stationed.
Turning to the indus-
trial possibilities of the
Pitch Lake, Hood said
that apart from using it
to build roads, we should
explore the possibilities
of using asphalt in other
processes, for example,
the making of stereo
records.

PROGRAMME

In fact, there should
be a concerted programme
of research into the uses
of asphalt so that "this
country would become
not simply the biggest
exporter of natural pitch
but also the largest user
and greatest experts on
this natural resource."
Hood's development
plan was "divided alpha-
betically" from A to Z,
in fact containing pro-
posals under heads from
"A g r i cu I t ur e" to
"Youth".
Introducing his bill of
proposals, Hood said:
"In view of the fact
that this Programme for


La Brea is being delivered
from a Tapia platform
by a Tapiaman, it is in
that indirect sense a
Tapia programme for La
Brea.
"I want it to be
known, however, that
neither Lloyd Best nor
any other member of
Tapia has seen this or
heard it in this fonn
before and that I have
been the author of it in
its entirety."
He' explained that he
was past the stage of
dealing with the woes of
La Brea. He said:
"I am not going ,to
treat you to a recital of
the trials and tribulations
the people of La Brea
have suffered at the
hands of the present
Government. I am here
to offer constructive
solutions to our problems
rather than faint-hearted
cries for 'piece ah de
action'." I
"My business," he
continued, "is to deal
in plans, not plaints."
The plan came out
strongly against Texaco's
ownership and control
of "prime playing space"
in La Brea,
It called for the
taking over of the Point
D'Or oval and "all that
area in Brighton where
only the elitest of the
elite play golf".
In addition: "If pos-
sible, every area in La
Brea must have a park
or playground.


AUSSIE



STARS




MAY




NOT



COME




TO Wl


-TIHE Caribbean cricket-
ing public may never
get to see in the flesh
the star-studded Austral-
ian team which humbled
the West Indies 5-1 in
the 1975-76 series.
This may well be the
result of decisions taken
at the level .of some
Caribbean Governments
and, last week, at the
level of the West Indies
Cricket Board of Control.
Divided as the region's
political administrations
are over the issue of
allowing entry to
cricketers who have
played in racist South
Africa, the WICBC deci-
sion announced last
week solved, nothing,
but 6nly added to the
confusion .
The Australian eleven
scheduled to tour here
in 1977, will include at
least three key men who
have played in South
Africa.

PERMITS

Gary Gilmore and
the Chappells Greg and
Ian played in South
-Africa as members of
the privately-organised
International Wanderers
team.
With every territory
doing its own thing on
the question of entry
permits to cricketers
who have been "tarnish-
ed" by contact with
apartheid, the Board
lacked the courage to
tell the governments
what they felt was in


the best interest of West
Indies cricket. -
Guyana and Jamaica
have indicated that they
would not allow players
who have been to South
Africa. Trinidad and
Tobago and Barbados
and the Combined Island
have announced no such
restriction.
In the light of this,
the WICBC decision to
draw the line at teams
which have toured the
. racist republic but to
allow individuals who
have made the same trip
in a private capacity
doesn't change the price
of rice.

RESTRICTIONS

Not when the govern-
ment policies in the
region are so at logger-
heads with each other
that one never knows
what will happen at the
immigration desks of
the various international
airports.
As things look now,.
the Australian tour if
it is to come off will
be restricted to a series
of matches played in
Bridgetown, Trinidad
and maybe in Antigua
or St. Vincent.
Meanwhile an interest
ing related question is:
will Richie Benaud who
managed the in terna-
tional Wanderers team
that went to South
Africa be allowed into
the Caribbean in tht
capacity of a correspon-
dent? (B.M.)


~I___