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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00085
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: November 18, 1973
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00085

Full Text



Vol. 3 No. 46


RIESf'-RCH( rtJ5~r;T'-
SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1973 'Ui, THE SiJ O
lf2 EAST 7e S!rREhi
NMW YORK 21, N. Y,
NOV 26 '73


OPEN


IN


TU


HOUSE




IAPUNA


1968


The Tapia House


IT WILL BE "Open House" on
Sunday when from 9 a.m. Tapia
begins to welcome people to our
Fifth Anniversary Assembly at the
Tapia House, 82 84 St Vincent
Street, Tunapuna.
The Assembly, a historic occa-
sion for ourselves and for the coun-
try, will mark a turning point in
the development of the group
that was founded in November
1968 and which has kept on
growing and building to today
when we are ready to launch a
national organisation.

000

Preparations for this Assembly
began soonafter the end of the
last Special Assembly on Septem-
ber 23 which was a notable suc-
cess despite the heavy rain which
kept pouring right through the
morning and into mid-afternoon.
And as the November 18 As-
sembly drew nearer, members,
friends and neighbours have
chipped in to put the House in
shape for the big day.
The space inside the house,
depleted by the putting up of
facilities for printing, folding etc,
has been augmented by the con-
struction of an adjoining shed
raised on stout bamboo poles.
Teams of volunteer workers


laboured throughout the week,
weeding and cutlassing the bush
which sprang up with the recent
rains on the adjoining vacant land
on St Vincent Street.
From as far afield as Corosal,
San Fernando, Fyzabad, Point
Fortin and Guayaguayare, Tapia
people and friends have been or-
ganising transport to come to the
Assembly.
Here in Tunapuna, a shuttle
service from the bottom of St
Vincent Street the Eastern Main
Road to the Tapia House has
been organised on the basis of
volunteered cars.
Man in charge of co-Drdinating


TAKE


arrangements, Ivan Laughlin, Conm-
munity Relations Secretary, would
like to advise that parking should
take place on one side of St
Vincent Street and Water Lane
only.
The back page of this paper
carries the Agenda, of the Assembl)
the highlight of which will be the
presentation of the Tapia Mani-
festo for Trinidad and Tobago.
The original plan was to pre-
sent the entire Manifesto at the
Assembly this Sunday. Midway in
the preparations we realized that
some of the headings, for example,
Foreign Policy and Social and
Economic Reorganisation, would


IT FROM


perhaps require full Assemblies
to be devoted to each of them.
Accordingly the progranune
has been tailored to suit the time
available and the kind of occa-
sion it is expected to be.
And a full day's programme -
with a break for lunch is ex-
pected, dealing with the import-
ant issues of the day and what we
are going to do about them.
TAPIA would like to remind
everyone of one of the points
taken at the last Assembly:
"Trinidad time" is a feature of
the old order.
We must start Dromvtly at
9.30 a.m., after registration.


HERE


JOIN TA PIA

NAME
ADDRESS


I AGREE THAT rHE TIME REACH


15 Cents


__


--j





SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1973


NI'Z


Above left:
MARGARET GIBBS who does typesetting for the TAPIA newspaper;
Above right: CAROL BEST, member of the Council ofRepresentatives
Above: MICHAEL HARRIS, Campaign Manager
Right: SHEILAH SOLOMON, member of the Council of Representatives
SEE PAGE 11


non~j


PAGE 2 TAPIA







SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1973


AS I prepare to write, I
feelsomething akin to what
Dylan Thomas must have
meant by "the first boiling
in the belly of a bad poem".
I am not a poet, or even a
writer of unjustified lines.
"Man must know herself"
is a piece of salty wisdom
that I often quote.
It must be that a (prose)
"statement" of some import-
ance to myself (who else?) is
close to the surface. Is the
eruption genuinely violent or
sufficiently disruptive to force
ah in-dwelling mineral out of
the vein? Or just another false
alarm?
Unexpected, when some-
thing like that comes to the
surface, it evaporates into illu-
sion. Even the mood is fragile,
susceptible of mortal fracturing.
Now what has all this to do
with the politics; the deteriorat-
ing situation; the unresolved
crisis? Yes, of course. Rice is
still the same price whether or
not I have a movement of the
emotional bowels.
I can hear the sharp retort,
rooted in the certainty of ob-
jective conditions, that an em-
pirically determinable majority
of people with flesh and blood
like myself are probably de-
nied, through malnutrition,
proper and regular movements
of the physical bowels.
"You too damn happy".
Eh?


SHARE

The term is."a social con-
scienc?. TIt' i.vr1what riakes
you uncomfortable for the fact
of\ worse distress around you.
Or what makes you confidently
self-righteous towards the un-
troubled others because you
can share the distress.
"Black people have been
clapping for too long".
But to perceive and to
"share" the greater distress you
can only multiply several times
over what you feel. So you
require, first of all, some
knowledge of self and then
some imagination.
I have always heard that
people in revolutionary groups
are misfits. But there must be
some grandeur of spirit in the
act of rejecting a going,society
and seeking to change it in
such a way that you can fit in.
For there is the option, the
barest expression of which was
brought to my attention by
Lloyd King who quoted from
Edmundo Desnoes' novel
"Memories of Underdevelop-
ment":


"I would rather go on being
underdeveloped Revolu-
tionaries are the mystics of
this century: willing to die for
an implacable social justice.
I'm a mediocre man, a modern
man, a link in the chain, a
worthless cockroach".

SCANDALISING

There is this admirable con-
fidence in the boundless capa-
city of the human will, the
human capacity. And if for no
other reason than that it keeps
you going, then it's worth the
while having.
I reenamber how I was
scandalized at a Tapia meeting
in San Fernando two years ago
to hear a feller suggesting that
we should start with "basic
psychology". It was outrageous
to me then. It seemed to repre-
sent one of the grosser distor-
tions of the Tapia policy of
free and open discussions to
make it appear like fat-arsed
lining in an exotic salon, of
cowshit and mud.
Bat.now I feel some clarity
on where you start off f.1uoi is
indispspable. People don't
often mshar your assumptions,
and talking could be to no end
except if your hearers care to
appreciate the music without
the weors, so to speak.

WHIPLASH

For we can so get over-
whehied by words. Words that
bear de handprints of the
hundreds who used them be-
fore; words that become tools,
objectively usable by anyone.
But you wonder if the
phrases do more than approxi-
mate to how you perceive a
reality. Whether they are not
deficiestly appropriate to any-
one it the man who. coined
them.
"Bourgeois subjectivism".
Walter Rodney's phrase falls
like a whiplash. Ihtand chas-
tisement for such irrelevant
meanderings when the work


Grain Drain

FOOTNOTE: IF IT is to change at all, few people expect the price of
rice to change for the better. But these days the issue with rice is
not so much the price as getting the staple to buy at all. And while
we get tired of sticking lunch-time forks into mashed potatoes,
breadfruit etc., recent news had it that forklift operators on the
docks were heedlessly puncturing bags of landed rice and .spilling
the precious grain all over the wharves.
Precious too was the insight thus provided into the mystery
of how all these thousands-of-bags' shipments we hear about some-
how never seem to survive the transhipment from the wharves to the
shopping baskets of housewives. And when the dockers told Sham
Mohammed about this grain drain last week, the Express reported an
associated grievance given vent to by a "talkative docker'
"What was even worse, said one talkative docke.', was that
people not permanently employed on the wharves collect the
sweepings which they sell. and they get none".


remains to be done.
Hi was departing from the
normal practice of acknowledg-
ing assistance in the writing of
his book and pleading personal
responsibility for errors. Such
responsibility is always collec-
tive, Rodney insisted.
I feel that the prac-
tice of all these columnists in
the newspapers these days of
talking more about themselves
than about the general situation
is justified and inevitable.That
is the only way in which the
general situation has meaning
to yourself: how it affects you,
what it makes you do, think,
feel. Or not do.

NO CONTEXT

J.F. Kennedy's speech-
maker's phrase "Ask not what
your country can do for you
etc "was ridiculed in a
TAPIA editorial in 1970 as "a
'tin slogan (with) plenty of
clatterand no content". I never
remember the context exactly,
but that little reference to the
Kenpeiy diptin moved me to
a new 'sticgf ef-undro'ind.l-
aig.
There is thingg like a
purely selfless motivation, I
believe. Th~eb has to be some-
thing tr it fqr ly.-
Shisto0r al analysis tc
.exptni t tI resounding
Latisquet Iactions like
""degiitini" qpd "disposses-
sion" cannot n~e anything to
me unless I ia place myself in


fLB,


SYou always

Wanted her

S sew...

I RFDNIR


IIAVE A DEMONSTRATION TODAY


KIRPALANI'S
NATIONWIDE AGENTS AND STOCKISTS


it, unless I can magnify the
history of my own personal ills
or handicaps into society pro-
portions.

ABOLISHED

"Mounting inequality". You
can pick up the phrases like
that one as they lie about like
fallen confetti. But to feel
engaged at all by its implica-
tions, I need to be convinced
that the slums of deprivation
and the blocks of unemploy-
ment can never be glamorized
save at the risk of cheating.
I can't excuse poverty. And
that's only because I've learnt
that leisure is essential; that


bread should be taken for
granted. There oghit to be
more satisfying pursuits in life.
But I can see too where this
had led others. The Czech re-
fugee who said that in his
socialist homeland they lived
neither well nor badly, just
mediocrely.
Poverty, can be abolished
here too, if only at the expense
of the enjoyment of abundance
by anybody at all. And that
may be a better state than the
first.
I am not a politician either.
Not that anybody asked. The
question is only perhaps im-
portant to me. And that is be-
cause I have been asking myself
what I doing here?


to


JA


Column


LM nnox Granth



Man must know herself


Annual


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--- --


TAPIA PAGE 3








IT .XT TA A V W TTlfr l1 I S0 1 Q'712


PAGE 4 TAPIA SUNiAY lOuv N ivi E to. 17


WILLIAMS' NEW PARTY TAKING SHAPE AS A

WHATEVER may be
Williams' plans for his po-
litical resurrection, it is
obvious that they are not
going to be carried along C i
on a wave of popular sup-
port. I have no doubt that
there are lingering senti- C
ments of good will toward
the Doctor, but our hard-
nosed judgment has been a
political one time for
change.
The IRO leaders must
be sadly out of touch with quit public life in the light of splitting between Karl and Ka
their flocks if they fail to their representations to him. mal, uncertain of its fate
perceive this. Their less So that, in their chosen pro- stranded between two worlds
than ingenuous position fessions of "instruments of re- one waiting to die, the other
that Dr Williams is the conciliation", the IRO may giving all indications of a future
man to lead us out of cisi have found their first clients, lusty life.
macks to lead us out of crisis, Do we glimpse here, in The people are with neither:
smacksulte om th embryo, the outlines of Wil- of Williams' parties, not the
culated and, from their liams' new party, a kind of old one, the party of the new
point of view, "worldly- National Civic Crusade, an elite, the PNM oligarchs, des
wise" compromise, alliance of Concerned Citizens, perately seeking to maintain
And yet, if an Abdullah or Voices of the People, padres their privileges, in the aid oi
a Pantin can be accused of inept, and pundits? Where, we might which, we have it on Williams
amateur dabbling in affairs of ask, are the people? own authority, they call for
state, surely Wahid Ali's cynical Not, certainly, with Wil- total repression.
assertion of his political neutral- liams' old party, that cabal now Nor is the new party, futilely
ity marks off his role in the
affairs for closer scrutiny.

CONSCIENCE

Much as for John Foster
Dulles neutrality in internation-
al affairs was tantamount to a
mortal sin, we know that the
PNM view of the world has
never catered for men who
would wish to place the dic-
tates of their conscience above
the directives of the Party. Not
for such are plums like Presi-
dency of the Senate reserved.
Nor would we expect such ".::I.:i..
men to submit to the rake-off. ::
of part of their emoluments
into party funds. They know
too well the value of their in-
dependence.
So that we must see Dr Ali
for the politician he is and
judge his actions in such light.
His reactionary appeal to the
messiah could have arisen from
only such base motives as the
desire to preserve some sectional:
or personal vested interest.
Only that kind of politics i:
could have projected him into
Dr Williams' camp alongside
such discredited and ineffectual
figures as Earle Lewis, Donawa- ii t's no secret th
McDavidson and Teshea, not ii: claim to be gett
to mention the PNM Women's
League, itself fast dwindling gallon and that'
down to its incorrigible hard i::.i on tyres too an
core.
i free engine.
PADRES Doesn't surprise
luxury options t
Dr Ali's tactic of veiling
selfish interests in "reasonable" the Datsun 1200
language has provided the open- nation of econor
ing for the suggestion of a
Queen's Hall type debate as an :formance and cc
"input" into the "decision- which most pe(
making process" in Parliament. cni pe
Superficially a concession to consider special
Tapia's demand for a Consti- Just come natural
tuent Assembly, the real thrust t a
of this idea is to create once with the DATSUl
again a situation in which Wil- ii good reasons w
liams can stand outside and
above the polticsofthecountry. You Should drive
The man to achieve this end S DATSUN.
could be none other than Ellis
Clarke, who has been gearing
up for the role of arbiter in the
grand national debate,and who
-had to request the IRO to pay
him a second visit to clarify
their position.
Significantly, Williams, hav-
ing been visited and petitioned
by the men of the cloth, agreed
to reconsider his decision to


seeking to refurbish the Mas-
ter's image, faring any better.
For we are well aware that the
ways of Doctor Politics only
breed oligarchs and repression,
and that the second time
around will inevitably be more
harsh than the first.
Our instincts are sound,
our judgments well founded.
The naive expect and the cor-
rupt continue to hope that we
will be blinded by manipulation,
seduced by images. Those
seasoned practitioners of the
old politics now parading in
new clothes are banking on the
same thing. But our actions
over the past five years, and
moreso during the past three,
tell a different story.
Having abandoned colonial
politics, we have intuitively
begun to organise ourselves for
independent life. We have been
throwing up organisation and
leadership all over, attempting
to grapple with issues in our
localities and on the job, and
this activity, in turn, has given
us a surer grasp of the reality
around us.
We know now that the
problems that confront our


-r
e

r
e
r


f

r

y


says

Allan Harris


country are larger and more
complex than any one man or
any now-for-now smart alec
party could hope to solve.
What we have been looking

Continued on0 Page 10


IJ








SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1973


IN OUR rounds of political
meetings throughout the
country Tapia is meeting
the demands of the popu-
lation.
"Yes, man", said a
member of the audience
at Point Fortin on Friday,
November 2, "No baccha-
naling and mauvais lan-
gueing".
After the failures of Inde-
pendence the country is looking
for serious politics -plans and
programmes that revives hope
and points a way out of the
social crises the PNM regime
has led this country into.
Because of the frustrations
of Independence too, agony
and pain, reputedly the best
teachers, the country has learnt
and is continuing to learn that
the politics of Independence
cannot .be based on simply
wasting down political oppo-
nents and uttering vague guide-
lines to change.
Tapia's large cast of speak-
ers have been meeting those
demands-educating, generating
hope, tangibly showing direc-
tions out of the crisis; all of
this not without a touch of
humour.
Last Friday our meeting at
New Village on the outskirts
of Point Fortin was like a
blockorama. New Villagers ne-
glected as much as people in
Matelot and Cedros, braved
inclement weather to receive
Tapia's Community Relations
Secretary with warmth. At the
end of the meeting they were
hungering to hear more.
The team arrived at New
Village under adverse weather
conditions after a full day's
programme of activity com-
pleting the folding of our news-
paper, distributing copies,


COMMUNITY work can involve Tapia in different kinds of activities. For
example, a football match against Blackgold in Corosal. Posing after the
match Tapia (above) and Blackgold both flushed, but Blackgold


triumphant.
throughout the Central areas,
maintaining contacts with our
colleagues in sugar and the
Blackgold Co-operative in
Corosal.
Electi:rns hv itself. !u;cn
said,won't resolve the political
crisis. Elections change the faces
of the men in power. We have
to change the structure of
power and bring large numbers
into thepolitical process for the
first time in our history. The


1971 elections showed that
people don't trust the election
arrangements,
No government will organise
an election they will not win,
the Tjpinmat' went on, and the
government consequently will
not allow an Independent Elec-
tion and Boundaries'Commis-
sion, the 18 year olds to vote or
theopposition to have radio and
TV time. We could call till
doomsday and they will not do


Workers denied rights at Printex


SEVERAL employees of the
Marabella firm, Printex Con-
verters, are now on the bread-
line as a result of what has
been described as an anti-union
law within the firm.
A report coming to TAPIA
San Fernando office states that
Printex Manager William Chen
fired some of his employees

after learning they had been
to Transport and Industrial
Workers Union (TIWU) South


Office to sign up membership
forms.
One of the fired workers,
Jennifer Stamers, who has four
years' service with Printex,
reveals that ordinary rights do
not exist in that firm. Manage-
ment takes no backchatt" from
employees, she says.
S The workers dismissed on
October 15, five days after
going to the Union Office, re-
ceived only two and a half
days' pay from the company.


They have put the matter
in the hands of the union
which has had to allow the
stipulated 11 weeks to pass
before raising the issue with
the Minister of Labour.
Nigel Gill of TAPIA South
Office understands too that the
girl employee who carried to
the management news which
led to her co-workers'dismissal
was also fired but was taken
back after two days and fully
paid as a reward for her
treachery.


TAPIA HAS




MET THE




DEMANDS




OF THE




PEOPLE-NO




MAUVAIS




LANGUE


Sit. We have to do it ourselves.
How can we have elections
where the government is like a
cricket team entering a match
and appointing the two um-
pires? Rigging in Trinidad
iake.s place in the gerrymant
ering of the boundaries. In any
case, he said, people must haw
greater participation in thB
political process than just vot-
ing once every five years. That
is old world colonial politics.
Colonial politics, he said,
is still prevalent here.
And he gave three reasons
why: 1. Setting up of the
police against the people; 2.
Divide and rule on the basis of
race and class; 3. Conditioning
people to believe that they are
second class, rum drinking
bacchanaling people.
From the outset the police
was never organised as a civil
force and it is still the same
today. We in Tapia know that
the majority of men in the
police service don't like the
way they are being used.
They are men like all of ts,
with families, facing the same
pressures of living in this society.


But, they have to think of their
bread, and jobs are hard to
find. We also know that a
few of them support the op-
pressive regime.

Racial politics is a fact
of life, and everywhere the
supporters of the regime des-
cribe us as people with a
"carnival mentality". The
tourism promoters sell us
abroad that way; that is why,
the Prime Minister of Singa-
pore could describe us as rum
drinking, fete loving people.

The darkest hour, Ivan
concluded, is nearest dawn.
Tapia over the last five years
has put in place the basic in-
gredients for a revolutionary
national party and we are ready.
All Tapia people from all part.
of the country will be assembl-
ing at the Tapia House on No-
vember 18 to found that na-
tionalpolitical organisation that
will deal with the political
situation in the country today,
and he extended an invitation
to that assembly to the people
of New Village .


Feliz


Trinidad!


FOOTNOTE: PA-RANG! Hear them roll the r, hear the note fall
like a strum from multiple strings. Peace on earth, goodwill to men
- Feliz Navidad.Merchants havenot let pass the chance to tag their
labels and their own peculiar message of Christmas onto the parang
bands.
What the strummers and the singers get out of sponsorship is
not immediately clear. (What are the expenses for tuners and
arrangers, for instruments, for a bandyard? The Parang Association
lately banned electric guitars).
On national TV we get prime-time state-sponsored culture
towards Better Villages. National Broadcasting Service Radio Six
Ten has been transfusing parang into our bloodstream in mighty
doses as if to make sure there will be no mistake about its stand-
ing as indigenous culture.
For further proof there was the visit last week of the Vene-
zuelan Los Angelitos Negros to show the Guardian's Martin Sanchez
that, despite the Spanish (?)lyrics, there is little resemblance between
Venezuelan and Trinidadian parang.
Aficionados this side of the Bocas concluded that our
thing is"a kind of hybrid parang that is characteristically Trinidadian
in which one can detect calypso and even soul influences a
new music (built) on the precious little that is left of our Spanish
antiquity "


THE BEST PLACE TO BUT BOOKS


ANY KIND OF


S, te phens
PORT OF SPAIN SAN FENANDO


- --


~~ ~l I~~ e~l~ I18' ~ Eol I ~ ib~ dZ I~~~I Ir!k 1


TAP~IA PAGE 5








SUNDAY, NOVEMBE


Statements


oft


The struggle now




on their doorsteps


That IRO call

MICHAEL HARRIS

THE CYNICS may say that there is no-
thing surprising in the appeal by the
Inter-Religious Organisation to Dr. Eric
Williams to return to public life and to
lead the country out of its crisis, on the
ground that it is in the nature of clerics
to seek not only absolution but solutions
as well from above.
But this would not only be unfair it
would also be very shortsighted. To
accept such a simplistic explanation of
the IRO's ;action would be to miss the
excellent opportunity it affords for in-
sight into the nature of the political
crisis that we face and into the psycho-
logical metamorphosis of a nation in a
critical and revolutionary era.


IMPOTENCE

One of the ever-present obstacles in the
way of a general comprehension of a political
crisis such as we face is what has been called
the Velocity of Events. This means simply that
as the political situation worsens, each stage in
the process.,of disintegration follows so quickly
on the heels of the previous orfe and seems so
much worse than the agony of the' previous
crisis is all but forgotten.
The result of this is that one is so pre-
occupied with today's crisis that one does not
perceive the relationship between today's crisis
and that of yesterday ano so one cannot elicit
any overall developmental pattern from the
chaos of events. Without this general concep-
tion, one has, at any given moment, little idea
of where one came from and absolutely none
of where one is heading.
The effort, however well-meaning, to pro-
pose solutions from such a conceptual vacuum,
is more likely than not to land one into the
manifest absurdity in which the good gentlemen
of the IRO find themselves today.
For on the one hand they recommend a
"specific course of action" which contains many
serious and essential steps, (many of which
incidentally were "borrowed" directly from
Tapia's proposals) while on the other hand they
allow themselves to be interred in the very
coffin of impotence which those proposals are
designed to destroy by.making the mendicant's
appeal to the No. 1 Messiah for his second
coming.


CRISIS


Any serious attempt on their part to try to
gain a general comprehension of the whole
political crisis would have saved them this
embarrassment. For it surely would have indi-
cated that this very notion of messianic deli-
verance must share with other factors the blame
for the present political situation. It would
have indicated, too, that in spite of the appa-
rent chaos, the political crisis of this nation is
pursuing a definite course toward a definite
resolution.
Of course, the one thing that all crises have
in common is that they move inexorably to-
wards resolution. And if I have read the state-
ments of the clerics correctly, it would appear


that they are well aware that the political
crisis is moving towards the eventual polarisa-
tion of this nation and that they are afraid to
accept evidences of their own intelligence.
For they are correct when they assert that
this country is, and has been, in a state of
confrontation; and they are correct when they
say that it will get worse; and unless these state-
ments were mere emotional rhetoric, they must
have understood that a political crisis of such
serious dimensions is not going to be solved by
any messianic band-aid.


LOGICAL

For the struggle that this country is in-
volved in today is being fought in terms of
deciding the fundamental nature of the politi-
cal system itself. And this is where we are
today. And the growing polarisation of the
country that is taking place is occurring pre-
cisely because more and more people are taking
sides on the question of what kind of political
system they want to live under.
The ambivalence of the clerics in. their
ability to understand the nature of the political
crisis at this point in time-and their inability to
perceive or accept its logical outcome is not
only a result of their failure to evaluate the
whole process of' the l 'elopiet 'of !ht crisis
but is also a stark manifestation of a psycholo-
gical state which they, being part of the larger
community, share with many others.
The fact is that the political crisis, or the
state of confrontation if you wish, has its roots
way back in our history, but the first tangible
shoots could certainly be seen above the gound
as many as five years ago. Since that time the
:crisis has grown, multiplying its dimensions, so
that today it embraces phenomena seemingly
as unrelated as the bloodshed in the hills and
the shortage of food in the shops. And it will
continue to expand until it touches in a
significant way every facet of our national life,
all of our people.


DELIVERANCE

But until that time there are going to be
people in our midst who, though hearing the
sounds of the struggle afar off, are not con-
cerned. And there are those who, like the
clerics, unable any longer to close their eyes
and ears to the reality of the struggle, look
around in futile desperation for quick and
easy solutions, the grand pronouncement from
above, the messianic rod of deliverance, and
who continue to do so until the battle reaches
their doorsteps, at which point they shall be
forced to take a stand in one camp or the
other. And this is so, this must be so, because
the psychological burden of making such a
decision is truly an enormous one.
The very idea of making a decision, a com-
mitment one way or the other, opens up a
Pandora's box and lets loose a swarm of fear.
The people recognize instinctively that the
decision they are being called upon to make will
change their whole pattern of existence and
they must make the correct choice for them-
selves or else pay the consequences. But this is
not easy; the situation so complex, the possi-
bilities so numerous, the variables so indistinct
and the imponderables so great. The choice is
not easy and they are afraid.
And as the struggle draws closer their frus-
tration mounts and they deliver their desperate
prayer as in the Trinidad Guardian "Deliver
us Good Lord." But the struggle contin-
ues its inexorable path to their doorstep.


POETRY SEL
the
SIGN OF THE 7TMES... eve
or the poetry of immediacy, fac
you may call it. Both "Terri- col
ble Black Men" and "In fut
Memory of Future Mornings" rev
question a situation where lat

Bro. AUSTIN,

I remember
As a boy
Had no toys
Meh folks couldn't afford it
Always hungry
Couldn't feed me
Did'n get to go no way either
Virtually a prisoner
No shoes to put on
Had no fun
Doh do dat, doh do dis
Bed is not ah place to piss
Could'o do nothing on meh own
Think ah lot bout leaving home
And now ah come ah man




LLOYD KING
After the years of groundings in
ception and after it was accepted 0
corruption in private affairs was nor
provided that certain sacred thi
were not thereby chiccd tess the st
tures of society might seem to be in
fering with the structures of society
and after the cock had crowed f
times and the old time calypso sir
was taken out and crucified on bei
of a new morality in public caly
singingandmany men were shown 0
it was safer to doubt that they mi
believe and after a generation of
corrupt had come and gone protest
their morality in private affairs
proclaiming the gush of oil and c
was sweet and had told everyone t




Th,


AKIMOV ZIVARAFAT
I AM NOT a historian.
Figures or facts are there-
fore not present, and I
believe, not necessary. I
write because I believe I
have something of value to
say from my own experi-
ences and perception of
things.
The history of the
world did not begin in
1970. Neither did the his-
tory of revolt. Revolt has
always been man's defence
against an oppressive en-
vironment.
It is the aims of the human
being to be comfortable and
improve his mental and-spirit-
ual capacity in a society which
offers material and emotional
stability. Revolt becomes in-
evitable as the answer to the
man who is denied these things
in a society that frustrates his
efforts and hopes classifying
and distorting his material and
spiritual being.


SECTIONN AND COMMENT
SGovernment battles un- on
enly with general dissatis- dou
'tion. But while the former pain
nfort in the possibility of inac,
ure retaliation, in a purging
olutionary darkness, the ft
ter sees a people who look awai


las es
Ah still cya understand
Fuzz men breaking down meh door
Searching for subversive literature
Doh-read dis, doh read dat

If ah read ah break de law
So dey have ah right to break down:
Dictating too, tuh me
What movie ah should'n see
Ah start back feeling like ah boy
Even reaching home before six now
Hate to be called dissident element

Hate to be called revolutionary
And why not, am only me
Yearning for freedom, for liberty



The same tu

the parched land was no
somepeople were trying
de- were pointing out that
'hat all were still wooded ai
mal bushmen knew snakes
wings trying to hold the w no,;j
tric- after the then new guarti
ter- fast on the heels ofi
and guard proclaiming that ti
our to work on the word "r
iger spit and polish and tl
half going to sing a new an
pso and after they with due
'hat up their tents and cal
eight village bands to sing
the tunes and beat some di
ting tro and with mandolin
and had proclaimed that th(
ane really not such a bad
hat they would allow no




ie danger


Trinidad and Tobago (Carib-
bean) is going through this
stage of national revaluation of
the society for a more mature
human being and political sys-
tem. The process of eliminat-
ing ignorance and distortion
goes on to develop a New
Society and a New Man.

NO HATE

The basis of struggle cannot
be defined as hate. Hate has
no justification. No struggle can
be justified on this basis, neither
can any leaders recruit disciples
on this basis. The elements of
hate, envy and greed are there-
fore out. And we must also not
lose sight of imperfection -the
human being in all his glory.
We may strive for perfection
but must accept and live with
imperfection in others and our-
selves.
Whatever form that hate is
defined in, this same quality is
reversed to cause self-destruc-


PAGE 6 TAPIA







TAPIA PAGE 7


Nation


SBY Esther Le Gendre
vhile their life-blood is dream, inherent in the deter-
ubly drained and translate mination of the people. And
in into words, epitaphs and so agrees Colin Murdoch. His
action "Revelation" reveals that
Yet Antiguan Gene Nan- power lies in the fruit of
ton in "Prophecy "sees the sweat and the insistence of
ailcd Messiah, the ancestral the fist.


n meh door




t







fne again

lot as parched as d
ig to suggest and t)
t the hills after h
and that as any n
Were always li
-thraltnd p
Shad followed iI
the then-old s{
they were going si
"morality with ai
that they were n
and simple tune o
ue pomp had set c
failed upon the a
rl ir old-time w
drnm, with cau- ta
in and after they w
'the old tune was tt
d tune and that w
!, violence to be ni


Revelation
COLIN MURDOCH
You will not see stars
Fall from heaven;
Nor great messiahs
Descend and lead.
You will only see sweat
Drip from men's foreheads,
See the callouses on their hands,
And hear their breath
When it labours.
You will only' hear men's voices,
And thunder; you will see
Rivers of blood; you will
Bury your dead.
For your clenched fist
Shall fall among broken promises,
And sweep them all away.


one to the language of the era since
he language was a good language but
ad merely been used too much by
ven who preferred to make it sound
ke bad language and after they hadl
reclaimed that the business of snakes
Srthe grass was reaIlly iru: tc i ,iit ll
pite of it the hills were joyful together
'nging the new and simple calypso
though the words weren't all that
ew and after the leader of the new
nes had sung his knowledge that his
country was not by half a desert
although he knew of a lot of deserts
'here snakes were biting their own
lils then the people who were fed up
'ith the sound of this music because
his music was the same old music
'ith the same old chorus: sans huma-
ite; said: "This shit must stop".


TERRIBLE BLACK MEN
IN WHITE HOUSES
M.WILLIAMS
In the new Caribbean
Terrible black men sit in
White houses
Administering
Horrible deaths
To young bodies and
Chains to young minds;
Filling the land with sounds
of funeral drums
And death chants.
Terrible men, who sit in
White houses
With blood on your hands,
Tell me
How will you sleep when ...
The darkness comes?

IN MEMORY OF
FUTURE MORNINGS
CHRISTOPHER LAIRD
I wake the day
to find a gun
in my hand
and a dead body
in the papers.

Shotgun against SLR
shatter a waiting morning
shouting brutal eclipse
early sunset.
West Indian hands
clutch for their spilled
blood carried away
in tankers.

Models for future statues in squares

Robbers fighting
for their dreams
and ours,
leave their speeches
for their graves.

While we become expert at epitaphs
written sobbing between
the tear stains,
professional mourners
wallowing in eulogies
assuming to immortalise
present desperation.


Prop ecy
GENE NANTON

We are the prophets' dream
Caught in the legacy
Of our insularity.
We are the spoken
Words of freedom
And the active
Voices of liberation.
We are the lost thoughts
Of our ancestors
And the hollow echoes
Of their painful cries.

We are thecaked sweat
That watered the cane
And enriched the soil
With its bitterness.
We are the chants and prayers
Of the bonfire gatherings
And the isolated talismans
of the buried memories.
We are the long hours
Of the sun-baked labourers
Working to the.rhythms
Of the slave's whiplash.
We are the tears
Of the weary mothers' pain
Straining her back
In birthing her grief.


We are the toms-toms message
Travelling in the wind
Carrying the word of God.
'Lc eaL ihe brtai of Tiuth
And drink of our cup of bitterness.
We weep our tears
Into the valleys of heritage
And wash clean
The putrefaction
Of the rotting vegetation.

Clench your fist,
Ready your soul;
Fear not
The wrath of man.
You are
The word of God.


national philosophy of IRREGARDLESS


tion, genocide, chaos and mad-
ness, which are not the ideals
of the rational human being.
The struggle therefore moves
to its objectives with obstacles
to be hurdled; the human emo-
*tions cannot be denied but
the basis of that cause must be
Love, Sincerity and Under-
standing.
This country lacks heroes.
Our young people lack heroes.
It is not surprising that they
relate and define themselves in
foreign terms and foreign peo-
pl'. The self-acclaimed gods
al',_ leaders Government,
Elders and opposition have
failed to set any standards for
the people.
Brother and sister, born
with natural talents or acquired
through hard work and de-
velopment, cultural conscious-
ness or philosophical ideas, are
denied access to the widest
scope of the society whose
leadership thrives on egoism.
What happens then? What


happens to the political mind
that cannot incorporate its
ideas into a society in which he
was born; a society which re-
jects and calls him subversive
--crying out disrespect for
subservience to decaying ele-
ments of human beings.


NEW MAN

What happens? Those who
do not run to the Promised
Land compromise and live frus-
trated for the rest of their lives.
The consequence of rebellion
is poverty, madness and death-
in-Life. But too long has this
been going on and we now have
a new dimension to the human
struggle the New Man, the
man who will fight you with.
his mind, body, and soul for
the realisation of his hopes and
ideals and who will destroy
hopelessness.
Ladies and Gentlemen, I
now introduce you to the New
Man. It is not important if they


have a policy or a plan for a
new society. What is important
is that here is the man who has
broken from the corrupt de-
mocracy and decided on what
basis their lives must be lived.
What Guy Harewood and
Andrea Jacobs are giving to us
is a dimension to politics and
man with his drives and hopes.
They have established that they
are concrete in carrying out
their plans. They have also
shown that they are more prac-
tical and efficient than your
whole political machinery. They
have shown restraint, mercy
and understanding where blood-
shed and mass killing were
possible.
We refer to them as ',dirty
guerrillas". But is it not time
we of this country transform
our impressionist emphasis of
threads and flashes which typi-
fies our attitudes and which is
responsible for the economic
drain of our countries and
personalities.
It has always been the im-
pression which is important.


How long the car is? How many
unwanted appliances I could
clutter up my house with,
while my child suffering from
gastro?
It is not that these things
are-unnecessary but it becomes
dangerous when it is an atti-
tude that says "I must have"
irregardless of if we do not
manufacture or produce, and it
means sacrificingan agricultural
system to feed the mass of the
people in the country.

VALUE SYSTEM

"Irregardless" is the egoistic
and irrational attitude that sells
our culture and our souls to
foreign powers and institutions
for little or no benefits but
honorary titles and paternalism.
The typical colonist and colo-
nized mind.
Living in the bush in de-
tached camps and on food of the
land, the value system of the
Trini-mentality for pseudo com-
fort and big impression has
been destroyed to a great ex-
tent.


The Revolution has begun
and is total. Those who stand
in the path of a human revolu-
tion for better human condi-
tions will be trampled. it is
too late for a corrupt regime
to change a corrupt system
into something relevant and
meaningful to the people.
They must either make their
contribution by preparing the
ground for a new vehicle of
policies and ideas or confront
this vehicle with everything
they have thereby causing con-
flict, bloodshed and chaos,
furthering the fragmentation of
the society. Knowing that this
struggle is a futile fight for
time.
We can only hope that no
Fractions will lose sight of the
Human Being and the stable
society. It is our hope that this
land become a land of harmony
ot human beings in an environ-
ment for the development of
man. A land where we can say
we have progressed materially
and matured as human beings
in the search for Truth,
Knowledge, Love and Peace.


S18, 1973

-I


ihe
**








SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1973


Earl Best questions Village Olympics violence


ROUGH CUFF





SHAKE HAND


AND RIOT




AND CUP


THE 1973 chapter of the
Prime Minister's Best
Village Competition came
to a close last weekend
at the Queen's Park Sa-
vannah. One week before,
the curtain had come
down on the Village
Olympics (V.O.).
"This year," ran the
Express report of Tues-
day October 23, "villages
took part in seven sport-
ing events ... Apart from
the trophies, teams will
get medals including
runners up".
The report, accompanied
by a picture of the nine tro-
phies being contested, goes on
to list the names of a dozen
firms which "already ... have
donated sets of medals".


ENERGIES

Which, for those of us
who suspected the change in
emphasis inherent in the
change from "Better" to"Best"
Village, is a clear statement
of what V.O. really means to
many of its devotees.
The V.O. was introduced
in 1972 to revive the seeming-
ly moribund Prime Minister's
Best Village Competition and
at the same time to involve
hundreds of disenchanted
young men and women in an
exercise which would ensure
that many, many energies
would be harmlessly expended.


PRIORITIES

We cannot, with the best
will in the world, find any
justification for the opinion
that the V.O. Competition was
conceived with a view to
improving community sport-
ing life since it is abundantly
clear that Sport does not rate
high on the list of Govern-
ment's priorities.
One has only to look at
the numerous playing fields
that feature on the casualty
list, the annual hustle-and-
scrunt of the Trinidad Foot-
ball and Olympic Associations,
etc., etc.
Anyway, two weeks ago,
the final of the football
competition between Barata-
ria and Point Fortin pre-
maturely ended in a scuffle.


4


AND WHAT ABOUT THAT "CONSCIOUSNESS" BANDIED
ABOUT ON EVERY BLOCK SINCE 1970? WHERE IS IT,
WHEN FOR THE DUBIOUS HONOUR OF RECEIVING A
PILE OFMEDALS, A TROPHY AND A HANDSHAKE FROM
SOME BIGWIG, WE ARE PREPARED TO CUFF AND KICK
AND BITE AND SCRATCH WE OWN BROTHERS?


TAPIA (Sunday August
19) carried a report about a
V.O: game between Tacarigua
and Tunapuna that ended in a
virtual free-for-all.
Our reporter took the
view then that, free-for-all
notwithstanding, the V.O.
Competition was performing
an important function since
it was clear that the commun-
ities were coming together
and new,desirable community
allegiance were being born.
He pointed out that the
community crowd no longer
finds itself ranged in opposing
camps in support of Colts,
Malvern, QRC, or St. Mary's.


"What was important
about this match",.he wrote,
"was that the game was well
attended, the spectators were
closely identified with the
teams". I think we need to
look rather more closely at
this, because of the Bara-
taria/Point incident.
Firstly, what of the near
antagonism existing between
partisan crowds at North/
South games? This is by no
means a new phenomenon.
And surely the kind of com-
munity spirit which he hails is
present here although perhaps
in less concentrated form.
It was present too in the


kind of crowd support evi-
dent in a clash between Tuna-
puna's Invaders and Arima's
Fulham of an era now past.
Secondly, has the advent
of the Village Olympics
brought any real change in the
traditional rivalries?
For instance, does any
Malvern supporter from Tuna-
puna support them less against
Maple because "Godfrey and
Jack playing for Maple and
them does play for Puna!"?
It may certainly be true
that when footballers play
"as mercenaries for clubs in
Port of Spain they never put
into their game any effort
comparable with when they
are representing their com-
munity."
But we must ask ourselves
what is behind this unwonted
zeal.
What are the real reasons
for the unusual enthusiasm
with which both players and
spectators seem to be fired at
these V.O. games?
Was it merely a momentary
overflow of community con-
sciousness that caused the
two above-mentioned inci-
dents?
We all recognize what a
profoundly revolutionary
situation we are now in, and
we know that no action nowa-
days especially those in-
volving collective violence -
- is apolitical.
So that when Tunapuna's
crowd, forgetting that Taca-
rigua is in no way responsible
for the daily hardships that
confront them both, loses
its revolutionary cool and
joins violent battle on the
football field, we all imme-
diately see that someone some-
where is rejoicing at our folly.
("The brothers are killing
themselves over some medals
and trophies, Sir").
And what about that
"consciousness" bandied
about on every block since
1970? Where is it, when for
the dubious honour of re-
ceiving a pile of medals, the
Jaggernauth shield and a hand-
shake from some bigwig, we
are prepared to cuff and kick
and bite and scratch we own
brothers?


Ask the Barataria fellas if
for having won the big Shield
and the medals dem getting
rice any more easily than the
Pasea fellas who defaulted in
the first round?
Fighting, that is, the fact
of fighting over so trivial a
matter at this point in time, is
a total waste of much needed
energies.

INVOLVEMENT
It is like using high trumps
to take a 10 when there is
still a jack to be hung. MAN
PLAYING FOR WHA HE
SEE!
I may well be wrong in
thinking that it would be
contrary to the plan of the
promoters of the Village
Olympics for the communi-
ties to benefit from it in any
meaningful way.
What is incontestable,
though, is that it can (even if
it does not at present) be
used as an instrument for
serious organization of the
communities.
But clearly, if this is to
happen, the present emphasis
has to be changed. It is im-
perative that we deemphasize
the fact of winning the trophy
and all the attendant sterile
acclaim.
We must turn our atten-
tion to raising the level of
community involvement in
-community sporting life: pro-
per facilities, serious coaching
programmes, organized com-
petition, exposure to top
class talent, literature, the
assurance that outstanding
talent will not feel obliged to
go to town.

POTENTIAL
If we can involve the
whole community on the
basis of a real interest in
contributing to the life of the
community and not on the
basis of immediate gains to be
had, if the forging of intra
and extra-community links
can be seen to be important
in itself, then and only then
will we realize the full po-
tential of the Village
Olympics.


Dorina


LUXURY

MARGARINE

soft, light


a and delicious.


--


I --


PAGE 8 TAPIA








SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1973


Put housing






before feteing


New Jewel knocks


Tourists'Grenada Independence plans


INSTEAD OF spending
millions of dollars to cele-
brate the event, why not
use the money to build a
thousand houses under a
special Independence
Housing Project for people
living in shanty towns?
This commonsense ad-
vice about the redirection
of expenditure earmarked
for Grenada's February 7,
1974 Independence comes
from the New Jewel Move-
"mi-ml", .I:c..- c onaT op-
position force in the neigh-
bouring Associated State.
An article in the undated
12-page "NJMSpecial" con -
demns the "bacchanal and cele-
bration" planned for the occa-
sion by 23 committees and
seven co-ordinating committees
as a waste of effort and re-
sources.

PAYMENT

The businessmen, civil
servants, hoteliers and others
comprising those committees
could have used their talents
more constructively in raising
funds for a housing project
associated with Independence.
The article argues too that
Grenada have "demanded from
(the British) and independence
payment of at least one hun-
dred million dollars as partial
reparation to make up for
some of the money stolen
from us and the exploitation,
human misery, suffering and
degradation we have endured at
their hands over the last 400
yeais".

FACTORIES

This money could be used
to build factories for the NJM-
proposed Agro-Industry
Scheme.
"In this way the whole
process of independence would
have been correctly seen as
something which does not be-
gin and end-on one day but
rather as a dynamic process of
developing self-reliance and at-
taining self-sufficiency in all
areas of our lives," the article
continues.
In the absence of this kind


of attitude, New Jewel insists
that "the present move towards
independence is an insincere,
opportunist move, designed to
strengthen the grip of tyranny
and corruption. It is bound to
result in a sham, bogus, mean-
ingless independence".
What the NJM would con-
sider meaningful independence
must bring a higher standard of
living for the people of Gre-
nada, Carriacou, Petit Marti-
nique and the Grenadian Gre-
nadines.
The benefits and improve-
ment? which ;lhe Movcmnieif
calls for would come only
when "a new progressive, dy-
namic, imaginative, honest and


hardworking leadership takes
power".


GRASSROOTS

NJM aims to replace the
present political system with a
"truly democratic and grass-
roots system in which the peo-
ple of every village and parish
and of the island as a whole,
will be able to exercise power
on their own behalf, in their
own interests in order to build
:I b'igl!t futCre f-oIr t!cm-71clvc"
The article gives Trinidad
and Tobago as an example of
a country where the people


were "shut out of process of
obtaining independence". To-
day, it continues the people of
Trinidad and Tobago are "en-
gaged in a violent struggle
against the government who
has cheated them of the fruits,
expectations and promises of
independence.
"Trinidad today after 11
years of independence, has
finally gone around the country
in an attempt to consult with
the people in drafting an Inde-
pendence Constitution for
Trinidad.
"If Gairy has his way, we
will find ourselves having to do
exactly the same thing at a fu-
ture date, but praise God,,the


people and the NJM will not
let him have the chance to
play the fool with us".
The New Jewel Movement
was formed in March this year
out of a merger of two groups
- Movement for Assemblies of
the People and the Jewel
Movement. It counts among its
achievements. the production
of a political newspaper which
has the biggest circulation in
Grenada.

Since NJM's formation, the
paper says, it has been "at the
forefront of organising all the
people's effective protests and
opposition to this corrupt, in-
human and unjust regime".


A little paper is born


"THERE WAS no crisis;
there is no crisis, and I do
not anticipate any".
The brittle confidence
of Eric Williams in June
1971 was reflected in dif-
ferent words by "brother
Prime Minister" Errol Bar-
row when he left his coun-
try on three months' leave
to lecture at an American
university earlier this year.

But last week a group
of "concerned young Bar-
badians" started something
which eventually may put
as much fire under the
vacant seat of Errol Bar-
row as there is under that
of his Prime Ministerial
brother in Trinidad and
Tobago.
It is called. "MANJAK", an
eight-page newspaper printed
by Tapia House Printing Com-
pany for the publishers, and it
declares itself part of the
"'upsurge of serious radical


journalism" in the Caribbean.
Like MOKO, TAPIA, A-
beng, or Ratoon, it takes its
name from a Caribbean source,
"something sprung from the
Bajan earth the only
mineral resource to have been
mined with any purpose over a
considerable period .."
The lead article headlined
"BARBADOS NEEDS A NEW
MOVEMENT FOR CHANGE"
began:
"Barbados is at a point of
crisis in its history. Ever since
the earliest months of this year,
we have been witnessing qiite
distinct signs of this. The clear-
est signs have been the ever
risingcostofliving,and threaten-
ing food shortages".
"MANJAK" gives other
clear symptoms of the crisis:
dissatisfaction with the existing
press, leading to publicised pro-
jections for a new newspaper
and the Government's declared
intention to consider labour
control legislation.
Another notable symptom
has been the call for a new


political party made in June
this year.
But the paper disagrees that
a real way out of the crisis lies
through new media or new
parties by themselves.
MANJAK comments:
"Another BLP another
Advocate-News. And we seemed
destined to remain stuck in
mud for another three hundred
years.
"MANJAK WOULD LIKE
TO OFFER CONSIDERATION
OF A NEW PERSPECTIVE.
We do not need just another
political party here just
another big newspaper. What
we need here is a whole new
movement for change".
Listing other needs,
MANJAK mentions study of
the Caribbean history, society,
culture and economics and the
encouragement of independent
thought.
It adds: "We need such
direct action as will contribute
to the mobilising of the peoples
of these communities to take
such initiative as would make


the road to meaningful change
smoother than is now the case.
We need to make an impact on
this colonial value-system still
prevailing here ..."
The paper describes its pub-
lishers:
"We are a group of con-
cerned young Barbadians inter-
ested in' fundamental processes
of change in this society. We
are not a purely intellectual
forum, not a covert political
'sect or cell. Our first task, in
fact, is a working out of a
philosophical position in the
context of a Barbados and
Caribbean to which we are all
attached and for which we have
only progressive intentions.
And in this no dogmatism has
and place. The uniqueness of
this society must be the prime
determinant of any positions
we take on the issues and
problems facing us".
The group hopes to develop
other areas of activity apart
from the newspaper MANJAK,
and it promises to bring out
occasional pamphlets of dif-
ferent kinds.


TAPIA PAGE 9












THE BRING-BACK-SINANANITES:


WHAT ARE THEIR



MOTIVES?


Dear Editor,
San Fernandians, inspired
by what motives one finds it
difficult to comprehend, seek
to play God and resurrect the
political dead. Only Christ
could say "Lazarus, come
forth" a n d the dead
would come to life. Ex-magis-
trate Roy Jananan and the
bunch of southerners despe-
rately grasping at political
straws cannot bring back to
life the political dead.
The frantic efforts to ob-
tain 60,000 signatures for the
recall of Ashford Sinanan is
such a waste of time. Why not
borrow the voting machines?
The Sinananites could then
easily obtain 120,000 votes for
their cause. Why make it diffi-
cult when it could be so sim-
ple? Ask A.N.R. Robinsonwhal
the voting machines can do,
He won't have them for elec-
tions!

BANDWAGON

It is significant that the
names behind the "bring Sina-
nan' Back" movement include
Harold Robinson, Conrad
O'Brien, Moon Persad. Will
Sinanan return to fight the
cause of the Comman Man, or
willhe be the Knight in Shining
Armour to protect the interest
of big business? This, Mr. Roy
Jananan, is the age of the Com-
moil Man.
And who will be on the
Sinanan bandwagon? Certainly
not young and dedicated men
who, in the archaic language of
the ridiculous resolution, would
want "to raise their country
from the political slough of
despondency" into which it
thas sunk. And what will the
[battle hymn of the Sinanan
movement be? "See the mighty
host advancing, Sinanan lead-
ing on?"
And who will form the rank
and file of the Sinanan drive
to scavenge the -mess of the
PNM? Disgruntled PNMites? Or,
will the leaderless sheep of the


DLP docilely and like lambs
being led to the slaughter accept
and resign themselves to the
fate that the former DLP Chief
Whip and DeputyLeader turned
PNM ambassador must be their
leader? Not very likely, Mr.
Jananan.
Whether we say a rose by
any other name is just as sweet
or asafoetida by any other
name is'just as stink, depending
on our political inclination,
Sinanan, having accepted an
ambassadorial and political ap-
pointment under the PNM go-
vernment, no matter how his
sycophants try to dress him in
a lion's skin, a tiger's skin, or a
sheep's clothing, Sinanan is a
pillar of the PNM temple and
that temple is about to collapse
and Sinanan is not the corner-
stone for a new political struc-
ture..
Some adherents of the move-
ment seem to want a political
organization, not to remove
PNM but to help Dr. Williams.
The only help the masses of
this country want to give Eric
Williams is a help out of this
country's politics.


After 17 years of leadership
in which he enjoyed more popu-
lar confidence and support
than most political leaders, he
has proved that he is a light
that failed, dismally. We have
sunk so hopelessly more into
clutches of capitalistic usurers
and so much more of our oil
reserves have been depleted by
expatriate interests.

BROKEN-REED

I am constrained in the
public interest to expose the
fallacy of the Jananan Move-
ment before it does any harm.
We have suffered enough.We
want no palliative, we want a
cure to our diseased body poli-
tic. Gangrenous limbs must be
amputated to save our lives.
That is why PNM is going.
One final question. Will
Sinanan cast out Eric Williams?
Will the servant cast out the
master? Will Beelzebub cast
out Beelzebub? No, Jananan,
Sinanan is a broken reed on
whon the people of Trinidad
will not lean-most especially
those who formed the backbone
of what was once the DLP.
NEMESIS
Balgobin Ramdeen.


YUH THINK


WATCH OUT for 'The Lonely
Crowd". It's a first album by
local: singer Lennox Gray and
it's to be recorded towards the
end of this month.
"The Lonely Crowd" is the
title song from which the al-
bum takes its name.
Composition of the song
started in the Hummingbird
Restaurant as Lennox observed
the crowds, their superficial
gaiety and conversations as
frothy and insubstantial as the,
beer that inspired them.
Even while they chatted
each was concerned with the
impression he made on the


other, lonely in spite of the
crowd that engulfed him.

CONFLICT

While studying in the States,
aTrinidadboymeta Vietnamese
girl. Things were great for a
while. Then she had to go home
while he gave up his birthright
for the larger mess of the Ameri-
can pottage. i
And like a true true citizen,
he was sent to defend the
honour of his new country in
the battleline of Viet Nam.


DrWahid Ali, IRO:


A note in passing


As President of the IRO he wants to be an "instrument
of reconciliation", and in this capacity he urges Dr. Williams to
remain in office. But he goes on radio to claim that his
actions are "not religious and not political".
Typically, he must cite some Commonwealth precedent
to say why "I cannot participate in political activities". But he
has occupied high public office by gift of the PNM, he has
been paying part of his Senate salary into the party treasury,
and he has attended General Council meetings.
In that radio programme he treated the nation to some
specious soul-searching which he tried to dignify as "frank-
ness" But he left unanswered the question how he could be
in politics and not in it at the same time. Where indeed is this
rarefied sanctuary that characters like Wahid Ali canr claim -
above politics, if not above religion too, yet working important
levers in both fields?



NEW WILLIAMS PARTY


From page 4
for is a national organisation
rooted where we live, organised
so as to develop leadership at
all levels and with a programme
that invites our participation
in the task of national recon-
struction. That organisation
can only be built from the
ground up, the slow and pa-
tient coming together of men
and women and groups in all
walks of ie.
-----------------


LOVE E
Lover-boy comes face to
face with a guerrilla.
Imagine the shock when he
discovers it to be none other
than his old love!
As his finger rests on the
trigger he is torn by inner con-
flict: why is he, a Third World
citizen like herself, bearing
arms for an imperialist power?
But then there is the glory
of medals awaiting him on
return, the sign that he has
been truly accepted and appre-
ciated by his adopted country.
Yuh tink it easy? "Love is
not Easy" is the name of the
tune that tells this story and


The Constituent Assembly,
by bringing the nation together,
to talk about the great issues of
national life, could help us to
find the elements, the parts,
that must go together to make
up what will be an authentic
instrument of national recon-
ciliation.
Only such a movement
could command the support
necessary to finally topple the
old order and lay the basis for
tile iew.
--- --- -


!ASY
A S Y

which is to be included in the
album.

OWN STYLE

Lennox Gray also intends
to include "Feet are Coming"
and "Youthquake", his own
compositions, plus three tunes
by local composers: Lancelot
Layne's "Putting Pieces To-
gether", one song by Andre
Tanker and one other to be
chosen.
The singer also intends to
tackle in his own style Roberta
Flack's "The First Time Ever
I Saw Your Face". [E. Le G]


THE


PLACE


WHERE THRIFTY PEOPLE SHOP









HODGKINSON'S

62, QUEEN STREET. P.O.S.


~1 -- I


SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1973


PAGE 10 TAPIA


I L E TI









SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 1973


TAPIA PAGE 11


SMITH RAMREKERSINGH















J. PIERRE SOLOMON










PANTIN ATWELL




Do you share with Keith Smith that nostalgia for the kind of intimacy
that we will never know again? For the time when there are only a few
of us held together by a common view and a commonfellowship and
the knowledge that in time we would discover other Tapiamen and
-Tapiawomen.sharing.that same.viw?

















Here and on page 2 are faces of some of the people who have kept the
Tapia House wuking. A remembrance of things past.

Keith Smith Member of Council l
Dennis Pantin Public Relations Officer
Dennis Solomon Education Secretary MAXWELL MOOTOO
Volney Pierre, Vice Chairman
Baldwin Mootoo, Treasurer
Jerry Pierre, Paste-up Artist & Camera
Robert Maxwell, Printer
Ruthven Baptiste Amenities Secretary
Ronnie Grant Paste-up Artist
Arthur Frederick Council Member "
Augustus Ramrekersingh- Council Member
Arthur Atwell, Director of Tapia Enterprises -




V. PIERRE FREDERICK


BAPTISTE


GRANT




n's. 1tndrea Talbutt, .
Research Institute for i.' ,
Study of I..nN
162, East 78th St'eet, 9 | -
IGJ'Z! YORK, N.Y. 10021,
Ph. Lehigh 5- 8 ,448 MAIL
U.S-.A.



5th Anniversary



Assembly



Sunday Novemberl8 1973





MORNING


8.30 a.m. REGISTRATION
9.30 WELCOME IVAN LAUGHLIN COMMUNITY RELATIONS SECRETARY .
0 STATE OF THE COUNTRY S. LOWHAR CHAIRMAN
MANIFESTO FOR TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
FOREIGN POLICY DiNIS SOLOMON EDUCATION SECRETARY
PROSPECTS FOR A NATIONAL POLITICAL ORGANISATION L. BEST SECRETARY
RESOLUTION -- MICHAEL HARRIS CAMPAIGN MANAGER




BREAK


AFTERNOON

1.30 p.m. 0 MANIFESTO FOR TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
CONSTITUTION REFORM ALLAN HARRIS ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARY
SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC REORGANISATION LLOYD TAYLOR ASSISTANT SECRETARY
SHARDWUK AHEAD
FUND RAISING BALDWIN MOOTOO TREASURER
PUBLIC MEETINGS MICHAEL HARRIS CAMPAIGN MANAGER
COMMUNITY ORGANISATION IVAN LAUGHLIN COMMUNITY RELATIONS SECRETARY
RESOLUTION THE ASSEMBLY
+ REGISTRATION BALDWIN MOOTOO
+ ACCOMMODATION ETC. AND TRANSPORTATION IVAN LAUGHLIN
+ DECORATION LENNOX GRANT
+ CATERING ALLAN HARRIS
+ ADVERTISEMENTS ETC. -- MICHAEL HARRIS
+ TAPIA SECRETARIAT LENNOX GRANT, KEITH SMITH, SHEILAH SOLOMON, DENNIS PANTIN, CAROL BEST,
MARGARET GIBBS REPORTING
C. CABRAL, L. ANDREWS: C. PAYNE TAPES AND SOUND SYSTEM


PRINTED BY THE TAPIA HOUSE PRINTING CO. FOR THE TAPIA HOUSE PUBLISHING CO., 82-84 ST VINCENT ST., TUNAPUNA