• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 When and where the councils have...
 Table of Contents
 Form of application for member...
 Executive board
 Proceedings of the executive...
 Meeting June 19, 1921
 Meeting December 18, 1921
 The President's message
 Financial report
 Report of the secretary
 Report of public accountants
 Report of board of governors
 The teachers' institute
 The alumni
 Register of students
 Degrees conferred
 Report of the board of delegates...
 Department of synagog and school...
 Program of synagog and school...
 Report of New York committee for...
 Report of commission on Jewish...
 Report of tract commission
 Report of rabbi Abraham Cronbach,...
 Statistical report
 School extension in Minnesota and...
 Report of the New York executive...
 Report of the national federatino...
 Boards and commissions of...
 Boards and commissions of...
 Memorial records
 Register of congregations
 Alphabetical list of rabbis
 Index






Group Title: Proceedings of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations ...
Title: Annual report of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072104/00002
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations
Alternate Title: Annual report, <197475>
Physical Description: v. : ; 21-26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Union of American Hebrew Congregations
Publisher: May & Kreidler
Place of Publication: Cincinnati Ohio
Publication Date: 1892-
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Reform Judaism -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 19th (1892)-
General Note: Vols. for 1891/92-<, 1921/22> include Proceedings of the 7th-<28th> biennial council.
General Note: Imprint varies.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072104
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: The Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica
Holding Location: The Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 04750396
lccn - 06007872
issn - 8755-0652
 Related Items
Preceded by: Proceedings of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    When and where the councils have met
        Unnumbered ( 3 )
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Form of application for membership
        Unnumbered ( 5 )
    Executive board
        Unnumbered ( 6 )
    Proceedings of the executive board
        Page 8949
        Page 8950
    Meeting June 19, 1921
        Page 8951
        Page 8952
        Page 8953
        Page 8954
        Page 8955
        Page 8956
        Page 8957
        Page 8958
        Page 8959
        Page 8960
    Meeting December 18, 1921
        Page 8961
        Page 8962
        Page 8963
        Page 8964
        Page 8965
        Page 8966
        Page 8967
        Page 8968
    The President's message
        Page 8969
        Page 8970
        Page 8971
        Page 8972
        Page 8973
        Page 8974
    Financial report
        Page 8975
        Page 8976
    Report of the secretary
        Page 8977
        Page 8978
        Page 8979
        Page 8980
        Page 8981
        Page 8982
        Page 8983
        Page 8984
        Page 8985
        Page 8986
        Page 8987
        Page 8988
        Page 8989
        Page 8990
        Page 8991
        Page 8992
        Page 8993
    Report of public accountants
        Page 8994
    Report of board of governors
        Page 8995
        Page 8996
        Page 8997
        Page 8998
        Page 8999
        Page 9000
        Page 9001
        Page 9002
        Page 9003
    The teachers' institute
        Page 9004 (MULTIPLE)
        Page 9005
    The alumni
        Page 9006
        Page 9007
        Page 9008
        Page 9009
        Page 9010
        Page 9011
    Register of students
        Page 9012
    Degrees conferred
        Page 9013
        Page 9014
    Report of the board of delegates on civil rights
        Page 9015
        Page 9016
        Page 9017
        Page 9018
        Page 9019
        Page 9020
        Page 9021
        Page 9022
        Page 9023
        Page 9024
    Department of synagog and school extension
        Page 9025
        Page 9026
    Program of synagog and school extension
        Page 9027
        Page 9028
        Page 9029
        Page 9030
        Page 9031
    Report of New York committee for school extension
        Page 9032
        Page 9033
        Page 9034
    Report of commission on Jewish religious educational literature
        Page 9035
    Report of tract commission
        Page 9036
        Page 9037
    Report of rabbi Abraham Cronbach, Jewish chaplain
        Page 9038
        Page 9039
        Page 9040
        Page 9041
        Page 9042
        Page 9043
    Statistical report
        Page 9044
        Page 9045
        Page 9046
        Page 9047
        Page 9048
        Page 9049
        Page 9050
        Page 9051
        Page 9052
        Page 9053
        Page 9054
        Page 9055
        Page 9056
        Page 9057
    School extension in Minnesota and Wisconsin
        Page 9058
        Page 9059
        Page 9060
    Report of the New York executive committee
        Page 9061
        Page 9062
        Page 9063
        Page 9064
    Report of the national federatino of temple sisterhoods
        Page 9065
        Page 9066
        Page 9067
        Page 9068
    Boards and commissions of the union
        Page 9069
        Page 9070
    Boards and commissions of the union
        Page 9071
        Page 9072
        Page 9073
        Page 9074
        Page 9075
        Page 9076
        Page 9077
        Page 9078
        Page 9079
        Page 9080
        Page 9081
        Page 9082
        Page 9083
    Memorial records
        Page 9084
        Page 9085
    Register of congregations
        Page 9086
        Page 9087
        Page 9088
        Page 9089
        Page 9090
        Page 9091
        Page 9092
        Page 9093
    Alphabetical list of rabbis
        Page 9094
        Page 9095
        Page 9096
        Page 9097
    Index
        Page 9098
        Page 9099
        Page 9100
Full Text

11311 __________Iz I l


FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT


OF THE



UNION OF AMERICAN


HEBREW

CONGREGATIONS


JANUARY, 1922


F[3 Fo_1ll1II ll








1roceebingss

OF THE


Enion of American

Sebreto

Congregations





fortp-eigbtf) annual Report
toobember- 1, 1920, to October 31, 1921


PRINTED AND PUBLISHED
JANUARY 1922













When and Where Councils Have Met


The Convention that organized The Union of American Hebrew
Congregations met on July 8, 1873, in Cincinnati, O.


The Councils have met:
1874 July 14 .................... ........... Cleveland, O.
1875 July 13................. ........... Buffalo, N. Y.
1876 July i1 ........................ .Washington, D. C.
1877 July o. ...... ..... ...... ......... Philadelphia, Pa.
1878 July 9 ............................ Milwaukee, Wis.
1879 July 8 ............................. New York City
1881 July 12. .................. ............. Chicago, Ill.
1883 July 0o ................................ Cincinnati, O.
1885 July 14............... .............. St. Louis, M o.
1887 July 12 .............................. Pittsburgh, Pa.
1889 July 9 ............. .. ............. Detroit, M ich.
1891 July 7 .............................. Baltimore, Md.
1892 December 6. ...................... Washington, D. C.
1894 December 4.............. ......... New Orleans, La.
1896 December I .......................... .Louisville, Ky.
1898 December 6 .......................... .Richmond, Va.
1901 January 15 ................... ........ Cincinnati, O.
1903 January 20 ............ ................ St. Louis, M o.
1905 January 17 .............................. Chicago, Ill.
1907 January 15...............................Atlanta, Ga.
19o9 January 19. ......................... Philadelphia, Pa.
1911 January 16......................... New York City
1913 January 21 ........................... Cincinnati, O.
1915 January 9 ............................ Chicago, Ill.
1917 January 16........................... Baltimore, Md.
1919 M ay 20 ............................... Boston, M ass.
1921 May 23 ............................. .Buffalo,N. Y.










Table of Contents


EXECUTIVE BOARD, PROCEEDINGS OF THE
Meeting June 19, I921 ........ ..................................
SMeeting December 18, 1921 ........................................

THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE ..........................................

FINANCIAL REPORT
Report of Secretary. .............................................
Report of Public Accountant. ......................................

HEBREW UNION COLLEGE
Report of Board of Governors........ ...... ........ ...........
The Teachers' Institute............................................
The Library......................................................
The Alumni .................. ...................................
Register of Students .............................................
Degrees Conferred................................................

BOARD OF DELEGATES ON CIVIL RIGHTS, REPORT ......................
-DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION
Program of Synagog and School Extension............................
Report of Board of Managers. .....................................
Report of New York Committee for School Extension .................
Report of Commission on Jewish Religious Educational Literature.....
Report of Tract Commission............... ..........................
Report of Rabbi Abraham Cronbach, Jewish Chaplain ...............
Statistical Report.................................................
School Extension in Minnesota and Wisconsin .......................
NEW YORK EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, REPORT OF .......................

NATIONAL FEDERATION OF TEMPLE SISTERHOODS, REPORT OF .............

BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS OF THE UNION ..............................
M EMORIAL RECORDS.................................................
REGISTER OF CONGREGATIONS .........................................
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF RABBIS ........................................
INDEX .............................................................


Page

8951
8961

8969


8977
8994


8997
9004
9004
9006
9012
9013
9017


9026
9027
9032
9035
o9036
9038
9044
9058
9063
9067

9071
9085
9089
9099
9103














Form of Application for Membership




(D ate)...................................

To the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew Congrega,
tions: *

Congregation .........................................

of ........................................... hereby makes
application to be admitted to membership in the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations.

........................ President.
ATTEST:

............. .................. Secretary

The above application, under seal of the Congregation, can be sent to the Secretary of the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Cincinnati, Ohio. No membership fee is required.





Form of Bequest



I give and bequeath to the Union of American Hebrew Con-

gregations, for the support of its institutions, the sum of..........

.................................................. Dollars.











Executive Board

CHARLES SHOHL, President
1314 First Natl. Bank Bldg.,
Cincinnati, Ohio


spires
ry


Term Ex
Janua
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BEN ALTHEIMER, 25 Broad Street. ................... ....... New York, N. Y
N. HENRY BECKMAN, 609 First National Bank Building. ............... Cincinnati, C
ISAAc W. BERNBEIM, 3RD VICE-PRES., 626 W. Main Street .............. Louisville, V
FRED E. BRUML, 902 Society for Savings Building ...................... Clevela.
EDGAR M. CAHN, 716 Hibernia Bank Bldg., .........................New Orlean
ALFRED M. COHEN, 54o Electric Building .............................. Cincinnati, O.
JUDGE JOSIAH COHEN, Court House ................................... Pittsburgh, Pa.
DR. DAVID W. EDELMAN, 520 W. Seventh Street. ......................Los Angeles, Cal.
GUSTAVE A. EFROYMSON, 10 W. Washington Street ................... Indianapolis, Ind.
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER, Anglo Trust Co ....................... San Francisco, Cal.
JuLtus W. FREIBERG, c/o Ideal Concrete Machinery Co ................... Cincinnati, O.
ISAAC GOLDBERG, 35 Seward Avenue................. ................ Detroit, Mich.
HON. DANIEL P. HAYS, Ii Broadway ................. ............. New York, N. Y.
SIMEON M. JOHNSON, Wiggins Block................................ Cincinnati, O.
ADOLF KRAUS, 7 South Dearborn Street...................................Chicago, 1ll.
ALBERT L. LEVI, 70 Prospect Park West ............................ Brooklyn, N. Y.
JACOB W. MACK, 989 Burton Ave ................. ................. Cincinnati, O.
EDWIN B. MEISSNER, 5532 Waterman St..............................St. Louis, Mo.
HENRY MORGENTHAU, 30 E. Forty-second Street ......................New York, N. Y.
ADOLPH S OCHS, "The Times".................................. New York, N. Y.
HERBERT C. OETTINGER, 8th and Walnut Streets..........................Cincinnati, 0.
HENRY OPPENHEIMER, C/O Hutsler Bros. Co ............................Baltimore, Md.
WILLIAM ORNSTEIN, 13 West Third Street...............................Cincinnati, O.
HON. A. C. RATSHESKY, United States Trust Co ............................. Boston, Mass.
MARCUS RAUH, 051 Penn Avenue.................................... Pittsburgh, Pa.
SIGMUND RHEINSTROM, IST VICE-PRES., Union Trust Building ........... Cincinnati, O.
MAURICE D. ROSENBERG, Commerce and Savings Bldg. ............... Washington, D. C.
SIMON W. ROSENDALE, 57 State Street ..................... .......... Albany, N..Y.
JULIUS ROSENWALD, 2ND VICE-PRES., c o Sears, Roebuck & Co .............. Chicago, Ill.
MORRIS H. ROTHSCHILD, 993 Park Ave... ........................ New York, N. Y.
A. L. SALTZSTEIN, First National Bank Bldg...........................Milwaukee, Wis.
Louis SCHLESINGER, 31 Clinton Avenue ............................... Newark, N. J.
JACOB SCHNADIG, 220 West Lake Street ................................. Chicago, Ill.
ISAAC SCHOEN, 323 Decatur Street. ..................................... .. Atlanta,'Ga.
CHARLES SHOHL; PRESIDENT, 1314 First National Bank Building.......... .Cincinnati, O.
HON. HORACE STERN, 1520 N. 17th St.............................Philadelphia, Pa.
SAMUEL STRAUS, Traction Building .................. ................ Cincinnati, O.
I. NEWTON TRAGER, 209 East Sixth St.................................. Cincinnati, O.
ISAAC M. ULLMAN, 558 Whitney Ave..............................New Haven, Conn.
LUDWIG VOGELSTEIN, 4TH VICE-PRES, 42 Broadway ....................New York City
AARON WALDHEIM, 12th and Olive Sts.............. .... ...............St. Louis, Mo.
A. LEO WEIL, 822 Frick Bldg.............. .....................Pittsburgh, Pa .
JOSEPH WIESENFELD, 300 W. Baltimore Street ........................Baltimore, Md
HERMAN WILE, Ellicott and Carroll Streets..............................Buffalo, N. Y.
ALBERT WOLF, 330 N. Twelfth Street ............................... Philadelphia,. Pa
ADOLPHE WOLFE, C /o Lipman Wolfe & Co.............................. Portland, Ore.
WILLIAM B. WOOLNER, 1700 South Washington Street; ..................... Peoria, Ill1
GEORGE ZEPIN, Secretary
JACOB D. SCHWARZ, Assistant Secretary
Merchants Bldg.
Cincinnati, Ohio








Proceedings
of the
Executive Board




































June 19, 1921
December 18, 1921













Proceedings of the Executive Board


Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, O.,
June 19, 1921.
The regular semi-annual meeting of the
Executive Board was held at the above
place and date at 10 A. M.
There were present Mr. Charles Shohl,
Mr. H. Oettinger, Mr. Wm. Ornstein, Mr.
Ludwig Vogelstein, Mr. Isaac Goldberg, Mr.
Alfred M. Cohen, Mr. I. N. Trager, Mr.
Isaac Schoen, Mr. J. R. Morse, Mr. Simeon
M. Johnson, Mr. Sam Straus, G. A. Efroym-
son, Sigmund Rheinstrom and Jacob W.
Mack.
ELECTION OF PRESIDENT
Mr. Charles Shohl, the First Vice-Presi-
dent, called the meeting to order, and voiced
the sorrow of the members of the Execu-
tive Board in the untimely passing away of
Mr. J. Walter Freiberg.
It was moved by Mr. Simeon M. Johnson,
and carried by a rising vote, that Mr.
Charles Shohl, hitherto the First Vice-Presi-
dent, be elected the President of the Execu-
tive Board.
Mr. Charles Shohl assumed the chair and
presided over the meeting; Secretary Rabbi
George Zepin recorded the minutes of the
meeting.
EXCUSES FOR NON-ATTENDANCE
Letters were presented from the follow-
ing members of the Board who were unable
to attend the meeting: Mr. N. Henry Beck-
man, Cincinnati, 0.; Mr. Isaac W. Bern-
heim, Louisville, Ky.; Mr. Fred E. Bruml,
Cleveland, O.; Mr. Albert L. Levi, Brook-
lyn, N. Y.; Mr. Maurice D. Rosenberg,
Washington, D. C.; Mr. Simon W. Rosen-
dale, Albany, N. Y.; Mr. Julius Rosenwald,
Chicago, Ill.; Mr. A. L. Saltzstein, Milwau-
kee, Wis.; Mr. Louis Schlesinger, Newark,
N. J.; Mr. Jacob Schnadig, Chicago, Ill.;
Mr. Joseph Wiesenfeld, Baltimore, Md.; Mr.
Herman Wile, Buffalo, N. Y.; Mr. Albert
Wolf, Philadelphia, Pa.; Mr. Adolphe Wolfe,
Portland, Ore.; Mr. William B. Woolner,
Peoria, Ill.; Mr. Edgar M. Cahn, New Or-
leans, La.; Mr. Sig. Kohlman, New Or-


leans, La.; Mr. Edwin B. Meissner, St.
Louis, Mo.; Mr. Henry Oppenheimer, Balti-
more, Md.; Hon. Horace Stern, Philadel-
phia, Pa.; Mr. Isaac M. Ullman, New Haven,
Conn., and Mr. A. Leo Weil, Pittsburgh, Pa

MINUTES OF THE LAST TWO
MEETINGS
The minutes of the last two meetings
were read and approved.

ELECTION OF FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT
It was moved and duly carried that Mr.
Sigmund Rheinstrom be elected First Vice-
President of the Executive Board.

EXECUTIVE BOARD
It was moved and duly carried that Mr.
Maurice J. Freiberg be elected a member of
the Executive Board of the Union to fill
the remainder of the term of Mr. J. Walter
Freiberg which expires January 1, 1925.
It was moved and duly carried that Mr.
Ludwig Vogelstein be appointed a committee
of one to call upon Mr. Felix Warburg, of
New York, for the purpose of securing his
consent to serve as a member of the Execu-
tive Board.

ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF BOARDS
The President appointed the following
nominating committees:
For nominating members to fill vacancies
on Board of Governors of the Hebrew
Union College: Sigmund Rheinstrom,
Chairman; Alfred M. Cohen, Gustave A.
Efroymson, Ludwig Vogelstein, Isaac Gold-
berg, Samuel Straus.
For nominating members to fill vacancies
on Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension: Wm. Ornstein, Chair-
man; Jacob W. Mack, Jacob R. Morse,,
Isaac Schoen, Herbert C. Oettinger.
For nominating members to fill vacancies
on Board of Delegates, Simeon M. Johnson,
Chairman; Charles Shohl, I. Newton Trager.
The reports of these committees were
unanimously adopted resulting as follows:







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


BOARD OF GOVERNORS
The following members of the Board of
Governors of the Hebrew Union College
whose terms expire January 1, 1922, were
duly re-elected for a period of three years,
term expiring January 1, 1925: Mr. Oscar
Berman, Cincinnati, 0.; Mr. Maurice J.
Freiberg, Cincinnati, O.; Dr. Max Heller,
New Orleans, La.; Mr. Felix Kahn, Cincin-
nati, O.; Mr. Murray Seasongood, Cincinnati,
O.; Mr. Charles Shohl, Cincinnati, O.; Mr.
Harris Weinstock, San Francisco, Calif.;
Mr. Morris Westheimer, Cincinnati, 0., and
Mr. Eli Winkler, New York, N. Y. Mr.
Sigmund Rheinstrom was elected to fill the
present vacancy on the Board of Governors
until January 1, 1922, and for a period of
three years thereafter until January 1, 1925.

BOARD OF MANAGERS
The following members of the Board of
Managers whose terms expire January 1,
1922 were duly re-elected for a period of
three years, terms expiring January 1, 1925:
Mr. Mortimer Adler, Rochester, N. Y.; Mr.
Maurice Berkowitz, Kansas City, Mo.; Mr.
Gerspn J. Brown, Cincinnati; Mr. Israel
Cowen, Chicago, Ill.; Mr. Gustave A.
Efroymson, Indianapolis, Ind.; Mr. Simeon
M. Johnson, Cincinnati, O.; Mr. David J.
Joseph, Cincinnati, O.; Mr. Nathaniel H.
Levi, New York, N. Y.; Mr. Jacob W. Mack,
Cincinnati, O.; Mr. Samuel M. Newburger,
New York, N. Y.; Mr. Herbert C. Oettinger,
Cincinnati, O.; Mr. Wm. Ornstein, Cincin-
nati, 0.; Mr. Charles Shohl, Chairman, Cin-
cinnati, O., and Mr. Samuel Straus, Cincin-
nati, 0.
The following were proposed and duly
elected members of the Board of Managers,
their term of office beginning immediately
and expiring January 1, 1924: Mr. Sol S.
Kiser, Indianapolis, Ind.; Mr. John W.
Keiler, Paducah, Ky.; Mr. Julius W. Frei-
berg, Cincinnati, 0., and Mr. Geo. A. Ger-
shon, Atlanta, Ga.

BOARD OF DELEGATES ON CIVIL
RIGHTS
The following were proposed and duly
elected members of the Board of Delegates
on Civil Rights for a period of two years,
beginning January 1, 1922: Mr. Charles L.
Aarons, Milwaukee, Wis.; Mr. Isaac Adler,


Birmingham, Ala.; Mi.
Denver, Colo.; Mr. Raip,. jiberi -
dianapolis, Ind.; Mr. Lee Baumgarten,
Washington, D. C.; Dr. E. N. Calisch, Rich-
mond, Va.; Judge Josiah Cohen, Pittsburgh,
Pa.; Mr. Myer Cohen, Washington, D. C.;
Mr. Morris M. Cohn, Little Rock, Ark.; Mr.
Nathan Cohn, Nashville, Tenn.; Mr. Israel
Cowen, Chicago, Ill.; Mr. Felix J. Drey-
fous, New Orleans, La; Hon. Abram I. El-
kus, New York, N. Y.; Mr. Harry Franc,
Washington, D. C.; Mr. Nathan Frank, St.
Louis, Mo.; Rabbi Leo M. Franklin, De-
troit, Mich.; Mr. Adolph Freund, Detroit,
Mich.; Mr. Bernard Ginsburg, Detroit,
Mich.; Hon. Hqnry M. Goldfogle, New York,
N. Y.; Mr. Louis J. Goldman, Cincinnati,
0.; Mr. Henry Hess, Mobile, Ala.;. Mr. Jo-
seph Hirsh, Vicksburg, Miss.; Mr. Melvin
M. Israel, New York, N. Y.; Mr. Marcus
Jacobi, Wilmington, N. C.; Hon. Julius
Kahn," San Francisco, Calif.; Mr. Max J.
Kohler, New York, N. Y.; Mr. Adolph Kraus,
Chicago, Ill.; Judge Lewis M. Marcus, Buf-
falo, N. Y.; Rabbi David Marx, Atlanta, Ga.;
Mr. Emil Mayer, St. Louis, Mo.; Rabbi H.
H. Mayer, Kansas City, Mo.; Rabbi Jacob
Nieto, San Francisco, Calif.; Mr. Julius'I.
Peyser, Washington, D. C.; Judge M. War-
ley Platzek, New York, N. Y.; Dr. Wm.
Rosenau, Baltimore, Md.; Hon. Simon W.
Rosendale, Albany, N. Y.; Mr. Julius
Rosenwald, Chicago, Ill.; Rabbi Charles A.
Rubenstein, Baltimore, Md.; Mr. Alfred
Selligman, Louisville, Ky.; Rabbi Abba H.
Silver, Cleveland, O.; Dr. Abram Simon,
Washington, D. C.; Mr. Moses Sonneborn,
Wheeling, W. Va.; Mr. Nathaniel Spear,
Pittsburg, Pa.; Mr. Samuel Ullman, Bir-
mingham, Ala.; Mr. Isaac M. Ullman, New
Haven, Conn.; Mr. Henry Wallenstein,
Wichita, Kans.; Mr. M. H. Wascerwitz, San
Francisco, Calif.; Mr. Jonas Weil, Minne-
apolis, Minn.; Mr. Lionel Weil, Goldsboro,
N. C.; Hon. Henry N. Wessel, Philadelphia,
Pa.; Mr. Eugene F. Westheimer, Cincin-
nati, 0.; Mr. Joseph Wiesenfeld, Baltimore,
Md.; Mr. Leo Wise, Cincinnati, O.; Mr. Ed-
win Wolf, Philadelphia, Pa.; Hon. Simon
Wolf, Washington, D. C., and Mr. Adolphe
Wolfe, Portland, Ore.
The President, Mr. Charles Shohl, and
the First Vice-President, Mr. Sigmund
Rheinstrom, were declared members ex-of-
ficio of the Board of Delegates.


-8952






PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD.


Hon.Simon Wolf of Washington was des-
ignated the chairman of the Board of Dele-
gates, and Washington, D. C., designated as
the seat of the Board of Delegates.

PENSION PLANS
Mr. Ludwig Vogelstein, Chairman of the
sub-Committee of the Executive Board on
Pension Fund, then submitted the follow-
ing report:
PENSION FUND
June 6, 1921.
To the Executive Board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
Gentlemen:
The President's message to the XXVII
Council contained a reference to the pension
fund; upon recommendation by the Com-
mittee on the President's message, it was
decided to refer this matter back to the
special committee for further consideration
and report to the Executive Committee.
In my attempt to review the previous re-
ports made on this subject I have come to
the conclusion the cause of events fully
justified the views expressed in my report
to Mr. Hays dated March 25, 1920-copy of
which is hereto attached-namely:
(1) That it would have been sheer reck-
lessness to base a pension system on the
Union's ability to contribute $100,000 annu-
ally.
(2) That for many years to come no pen-
sion system can be inaugurated if the Union
insists upon extending the full benefits at
once to all ministers regardless of age.
I may be permitted to take issue with the
suggestion in the President's report that
the money for the pension fund could be
found if the collection was made the sub-
ject of a special appeal to our constituents.
I do not believe that our experience of the
last few years justifies the assumption that
we could raise over one million dollars by
such efforts, and it must be admitted that
an appeal of this kind could not be re-
peated except at intervals of some years;
such appeal could not be made at present
simultaneously with an effort to raise
money for the dormitory for the college.
Finally, I am afraid that efforts to raise
funds for specific purposes of the Union
would so seriously interfere with our col-
lections for the general fund as to endanger


the financial structure of the Union. Mr.
Daniel P. Hays has expressed most forcibly
his objection to any scheme impeding our
general financial situation.
I am decidedly under the impression that
my tentative plan has not received the care-
ful consideration of the members of the
Executive Committee, and that the objec-
tions to the plan are based rather on senti-
ment than on a thorough study of the. sub-
ject. After all, it must be borne in mind
that Col. Wolfe's original project was
drafted by a man who, while mastering the
subject as an actuary, was not familiar
with the peculiar difficulties of the congre-
gations and the Union.
Since the last discussion of this subject
I have studied some plans for a municipal
pension system and a plan for a pension
system for the employees of the Federation
of Jewish Charities in New York.
Both plans differ from our project-
(a) By making the beneficiaries contri-
bute towards the annual payments.
(b) By allocating the premiums, and con-
sequently making the benefits variable ac-
cording to the sum of annual payments re-
ceived.
As to point (a) I do not believe that the
relatively small salaries paid by congrega-
tions would justify such charge against the
rabbis, though it must be admitted as a
sound principle that nobody should get a
benefit towards -which he has not contri-
buted.
'In order to illustrate point (b) I give
the following schedule of the pension plan
to the Federation:
Pension on retirement at age 65 after at
least 30 years' service with the following
scale:


Age at
Time of
Em ployment:
up to 25
26 to 35
over 35


Percentage of Final
Salary for Each Year
of Service to be Paid
Annually as Pension:
2 pet.
1 > pet.
1 pet.


In other words, while we attempted to pay
a pension at the flat rate of 50 per cent to
all, the Federation would pay:
Class I ............. ....... 60 pet.
Class II .................... 45 pet.
Class JII ..................... 30 pet.


144


8953






FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


But even with this variation the Fed
is going to exclude a number of em
who are already at advanced ages,
may require special treatment.
Inasmuch as it is agreed that an
sion plan must be based on sound ac
principles, and that pensions can o
paid out of premiums or other fun
elected and in the treasury of the i
give the following data from ac
tables:
Assume a salary of $3,300 p. a., i
earnings at 4% p. a., assume 9%
premium.
Premium, 1 year ...............$
Accumulation after 30 yrs., regular
payments, approximately .......
Accumulation after 31 yrs., regular
payments, approximately .......
Accumulation after 32 yrs., regular
payments, approximately .......
Accumulation after 35 yrs., regular
payments, approximately.......
Disregarding widow's pension, you
pay out of $16,700-
Accumulation in annuities to a man
about $1,500 yearly.
Accumulation in annuities to a man
about $1,600 yearly.
Accumulation in annuities to a man
about $2,000 yearly.
-or you could pay out of $22,000-
To a man at age of retirement of 60
abdut $2,200 yearly.
To a man at age of retirement of 65
About $2,580 yearly.
To a man at age of retirement of 70
about $3,300 yearly.
I am giving these figures in or
show clearly to those members of tl
ecutive Committee who may not be fh
with insurance principles the basis
has to be taken for any plan to be ad
i. e., in order to pay a pension of
p. a. to a man who is to retire at age
somebody has to provide a cash ft
the time of retirement of $16,700, eit
putting up the entire sum in one lum
ment or gradually. There are quite
rabbis of that age, and even if we
L propose to retire them before they
the age of 68, somebody would have


eration a certain large amount of money."'o con-
ployees tinue the same example:
which A man entered the rabbinate at the age
of 27, and our pension system is inaugurated
S when he has reached the age of 57, at
tuarial which time he draws a salary of $3,300.
nly be He or his congregation would pay for 11
Is col- years more $297 p. a.,and the accumulation
und, I of these annual payments plus 4% interest
tuarial in 11 years would amount to $4,050. In
order to pay him a 50% pension (disre-
garding the widow's pension), we would
interest have to have a fund available of.. $12,210
annual Against accrued premiums........ 4,050
To be provided for by us in 11 yrs. 8,160
297.00 Or today in cash................ 5,500

16,700 If, in addition to an old age pension, a
widow's pension is to be provided, the above
17,700 requirements would be increased from 33%
to 50%.
I beg to state most emphatically that it
18,700 could not be considered an equitable de-
mand on the part of any congregation that
22,000 the Union should contribute an amount to-
could wards the pension of its rabbi which would
run far in excess of any amount which the
of 57, respective congregation might contribute
towards the maintenance of the Union;
of 60, but such would be the case if we would in-
elude unreservedly all ministers in the pen-
sion system; in fact, inasmuch as we could
of 65, not offer better terms to young rabbis than
actuarial calculations permit, and inasmuch
as these terms could be met by an insurance
years, company, the result of general adoption of
the plan might prefer to go independently
years, to an insurance company.
The only method which seems feasible to
years, me would be a gradual introduction of the
pension system for the ministers of congre-
der to nations belonging to the Union as outlined
ie Ex- in my report of March 25, 1920, and pos-
amiliar sibly to meet the objections raised by the
which following alterations:
[opted; 1. Instead of a fixed pension of 50% of
$1,500 the salary, introduce a graduated' pension
of 57, on the lines proposed by Federations in
ind at New York, but graduated further, not only
her by by the time when the minister entered, but
p pay- also by the period for which he contributes
a few towards the pension fund or by actual allo-
don't cation.
reach 2. The Union assumes a cash obligation
to find for those ministers who desire to join, of


8954






PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD.


not to exceed $2,000 per minister,
may pay in cash or in deferred
as it sees fit.

3. The congregations or minist
have the right to supplement the
by paying back premiums.
4. The current premium of 8%
paid by the congregations.
Example 1. Assuming a minister
three years in service who has rei
age of 50 is to join, his salary
sumed at $5,000.

(a) The current premium is 89
payable by congregation or minist

(b) In order to obtain the ful
a back premium has to be met fo
three years" which, with interest
amounts to.....................
towards which .................

is contributed by the Union; if he
or his congregation contribute the
balance of .....................
he would be entitled to the full
benefit upon reaching the age
eight; if a lesser amount in cash
tribute, then his pensionable sala
be considered reduced in proper
premium reduced accordingly and
pension; for instance, if his con
would contribute only $2,800 to tl
by the Union, he would be eligible
sion on $1,666 salary only, and h
premium would be reduced to 8%
Example 2. Assuming a minis
ten years' service is to join at th
thirty-seven years, salary $5,000.
tiring fund required is about....
towards which the Union pays....

Required by congregation........
If his congregation pays only.....
his salary eligible for pension
reduced to $3,333, his annual pre
collected accordingly, 8% of $3,3
Example 3. Minister after fil
service, age of thirty-two, salary $5
retiring fund required is about $2,0
the Union will pay, so that the
immediately eligible to all the be
the pension system if he or his con
pay the base rate of premium.


which it
no i*lnoflflG


Financial Aspect for Union


'vy' If this modified plan would be adopted it
would appear at first blush a heavy burden
ters shall for the Union, but the theoretical figure is
premium not going to be reached because common
sense is going to keep all rabbis of ad-
vanced age out of the system. Theoret-
is to be ically, the Union might be obligated to pay
250 to 300 times $2,000. I feel confident,
r twenty- however, that hardly any rabbi or congre-
ached the gation are going to avail themselves of the
being as- opportunity if their rabbi has reached the
age of 50 or over as per example. The re-
sult is therefore going to be at the begin-
o or $400 ning a limited application, possibly of 100
er. rabbis, which is readily -in the means of

11 benefit, the Union, with $125,000 cash available, and
r twenty- additional sums to be raised from year to
accrued, year. If 100 rabbis should join, and a sum
.$ 14,400 of $2,000 should be required for every one
2,000 of them, say a total of $200,000 minus
S$125,000 in our special fund, we could read-
ily provide for the deficiency by annual
payments of $10,000 for a period of years,
12,400 a sum which lies well within our means.
pension
of sixty- Psychological Aspect of Plan
h is con- While this plan is by no means mope uni-
ry would versal than the one proposed over a year
tion, his ago, I think it is going to be more palatable
also his, to the world, inasmuch as it gives every
gregation rabbi and every congregation a chance to
he $2,000 join. Furthermore, limiting the Union's
to a pen- contribution to a fixed sum-the $2,000
is annual mentioned are subject to discussion-has
of $1,666. the great advantage of an equitable dis-
;ter after tribution of the Union's share of the pen-
le age of sion funds; no rabbis or congregations
The re- could complain that they are being treated
.$ 4,750 less favorably than any other congregation
2,000 or rabbi.
In all previous plans it does seem to me
2,750 objectionable that the Union should assume
1,200 in one case, where a rabbi has reached the
would be age of 60 years, a risk and a financial re-
;mium be sponsibility which is over six times as great
33-$266. as in the case of a young man under 30.
ve years'
5,000; the Question of Self-Insurance or Company
00, which
rabbi be No doubt it would be more economical
benefits .of to have the Union carry its own risk; any
grega ion insurance company is bound to load the
premium-


8955






FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


1. With its general expense; Resolved further, That any plan to be
2. With its agency commissions; inaugurated shall safeguard the interests
3. With a profit. of the rabbis in case they should retire
3. Wit a from the ministry before they are eligible
The Union could not avoid :- to a pension (excluding disability), so as
pense entirely, but it could avoid refund to them the premiums collected
expenses and profit. On the other hand, aior their congregations plus 3%
well-established insurance company offers in~er their in cash or in annuities,
better guarantees in case of emergencies,
and any financial advantage obtainable by Resolved, That the special committee
insuring to ourselves would be offset by shall have the power to declare the pen-
the necessity of accumulating a certain re- sion system in operation whenever in its.
serve fund. Furthermore, it is doubtful opinion sufficient congregations .or rabbis
whether enough rabbis would join at the have indicated their willingness to join.


beginning to permit an independent pension
system. It seems therefore advisable to in-
sure in a company.

Recommendation to the Executive Board
I would suggest that the following resolu-
tions be passed by the Executive Commit-
tee:
Resolved, That a special committee of
five be appointed with power to enter
into an agreement with a reputable insur-
ance company of unquestionable standing
for group insurance of rabbis of congre-
gations belonging to the Union.
Resolved further, That the Union
agrees to contribute an amount equivalent
to not exceeding $2,000 cash towards the
premiums to be paid by rabbis of an age
of over 30 years.
Resolved further, That the amounts re-
quired for these contributions be taken
out of the Synagog Pension Fund, and if
this fund should prove insufficient out
of the general fund, provided, however,
that the Union shall not be obligated to
more than ten annual payments of not to
exceed $10,000 without special approval
by the Executive Board.

Resolved further, That. as soon as the
special committee has made satisfactory
arrangements with the insurance com-
pany, but not later than December 1,
1921, the pension plan adopted shall be
placed before the various congregations
with the request to inform the Union
within 30 days whether they desire to
avail themselves of the pension plan as
submitted, and- to what extent the re-
spective congregations are willing to con-
tribute towards the retiring fund.


Resolved, That all legitimate expenses
of the committee, as printing, postage and
employment of expert accountants, actua-
ries and insurance men, be charged to
the Union's regular expense account until
the plan become operative.
Resolved, finally, That all and any com-
mittees on Synagog Pension Plan now ex-
isting be and are hereby discharged.
Respectfully submitted,
SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON
SYNAGOGUE PENSION FUND.
by L. VOGELSTEIN
Supplementary to the above report, Mr.
Vogelstein presented the following:


June 19, 1921.
In response to my suggestions of June 6,
I received a letter from Daniel P. Hays as
follows:
"New York, June 16; 1921.
Mr. L. Vogelstein,
61 Broadway, City.
Dear Mr. Vogelstein:
I have read very carefully the report
which you have prepared on the Pension
Fund, and I entirely agree with you in the
criticism which you make as to the plans
proposed by the Union, and in the recom-
mendations which you suggest.
It seems so clear, from past experiences,
that it is impossible for the Union to con-
tribute $100,000 annually to a Pension
Fund, that your statement that it would be
'sheer recklessness' to base the fund on
such a contribution, fully expresses the sit-
uation, and it is also equally clear that if


8956







PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD.


the pension system is to extend the full ben-
efits at once to all ministers, regardless of
age, that it would be impossible to put it
into effect for many years to come.
The late President's suggestion about
making a special appeal for this fund is,
to my mind, absolutely impracticable, owing
to the fact that with all the efforts being
made, it has been impossible to raise a
sufficient fund for carrying on the work of
the Union and the College, and inasmuch as
an appeal is now to be made for money
for a dormitory, I am convinced that the
appeal for a special pension fund would
produce but little result.
It has been, as we all know, a matter of
great difficulty to raise the necessary money
to carry on the work of the Union and the
College, and it would require all the ef-
forts of the various committees throughout
the country to make any respectable show-
ing for this purpose.
I do not deem it necessary to discuss
your other criticism, as you have gone into
the matter so fully and carefully that I
could not add anything of any value, but
I believe your criticisms are perfectly sound.
I therefore in every way coincide with
your report.
Very truly yours,
DAN'L P. HAYS."

Upon my arrival in Cincinnati I received
an elaborate statement from Mr. Saltzstein
which I shall' read to you:

"Milwaukee, Wis., June 16, 1921.
Mr. Ludwig Vogelstein,
61 Broadway, New York, N. Y.
Dear Mr. Vogelstein:
Pursuant to my father's letter to you of
June 14th, I am enclosing a few sugges-
tions relative to the Synagog Pension Fund,
which I trust will prove of some value.
With kindest regards, I am,
SVery truly yours,
JEROME C. SALZSTEIN."
In considering the details of the Pension
Fund two facts seem to me to be of vital
importance:
1. That the pension plan finally sub-
mitted to the individual congregations
must contain a sufficient appeal to induce
the average congregation to join.


2. That the plan submitted must be
sufficiently flexible to take into, account
the fact that rabbis. frequently change
congregations.
The suggestion that the Union assume a
cash obligation for those rabbis who desire
to join of not more than $2,000 per rabbi,
I do not believe would induce the average
congregation to join this fund. If the
rabbi is at all advanced in years the amount
necessary to make up the back reserve,
minus this $2,000, would be an amount
which the average congregation could not
assume under ordinary conditions, espe-
cially since it is called upon to pay the pre-
mium each year thereafter.
It seems to me that it is very important
to formulate a plan so that the amount of
money necessary for a congregation to pay
at the beginning will not be so large as to
make it seem prohibitive.
If the Union will agree to pay one-half
or one-third of the annual premium as it
falls due-this would probably be within
their means-the appeal to the average con-
gregation would be very much greater.
There would then be a reason for a congre-
gation making every effort to continue the
pension plan each year. Whereas, if the
Union were simply to allow $2,000 toward
the back reserve, I do not believe that the
average congregation Iuld consider this
sufficient help -to m possible for them
to join the tund. rmore, any pre-
mium that a congrer a- s to the Union
will be considered l in lieu of an
increased salary lo -A bi, but if they
are called upon to 1 one-half of the
premium-the othe= *-.' ing paid by the
Union--the rabbi's salary ill not suffer as
it might if the Union simply paid $2,000
toward the back reserve and nothing, toward
the annual premium.
If the average congregation were asked
to make up the necessary reserve fund in
a lump sum, I know that the Union would
meet with two obstacles. First, the mem-
bers of a joining congregation would voice
the opinion that as their rabbi might not
be permanent with their congregation, it is
asking too much to call upon them for the
whole back reserve. Second, if the rabbi
had served some other congregation for
some time his constituents might feel that
his previous congregation should contribute


8957







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


its share. Also, it must be borne in mind
that many rabbis, as they get along in
years, change congregations, receive in-
creased salaries, and have more wealthy
constituents, all of which would make it
more possible for them to have the back re-
serve paid in later years.
My father's suggestion briefly is this:
Base the rate at age thirty for all members.
Let the Union assume the obligation of pay-
ing one-half or one-third of the premium
each year-the pension to be limited to
$2,400 per year. This will certainly be an
attractive proposition to the ordinary con-
gregation and probably within their means.
If the rabbi is at an age where it is
necessary to make up a back reserve, let
the Union carry that amount as a lion
against his pension. In this way a con-
gregation that could afford to pay its share
of the annual premium, but that is not able
or willing to pay the back reserve also,
would join the fund and the rabbi would be
immediately benefited. This lien could be
paid at any time either as a whole or in in-
stalments, or the amount of this lien could
be pro-rated during the years up to the
time the rabbi becomes sixty-eight. This
will permit congregations to join that would
not consider the pension plan if the back
reserve had to be met immediately.
Frequently congregations desire to give
their rabbi a gift-particularly after his po-
sition is more or less permanent. There
could be nothing more attractive to a con-
gregati'on in this frame of mind than the
opportunity to pay the back reserve for
their rabbi. Furthermore, it is probable
that the present pension fund will be aug-
mented in the future by bequests similar to
the one left by Mr. Jacob Schiff. This
money- could be used toward paying part of
these liens if deemed advisable.
This would be fair to every rabbi, as the
Union would be paying the same amount
for each one who joins, instead of requiring
the congregation to pay the back reserve
at the time of joining; by giving the rabbi
an opportunity to raise this money up to
age sixty-eight he certainly would have a
much greater chance of receiving the full
pension than if his present congregation
were called upon for a large sum of back
reserve immediately.
Now supposing the rabbi attains age


sixty-eight and this back reserve has not
been paid for him, but the annual premiums
have been paid regularly. The Union
would then simply give him the amount of
pension which the amount of premium paid
would buy. He loses nothing whatever by
having this lien against his pension but
gains the amount of pension which the
Union would be paying him from the an-
nual premiums paid by his congregation,
which probably would not have joined had
it been necessary for them to pay the back
reserve upon joining.
If this be done, at the end of fifteen or
twenty years the fund would be functioning
normally for all rabbis and at the present
time would certainly include a greater num-
ber than might otherwise be able to take
advantage of the fund.
In addition to the above, the Union might
be able to set aside a fund to take care of
urgent cases of rabbis who attained the age
of sixty-eight and on account of their age
were not able to enter.
On page 5, paragraph one, of Mr. Vogel-
stein's letter, allocation is suggested, and
the second example shows that a congrega-
tion, instead of paying the entire back re-
serve, may pay a part of it and reduce the
amount of their premium, and consequently
the amount of pension. It seems to me that
the effect of this would be to reduce the
amount of premium, and consequently the
pension also in many cases, by basing the
amount that they will carry by their ability
to meet part of this back reserve, rather
than by their ability to pay the annual pre-
mium.
If the Union were to carry this back re-
serve as a lien against the pension, many
congregations would pay the premium for
the entire amount of the pension and the
rabbi would thereby be greatly benefited,
or at least would not be. called upon to suf-
fer a serious reduction in pension-for
which he might later be able to secure the
funds-because at the percent time his con-
gregation is not sufficiently wealthy to pay
his back reserve.
In example one, on page five of Mr.
Vogelstein's letter, the case of a rabbi
twenty-three years in the service, and fifty
years of age at the present time, with a
salary of $5,000 per year, is given. His
congregation would be called upon to pay


8958







PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD.


..14,400, less the $2,000 which the Union
would contribute, or $12,400. This amount
would be prohibitive to most congregations,
and the result would be that they would
follow the lines of least resistance and re-
duce the amount of the pension and the
amount of the premium which they would
pay, as suggested in Mr. Vogelstein's ex-
ample, and the rabbi's pension might be-
come negligible.
In the plan that is suggested in this let-
ter the congregation would pay the $400
per year, minus the amount which the
Union would pay, and the pension would be
based on the full amount. The rabbi would
then have eighteen years-up to the time
he is sixty-eight-to raise the $12,400. If
this or any part of it could be raised his
pension would be paid accordingly.
If not, his congregation would have paid
on a basis of $400 per year. In any event
his pension at age of sixty-eight would be
considerably greater than if his congrega-
tion would reduce the amount on which his
pension would be based to $1,666, on ac-
count of the necessity of making up the
back reserve.
If a rabbi earning $3,000 a year should
receive a raise to $5,000 several years after
joining the fund, the back reserve on the
difference of $2,000 could be carried as a
lien just as described heretofore, and he
would be eligible, at age of sixty-eight, to
the full pension for a salary of $500.
There might be several variations neces-
sary to meet individual conditions, but it
seems to me that by giving the rabbi a
longer period of time to raise the necessary
back reserve, more congregations would be
willing to pay the annual premium and
more rabbis would receive the maximum
pension.
In the event of a rabbi's death before
the age of sixty-eight the amount of money
set aside to his credit could be paid to his
family in any form that the Union deemed
advisable.
I agree with Mr. Vogelstein that it would
be preferable to have a standard life insur-
ance company carry this fund.
[Submitted by A. L. Saltzstein, Milwau-
kee, Wis.]
per JEROME C. SALTZSTEIN.
June 16, 1921.
I am very grateful to Mr. Saltzstein for


his suggestions and shall discuss same with
him when I see him in New York next
week according to previous appointment. I
am particularly sorry I could not discuss
the matter with him prior to this meeting,
because he has the advantage of being an
insurance expert, aside from being inter-
ested in the Union.
A cursory examination of Mr. Saltzstein's
suggestions leads me to believe that we
should not accept his plan for the following
reasons:
(1) The lien of back premiums in many
instances is going to be so large that
unless they were paid up the rabbi would
receive only an infinitesimal amount as pen-
sion; take example 1 of my report, page 6-
the back premium amounts to $14,400-un-
less this is paid, the rabbi's pension ac-
cording to actuarial figures would amount
to $870, instead of $2,500.
(2) I cannot see how any insurance
company could leave it optional with the
insured whether he desires to assume the
back premium lien or not, because in case
of death prior to reaching the age of 68 the
risk of the insurer (whether company or
Union) must be defined.
(3) I question the advisability of bur-
dening the Union once and forever with a
33% to 50% payment of the annual pen-
sion insurance premium. If we assume
that 200 congregations would join with an
average salary of $3,000 and a base pre-
mium of 9%, the total annual premium
would be $54,000, and the Union's obliga-
tion, if one-third, $18,000 per annum; if
one-half, $27,000. Inasmuch as it is rea-
sonable to suppose that the number of con-
gregations is going to increase permanently
this would be an ever-increasing charge on
the Union, which, in my opinion, we have
no right to assume.
It may be, however, that Mr. Saltzstein's
suggestions could be adapted for our pur-
poses in a different way and harmonized
with my suggestions to some extent in the
following way:
The Union agrees to pay any excess pre-
mium above the base rate, provided (1)
that such excess to be paid by the Union
shall not be more than one-half of the an-
nual payment of the congregation or the
rabbi, or both. (2) That the premiums be
limited on a $5,000 salary.


8959







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


If you adopt this suggestion you prac-
tically go back to my original plan with
some slight variation.
In order to make it clear to you what
effect this proposal would have, I take the
examples from my memo of June 6th.
I Example: Minister 50 years. If his
congregation desires him to get full benefit
of pension system, an annual premium of
about 24% has to be paid, of which the con-
gregation would pay 8% base rate, plus 8%
excess, equal 16%; Union, 8%.
II Example: Minister 37 years. Premium,
12%, congregation pays 8%, Union pays 4%.
III Example: Minister 32 years. Pre-
mium .8%, which the congregation pays.
FINANCIAL ASPECT OF THIS PROPO-
SITION
The financial aspect of this proposition
cannot be gauged absolutely, but it is rea-
sonable to suppose that it could be car-
ried out with 20 annual payments by the
Union of not to exceed $20,000, because
congregations are going to hesitate to as-
sume the additional burden of premiums if
they have to share this burden with the
Union. I venture to predict that men of
over 50 years won't join this pension plan,
and this is perfectly sound and healthy; no
plan can be devised to take care at once of
men of advanced age. No man 60 years of
age, with a 60% premium, would insure
himself, and therefore should not expect
the Union to do it for him either.
All other recommendations of Mr. Saltz-
stein should be considered carefully in
finally working out the plan, especially the
suggestions contained in his letter of March
22, 1921, but all details have to be left to
a committee anyhow.
In view of Mr. Saltzstein's objections, it
may be considered advisable to amend the
resolutions proposed on page nine of my
memo of June 6th, but I trust that definite
action will be taken enabling the Union to
proceed at once with the negotiations with
congregations, rabbis and insurance com-
panies.
Lack of time has prevented me from ex-
hausting the points raised by Mr. Saltz-
stein.
Respectfully submitted,

L. VOGELSTEIN.


It was moved and duly carried that the
report be accepted and that the Committee
be instructed to formulate a definite plan
of action and to submit the same to the ex-
ecutive officers, namely, the President, Vice-
President and Secretary of the Union. This
plan is subsequently to be submitted to the
Commission on Synagog Pension, and when
finally adopted, to be submitted to the con-
gregations of the Union for their ultimate
approval and adoption.
It was moved and duly carried that the
vacancy on the Board of Governors be left
open until the next meeting of the Execu-
tive Board.
Correspondence was presented by the
Secretary from various cities in the United
States where financial campaigns are being
conditeted.
It was moved and duly carried that all
expenditures with reference to the mainte-
nance of the campaigns in various cities be
left to the President with power to act.
It was moved and duly carried that the
President appoint a Committee to prepare
suitable resolutions in memory of Mr. J.
Walter Freiberg, and that these be en-
grossed and sent to Mrs. J. Walter Frei-
berg.
The President announced the appointment
of the following Committee on Memorial
Resolutions for Mr. J. Walter Freiberg: Mr.
Sigmund Rheinstrom, Chairman, Mr. J. W.
Mack, Mr. Simeon M. Johnson and Rabbi
George Zepin.
APPROPRIATIONS
The following appropriations for the next
fiscal year beginning November 1, 1922,
were then voted:
For the Executive Office .........$ 37,900
For the Board of Governors...... 113,500
For the Board of Managers....... 62,350,
For the Board of Delegates....... 3,600
For the N. F. T. S. .............. 23,550
For the Union Bulletin .......... 32,000,
For the New York Schools ....... 27,800
For the Chicago Schools ......... 15,400
Mr. Isaac Schoen, of Atlanta, Ga. ad-
dressed the meeting, and an informal dis-
cussion followed on the general policy of
the Union of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions.
Adjourned.
CHARLES SHOHL,
President.
GEORGE ZEPIN,
Secretary.


8960

















Proceedings of the Executive Board


Hebrew Union College,
Cincinnati, Dec. 18, 1921.
Pursuant to the order of the President,
the Executive Board met in semi-annual ses-
sion at ten A. M.
Present: Messrs. N. Henry Beckman, Al-
fred M. Cohen, Julius W. Freiberg, Simeon
M. Johnson, Jacob W. Mack, Herbert C.
Oettinger, Wm. Ornstein, Marcus Rauh,
Maurice D. Rosenberg, Louis Schlesinger,
Samuel Straus, I. Newton Trager, Ludwig
Vogelstein and Herman Wile.
President Mr. Charles Shohl presided.
Secretary Rabbi George Zepin recorded the
minutes of the meeting.

EXCUSES FOR NON-ATTENDANCE
Letters were presented from the following
members of the Board who were unable to
attend the meeting: Messrs. I. W. Bernheim,
Fred E. Bruml, E. M. Cahn, Josiah Cohen,
G. A. Efroymson, Isaac Goldberg, Daniel P.
Hays, Sig Kohlmann, Adolph Kraus, Albert
L. Levi, B. Mahler, E. B. Meissner, Henry
Morgenthau, A. S. Ochs, H. Oppenheimer,
A. C. Ratshesky, S. W. Rosendale, Julius
Rosenwald, M. H. Rothschild, Jacob
Schnadig, Isaac Schoen, Horace Stern, I.
M. Ullman, Aaron Waldheim, A. Leo Weil,
Joseph Wiesenfeld, Albert Wolf and Wim.
B. Woolner.
MINUTES OF THE LAST MEETING
The Minutes of the last meeting were read
and approved.

PRESENTATION OF ANNUAL REPORTS
The following Annual Reports were then
presented, and upon motion duly carried,
were ordered to be incorporated in the
printed Annual Report of the organization.
(a) President.
(b) Secretary (including Public Ac-
countants).


(c) Board of Governors of the Hebrew
Union College.
(d) Board of Delegates on Civil Rights.
(e) Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension.
(f) National Federation of Temple Sis-
terhoods.
(g) The New York Executive Committee.

RECOMMENDATIONS IN PRESIDENT'S
REPORT REGARDING HEBREW
UNION COLLEGE

In connection with that part of President
Shohl's Report, dealing with the three re-
commendations of Mr. J. Walter Freiberg
the following action was taken. j
(a) Regarding the suggestion of in-
creasing the number of desirable students,
Mr. Alfred M. Cohen, President of the Board
of Governors reported that the enrollment
of new students for this year was thirty-one,
an unusually large number.
(b) Regarding the introduction of
courses for Social Workers of the Hebrew
Union College, it was moved and.duly car-
ried that this .subject be referred to the
Board of Governors.
(c) Regarding Summer Courses for post-
graduates, it was moved and duly carried
that this subject be referred to the Board
of Governors.

MEMORIAL RESOLUTIONS
JACOB R. MORSE

Upon receipt of the news of the death
of Mr. Jacob R. Morse, the fifth Vice-Presi-
dent of the Union, Mr. Shohl appointed the
following committee to draft resolutions ex-
pressing the sentiments of the members of
the Board: Mr. Herman Wile, Chairman,
Mr. Gustave A. Efroymson, Mr. Julius Frei-
berg, and Mr. Louis Schlesinger.
The committee presented the following
resolutions which were unanimously adopted:

















en Attemoriam
JACOB R. MORSE
FIFTH VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE UNION
DIED OCTOBER 8, 1921


The Union of American Hebrew Congregations records with deep sorrow
the passing away of Jacob R. Morse, a member of the Executive Board for
several years and a Vice-President of the organization for the past year.

Mr. Morse was for many years a staunch and loyal friend of the Union.
When the 26th Council met in Boston two years ago, the visiting delegates re-
ceived a most royal welcome. This was due in large part to the personal
efforts and enthusiasm of Mr. Morse. He was the energetic and efficient general
chairman of the Committee on Arrangements. He was a most genial, considerate
and generous host.

In Boston, where for many years he had been an active communal worker
and occupied the position of President of Congregation Adath Israel, no one
was better known or more generally respected than Jacob R. Morse. His interests
were all-embracing; every good cause, charitable or educational, could count on
his support. His generosity was proverbial; his sympathies were of the broadest;
his philanthropies knew no bounds of creed or race. He was an exemplary citi-
zen and splendid Jew. He was a generous, loyal and able co-worker and in
his death the Union and American Judaism have been deprived of a splendid
champion of the cause. We miss him and mourn his loss.

Resolved: That these resolutions be recorded in our Minutes, and a copy
thereof he sent to the bereaved family.

By Order of the Executive Board of the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations.

CHARLES SHOHL, President.
GEORGE ZEPIN, Secretary.






PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD.


SAFEGUARDING THE ENDOWMENT
FUND
It was moved and duly carried that the
President be authorized to appoint a 'Com-
mittee to devise a suitable plan for safe-
guarding the Endowment Fund. The Presi-
dent appointed the following Committee:
Mr. Simeon M. Johnson, Chairman, Mr.
Alfred M. Cohen and Mr. M. D. Rosenberg.
The Committee subsequently presented
the following report which was unanimously
adopted.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE
ON
SAFEGUARDING TRUST FUNDS

Cincinnati, Ohio,
December 18, 1921.
To the Executive Board of the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
Gentlemen:
Your committee appointed for the purpose
of suggesting means whereby the system of
administering the trust funds of the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations may be
improved recommends the following:
That a Committee of Three be appointed,
of which the President shall be a member,
whose duties shall be to make a complete
list and permanent record of each trust ad-
ministered by this corporation, and the
terms and conditions thereof, and also to
provide a plan for the continuation of such
record so that there may be permanently kept
therein .the list aforesaid and the future
additions thereto.
Your Committee further recommends-
(a) That all moneys, funds, securities
and property of whatever kind or nature in
any manner now or hereafter held, or to
be held in trust by the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations shall be kept sep-
arate and apart from all other property of
said Union. The custody and control there-
of shall be vested in a committee hereafter
provided for, which shall be known as the
Committee on Endowment and Trust
Funds.
(b) That Section 34 of the By-Laws
shall be supplemented by a section to be
known as Section 34-A which shall read as
follows:


The Committee on Endowment and Trust
Funds
Section 34-A. The President of the Exec-
utive Board shall biennially appoint five
members thereof as a Committee on Endow-
ment and Trust Funds. Said Committee
shall be vested with the custody and can-
trol of all the trust funds, money, securities
and trust property of the Union. All trust
securities shall be kept in a safety box or
*boxes of a Trust Company or Trust Com-
panies, to be designated by the Executive
Board and in the name of The Union of
American Hebrew Congregations, access to
which shall only be had by not less than
a majority of said Committee.
"Investment and re-investment of all
moneys and funds received in trust shall be
made by said committee by a vote of not
less than a majority of the whole commit-
tee. The Executive Board shall designate
depositories for said moneys and funds; the
same shall only be withdrawn on checks
which shall be signed by not less than two
members of the Committee, (such members
to be designated by a majority of the whole
committee) and by the secretary or assist-
ant secretary of the Union of American He-
brew Congregations, and said Secretary or
Assistant Secretary shall act as Secretary
of said Committee and shall keep accurate
records of its proceedings and transact ons.
No bond shall be required .of any member
of the committee."

Committee on Finance and Auditing
Your Committee recommends-
(c) That Section 34 be amended to read
as follows:
Section 34. The President of the Execu-
tive Board shall biennially appoint five
members thereof as a Committee on
Finance and Auditing. All duties here-
after prescribed for said committee shall in
no manner relate to any moneys, funds, se-
securities or other property held in trust,
but shall relate only to other moneys, funds,
securities and property of the Union not
held in trust. A majority of such committee
must agree as to the making of all invest-
ments or withdrawing any of the securities
from their place of deposit. It shall further
be the duty of said committee to examine
all bills and claims against the Union for
which no appropriations have been made,
and if found correct, to certify the same by


8963








FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


their signatures; which certificate, when
signed by the Chairman, or by the Vice-
Chairman, or in the absence of both of them
by some member of the committee desig-
nated for that purpose, shall be a proper
voucher upon which the Secretary shall draw
a check, countersigned by the President or
Vice-President, as provided in Section 32
hereof.
Deposits of Securities
Your 'Committee further recommends-
(d) That Section 35 be amended to read
as follows:
Section 35-All securities provided for in
Section 34 hereof, including the bonds given
y the officers of the Union, shall be depos-
ited in a safe deposit box or boxes, in a
vault of a Company or Companies, to be
designated by the Executive Board.
Your committee further recommends-
(e) That there be a supplemental sec-
tion, to be known as Section 34-B, which
shall read as follows:
Section 34-iB-All other laws and regula-
tions of The Union of American Hebrew
Congregations which in any way conflict
with the foregoing are hereby repealed.
SIMEON M. JOHNSON,
Chairman.
ALFRED M. COHEN,
M. D. ROSENBERG.

COMMITTEES APPOINTED
In accordance with the above action, the
President appointed the following commit-
tees:
On Making a Permanent Record of Each
Trust Administered: Mr. Alfred M. Cohen,
Chairman, Mr. Simeon M. Johnson, Mr.
Charles Shohl.
On Endowment and Trust Funds: Mr.
Wm. Ornstein, Chairman, Mr. Alfred M.
Cohen, Vice-Chairman; Mr. N. Henry
Beckman, Mr. Charles Shohl, Mr. Samuel
Straus.
On Finance and Auditing: Mr. Herbert C.
Oettinger, Chairman, Mr. Jacob W. Mack,
Vice-Chairman, Mr. Julius W. Freiberg, Mr.
Wm. Ornstein, Mr. I. Newton Trager.

INSURANCE FOR SECURITIES
It was moved and duly carried that the
President be authorized to appoint a Com-
mittee to make inquiries regarding the cost


of the insuring against hold-up and burglary
and other forms of insurance of the securi-
ties of the Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, and that this Committee be em-
powered to effect such insurance as it
deems necessary.
The president appointed the following
Committee on Insuring Securities of the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations:
Mr. Wi. Ornstein, Chairman, Mr. Alfred M.
Cohen, Mr. Herbert C. Oettinger, Mr. Jacob
W. Mack, Mr. Charles Shohl.
It was moved and duly carried that the
President be authorized to appoint a Com-
mittee to look into the advisability of pub-
lishing the Union Bulletin on a subscription
basis. The President appointed the following
Committee: Mr. N. Henry Beckman, Chair-
man, Mr. Jacob W. Mack, Mr. Julius W.
Freiberg.
APPOINTMENTS
It was moved and duly carried that the
action of the President in making the follow-
ing appointments in the interim between
meetings of the Executive Board be ap-
proved:
On the Executive Board-Mr. Julius W.
Freiberg to fill the unexpired term of his
father, Mr. J. Walter Freiberg, to January
1st, 1925.
On the Hebrew Union College Press Com-
mittee-Rabbi George Zepin.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON
SYNAGOG PENSION FUND.
Mr. Ludwig Vogelstein, Chairman of the
Committee on Synagog Pension Fund stated
that his Committee had prepared a report,
presenting a plan of action upon somewhat
different lines from the plan of action advo-
cated at the last meeting. He requested that
the Committee be relieved of the instructions
given to it at the last meeting of the Execu-
tive Board, and that the Committee be given
further time to complete the report which
they had in preparation. Mr. Vogelstein
also presented verbally to the meeting a ten-
tative statement of the new report.
It was moved and duly carried that the
Committee on Synagog Pension Fund be re-
lieved of the instructions entrusted to it
at the last meeting.
It was moved and duly carried to recon-
sider the action taken at the last meeting


8964






PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD.


with reference to the report of the Commit-
tee on Synagog Pension Fund.
It was moved and duly carried that the
Committee be granted further time to com-
plete the report, and that upon completion
of the report the same should be submitted
to the Joint Commission on the Synagog
Pension Fund, appointed by the Central
Conference of America Rabbis and the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations.

COMMUNICATION FROM DR.
SCHULMAN
A communication from Dr. Samuel
Schulman, of New York, relating to the
establishment of a Normal School for Sab-
bath School Teachers in New York City was
presented.
It was moved and duly carried that the
matter be referred to the Board of Gov-
ernors of the Hebrew Union College.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE AND
AUDITING COMMITTEE
The Committee on Finance and Auditing
presented the following report which, tpon
motion was adopted:
December 13, 1921.
To the Executive Board of the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations.
Gentlemen:
The Committee on Finance and Auditing
recommends the following depositories for
the main and subsidiary bank accounts of
the Union.
The Main Account of the Union shall
remain at the Fourth National Bank
where it is now kept.
The Synagog and School Extension ac-
count, a subsidiary account, shall remain
at the Citizens National Bank.
The Pension Fund Account shall re-
main at the First National Bank.
The Endowment Fund Account of the
Union of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions shall be placed at the First Na-
tional Bank.
The following accounts shall be placed
with the Peoples Bank & Savings Co:
The Hebrew Union College Dormitory
Account.
The Union Administration Account.


The Hebrew Union College account,
which is now kept at the Peoples Bank
& Savings Co. shall remain at that bank.
The Committee recommends that the
annual meeting of the Executive Board of
the Union shall henceforth be held during
the month of January instead of December
in order to give the accountants and the
Executive Office sufficient time to prepare
and print the annual reports.
WM. ORNSTEIN,
Chairman.
N. HENRY BBCKMAN,
CHARLES SHOHL,
SAMUEL STRAUS,
I. NEWTON TRAGER.

The Chairman announced that since the
last meeting of the Executive Board he had
appointed a committee consisting of the
President and Vice-President of the Execu-
tive Board, the President of the Board of
Governors, the Chairman and Vice-Chair-
nan of the Board of Managers, the commit-
tee bearing the title Committee on Gen-
eral Conduct of the Union's Campaigns.
This Committee reported on the status of
the general campaign enterprises of the
Union during the last few years and set
forth the methods used and the results ob-
tained. The Committee recommended a
continuation of the same plans for the en-
suing year.

It was moved and duly carried that the
report of the Committee be accepted with
thanks and placed on file and that the re-
commendations be approved and conveyed
to the officers of the Union for execution.

MEMORIAL RESOLUTIONS
LOUIS J. GOLDMAN
Mr. Charles Shohl, president, announced
that he had appointed the following com-
mittee to frame suitable resolutions in mem-
ory of Mr. Louis J. Goldman, at one time
President of the Union, who had passed
away on August 23, 1921: Mr. Wm. Orn-
stein, Chairman, Mr. N. Henry Beckman,
Mr. Sigmund Rheinstrom, and Mr. Samuel
Straus.
The committee presented the following
resolutions which were unanimously
adopted.


8965















3n 1Memoriam

LOUIS J. GOLDMAN
PRESIDENT U. A. H. C., 1907-1911
DIED AUGUST 23, 1921


On August 23, 1921, after three score years and ten of a life filled with dis-
tinguished and faithful service to his faith, to Cincinnati, the community in
which he lived, and to his fellowmen at large, Louis J. Goldman laid down his
earthly burdens and passed to his eternal reward.
Mr. Goldman was a Past President of the Union, having held the highest
office in the gift of our organization from 1907 to 1911. He was a member of
the Executive Board, of the Board of Managers of Synagog and School Extension
and of the Board of Delegates on Civil Rights for many years and gave his
best talents and energies to the performance of every duty which was laid upon
him. He was a staunch friend and supporter of the Hebrew Union College and
was a firm believer in its exalted purpose and in its mighty possibilities of far
reaching influence.

Louis J. Goldman stood high in the councils of Judaism and his integrity
and lofty ideals were an inspiration to all his colleagues. His place was in
front rank of those who had labored for the progress of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations and the upbuilding of it institutions and he was second
to none in his enthusiasm, loyalty and zeal in every enterprise that contributed
to the welfare and solidarity of the Jewish people in America and to the strength-
ening of American Judaism. His heart went out to every good cause and
he gave liberally of his means to every worthy charitable and philanthropic pur-
pose which was called to his attention.

We deem it a high privilege to express in this brief testimonial our grate-
ful appreciation of his sterling character, his inspiring example and his signal
service to the Jewish cause and we tender to the bereaved family our heartfelt
sympathy in their great loss.

Resolved: That these resolutions be spread upon the official records of the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations and a copy of the same be transmitted
to the family.
By Order of the Executive Board of the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations.

CHARLES SHOHL, President.
GEORGE ZEPIN, Secretary.






PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD.


SPECIAL REPORT OF THE CHICAGO
COMMITTEE OF THE UNION OF
AMERICAN HEBREW CON-
GREGATIONS
The report of Mr. Israel Cowen, Chair-
man of the Chicago Committee, was pre-
sented.
It was moved and duly carried the work
of the Chicago Committee set forth in the
report be approved and that the report be
placed on file.
The Committee on J. Walter Freiberg
Memorial consisting of Messrs. Jacob W.
Mack, Samuel Strauss, Daniel P. Hays,
Ludwig Vogelstein, Adolph S. Ochs, Albert
Wolf, Marcus Rauh appointed to devise a
suitable memorial for Mr. J. Walter Frei-
berg, deceased, reported progress and re-
quested further time.

It was moved and duly carried that in
view of other plans contemplated by the
Executive Board, the present plans for a
J. Walter Freiberg Memorial be deferred.

DORMITORY BUILDING COMMITTEE

The following resolution was adopted:

Whereas the XXVII Council held in Buf-
falo approved the plan of building a dormi-
tory for the Hebrew Union College and
accepted the offer of the National Federa-
tion of Temple Sisterhoods to raise funds
necessary therefore, and
Whereas The National Federation of
Temple Sisterhoods is proceeding with com-
mendable zeal in its self-imposed task of
raising these funds in consonance with its
offer to do so, and

Whereas the time has arrived when steps
should be taken to select a site on the Col-
lege Campus for the Dormitory; and when
an architectural plan should be prepared
and after approval, contracts should be en-
tered into for the construction and equip-
ment of the Dormitory and for doing all
things necessary for or incident to the
same,

Now Therefore, be it resolved that the
President be authorized to appoint a Com-
mittee from this body or otherwise, to se-
cure architectural plans and building esti-
mates, and to report back to this Board.


Also that this Committee shall be empow-
ered to expend for that purpose a sum not to
exceed Twenty-Five Hundred ($2,500)
Dollars out of the Hebrew Union College
Dormitory Fund, with the approval of the
proper authorities.
The President appointed the following
Committee:
Representing the Executive Board: Mr.
Alfred M. Cohen, Chairman, Mr. Julius W.
Freiberg, Mr. I. Newton Trager; represent-
ing the Board of Governors: Mr. Oscar
Berman, Mr. Maurice J. Freiberg, Mr. Emil
A. Pollak; representing the National Fed-
eration of Temple Sisterhoods: Mrs. Joseph
Weisenfeld, Mrs. Abram Simon, Mrs. J.
Walter Freiberg; representing the Faculty:
Dr. Julian Morgenstern.

CHANGE OF RULES
IN
RETIRED TEACHERS' PENSIONS
Communications were presented from Mr.
Isaac Bloom, Secretary of the Board of
Governors giving excerpts from the minutes
of the meeting of the Board of Governors
which took place on November 29th, 1921,
relating to a change in the rules regarding
the Teachers' Retiring Fund and explaining
in detail how the proposed change might
affect persons named in the letters.
It was moved and duly carried that the
change in the rules be referred to the next
Council of the Union.
It was moved and duly carried that action
on special cases mentioned in the commun-
ications be deferred until the next meeting
of the Executive Board.
A communication was presented from Dr.
Emil G. Hirsch, resigning from the Board
of Governors.
It was moved and duly carried that a com-
munication be addressed to Dr. Hirsch re-
questing him to withdraw his resignation.
A communication was presented from
Richard Smethurst & Co., offering to exam-
ine the bank balances of the Union once a
month for One Hundred and Fifty Dollars
per annum.
It was moved and duly carried that the
Secretary be authorized to make such an
arrangement with the firm of Richard
Smethurst & Co.


8967







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


It was moved and duly carried that the
Union Mailing List be used for Union pur-
poses only.
The following resolutions presented by
Mr. Alfred M. Cohen was duly adopted.
"Be It Resolved that the President or a
Vice-President of the Executive Board be,
and he is, hereby authorized to execute in
behalf of the Board, any and all papers or
instruments necessary or incident to the col-
lection of funds by bequest or otherwise,


including those that may be required under
the laws of the United States or the laws of
any of the States."
The foregoing minutes were read and ap-
proved. Adjourned.

CHARLES SHOHL,
President,
GEORGE ZEPIN,
Secretary.


8968











The President's Message


Cincinnati, December 18, 1921.
To the Executive Board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
Gentlemen:
We meet at the close of the forty-eighth
year of the Union's existence. It is my happy
privilege to look back over eighteen years
during which I have been a member of this
Board. This retrospect reveals the fact that
we have never closed a year as successful as
1921 and never faced a prospect more prom-
ising than 1922.
The finances of the Union are in excellent
shape for the tasks we have undertaken to
accomplish. The College begins the new
year with a new and young President and
has never had as large a registration of
new students as during this year. The De-
partment of Synagog and School Extension
has been at work in more fields and enjoyed
the cooperation of more rabbis than ever
before. Its publications have multiplied and
its sale of books and magazines has increased
in a most commendable fashion. The Board
of Delegates has zealously pursued its ap-
pointed tasks. The National Federation of
Temple Sisterhoods has vastly increased in
numbers and in the efficiency of its labors,
and has just undertaken to build and equip
a dormitory for the Hebrew Union College.
The numerous subsidiary boards, committees
and commissions of the Union have brought
in encouraging and hopeful reports. Gentle-
men, I congratulate you upon the status of
the Union, whose welfare is entrusted to
your hands.
IN MEMORIAL
J. Walter F;reberg
We must not forget that during the same
year we have met with severe and irretriev-
able losses. J. Walter Freiberg, who stood
at the helm of this organization for more
than a decade, was called to his reward on
High, on June 9, 1921. In his taking away
we have all lost a dear friend, a great leader,
a far-visioned man, who built for the future.
The Union's success of today is the result
of his energy, courage, wisdom and sincerity.
The work of his hands is to be seen in


every city in the United States where we
have a congregation. Where the Union was
formerly regarded by many as merely a local
organization, it is now conceded to be a
national institution. In well-nigh two hun-
dred cities Mr. J. Walter Freiberg estab-
lished Union agencies which have made our
welfare their concern. This committee of
two hundred cities, imbued with the spirit
of our departed leader, will assure him an
immortality more lasting than inscriptions in
bronze and marble. This immortality is
written in the hearts of men who have been
touched with the precious contagion of his
spirit and who will bequeath this new-found
love of Judaism to their children's children.
On November 6, 1921, the Union con-
ducted a Memorial Service in honor of Mr.
J. Walter Freiberg, in Cincinnati. We were
assisted by the three congregations and the
three Sisterhoods of this city. A large out-
pouring of friends and admirers of Mr.
Freiberg listened with attention to the many
just tributes that were paid to Mr. J. Wal-
ter Freiberg's memory.

Louis J. Goldman

Louis J. Goldman, the fourth President of
the Union, during the years 1907 to 1911,
and, during his whole lifetime, a friend of
the Jewish Cause, passed away August 23d.
Mr. Goldman stood very close in years to
the generation of men who founded the
Union and the College. He partook of their
spirit. He gave his help when it was needed.
For many years he suffered from ill health
and was compelled to withdraw from activi-
ties that were close to his heart. He will be
remembered with affection and regard by
those who sat with him around the council
table of the Union.

Jacob R. Morse
We chronicle with sad hearts the passing
of Jacob R. Morse, the fifth Vice-President of
our Union, a staunch Jew, a representative
citizen, a lovable personality. His untimely
taking away on October 8th, 1921, in the
prime of his life, will be long regretted. He
was keenly interested in Judaism. He was a







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


leader in the Jewish communal life of the
City of Boston. He was a zealous worker
in the Union Councils. His enthusiasm was
exemplary, his counsel wise. He will be
missed in our deliberations.
THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE
The very interesting report of the Board
of Governors of the Hebrew Union College,
which bears the signature of its zealous
president, Mr. Alfred M. Cohen, will ac-
quaint you with a state of affairs that af-
fords much cause for gratification. The
three departments of the College, the College
proper, the Teachers' Institute under the
principalship of Dr. Louis Grossmann, and
the Library, have all functioned most effi-
ciently in their several important spheres.
I have reserved for mention only a few of
the outstanding facts and occurrences. The
large enrollment of students this year is, we
hope, only a forerunner of a movement to
increase the output of our College, in order
to meet the great demands made upon us.
This year we graduated fourteen rabbis to
fill the demands made by 35 empty pulpits.
I sincerely trust that the Executive Board
will commend the Board of Governors for its
efforts to increase the student body by desir-
able additions, and will encourage the Board
of Governors to continue its activity in this
direction.

The New President
During the past season, Dr. Kaufmann
Kohler, the revered head of the College, asked
to be relieved of his duties on account of
advancing years and infirmity. His resigna-
tion was accepted with regret and Dr. Julian
Morgenstern, a member of the faculty, was
elected Acting President. We extend our
felicitations to the Board and to Dr. Morgen-
stern, and look forward with eager antici-
pation to many accomplishments which youth
and ability always have in store.
The Additions to the Library
During this season our very efficient li-
brarian, Mr. A. S. Oko, directed the atten-
tion of the Board of Governors to the oppor-
tunity for purchasing a famous collection
of books, the personal property of Dr. A.
Freimann, Librarian of the Staats-Bibliothek,
at Frankfort, Germany. The situation re-
quired quick action. In view of the emer-
gency, the officers of the Union, together


with the Board of Governors, empowered
Mr. Oko to go to Europe for this purpose.
The Freimann library consisting of approxi-
mately 8,000 valuable items, for the study of
Jewish history and religion, was thus ac-
quired. On his trip Mr. Oko heard of a
very valuable collection of books and manu-
scripts dealing with Jewish ritual, music, etc.
This collection, the Birnbaum Musical Col-
lection, was also purchased. Mr. Oko made
many purchases of special books and illus-
trations for the Department of Synagog and
School Extension and a large collection of
historic coins and Jewish ceremonial art ob-
jects for the Union Museum of the National
Federation of Temple Sisterhoods.

Opening of the Dormitory Campaign
The most notable event in the College
year has been the auspicious opening of the
Campaign for a Dormitory Building by the
National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods.
The need for such an addition to the Col-
lege buildings has been carefully considered
for many years, and the prospect of its
speedy realization is cause for hearty con-
gratulations.

Three Recommendations of Mr. Freiberg
In closing this part of my report, I beg
to call your attention again to three specific
recommendations made by Mr. J. Walter
Freiberg in his last Presidential Message.
All three were highly recommended by the
XXVII Council and I leave to your further
consideration the advisability of carrying
them out.
The first was a recommendation for greater
activity in attracting desirable students to
the Hebrew Union College. The second was
the project of introducing courses of study
at the Hebrew Union College for the prepa-
ration of a class of workers needed by all
Temple Centers, Y. M. and Y. W. H. A.'s,
in short, professional social workers for re-
ligious and semi-religious institutions. The
third proposal dealt with the advisability of
conducting a Summer School for post gradu-
ate work, under the auspices of the Hebrew
Union College.
I again urge these recommendations upon
your attention and trust that your sanction
and promise of support will encourage the
Board of Governors to undertake their
speedy execution.


8970







PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE.


SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION
The Department of Synagog and School
Extension has experienced a year of unusu-
ally great activity. The Department is the
clearing-house and directing agency for the
generous efforts of a large group of rabbis
and laymen who are willing to make sacri-
fices, for the Cause of Judaism. It deals
largely with the organization and mainte-
nance of religious institutions like congre-
gations, schools, study circles, etc., etc.
It pays the expenses of such efforts, and
often even this is donated by those who
serve. Its guidance has been evident
this season in numerous communities, in
summer resorts and institutions, in metro-
politan centers, in small cities, on farms, in
short, wherever Jews reside. The Depart-
ment is now at work in New York, Chicago,
Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, and hopes to
enlarge its activities as its means permit. It
has carried on a nation-wide correspondence
with communities and individuals that ask
for guidance in maintaining Jewish religious
institutions. We select for particular con-
sideration the following items from the
transactions of the Board of Managers.

A Normal School in New York
The three schools under the administra-
tion of the Union in New York are in con-
stant need of well-prepared teachers. The
whole project of founding new schools de-
pends to a large extent upon the supply of
such teachers. This supply is limited. Even
those who are now employed in our schools,
and in all the schools of New York City,
require additional instruction. The situation
urgently requires the establishment of a Nor-
mal School for Jewish Religious School
Teachers. I beg to direct your attention to
correspondence which has been forwarded
to us by the Board of Managers on the sub-
ject.
Publications of the Department
The Synagog and School Extension publi-
cations comprise ritual publications and re-
prints circulated by the Department of Syna-
gog and School Extension, propaganda liter-
ature of various descriptions, text books on
Jewish literature, history and religion, a
magazine for the Jewish youth and Jewish
Tracts. We call the attention of the Execu-
tive Board to the excellent report of the Com-
mission on Jewish Religious Educational


Literature telling of the publications of the
Department, and we especially commend the
Department for the business sagacity dis-
played in the sale of these books which are
now used by 479 Religious Schools in the
United States and Canada. The children's
Magazine, known as "The Union Home Study
Magazine," will commend itself to your at-
tention, not only for the value and interest
of its pages, but by the fact that its circu-
lation jumped from 3,000 to 14,300 in one
year.
I am happy to say that a beginning has
been made in the publication and distribu-
tion of Tracts. The Tract Commission is
deserving of great praise for its Tracts, its
annual Sermon Pamphlet and its Holiday
Press Notices.
A gratifying beginning has also been made
in the work of federating and standardizing
the work of Temple Centers and Young
People's Organizations in general. The
State Teachers' Associations in various locali-
ties are rendering great service in this re-
spect.
The Board of Managers has been very
fortunate in the selection of Mr. Wm. Orn-
stein for Chairman and Mr. Jacob W. Mack
for Vice-Chairman. Both have long been ac-
quainted with all the problems of the De-
partment, and a new era of progress in this
work may be confidently expected.
BUREAU OF CIVIL RIGHTS
Our venerable Chairman of the Board of
Delegates, the Hon. Simon Wolf, has dis-
charged his duties with youthful vigor. His
able report touches upon many vital prob-
lems of legislation and governmental policy.
While no direct recommendations are made,
the perusal of the report will acquaint you
with conditions of immigration and kindred
matters of great interest.
SYNAGOG PENSION REPORT
We have been very fortunate in having on
our Board a group of men who have been
willing to seek the information necessary for
a solution of the vexing problem of provid-
ing pensions for aged and disabled rabbis.
The original report of the Commission on
Synagog Pensions prepared by Mr. S. H.
Wolf, an actuary of New York City, is still
in the hands of the Pension Committee.
From time to time this Committee has in-


8971







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


vestigated various angles of the problem,
and these findings have been brought to the
attention of the Executive Board in the shape
of supplementary reports.
I am happy to inform you that the Syna-
gog Pension Committee will submit a supple-
mentary report at this meeting.
THE NATIONAL FEDERATION OF
TEMPLE SISTERHOODS
The National Federation of Temple Sister-
hoods reports an unusual year in growth
and in progress. This organization has a
membership of forty thousand women, in-
terested in promoting congregational activity,
and in assisting the Union in its enterprises.
This year the Sisterhoods have undertaken
to raise $250,000.00, the amount necessary
to erect a Dormitory at the Hebrew Union
College. Their chief efforts for this season
will be directed toward this accomplishment.
The Federation has collected during the
last year $14,432.00 in scholarships. It has
also become interested in University Wel-
fare Work and endeavors through its local
societies to get in touch with the Jewish
students. State Federations of Sisterhoods
are being organized in order that national
activities may be intensified and that more
women may be interested in religious work.
THE GENERAL ACTIVITIES OF THE
UNION
The general activities of the Union are
carried out in the office of the Executive
Board and under the guidance and direction
of the Executive Officers.

Membership
Naturally one of the chief interests of the
organization is its growth. In the last year
we have added fifteen congregations to our
roster, making a total of two hundred and
thirty-seven congregations. The individual
membership has increased by 5,273 persons,
making the total membership of our Union,
36,110.
The Union Bulletin
During the last year we have changed the
form of the Union Bulletin from the large
eight page newspaper size to a smaller,
thirty-two page magazine size. The new
form has greatly increased the attractive-
ness of the paper. We have endeavored al-
so to secure well-written articles and good


illustrations. These efforts have been re-
warded by many favorable comments. The
Bulletin aims to acquaint its readers with
Jewish news and Jewish movements in all
parts of the world. At the same time its
point of view and much of its space is de-
voted to the principles upon which our Union
is built. Circulating as it does among the
membership of our congregations, we use
its pages to disseminate a knowledge of the
activities and interests of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations. The Bul-
letin reaches 62,000 homes. It is my firm
belief that every dollar expended in its pub-
lication is repaid a hundredfold by the propa-
ganda which it makes for Judaism and by
the knowledge it spreads about the Union
and the College.

Financial Campaign
We will hear at this meeting, a report
prepared by a special committee of the Exec-
utive Board on the "General Conduct of the
Union's Campaigns." The recommendations
represent the careful deliberations of the
heads of the Boards of the Union repre-
sented on the Executive Board. I sincerely
trust you will give these recommendations
your careful attention and your approving
vote.
One of the principal activities of the
Executive Office is the collection of funds.
The remarkable campaign which we ran in
1919 has been followed by active propaganda
in the last two years with the result that
our subscriptions have very materially in-
creased. In 1919, as a result of our cam-
paign, our annual subscriptions amounted to
about $150,000 while our donations reached
$170,000. In the next year these subscrip-
tions were increased by about $25,000. The
donations of the preceding year were, of
course, wiped out but new donations to the
extent of $27,000 were secured. In 1921,
the subscriptions were further increased by
about $25,000, and $10,000 in donations were
secured.
These results were obtained by establish-
ing unpaid agencies in all cities where we
have congregations. Although it may sur-
prise many to learn that almost miraculously
we seem to get this money by the mere act of
asking for it, I beg to call to your attention to
the faithful labor and deep sagacity of the
few men who have worked to build up this


8972







PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE.


very efficient machinery. It has taken much
more than the mere asking. A great cam-
paign of education has been conducted
through the Union Bulletin and many other
channels, and a great campaign of inspira-
tion has been set in motion to open the
eyes of American Jews to the needs and
opportunities of the Union of American He-
brew Congregations.
This report of the Committee on the Gen-
eral Conduct of the Union's Campaigns,
makes a plea for the continuation of the
methods which we have tried and found suc-
cessful. It goes a step further and recom-
mends a higher degree of organization. Our
campaigns have revealed the possibilities
of the situation. They have showed us what
deep springs of religious loyalty and affec-
tion may be uncovered by the proper efforts
to unite American religious Jewry. These
possibilities should be pursued. Our first
task now is to strengthen our cause in the
cities where we are weak and to establish
new agencies in the cities where we are not
represented. This is the task of the Execu-
tive Board. Permit me to say not only of
the officers and heads of departments of
the Union, but of the individual members
of the Executive Board.
It is my plan, and I trust this will meet
with your approval and cooperation, to as-
sign to each member of the Executive Board
a certain number of cities where we have
congregations, especially cities where we are
weak. I expect to take a certain number of
cities under my personal supervision. I
expect to visit them. I trust every member
of the Executive Board will do the same.
It has come under my observation that many
national organizations expect this service of
the members of their Executive Boards and I
think we have the right to expect as much
of our own membership.

Bequests to the Union
On many occasions I have met attorneys
who have called my attention to the fact that
they had advised clients of theirs, in making
out their bills, to remember the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations. It has oc-
curred to me that instances of this kind
could be multiplied by spreading a proper
knowledge of the Union and its work among
prominent Jewish attorneys.
I have asked the Secretary to write to


the Rabbis and Presidents in the various
cities, requesting lists of prominent Jewish
attorneys in their home cities. Letters will
afterwards be addressed to these attorneys,
calling their attention to the Union, etc.

The Jacob H. Schiff Foundation for the
Hebrew Union College
The greatest event in our financial history
of last year was the bequest of $100,000
under the will of Mr. Jacob H. Schiff of
sainted memory. Mr. Schiff's generosity was
like the sea that touched all the shores of
Jewish misery, Jewish joy and Jewish aspir-
ation. In fact, nothing of human interest
failed to appeal to his mind and heart. The
sum bequeathed is to remain intact and will
be known as the Jacob H. Schiff Foundation
for the Hebrew Union College. The princi-
pal is to form a perpetual endowment fund
and only the interest is available for use.

The Finance Committee
In this connection I desire to compliment
the Committee on Finance and Auditing, un-
der the able chairmanship of Mr. Wm. Orn-
stein, for the way in which it has handled
the investing of this money and of other
funds that have come into the possession of
the Union. The $100,000 of Mr. Schiff were
invested in Municipal and Federal bonds,
purchasing the full amount of $100,300 worth
of bonds and yielding an annual income of
$5,642.75.
The Committee on Finance and Auditing
has a report to submit to this meeting with
reference to bank depositories for our vari-
ous funds. I trust you will give this matter
your careful consideration.
I am informed by this Committee that at
the close of the fiscal year we had a suffi-
cient balance in the General Fund to make
it safe to replace in the Endowment Fund
the rest of the sum which has in the past
been borrowed from it. No special action
of the Board is necessary for this purpose.
This statement is made in order that the
members may know that this transfer will
now be made.

THE STAFF
I wish to tender a due measure of appre-
ciation to the fine organization which Rabbi
George Zepin has built up for the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations. Those of


8973







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


us who have come into almost daily contact
with the Union's work appreciate fully the
diligence, the tact, the mastery of detail, the
business sagacity, which Rabbi Zepin and
his assistants have brought to the service of
our Cause. The character of the workers
with whom Rabbi Zepin has surrounded him-
self assures us that the business of our or-
ganization will be administered with a high
degree of faithfulness and painstaking in-
telligence.
Rabbi Jacob D. Schwarz is assistant in
the department of the Union's special activ-
ities. Rabbi Louis I. Egelson is assistant
director of Synagog and School Extension.
Miss Miriam Westheimer serves in a similar-
capacity for work of the National Federation
of Temple Sisterhoods. Rabbi Jacob B. Pol-
lak is assistant director of Synagog and
School Extension for the work in New York
City. Mr. Louis Rich is editor of the
Union Bulletin. Miss Elsa Weihl is editor
of the Union Home Study Magazine. Mr.
M. Myer Singer is our purchasing agent.


I beg to call your attention to this splendid
organization for your commendation.
MY THANKS
My thanks are due to you, my friends,
for the kind reception you have accorded my
efforts and for your unwavering support in
many trying situations which arise in the
administration of large affairs. In this work
I find no allurement in the prospect of per-
sonal success. My only object is the success
of the Cause.
But in this respect also, I do not desire
to succeed alone. I want you to share in
every difficulty and in every achievement of
the Union. With this in mind, I thank all of
you for your support, and to this purpose I
solicit your further cooperation and assist-
ance.
Respectfully submitted,

CHARLES SHOHL,
President,
Union of American Hebrew Congregations.


8974






The Annual Reports
of
All Departments







FINANCIAL REPORT.


The Secretary's Report

To the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations:
Gentlemen:
Since the last meeting of the Executive Board, we have lost by death an honored
member of this Board, Mr. Jacob R. Morse, of Boston, Mass., the fifth Vice-President
of the Union. Three more vacancies on the Executive Board were created by the
resignations of Mr. Maurice J. Freiberg, of Cincinnati, Mr. Felix M. Warburg, of
New York, and Mr. B. Mahler, of Cleveland.
There is a vacancy on the Board of Managers owing to the resignation of Mr.
Adolph Lewisohn, of New York City.
There is a vacancy on the Board of Governors owing to the ,resignation of Dr.
Emil G. Hirsch, of Chicago.
There is a vacancy on the Board of Delegates owing to the death of Mr. M. H.
Wascerwitz, of San Francisco.

Appointments in Interim

In accordance with the provisions of the Constitution, Mr. Charles Shohl, Presi-
dent, has made the following appointments:
On the Executive Board, Mr. Julius W. Freiberg, to serve the unexpired
term of his father, Mr. J. Walter Freiberg.
On the Hebrew Union College Press Committee, Rabbi George Zepin.


Membership of the Union

In the last year we have added fifteen (15) congregations to our membership list,
making a total of two hundred and thirty-seven (237) congregations. Owing to these
additions, and also to the increasing membership of the older congregations, we have
added five thousand, two hundred and seventy-three (5,273) to our roster of individual
congregational memberships, making a total of thirty-six thousand, one hundred and ten
(36,110) persons belonging to these two hundred and thirty-seven (237) congregations.

New Congregations

Ashland, Ky................. Agudath Achim
Chicago, Ill................... B'nai Abraham Zion
Orange, N. J. ............. Shaare Tephila
Gloversville, N. Y............ Jewish Community Center
Greenwood, Miss .............Beth Israel
Hot Springs, Ark............. House of Israel
Leavenworth, Kans.......... .B'nai Jeshurun
Middletown, Ohio............Temple Emanu-El
Minneapolis, Minn ........... Temple Israel
New York, N. Y............ Mt. Neboh
New York, N. Y .............Mt. Zion
Oakland, Calif ................Temple Sinai
Racine, W is.................. Temple Sinai
St. Louis, Mo................ Congr. B'nai El
Wilmington, N. C............Temple Sinai


8977







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


The Growth of Our Membership

For eleven (11) years previous to our campaign of 1919 our membership re-
mained almost static. It fluctuated between one hundred and eighty (180) and one
hundred and ninety (190) from year to year. Since the agitation and publicity of
our campaign year, the membership has steadily increased. We now have thirty-four
congregations more than in 1918. Our individual membership, representing our po-
tential income from dues, is now thirty-six thousand, one hundred and ten (36,110) as
compared to twenty-five thousand, two hundred and eighty-seven (25,287) in 1918.


Income

Our Endowment Fund has been increased this year by the bequest of Mr. Jacob
H. Schiff amounting to one hundred thousand ($100,000) dollars and smaller gifts
totaling sixteen hundred ($1,600) dollars. A new Endowment Scholarship has been
created by the children of Dr. Max Lilienthal to be known by his name. The Manny
Strauss Fund No. 2 has been created with moneys out of the General Funds. The
Hermine Schonthal Endowment Fund has been increased by $87.49. The remaining
Endowment Funds have remained static.


General Maintenance Funds

Our receipts for general maintenance are practically of two categories, those that
may be developed independently and those that are dependent upon conditions not
easily changed. To the second class belong Dues from Congregations, Income from
Securities, Income from Foundation for Support of the Teachers' Institute, and Gifts
from the N. F. T. S. for clerk hire and space in Union Bulletin. These have fluctu-
ated between certain limits, have remained the same or have grown very gradually.

To the first category belong, first, the Income from Sale of Text Books and the
Union Home Study. In the last eleven (11) years, beginning in 1911, these have
grown as follows: $1,598.79; $3,432.60; $3,611.33; $3,338.30; $3,730.67; $3,761.69;
$3,488.31; $4,084.29; $4,033.53; $7,351.86, and $11,142.74.
To this first category also belong the following classes of income which permit
of independent development: Subscriptions for General Maintenance, Memorial Be-
quests, Donations, Special Subscriptions to Synagogue and School Extension, to
Tracts, to Summer Services, to Scholarships, including N. F. T. S. subscriptions to
Scholarships. Taken in the total, these have grown as follows in eleven (11) years,
beginning in 1911: $12,702.50; $31,038.61; $54,378.73; $52,932.89; $53,267.14; $67,650.60;
$77,674.85; $52,105,43; $354,536.56; $201,379.24; $282,599.25.
Each separate class has fared as follows: Subscriptions to Tracts have declined
from $1,017.00 in 1916 to $280.78. These represent small sums like five ($5) and ten
($10) dollar donations and are replaced by the larger subscriptions secured in 1919.
Subscriptions to Synagogue and School Extension ran as high as thirty thousand
($30,000) dollars in 1917, but were reduced to twenty thousand ($20,000) dollars in
1919, ten thousand ($10,000) dollars being absorbed by the campaign of 1919. This
year the sum has further been reduced by the five thousand ($5,000) dollars received
annually from Mr. Jacob H. Schiff.

Subscriptions to Scholarships are generally made by congregations and have re-
mained about the same. The Sisterhood subscriptions to Scholarships, however, have
grown very much. These have been donated for the last eight years. Beginning in
1914 with $250.00, they have grown each year as follows: $2,250; $2,700; $4,400;
$5,300; $6,850; $11,200; $14,432.


8978








FINANCIAL REPORT. 8979

Subscriptions for General Maintenance, Donations and Bequests, must be grouped
as one in order to be accurately judged, because it is often impossible to tell whether
a receipt is a donation or a subscription until we send a bill on the anniversary of
its receipt. This class of income has grown in eleven (11) years as follows:
$8,572.50; $13,358.61; $41,999.73; $20,479.00; $24,929.25; $26,052.00; $36,163.90; $13,-
464.50; $314,173.59; $159,619.82; $241,568.13.


Disbursements
The disbursements of our organization have grown from fifty-five thousand, one
hundred and fifty-nine dollars and seven cents ($55,159.07) in 1910-1911 to two hun-
dred and. eighty-six thousand, two hundred and fifty-four dollars and ninety-four cents
($286,254.94) this year. It hardly need be pointed out that all this increased activity
in raising funds is due to the necessity for meeting the legitimate cost of the growing
institutions of the Union.


The Union Bulletin
We have issued pine numbers of the Union Bulletin during the past year. In re-
sponse to a general demand we changed the form of the paper to a thirty-two (32)
page magazine size. Its changed appearance has elicited much praise. The Bulletin
is under the management of Mr. Louis Rich. Rabbi Joseph Leiser, who was our
editorial writer, has severed connection with our organization to accept a pulpit in
Racine, Wisconsin, but he still contributes regularly to the Bulletin. We have en-
deavored to make the paper carry an appreciable amount of American and foreign
news, and are also giving a reasonable amount of space to interesting and serious
information about Jewish religious problems, Jewish History, etc. Illustrations and
display matter have been used to improve the appearance of the paper. Each issue
has contained news about the work of one or more departments of the Union.


The Financial Report
Our financial report, which follows, is audited by Richard Smethurst & Company,
Certified Public Accountants. The statement of the accountant is submitted as part
of this report.







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.



SECRETARY'S FINANCIAL REPORT

SCHEDULE "A"


UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS

BALANCE SHEET
At October 31, 1921

ASSETS
Cash-
Deficit in General Fund................. $59,130.43
Balance in Endowment Fund.............. 66,252.43
Balance in Hermine Schonthal Publication
Fund .............................. 37.49


Total Cash Balance ..................
Investment-Par Value-
General Fund .......................... $148,500.00
Endowment Fund ........................ 433,700.00
Manny Strauss Fund No. 1 and No. 2...... 50,000.00
Hermine Schonthal Publication Fund....... 10,000.00
Jacob H. Schiff Bequest for Hebrew
Union College.................... 100,300.00

Total Investments....................


$7,159.49


$742,500.00


Premium and Interest-
General Fund.......................... $1,898.79
Endowment Fund......................... 16,179.24
Hermine Schonthal Publication Fund....... 50.00

Total Premium and Interest........... $18,128.03
College Buildings and Grounds .......... $217,799.49

Total Assets ....................


$985,587.01


LIABILITIES


General Fund ................................
Endowment Fund............................
Manny Strauss Fund No. 1 and No. 2..........
Hermine Schonthal Publication Fund..........
Jacob H. Schiff Bequest for Hebrew Union
College ....................................
Discount on Investments Purchased-
General Fund............................
Endowment Fund........................

Total Discounts ............ .........

College Building Fund...................

Total Liabilities. .............. .. ..


$ 81,404.04
506,266.83
50,000.00
10,087.49

100,300.00


$9,864.32
9,864.84

$ 19,729.16
217,799.49


$985,587.01


8980







FINANCIAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "A" Exhibit 1

UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS

SUMMARY OF CASH FUND BALANCES
At October 31, 1921

General Fund (Deficit) ................. ............... $59,130.43
Endowment Fund ......................................... 66,252.43
Hermine Schonthal Publication Fund ....................... 37.49

Cash Balance all Funds in 4th National Bank..........


$7,159.49


SCHEDULE "A" Exhibit 2

UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS

RECONCILIATION OF BANK ACCOUNT

At October 31, 1921


FOURTH NATIONAL BANK-
Balance at Close of Business, October 31, 1921 ........
Less Outstanding Checks-
No. 414 Administration Account, U. A. H. C..... $ 200.00
No. 415 Ludwig Vogelstein, Treas............... 1,038.31
No. 416 Israel Cowen, Treas................... 363.35
No. 417 George Zepin, Director ............... 4,772.17
No. 418 George Zepin, Secy ................... 2,364.37
No. 419 George Zepin, Secy ................... 5,631.00
No. 420 Ben Altheimer, Treas.................. 384.37


Total Outstanding Checks .................

Balance as per Books at October 31, 1921......


$21,913.06


$14,753.57

$7,159.49


8981







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "B"

GENERAL FUND
A. Receipts and Disbursements for Year Ended October 31, 1921
RECEIPTS
For Maintenance of all Departments-
Dues from Congregations. ................... . .. $ 32,204.00
General Maintenance Subscriptions ......................... 222,405.63
Memorial Donations and Bequests .......................... 400.00
Miscellaneous ........................... ........... 1,660.79
Interest on Securities in General Fund....................... 6,311.25
Interest on Bank Deposits ................. .. ............ 474.66
From National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods ............. 788.94
Interest on Manny Strauss Propaganda Fund No. 1.......... 1,187.50
Refund on cancelled Insurance Policies ...................... 59.68
Refund from Board of Managers ............................ 6,300.00
Refund from Board of Governors ........................... 1,000.00
Interest Hermine Schonthal Publication Fund................. 700.00

Total for Maintenance all Departments.................. $273,492.45

For Hebrew Union College-
Memorial Donations and Bequests .......................... 10,262.50
Special Donation in Memory of Louis I. and Mina Lippman
Aaron, for Purchase of Library for H. U. -C ............ 8,500.00
Subscriptions and Donations for Scholarships ................. 13,048.84
Interest from Endowment Fund Securities ................... 20,907.96
Hebrew Union College Press ............................ 175.85
Dormitory Building Fund Account. ............... $3,536.00
Less: Transfer to Dormitory Building Fund Account 3,536.00

Total for Hebrew Union College ........................ $52,895.15

For Teachers' Institute-
Jacob H. Schiff Foundation for Teachers' Institute............ $3,000.00

For Synagog and School Extension-
Subscriptions........... ... ........................ $ 13,269.50
Summer Services.......................................... 522.41
Religious Text Books .................. ................... 11,142.74

Total for Synagog and School Extension ................ $24,934.65

For Tract Commission-
Subscriptions ............................................. 280.78

For Work in New York City-
Subscriptions through Federation of Jewish Philanthropic
Societies.................... ................... ...... 12.00
Less: Refund to New York School Committee ................ 12.00
For Synagog Pension Fund-
Subscriptions...................................... $50.00
Less: Transfer to Pension Fund Account .............. 50.00


Total Receipts for General Fund ........................


8982


$354,603.03







FINANCIAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "B"-(Continued)

DISBURSEMENTS FOR EXPENSES
Appropriations, Taxes, Refunds, Transfers, etc.
Board of Governors of Hebrew Union College ................... $101,732.06
Special Grant for Purchase of Library ........................... 31,000.00
Board of Managers of Synagog and School Extension. ............. 56,562.18
Board of Delegates on Civil Rights .................. .......... 3,350.00
Executive Board, Direct Expense ............................. 74,703.39
New York Executive Committee ............................... 8,776.98
New York Comumttee for School Extension.................. .... 12,708.65
National Federation Temple Sisterhoods, Appropriation for ........ 18,025.79
Chicago Federation. ......................................... 8,912.57
Religious Schools in Pittsburgh District .............. $1,467.50
Less Refund ...................................... 177.50

1,290.00
Premium and Commission on Bonds Purchased ................... 3,571.46
Accrued Interest on Bonds Purchased ........................... 1,337.11
Local Campaigns ............................................. 15.82
Refund on Paper Stock ................... ......: ............ 7.42
Transfer: Profits to Hermine Schonthal Fund .................... 87.49
On hand in First National Bank for Contingent Disbursements of
all Departments, at October 31, 1921*................... ... 18,070.00

Total Disbursements .............. ................. $340,150.92
Excess Receipts over Disbursements. ............. ............ .. $14,452.11

Note: As against this excess of $14,452.11 there was an over draft of $48,077.86 at the beginning
of the year.
*This amount has since been in part returned.
B. Statement of Cash Balance at October 31, 1921-
Deficit at November 1, 1920............................ $48,077.86
Add-Excess Receipts over Disbursements.......... $14,452.11
Securities Matured and Sold................. 41,500.00

55,952.11

$ 7,874.25
Less-Securities Purchased ...................... $42,004.68
Transfer to Manny Strauss Fund............ 25,000.00

67,004.68
Deficit at October 31, 1921 ................... $59,130.43


C. Statement of Financial Condition of General Fund-
Cash Overdraft at October 31, 1921 ................... $59,130.43
Investments ................................... $148,500.00
Add-Premium and Interest ....................... 1,898.79

150,398.79
Less- Discount .................................. 9,864.32

Net Cost of Investments ...................... 140,534.47
Balance in General Fund ...................... $81,404.04


8983







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "B" Exhibit 1

EXECUTIVE BOARD OF THE UNION

STATEMENT OF DISBURSEMENTS
(Not Including Appropriations for Subsidiary Departments)

For Year Ended October 31, 1921


Stationery and Office Supplies ............................
Telephone ........................ .......... .........
R ent ................................... .... ...........
Office Furniture and Equipment............................
Salaries .................................................
Postage and Expressage ................................ ..
Telegrams ...........................................
Printing ................................................
Mailing List, Upkeep of.................... ..............
Industrial Insurance.....................................
Auditing Books...................... ..............
U nion Bulletin ...........................................
A advertising ..............................................
New York Committee .................................
Resolutions .... ............. ... ... ................
Officials' Bonds Premium.................................
Periodicals ..............................................
Fire Insurance Premium..................................
Refunded to Individuals on Subscriptions .................
Safety Deposit Box Rent .................................
Union Tidings ............................................
Year Book...........................................
Twenty-Seventh Council .................................
Refunders Claimed by Congregations for Money Expended in
Their Local Campaigns........................ .........
Traveling Expenses, Rabbi Zepin .........................
"" Rabbi Schwarz ......................
S" Mr. Singer ..........................
M r. Shinedling ......................
Mr. Popkin ........................
Rabbi Pollak .......................
Less-Amount Advanced to New York Office for Payment of
Bills Contracted in Cincinnati ............... ..........


Total Disbursements ..........................


$ 3,016.71
62.60
1,409.44
2,193.72
29,567.62
3,154.65
1,351.15
7,639.87
337.66
12.53
295.00
18,685.07
243.07
1,576.73
275.00
162.30
39.22
66.60
85.00
47.50
252.89
747.50
422.18

751.99
1,505.96
115.12
377.34
187.00
76.35
45.62 $74,703.39


348.53

$74,354.86


8984







FINANCIAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "B"-Exhibit 2

BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF HEBREW UNION COLLEGE
STATEMENT OF DISBURSEMENTS
For Year Ended October 31, 1921

Salaries of Faculty. ............................................................ $50,990.66
Salaries of Librarian and Staff ................. .................................. 8,790.00
Purchases and Maintenance of Library ........................................... 3,524.53
Salaries of Secretary's Office ...................................................... 2,400.00
Advertising ................ .......................................... ...... 457.00
Graduation Exercises ................. .......................................... 203.00
Catalogues and Envelopes ............... ....................................... 354.50
Stationery, Supplies and Postage................................................ 622.41
Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds ................ .......................... 10,598.58
Insurance ................. ......................................... ....... 2,801.69
Taxes....................... ......... .. 228.64
Department of Hygiene. ................. ...................................... 550.00
Prizes ............... .. ..................................... ........ ..... 525.00
Emergency Loan Fund ...................................................... .. 55.00
H. U. C. Press and other Subventions ................. ........................... 1,616.23
Student Activities ............................................................. 395.80
Scholarship Items ............... ............................................. 14,811.50
Teachers' Institute. ................ ............................................ 2,407.52
Salary Advance ................................................................. 400.00

Total Disbursements................ ............................... $101,732.06


8985






8986


FOTRY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "B" Exhibit 3


BOARD OF MANAGERS OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION
STATEMENT OF DISBURSEMENTS
For Year Ended October 31, 1921
Stationery and Office Supplies ............................ $ 1,220.26
Telephone ............................................... 73.29
Rent ................................................. 824.38
Office Furniture and Equipment .......................... 998.70
Salaries ............................................ 23,396.02
Postage and Telegrams .................................. 615.88
Express .............................................. 693.27
Printing, General .......... .. ........................ 660.59
Mailing List, Upkeep of.............. ....... .............. 337.64
Industrial Insurance. ...................................... 19.59
Supervisors' Expenses .................................. 5,239.86
Text Books, Publishing and Printing ...................... 8,826.81
Summer Services......................................... 856.98
Tract Commission....................................... 3,577.07
Union Home Study Magazine ............................. 4,759.01
Sabbath School Exhibit .................................. 89.56
Board of Editors ................... ................. ..... 353.01
Traveling Expenses, Rabbi Egelson .................$111.10
SMr. Clark .................... 651.01 762.11

Total Disbursements.............................. $53,304.03


Add-Deposited in First National Bank for Contingent Ex-
penditures ......................................
Deposited in Citizens National Bank for Contingent Ex-
penditures ......................................


Less-Refunds deposited in Citizens National Bank.........


3,000.00

300.00

$56,604.03
41.85


$56,562.18


SCHEDULE "B" Exhibit 4
APPROPRIATION FOR NATIONAL FEDERATION TEMPLE SISTERHOODS
STATEMENT OF DISBURSEMENTS
(For Upkeep of Headquarter's Office in Cincinnati)
For Year Ended October 31, 1921
Stationery and Office Supplies. ....................................... $ 604.04
Telephone ................................ .................... .... 31.30
Rent .............................................................. 524.35
Office Furniture and Equipment..................... ............... 998.70
Salaries ......................................................... 15,256.98
Postage .................. .......................................... 38.88
Printing ............................................................. 227.62
Mailing List, Upkeep of.............................................. 337.65
Industrial Insurance ................................... ........... 6.27

Total Disbursements .............................................. $18,025.79







FINANCIAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "C"

UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS

ENDOWMENT FUND

Receipts and Disbursements for Year Ended October 31, 1921

A. Receipts-
Donations ................................ ...... $101,600.00
Scholarships .................................... 6,000.00


Disbursements-


Net Receipts .....................................


$107,600.00

.00

$107,600.00


B. Statement of Cash Balance at October 31, 1921-
Cash Balance at Nov. 1, 1920.........................
Add-Receipts for Year Ended ................... $107,600.00
Securities Matured and Sold ................. 4,000.00




Less- Securities Purchased ........................

Cash Balance at October 31, 1921.............




C. Statement of Financial Condition of Endowment Fund-
Cash Balance at October 31, 1921.....................
Investments ................................... $534,000.00
Add-Premium and Interest...................... 16,179.24

$550,179.24
Less- Discount ................ ................. 9,864.84


Net Cost of Investments ....................

Balance in Endowment Fund.............


$63,861.65



111,600.00

$175,461.65
109,209.22

$66,252.43






$66,252.43






540,314.40

$606,566.83


8987







8988 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.



SCHEDULE "D"

HERMINE SCHONTHAL PUBLICATION FUND

A. Receipts and Disbursements for Year Ended October 31, 1921-

Receipts-
Profit from Sale of Books for Year Ended October 31, 1921.......


$ 87.49


Disbursements-
Refund of Deficit at November 1, 1920........................ 50.00

Excess Receipts over Disbursements ....................... $ 37.49




B. Statement of Fund Cash Balance at October 31, 1921-
Excess Receipts over Disbursements............................ $37.49




C. *Statement of Financial Condition of Hermine Schonthal Publication Fund-
Cash on Hand at October 31, 1921............................ 37.49
Investments .................. ................... $10,000.00
Premium ...................................... 50.00

Net Cost of Investments............................. 10,050.00
Balance in Publication Fund .............................. 10,087.49






FINANCIAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "E" Exhibit 1

UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS

DETAILED STATEMENT OF SECURITIES SOLD
For Year Ended October 31, 1921


Cost
Mortgage, M. A. Selvey............................Donated
Delaware, 0................................ ... $ 3,361.03
Springfield, O., Paving ............................. 1,045.13
U. S. Certificate of Indebtedness .................... 15,015.49
U. S. Sertificate of Indebtedness...................... 25,018.84

Total Securities Sold............................


SCHEDULE "E" Exhibit 2

UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS

DETAILED STATEMENT OF SECURITIES PURCHASED
For Year Ended October 31, 1921
Par Value Premium Discount
Guaranteed First Mortgage Certificate...... $ 6,000.00


City of Hamilton-Library Improvement...
U. S. Certificate of Indebtedness..'........
U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan ...............
St. Bernard, O.-Carthage Pike Improvement
City of Norwood, O.-Revenue Deficiency..
City of Ironton, O.-School District.......
Mahoning County, O.-Road..............
State of Dakota Soldiers' Compensation....
City of Butte, Mont.-Funding ...........
City of Springfield, O.-Street Improvement
City of Lima, O.-General Service No. 1...
City of Roanoke, Va.-Public Improvement.
U. S. First Liberty Loan, Converted.......
U. S. Fifth Liberty Loan.................
Oity of Memphis, Tenn., Refunding.........


4,000.00
25,000.00
4,200.00
25,000.00
15,000.00
10,000.00
15,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
6,000.00
15,000.00
4,300.00
15,000.00
5,000.00


$ 102.80

2.40
1,000.00
438.00
418.71
450.00
475.00
350.00
170.00
160.80


$ 76.00
18.84
$ 575.35 27.76

13.33
106.67
97.50
71.67
171.67
71.67
103.00
18.75 202.50
301.00 62.95
75.00 245.42
556.00 68.13


Total Investments Purchased.......... $179,500.00 $3,567.71 $3,382.35 $1,337.11
U. S. Third Liberty Loan, Donated........ 100.00

Total ......................... .$179,600.00
Note-Accrued interest amounting to $1,337.11 on bond purchases is charged to
the General Fund as this fund receives the benefit of all interest earnings.


Par
$ 1,500
3,000
1,000
15,000
25,000

$45,500


Realization
$ 1,500
3,000
1,000
15,000
25,000

$45,500


Interest


8989









SCHEDULE "E"
o
UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS AND INCOME

At October 31, 1921

ENDOWMENT FUND


Penna. Co. Trust Securities ...................................
Illinois Central R. R. Stock Interest Certificates ..................
Western Union Telegraph Co., Real Estate Bonds................
Newport, Cincinnati Bridge Co., General Mortgage...............
K. K. Bene Yeshurun, School Building.........................
Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern Ry. Consol. Mortgage...........
Choctaw & Memphis R. R., First Mortgage......................
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton R. R., Fifty-Year Mortgage......
Northern Ohio Traction & Light Co. Consol. Mortgage ...........
Delaware, Ohio, Improvement................................
Clarksville, Tenn., Waterworks ...........................
Parkersburg, W. Va., School ..................................
Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry., First Refunding ..........
K. K. Bene Israel, Temple Bonds ..............................
Southern Pacific Ry., First Refunding ..........................
Charleston, W. Va., Refunding.......... ....................
Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio, Refunding ....................
Schaengold Realty Co., Mortgage..............................
Gimbel Bros., 20 Shares Stock .... ......... ...............
Port of Seattle, Wash., Improvement...........................
N. Y. Central & Hudson River R. R., Collateral Gold............
Rothschild & Co., Chicago, Ill., Store Building ..................
Northern Pacific R. R., Prior Lien............................
Union Pacific R. R., First Lien ..............................
Baltimore & Ohio R. R., Refunding...........................
St. Louis-San Francisco R. R., Income Mortgage ................
St. Louis-San Francisco R. R., Adjustment Mortgage............


On Hand
Oct. 31, 1920
(8,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
20,000.00
10,000.00
25,000.00
16,000.00
20,000.00
1,000.00
3,000.00
5,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
16,250.00
15,000.00
5,000.00
2,000.00
5,000.00
2,000.00
10,000.00
12,000.00
6,000.00
11,000.00
15,000.00
10,000.00
3,000.00
1,700.00


Purchased
Cost Par Value Sold
. ... . . . .
.. . ... . . .
.. . ... . . .
.. . ... . . .
.. . .. . . .
.. . ... . . .
.. . ... . . .
.. . ... . . .
. ... . . . .
....... ......... 3,000.00
.. . ... . . .
. . .. . . .
.. . ... . . .
.. . ... . . .
.. . ... . . .
. ... . . . .
.. . ... . . .
.. . ... . . .
. ... . . . .
.. . ... . . .
.. . ... ... .. . ..
.. . ... . . .
. ... . . . .
. ... . . . .
. ... . . . .
.. . ... . . .
. .. . . . . .


Interest On Hand
Rate Amount Oct. 31, 1921
3Y2% $280.00 $8,000.00
4 % 400.00 10,000.00
4%% 450.00 10,000.00
4Y2% 900.00 20,000.00
4 % 400.00 10,000.00
4 % 1,000.00 25,000.00
5 % 800.00 16,000.00
4Y2% 900.00 20.000.00
5 % 50.00 1,000.00
5 % 72.90 ....
4 % 200.00 5,000.00
4 % 400.00 10,000.00
4 % 400.00 10,000.00
4 % 650.00 16,250.00
4 % 600.00 15,000.00
4Y% 225.00 5,000.00
4 % 80.00 2,000.00
6 % 282.50 5,000.00
6 % 120.00 2,000.00
4Y2% 450.00 10,000.00
3Y/2/ 420.00 12,000.00
6 % 360.00 6,000.00
4 % 440.00 11,000.00
4 % 600.00 15,000.00
5 % 500.00 10,000.00
6 % 180.00 3,000.00
6 % 102.00 1,700.00








St. Louis-San Francisco R. R., Prior Lien ...................... 1,500.00 ........ ......... .. ...... 4 % 60.00 1,500.00
Springfield, Ohio, Paving .................................... 1,000.00 .................. 1,000.00 5 % 50.00 ...
Warren, Ohio, High St. Improvement .................. ....... 1500.00 ..... 5 % 75.00 1,500.00
Youngstown, Ohio, School.................................... 7,000.00 .......... ......... ......... 5 % 350.00 7,000.00
M A. Selvey, M ortgage....................................... 1,500.00 .......... ......... 1,500.00 6 % 61.61 ...
Dayton, Ohio, Sewer................... ...................... 1,200.00 .......... ......... ......... 5 % 60.00 1,200.00
Montgomery County, State of Tennessee, Funding. .............. 2,000.00 ............................ 5 % 100.00 2,000.00
U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan .......................... ......... 27,200.00 .......... .................. 44 4% 1,156.00 27,200.00
U. S. Fifth Victory Loan.................................... 25,000.00 15,170.42 15,000.00 ......... 434% 1,187.50 40,000.00
Alliance, Ohio, W aterworks. ................................. 15,000.00 .......... ......... ......... 5 % 750.00 15,000.00
County of Cuyahoga, Ohio, Road Improvement ................... 15,000.00 ......... .. ..... ......... 5 % 750.00 15,000.00
County of Lucas, Ohio, Road Improvement ..................... 6,000.00 .......... ......... ......... 5 % 300.00 00.00
State of Louisiana, Highway Improvement. ...................... 10,000.00 ... .. .. ...... 5 % 500.00 ,000.00
County of Mingo, W. Va., Road Improvement .................. 10,000.00 ................. ....... 5 % 500.00 J,000.00
U. S. First Liberty Loan, Converted............................ 250.00 4,061.95 4,300.00 .. ....... 44% 10.63 4,550.00
U. S. Certificates of Indebtedness ................. ....... ... 15,000.00 ................... 15,000.00 4Y4% 356.25 ...
Portsmouth, Ohio, Sewer.................................... 14,000.00......................... 5 % 700.00 14,000.00
Marion, Ohio, Improvement. ................................ 15,000.00 5%% 825.00 15,000.00 '
Xenia, Ohio, School .......................................... 14,000.00 .......... .. 5Y2% 1,155.00 14,000.00
Pacific Fruit Express Co., Equipment Certificates................ 10,000.00 ............................ 7 % 700.0C 10,000.00 >
Delaware & Hudson R. R., Collateral Trust Certificates ........... 10,000.00............................ 7 % 700.00 10,000.00
Guarantee Title & Trust Co., First Mortgage Certificate No. 1016 6,000.00 6,000.00 ......... 6Y2% 180.90 6,000.00
City of Hamilton, Ohio, Library Improvement ................... 4,178.80 4,000.00 ......... 6 % 240.00 4,000.00
U. S. Certificates of Indebtedness............................. 25,018.84 25,000.00 25,000.00 5Y2% 687.50 ......
St. Bernard, Ohio, Carthage Pike Improvement .................. 26,000.00 25,000.00 ......... 6 % 90.40 25,000.00
City of Norwood, Ohio, Revenue Deficiency................... ......... 15,451.33 15,000.00 ......... 6 0% ..... 15,000.00
City of Ironton, Ohio, School District.................... ...... ....... 10,525.38 10,000.00 ......... 6 % ..... 10,000.00
M ahoning Co., Ohio, Road ............... ................. ......... 15,547.50 15,000.00 ......... 6 % 15,000.00
State of Dakota, Soldiers' Compensation ........................ .......... 10,546.67 10,000.00 ......... 6 % ..... 10,000.00
City of Butte, Mont., Funding. ............................... .......... 10,521.67 10,000.00 ......... 6 % ..... 10,000.00
City of Springfield, Ohio, Street Improvement ................... .......... 10,241.67 10,000.00 ......... 6 % ..... 10,000.00
City of Lima, Ohio, General Sewer No. 1................................ 6,263.80 6,000.00 ........ 6 ..... 6,000.00
City of Roanoke, Va., Public Improvement ............................... 13,327.50 15,000.00 ......... 6 % .... 15,000.00
City of Memphis, Tenn., Refunding............................ .......... 4,512.13 5,000.00 ......... 6 % ..... 5,000.00
U. S. Third Liberty Loan (Donated)........................... .......... .......... 100.00 ......... 41'4 % 2.13 100.00

GENERAL FUND
U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan................................... 77,800.00 3,654.81 4,200.00 ......... 4% 3,70.14 82,000.00
U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan................................... 66,500.00 ...... ................. 4/4% 2,826.25 *66,500.00

Totals ............................................. 608,400.00 181,022.47 179,600.00 45,500.00 29,106.71 742,500.00
*Since this report was submitted, this sum, $66,500 has been transferred to the Endowment Fund in payment of indebtedness.






FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "F"

UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS

ENDOWMENT FUNDS
Hebrew Union College Endowments-
Isaac M. Wise Memorial Fund ....................... $349,010.43
Additional Endowment Funds......................... 87,446.40
Scholarship Fund (Sch. "F", Exhibit 1)................ 70,110.00
Jacob H. Schiff Bequest for Hebrew Union College..... 100,000.00 $606,566.83


Manny Strauss Fund No. 1...............................
Manny Strauss Fund No. 2................................
Hermine Schonthal Publication Fund......................



SCHEDULE "F"-EXHIBIT 1

HEBREW UNION COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS

INDIVIDUAL ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS
William Solomon Rayner Scholarship...................... $ 7,500.00
Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship.......................... 7,500.00
Madeline Wise Rheinstrom Scholarship .................... 6,000.00
Mina and Louis I. Aaron-Free Scholarship................. 7,000.00
Mrs. Sarah Weil Scholarship .............................. 1,000.00
Myer Oettinger Scholarship.............................. 7,500.00
Rev. Dr. Kaufmann Kohler Scholarship..................... 2,500.00
Sol May Scholarship .................................... 10,000.00
Laura Seasongood Scholarship............................. 7,610.00
Ella H. Philipson Prize Essay................... ............ 1,500.00
Emil G. Hirsch Scholarship ............................... 6,000.00
Max Lilienthal Scholarship............................... 6,000.00

Total Scholarship Fund ...............................


25,000.00
25,000.00
10,087.49


$70,110.00


8992







FINANCIAL REPORT.


SCHEDULE "G"

UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS

PENSION FUND

A. Receipts and Disbursements for Year Ended October 31, 1921-

Receipts--
Donations .................................... $ 598.15
Interest on Investments........................... 5,077.67

Total Receipts................................


Disbursements for Expenses-


Excess Receipts over Disbursements................


$5,675.82


.00

5,675.82


B. Statement of Pension Fund Cash Balance at October 31, 1921-
Balance at November 1, 1920 .................... $ 221.73
Add-Receiipts for Year Ended October 31, 1921..... 5,675.82

5,897.55
Less-Investments Purchased..................... 5,807.54

Balance at October 31, 1921 .................. $90.01


C. Statement of Financial Condition of Pension Fund-
Cash Balance ................................ .
Investments ................................. 123,850.00
Less- Discounts ................................. 774.01

Cost of Investments................ ..........

Balance Synagog Pension Fund ...................


$90.01



123,075.99

$123,166.00


STATEMENT OF SECURITIES AND INCOME

In Synagog Pension Fund


On Hand
Oct. 31,
1920
U. S. Third Liberty Loan..... $117,500.00
U. S. Third Liberty Loan.....
U. S. Third Liberty Loan.....
U. S. Third Liberty Loan.....
U. S. Third Liberty Loan.....

$117,500.00


Purchased
Cost Par
Value


$368.23
2,800.08
45.73
2,593.50

$5,807.54


$400.00
3,100.00
50.00
2,800.00

$6,350.00


On Hand
Interest Oct. 31,
Rate Amt. 1921
4.25 $4,993.75 $117,500.00
4.25 $17.00 400.00
4.25 65.85 3,100.00
4.25 1.07 50.00
4.25 2,800.00

$5,077.67 $123,850.00


Respectfully submitted,
GEORGE ZEPIN, Secretary.


8993







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


Report of Public Accountants



Cincinnati, December 13, 1921.
To the President and Members of the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Sirs:
In accordance with your instructions we have examined the books and accounts of
the Union of American Hebrew Congregations for the year ending October 31, 1921,
and beg to submit the following report concerning the books of the Union and the
Schedules and Exhibits mentioned herewith:
We have examined all receipts and disbursements and find same properly entered
upon the books.
We have examined and verified the bonds deposited in the Safety Deposit Vault
at the Central Trust Co. and find that these correspond with the list of bonds given in
Schedule "E" of the Secretary's Report.
Schedules "A", "B", "C", "D", "F" and "G", together with supplementary Exhibits,
of the Secretary's Report contain in our opinion a correct statement of the receipts and-
disbursements for the current year and reflect the true financial condition of the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations as of October 31, 1921.

Respectfully submitted,
RICHARD SMETHURST & COMPANY.
Certified Public Accountants.


8994






The Hebrew Union College







HEBREW UNION COLLEGE.


ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

Board of Governors Hebrew Union College


Cincinnati, November 29, 1921.
To the Executive Board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
Gentlemen:
A chronological report of the transactions
of the Board of Governors of the Hebrew
Union College and other features of inter-
est brought to its attention, covering the
period November 1, 1920, to October 31,
1921, is herewith presented:
November, 1920:
A course of lectures on Jewish Philan-
thropy to the Senior and Junior students of
the College was established by Dr. Kohler.
The first series of lectures in this course was
given by Rabbi Barnet R. Brickner of Cin-
cinnati.
The ICollege received as a gift from Mrs.
Schiff a portrait of the late Mr. Jacob H.
Schiff.
The Board of Governors laid the founda-
tion for the publication of a scientific jour-
nal, to be known as the Hebrew Union
College Annual, with an editorial staff com-
prising Dr. David Philipson, chairman, Dr.
Kaufmann Kohler, Dr. William Rosenau,
Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, Dr. Julian Morgen-
stern, Dr. David Neumark and Dr. Jacob Z.
Lauterbach. It is expected that the first
issue of the Annual will appear in the early
part of 1922.
December, 1920:
Dr. Abraham Cronbach delivered a series
of lectures on "The By-Ways of the Jewish
Ministry" on December 15th and 16th and
gave an account of the spiritual work re-
quired in visiting hospitals and prisons.
Professor Freehof was appointed as the
Faculty member on the Students' Athletic
Board.
Upon recommendation of the Committee
on Library, the Board of Governors appointed
Mr. Maurice J. Freiberg, Dr. K. Kohler, Mr.
A. S. Oko and Dr. David Philipson as a
special committee to report on the sugges-
tion of the Librarian concerning the purchase
of the Freimann Library, in Frankfort, Ger-


many. The committee reported in favor of
the purchase, whereupon the chairman of
the Committee on Library and Mr. Charles
Shohl, chairman of the Finance Committee
of the Executive Board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations, were ap-
pointed a committee of two to make arrange-
ments for the financing of the purchase of
the Library and Mr. Oko's trip to Europe for
the purpose of making the purchase.
The Board of Governors was advised of
the receipt of check for $8,500.00, a gift of
Mr. Marcus Aaron and Mr. Charles I. Aaron
of Pittsburgh, in memory of their parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Aaron-this gift to
be applied toward the purchase of the Frei-
mann Library.

January, 1921:
The Board of Governors was advised by
the Executive Board of the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew ICongregations of the election
of Mr. Harris Weinstock of San Francisco
as a member of the Board of Governors to
take the place of Mr. Henry Wangenheim,
deceased.
Mr. Alfred M. Cohen was re-elected Presi-
dent by accalamation and Mr. Maurice J.
Freiberg was elected Vice-President by ac-
clamation. Isaac Bloom was re-appointed
secretary.


February, 1921:


S.-


Rabbi Horace J. Wolf delivered a series
of lectures on "The Relation of the Pulpit
to Social and Industrial Problems". Mr.
Oscar Leonard addressed the classes in Jew-
ish Philanthropy on "The Treatment of the
Defective and the Delinquent."
Dr. Deutsch expressed his wish to avail
himself during the coming year of his Sab-
batical year, in accordance with the resolu-
tion of the Board passed in June, 1916. Dr.
Deutsch's request was granted, but he sub-
sequently decided not to avail himself of
this privilege, owing to the resignation of
Dr. Kohler as President of the College.
At the meeting President Cohen bore the
following message from Dr. Kohler:
"Dr. Kohler begs to be relieved of the


8997







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


arduous duties and responsibilities of the
Presidency of the College and herewith ten-
ders his resignation to take effect at the
close of the academic year, being thus ad-
vised by his physician. He hopes thereby
to conserve his strength and to be enabled
to devote his time to long cherished literary
work for the rest of his life. He assures
you that the College will ever remain near
and dear to his heart and that he fully ap-
preciates the ever kind cooperation and good
will of the Board in furthering its interests.
He will always be ready to serve its cause
whenever called upon to do so."
Action on Dr. Kohler's resignation was
postponed to a future meeting.

March, 1921:
Founder's Day was celebrated on March
26th with appropriate services in the Chapel.
Rabbi Joseph Rauch of Louisville, Ky., de-
livered the principal address of the day.
Lectures to the class in Jewish Philan-
thropy were given this month by Mr. Maurice
B. Hexter on "Communal Organizations."
Dr. Ludwig Bernstein also delivered a series
of lectures on "The Various Institutions for
the Care of Dependent Children." Mrs.
Siegfried Geismar addressed the class on
"Americanization".
Senior student Jack H. Skirball, who had
completed his work at the College but, ow-
ing to war service in which he distinguished
himself, had not received his degree from
the University, was, upon recommendation
of the Faculty, permitted to be ordained as
Rabbi under the condition that he will not
receive his rabbinical diploma until he shall
have presented to the Faculty evidence of
having received his academic degree from
some university of equal standing with the
University of Cincinnati.
The special committee on the San Remo
Declaration presented 'its final report and
was discharged with thanks.
The resignation of Dr. Kohler as Presi-
dent of the College was accepted at the
March meeting. Dr. Kohler was elected
President Emeritus for life at his present
salary of $7,000.00, effective upon the elec-
tion of his successor. A special committee,
consisting of Rabbis Wolsey, Philipson, Hel-
ler and Levi and Messrs. Alfred Mack and
Seasongood, was appointed to take such ac-


tion with reference to Dr. Kohler's resigna-
tion as seems in its judgment fitting. Presi-
dent Cohen was authorized to appoint a
committee of five, himself included, to con-
sider the selection of a successor to Dr.
Kohler. President Cohen appointed as such
committee Messrs. Aaron, J. Walter Frei-
berg, Pollak and Westheimer. This commit-
tee was later increased to seven members
by the addition of Messrs. Berman and Pritz.
Owing to the death of Mr. J. Walter Frei-
berg, Judge Hoffheimer was made a mem-
ber of the committee in his place.

April, 1921:
The special committee on unreturned stu-
dent loans submitted a report and the sec-
retary was requested to proceed with the
collection of the items mentioned therein.
The Class of 1902 requested and was
granted leave to establish the Rabbi Eli
Mayer Memorial Fund in the sum of $170.00
in memory of their deceased classmate and
colleague, Rabbi Eli Mayer. This fund was
incorporated in the Students' Emergency
Loan Fund, of which Dr. Henry Englander
is custodian.

May, 1921:
Upon recommendation of the Faculty and
the special committee appointed to take such
action with reference to Dr. Kohler's resig-
nation as seems in its judgment fitting, it
was decided to confer the honorary degree
of Doctor of Divinity on Dr. Kohler on
Graduation Day.
Upon recommendation of Dr. Kohler the
question of graduating women as Rabbis was
considered and is still under advisement.
The Board gratefully received and accepted
the Library of the late Rabbi Moritz Spitz
of St. Louis, Mo., donated by his widow.

June, 1921:
With profound sorrow the death of Mr.
J. Walter Freiberg, a member of the Board
of Governors, on June 9, 1921, was officially
announced. A suitable tribute to the mem-
ory of Mr. Freitberg was adopted by the
Board.
Graduation Exercises were held Saturday,
June 4th. The following were ordained as
Rabbis, the number being the largest of any
graduating class in the history of the Col-
lege. The pulpits these graduates are now
occupying are also indicated.


8998







HEBREW UNION COLLEGE.


SRabbi Henry J. Berkowitz, Detroit, Mich.
Rabbi Iser Freund, Pensacola, Fla.
Rabbi Milton Ellis, New York City.
Rabbi Carl N. Herman, Canton, Ohio.
Rabbi Hyman Iola, Wheeling, W. Va.
Rabbi Alvin S. Luchs, Duluth, Minn.
Rabbi Harry S. Margolis, Bridgeport, Conn.
Rabbi Myron M. Meyerovitz, Alexandria, La.
Rabbi Irving F. Reichert, Jamaica, Long Island.
Rabbi Frederick I. Rypins, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Rabbi William B. Schwartz, Montgomery, Ala.'
Rabbi Jack H. Skirball, Cleveland, Ohio.
Rabbi Bernhard J. Stern, Jackson, Mich.
Rabbi Morris H. Youngerman, Lancaster, Pa.
Rabbi Louis Wolsey delivered the Bac-
calaureate Address and Rabbi William B.
Schwartz was the Valedictorian. President
Cohen delivered the Saluatory Address and
announced the award of the following prizes.
The Jacob H. Kaplan Prize of $50.00 to
Nelson Glueck for essay entitled: "The As-
sembly at Usha and its Institutions."
The Ella H. Philipson Prize of $75.00 to
Louis Binstock for essay entitled: "Ezekiel's
Priestly Legislation Historically Treated."
The Fred Lazarus Prize of $100.00 to
Sheldon H. Blank for essay entitled: "The
Jewish Care for the Homeless and Father-
less in Ancient and Modern Times."
The Ben Altheimer Prize of $100.00 to
Samuel Wolk for essay entitled: "Respect
for Old Age as Taught in Jewish Religious
Law."
The Fred Lazarus Prize of $100.00 avail-
able this year for the Senior graduating with
the highest academic standing in the Col-
legiate Department-to Hyman Iola.
The I. Fleischer Prize of $100.00 for the
student of the Preparatory Department at-
taining the highest standing in that depart-
ment-to Joseph Taxay.
The Honorary Degree of Doctor of Di-
vinity was conferred on Dr. Kohler by Dr.
Deutsch.
The B. H. Degree was granted to the fol-
lowing students: Samuel H. Gordon, Louis
H. Schostak and Joseph Taxay.
At the Board meeting Dr. Kohler reported
that arrangements had been completed with
the following students to officiate ibi-weekly
during the coming academic year in the
cities indicated.


Ferdinand M. Isserman, Rockford, Ill.
Julius Mark, Bay City, Mich.
Samuel H. Markowitz, Zanesville, Ohio.
Elihu Starrels, Owensboro, Ky.
Sheldon H. Blank, Jackson, Tenn.
Benjamin M. Frankel, Champaign and Danville, Ill.
Nelson Glueck, Saginaw, Mich.
Walter E. Rothman, Lima, Ohio.
Harry J. Stern, Cairo, Ill.
Michael Aaronsohn, Hamilton, Ohio.
Solomon N. Bazel, Middletown, Ohio.
Louis Binstock, Portsmouth Ohio.
Abraham Feinberg, Portsmouth, Ohio.
Samuel Wolk, Kokomo, Ind.
Mayer Lipman, Ashland, Ky.
The Committee on Applications tentatively
reported favorably on the applications for
admission of twenty-seven young men. This.
number was later increased to thirty-eight.
The following students attained scholar-
ship rank, showing an average of over 94%
in their academic record.


Sheldon H. Blank
Louis Binstock
Samuel Wolk
Theodore Lifschitz


Maurice N. Eisendrath
Lawrence E. B. Kahn
Sidney Regner


The annual report of Dr. Weiss, College
physician, was presented through Dr. J. Vic-
tor Greenebaum, head of the Department of
Hygiene.

Cincinnati, June 21, 1921.
Board of Governors, Hebrew Union College.
Gentlemen:
Allow me to present to you the annual re-
port regarding the medical work of the
Hebrew Union College for the year 1920-21.
1. Fortunately, there was no epidemic dur-
ing the past year among the students.
2. The general health of the student body
has been unusually good and this con-
dition is reflected in the number of pa-
tients that were sent to the hospital,
which was very few.
3: All of the new students (18) have been
examined and efforts made to remedy
their physical defects. The majority of
the defects have been corrected and the
remainder are in process of correction.
4. Some difficulty seems to have arisen dur-
ing the past year in regard to the dental


8999,







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


attention of the College boys. The cus-
tom has been to send the students to a
dentist, who in turn is expected to ob-
tain payment for his work from the stu-
dents, if the student is able to pay,
otherwise he received free treatment. I
believe that the dentist should be classi-
fied somewhat differently from the other
consultants, inasmuch as he is often re-
quired to supply various amounts of ma-
terial, much of which is very expensive,
in addition to giving his time and work.
I feel that a dentist should be designated
as dentist to the Hebrew Union College
and that he should be paid for his work
by the College. I do not know whether
a definite salary could be attached to
this position, because the amount of ma-
terial and the time used is so variable
that it would be difficult to estimate the
cost of work for such a group.

5. The question of a dormitory still stands
as a paramount need in the life of the
students of the Hebrew Union College.
Much has been said concerning this in
previous reports by Dr. Greenebaum and
by me in my report for last year. Look-
ing at it from a medical point of view I
feel that the health and well-being of
the student body can be made much more
satisfactory and can be controlled better
through the medium of a dormitory than
under the present conditions.
I desire to express my thanks for the
hearty cooperation that all of the consul-
tants whom I have called upon have given to
us.
The following figures are a resume of the
entire year's work.
Students seen ............................. 150
Office calls ............................ 195
Complete examinations ............... .... 18
Home calls.... ............. .......... 10
Jewish Hospital calls..................... 57
General Hospital calls. .............. ..... 19
Operations........................... 4
Hours of work ......... .................. 96

Consultants


Dr. Forcheimer.... 15
Dr. Rabkin........ 12
Dr. Jones......... 11
Dr. Schiff......... 1
Dr. Mombach..... 1


Dr. Frankel........
Dr. Tauber........
Dr. Lurie .........
Dr. Freiberg .......
Dr. Iglauer .........


Ten consultants gave fifty-seven examina-
tions and treatments for us.
Respectfully,
H. B. WEISS,
College Physician.

The committee on Hebrew Union College
Press, comprising President Cohen, Mr. Hoff-
heimer, Mr. Berman, Dr. Kohler, Dr. Mor-
genstern, and Dr. Lauterbach, presented a
report containing, among other things, the
information that the volume by Dr. Berko-
witz, entitled: "Intimate Glimpses of a
Rabbi's Career" had been printed and placed
on the market. Upon recommendation of
the Committee, Mr. Oko and Rabbi Zepin
were added to the Committee on Hebrew
Union College Press.
Upon recommendation of the Committee
on Course of Studies it was resolved that a
course in Elocution be introduced as a regu-
lar part of the curriculum.
The matter of eliminating the ninth year
of the College course was referred to a com-
mittee of five for its recommendations.

September, 1921:
The Board was notified of the election of
Mr. Sigmund Rheinstrom of Cincinnati as a
member of the Board of Governors to fill
the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. J.
Walter Freiberg.
Dr. Kohler reported that forty-two students
occupied pulpits in various cities throughout
the country during the fall Holy Days.
The Board received with gratitude a gift
of $100,000.00 for the Endowment Fund of
the College from the estate of the late Mr.
Jacob H. Schiff.
The purchase of the Birnbaum Musical
Collection in Europe by Mr. Oko, the Librar-
ian, was approved. This collection gives to
the Hebrew Union College the distinction of
possessing the finest Jewish liturgical library
in this country.
Rabbi Max Heller presented to the Col-
lege a bust of Professor Masaryk of Bo-
hemia, now President of that Republic. Pro-
fessor Masaryk heroically defended a Jew
charged with ritual murder, and Rabbi Heller,
in making the gift, remarked the distinction
which had come to the Professor, who had
discharged what to him was a conscientious
duty.


9000







HEBREW UNION COLLEGE.


October, 1921:
Dr. Gotthard Deutsch, Dean of the Faculty
and Professor of Jewish History and Litera-
ture at the College for thirty years, passed
away on October 14, 1921. A suitable tribute
to the memory of the dearly beloved friend
and teacher was adopted by the Board.
Numerous messages of sympathy and con-
dolence were received by the Board, notably
from the Dropsie College, the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary of America, the New York
Board of Jewish Ministers and the Chicago
Rabbinical Association.
Owing to the death of Dr. Deutsch the
opening of the College was postponed one
week and took place on Saturday, October
22nd, with the usual exercises in the Chapel.
The registration showed an enrollment of
thirty new students and forty-six present
students, making a total enrollment of seven-
ty-six distributed in the following classes:
Senior-5; Junior-8; III Collegiate-10;
II Collegiate-5; I Collegiate-5; A Grade
-5; B Grade-3; C Grade-11; D Grade
-24.
Of these 21 students are graduates of a
University, 39 are attending the University
of Cincinnati, and 16 are students at High
School.
These students hail from the following
states:
California-2, Colorado-1, Illinois-5, In-
diana-2, Kentucky-1, Louisiana-1, Mary-
land-3, Massachusetts-2, Minnesota-1,


Mississippi-1, Missouri-I, Michigan-2,
New Jersey-1, New York-10, North Caro-
lina-2, Ohio-29, Oregon-1, Pennsylvania
-7, Tennessee-1, Wisconsin-3.

Through the generosity of Dr. Max Lands-
berg our Library was enriched by a large
collection of books from the library of Dr.
Landsberg, who also informed the Board
that in his last will he has bequeathed all
his Hebrew and theological books to the
College.
The date of the annual joint meeting of
the Board of Governors and the Advisory
Board of the College was set for Tuesday,
November 1, 1921, to be immediately fol-
lowed by a special meeting of the Board of
Governors to act on the succession to Dr.
Kohler as President of the College.
Mrs. Caesar Misch of Providence, R. I.,
presented to the College, through Mr. Charles
Shohl, a life-like plaque of the late Dr.
Wise, executed by Professor Boris Schatz
of Jerusalem. This plaque has been promin-
ently placed in the College Building.
The Board of Governors tendered its ob-
ligations to the Sisterhoods of congregations
in many cities, as well as to the National
Federation of Temple Sisterhoods, and to
individual donors, for gifts to the Scholar-
ship Fund of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations for the benefit of College
students. These are contained in the fol-
lowing schedule, together with a list of
other bequests and donations to the College:


SCHOLARSHIPS

November 1, 1920--October 31, 1921

From National Federation Temple Sisterhoods-

The Temple Sisterhood, Atlanta, Ga. (In honor of Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Marx)....
Baltimore Hebrew Congregation Sisterhood, Baltimore, Md. (Adolf Guttmacher
Scholarship).................... .. .... ................................
Sisterhood Oheb Shalom Temple, Baltimore, Md. (Szold-Kaiser Scholarship)....
Har Sinai Sisterhood, Baltimore, Md. (Einhorn Scholarship)......................
The Temple Israel Sisterhood, Boston, Mass.................. ................
McKinley Avenue Temple Sisterhood, Canton, Ohio (In honor of Miss Mary Stern).
Isaiah Woman's Club, Chicago, Ill. (The Isaac M. Wise Memorial Scholarship) ....
Sisterhood B'nai Sholom Temple Israel, Chicago, Ill. (Gerson B. Levi Scholarship)
Plum St. Temple Sisterhood, Cincinnati, Ohio (The Isaac Mayer Wise Scholarship).
Rockdale Avenue Temple Sisterhood, Cincinnati, Ohio (The Dr. Max Lilienthal
Scholarship)........... ........... .................... .........................
Euclid Avenue Temple Sisterhood, Cleveland, Ohio .............................
The Temple Women's Association, Cleveland, Ohio .......... ..............


$350.00

300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
350.00
350.00
350.00

300.00
350.00
350.00


9oo0







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


Woman's Auxiliary Temple Beth El, Detroit, Mich............... ............... 300.00
Sisterhood of Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation, Indianapolis, Ind. (In memory
of departed members for the past year) ............... ................ 350.00
Adath Israel Sisterhood, Louisville, Ky....................................... 300.00
The Ladies' Auxiliary of Children of Israel, Memphis, Tenn. (The 1. M. Wise Scholar-
ship)........ ........................... .............. 350.00
Vine St. Temple Sisterhood, Nashville, Tenn.................... ..... ......... 350.00
Temple Sinai Sisterhood, New Orleans, La. (James K. Gutheim Scholarship)...... 300.00
Sisterhood of Mt. Neboh Congregation, New York, N. Y ........................ 350.00
The Woman's Association of Temple Rodeph Shalom Congregation,, New York,
N. Y....... ............................ .. ............... ............... 350.00
The Sisterhood of Rodef Shalom Congregation, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Contributed by
Mrs. Marcus Rauh and Edwin S. Rauh in memory of Mrs. Aimee Rauh Sun-
stein) ................ .............................. ..................... 300.00
Sisterhood Rodef Shalom Congregation, Pittsburgh, Pa. (J. Leonard Levy Scholar-
ship)...... .............................. ......................... 300.00
Sisterhood of Rodef Shalom Congregation, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Given by Mrs. Meyer
Forst, in memory of her parents Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Falk) ................... 300.00
The Temple Emanu-El Guild, San Francisco, Calif. (The I. M. Wise Scholarship).. 300.00
The Temple Emanu-El Guild, San Francisco, Calif. (In memory of the late Dr.
Jacob Voorsanger) ........................................... ..... ....... 300.00
Sisterhood of Washington Hebrew Congregation, Washington, D. C. (Dr. Abram
Simon Scholarship) ...................... ........................... 300 00
7 Complete Scholarships of $350 each-four from District No. 2, and one each from
Districts Nos. 5, 6 and 9............... ................ ................. 2,450.00
3 Complete Scholarships of $300 each-one from District No. 3, and two from Dis-
trict No. 10............................................. .... .................. 900.00
3 Complete Scholarships of $300 each from District No. 11........................ 900.00
1 Complete Scholarship from the State of Texas................................. 490.00
3 Complete Scholarships of $350 each, comprising amount from Districts Nos. 1, 2,
3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 ................. ........ ........... 1,050.00
1 Complete Scholarship of $350 left over from last year........................ 350.00

From Congregations-
Sinai Congregation, Chicago, Ill.......... ............................. $300.00
Emanu-El Theological Seminary Association, New York, N. Y .................... 205.00
Congregation Emanu-El, San Francisco, Cal. (Elkan Cohen Memorial Scholarship) 300.00

From Individuals-
Mrs. Chas. Kline, Allentown, Pa........................................ 150.00
H. L. Cohn, Baton Rouge, La ........................................ .......... 50.00
The friends of Mrs. Alex Cohn. of Charlestown, W. Va. (In her memory).......... 118.00
Albert Steindler, Chicago, Ill. (To be known as the Carl Steindler Scholarship).... 350.00
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Kiser, Mr. and Mrs. Melville S. Cohn, and Mrs. Sol S. Kiser,
Indianapolis, Ind. (Dina S. Kiser, Scholarship) ............................ 300.00
Maurice Berkowitz, Kansas City, Mo............................................. 350.00
Gustav and J. H. Bernheimer, of Kansas City, Mo. (In memory of I. E. Bernheimer). 100.00
E. J. Reefer, of Kansas City, Mo. (In memory of M. C. and Marie Reefer)......... 300.00
Mrs. Wm. B. Woolner, Peoria, Ill. (In memory of Samuel Woolner) .............. 350.00
S. Simmons, Los Angeles, Calif ............. .. .. ...................... 25.00
Community of Pittsburgh, Pa. (In honor of Judge Josiah Cohen's 80th birthday).. 1,198.00
Mrs. Jacob Kaufmann and family, of Pittsburgh, Pa. (In memory of Jacob Kauf-
mann's birthday)........................................................... 350.00
Estate of Max P. Heavenrich, Saginaw, Mich ................................... 1,250.00
Mrs. Judy Thorman and the local Council of Jewish Women, Terre Haute, Ind. (In
memory of Mrs. Augusta Frank)............................. ............ 350.00


9002







HEBREW UNION COLLEGE.


DONATIONS

Mrs. Blanche P. Meis, of Danville, Ill., in memory of her father, Charles M. Pfeifer. $100.00
Mrs. A. H. Seinsheimer, of Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of her husband........... 100.00
The Friedman Children, of Pittsburg, Pa., in memory of their mother, Nina Fried-
man........................................... ........................ 100.00
Messrs. Marcus and Charles Aaron, of Pittsburgh, Pa., in memory of their father,
Louis I. Aaron, and mother, Mina Lippman Aaron.......................... 8,500 00
Mrs. Conrad Newman and family, of Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of their husband
and father, Conrad Newman ................... ..... .... ................ 100.00
Mr. Milford Stern, of Detroit, Mich., in memory of his mother, Regina Stern...... 100.00
Misses Sadie and Gussie Hyman, of Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of their nephews,
Jerome E. Hyman and Earle J. Hyman ..................................... 200.00
Mrs. Rebecca Steinharter, of Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of her husband, Ben
Steinharter.......................................................... 250.00
Mrs. Cora Hyman, of Kansas City, Mo., in memory of her husband, Alexander Hy-
man. ................... .............. .... .. ....... .................... 100.00
Mr. Moses Moritz, of Michigan City, Ind., in memory of his mother, Henrietta
M oritz............................... ......... ........................... 100.00
Mr. Simon Lazarus, of Columbus, Ohio, in memory of his father, Fred Lazarus ... 100.00
Mrs. Celia Wittekind, of Lancaster, Ohio, in memory of her husband, Alfred Witte-
kind................................ ................. ......... ............. 100.00
Mrs. Alfred Newman, of Brooklyn, N. Y., Miss Rebecca S. Whitlock, and Mrs. Julius
W. Klaus, of Richmond, Va., in memory of their brother, Simon M. Block, and
their sister, Saidie Whitlock Block..................................................... 200.00
Mr. Mark M. Cohn, of Little Rock, Ark., in memory of his son, Victor Cohn...... 200.00
Mrs. Ignatius Green, of Tuscaloosa, Ala., in memory of her husband .............. 100.00
Mr. David Meyer, of Louisville, Ky., in memory of his wife, Janette Meyer........ 100.00
Mrs. Julia F. Block, of Wynne, Ark., in memory of her husband, Ben Block........ 100.00
Mr. J. Lipstate of Tyler, Texas, in memory of his son Wadel A. Lipstate.......... 100.00
Mrs. Levi Rosenberg, of Cincinnati, Ohio. in memory of her husband .............. 250.00
Mrs. Fisher Bachrach, of Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of her mother, Mollie Silver-
glade.............................. ............. ..... .. ..... .. ............. 200.00
Mrs. Millard D. Loewenstein, of Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of her mother, Mollie
Silverglade............. ................................................ 100.00

BEQUESTS
Louis Schroeder, Cincinnati, Ohio. .............. ....... ..................... $200.00
Rabbi Jacob Feuerlicht, Chicago, Ill ................. .. ............... .. 100.00
Mrs. Rosa Silberstein, of Dallas, Texas, in memory of Ascher Silberstein, Rosa
Silberstein, Joseph and Hannah Frank ....................... .......... 5,000.00
Samuel Kahn, Cincinnati, Ohio ............................................. 400.00
Mrs. Lina Frank Hecht, Boston, Mass ................................. 500.00
Mrs. Rosa Karpeles, Cincinnati, Ohio.................... ..................... 100.00
Byron Bear, Richmond, Va......... ................................. ......... 250.00
Jacob H. Schiff, New York, N. Y............................ ............. 100,000.00
Harry Degen, Sr., Pittsburg, Kansas................................... .. ........ 300.00
Sam Baer, Charleston, W. Va................... ............................. 500.00

Respectfully submitted,

ALFRED M. COHEN,
President.

ISAAC BLOOM,
Secretary.


9003







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


The Teachers' Institute
of the Hebrew Union College

By DR. LOUIS GROSSMANN, Principal


During the year 1920-1921 the Teachers'
Institute conducted several Sessions for
Teachers in Jewish Schools, one Session at
New York City, one at Brooklyn, N. Y., one
at Cleveland, Ohio, and one at Chicago, Ill.
The Sessions comprised Courses on the
subjects taught in Jewish Schools, such as
Biblical History, the History of the Bible,
History of the Israelites after the Exile,
Jewish Ceremonies, Jewish Liturgy.
The Sessions lasted two weeks in each
city. Besides these academic sessions, the
Teachers' Institute was represented at a
number of meetings of Association of Jew-
ish Teachers throughout the country, such as
those of the State of Indiana, State of Texas,
Detroit, Mich., Toledo, and Youngstown,
Ohio.
Extension Lectures were delivered at Dal-
las, Waco, San Antonio, Galveston, and
Houston, Texas, Richmond, Va., Birmingham
and Selma, Ala., New Orleans, La., and Little
Rock, Ark.


The year's program calls for Lectures at
Fort Wayne, Ind., before the Association of
Jewish Teachers of Indiana, and that of the
State of Ohio. Also a Course of Lectures
to the Teachers and the Men's Clubs of De-
troit, Mich., and Pittsburgh, Pa. Throughout
the winter Extensive Winter Sessions are
being provided for the teachers of the Cities
of New York, Brooklyn, Chicago, and Cleve-
land.

The Staff of Lectures of the Teachers' In-
stitute comprises: Drs. Henry Englander,
Solomon B. Freehof, Jacob R. Marcus, J. Z.
Lauterbach, Julian Morgenstern, and Louis
Grossmann.
I regret to state that the Faculty of the
Teachers' Institute has sustained an irretriev-
able loss in the death of Dr. Gotthard
Deutsch, whose activities were valuable for
his scholarship, his affability and sympathy
with the students and the example he set for
conscientiousness and devotion to his duties
and the cause of education.


The Library
of the Hebrew Union College

By ADOLPH S. OKO, Librarian


The Library contains over 55,000 volumes.
It is a distinctly Jewish collection, limiting
itself to the fields of Hebraica, Judaica, and,
to facilitate the work of the student, to the
closely allied subjects of Semitica and com-
parative religion.
The recent acquisitions place the Library
in the foremost ranks of the world's greatest
collections of printed Jewish books.
The Dr. A. Freimann Collection
This collection comprises about 8,000 vol-
umes. The owner has specialized in Jewish
history and in certain phases of Jewish liter-
ature. The collection contains many excep-
tionally rare and valuable books, in Hebrew,
Latin, German and French, but it is among


the Hebrew books that we have secured most
of our desiderata. Among the thirty-three
Hebrew incunabula (being nearly one-half
of the Hebrew "cradle-books" known), there
are found a few which until now were not
represented in American collections. Of the
Jewish books printed in the first half of the
sixteenth century, more than one half is con-
tained in this collection-including the early
editions of the Hebrew Bible, the Midrash,
various tractates of the Talmud, and the
Codes of law. Here, too, is found the com-
plete literature of the "Juedische Wissen-
schaft". Other noteworthy features of the
collection consist of long and complete sets
of Hebrew and Judaic periodicals, of the
long run of Responsa volumes and of books


9004







HEBREW UNION COLLEGE.


of certain important authors (e. g., Jacob
Embden). Nearly all the privately printed
(and hence not easily obtainable) mono-
graphs on Jewish subjects which were pub-
lished during the past twenty-five to thirty
years are likewise contained in this collec-
tion.

The Eduard Birnbaum Collection
This collection consists mainly of Jewish
music and liturgy; but it also contains a
large number of scarce and out-of-the-way
books and pamphlets, in various languages,
of a general Jewish character. The collec-
tion comprises about 10,000 to 12,000 vol-
umes and pamphlets (estimated). It is the
most important and greatest, inside its limi-
tations, in the world. It contains about 1,500
manuscripts of Jewish music. As regards
the printed Jewish music, synagogal and


secular, the collection approaches well-nigh
completeness. It contains, besides, the non-
Jewish music which influenced the Synagog
chant. Further, the collection comprises
practically, if not actually, all the books and
monographs that treat on the subject of
Jewish music. It also has a wealth of litur-
gical works of the various rites or Minhagim
(among them a number of the greatest rar-
ity), as well as the almost complete histori-
cal material pertaining to the subject of
Jewish liturgy. The collection is also note-
worthy for its numerous works of Hebrew
and Judaeo-German poetry. During the cur-
rent year there was formed a collection of
art books, etchings, and engravings. The
prints constitute perhaps the most represen-
tative collection of its kind in this country,
and adds an entirely new department to the
Library.


9005


CS







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


The Alumni
of the Hebrew Union College
Alphabetical arrangement and present residence

In order to insure correctness of this list the Alumni are urgently requested to send
notification of any change in their position or in their academic degrees to
DR. HENRY ENGLANDER, Registrar, H. U. C., Cincinnati, O.


1883 Israel Aaron, D. D.t
1916 Samuel J. Abram, M. A., Boston,
Mass.
1901 David Alexander, B. A., Akron, O.
1900 Abraham S. Anspacher, Ph. D., Hart-
ford, Conn.
1919 Garry J. August, A. B., St. Joseph,
Mo.
1918 Nathan E. Barasch, A. B., East
Orange, N. J.
1920 Joseph L. Baron, M. A., Davenport,
Iowa.
1901 Moise Bergman, B. A., Albuquerque,
N. M.
1921 Henry J. Berkowitz,. B. A., Detroit,
Mich.
1883 Henry Berkowitz, D. D., Ventnor
City, N. J.*
1906 Louis Bernstein, B.A., Baltimore, Md.
1912 Israel Bettan, D. D., Charleston, W.
Va.
1901 Joseph Blatt, B. A., Oklahoma City,
Okla.
1908 Joel Blau, B. A., New York, N. Y.
1913 Irving M. Bloom, B. A., New York,
N. Y.
1895 Seymour G. Bottigheimer, B. A., Peo-
ria, Ill.*
1905 Frederick F. Braun, B. A., New York,
N. Y.
1919 Barnet R. Brickner, M. A., Toronto,
Canada.
1900 Abram Brill, B. A., Shreveport, La.
1903 Morris Cahan, B. A., New York, N. Y.*
1887 Edward N. Calisch, Ph. D., Richmond,
Va.
1916 Hyman B. Cantor, M. A.t
1916 Simon Cohen, B. A., Springfield, O.
1899 Simon R. Cohen, B. A., Brooklyn, N. Y.
1896 Frederick Cohn, Ph. D., Omaha, Neb.
1912 Samuel S. Cohon, B. A., Chicago, III.

Those marked with an are located in places
t Deceased.
11 Assistant Professor in Rabbinics in Hebrew
SProfessor of Biblical Exegesis and Biblical
xx Executive Director The Jewish Charitable


1906 Abraham Cronbach, D. D., Chicago,
Ill. x
1898 Max Cohen Currick, B. A., Erie, Pa.
1889 Heiman J. Elkin, B. A.
1921 Milton Ellis, B. A., New York, N. Y.
1898 Hyman G. Enelow, D. D., New York,
N. Y.
1901 Henry Englander, Ph. D., Cincinnati,
Ohio.T
1904 Harry W. Ettelson, Ph. D., Philadel-
phia, Pa.
1919 Abraham Feinstein, M. A., Hunting-
ton, W. Va.
1918 Abraham J. Feldman, A. B., Phila-
delphia, Pa.
1901 Morris M. Feuerlicht, B. A., Indian-
apolis, Ind.
1913 David Fichman, B. A., New Orleans,
La.xx
1920 Solomon Fineberg, B. A., Niagara
Falls, N. Y.
1900 William H. Fineshriber, B. A., Mem-
phis, Tenn.
1919 Joseph L. Fink, M. A., Terre Haute,
Ind.
1903 Henry M. Fisher, B. A., Atlantic City,
N. J.
1893 Charles Fleischer, B. A., Boston,
Mass.*
1902 Solomon Foster, B. A., Newark, N. J.
1908 G. George Fox, Ph. D., Fort Worth,
Texas.
1920 Leon Fram, A. B., Chicago, Ill.
1916 Harvey B. Franklin, Ph. B., San Jose,
Cal.
1892 Leo M. Franklin, B. L., Detroit, Mich.
1915 Solomon B. Freehof, A. B., Cincin-
nati, Ohio.I|
1900 Charles J. Freund, B. S., B. L., To-
ledo, Ohio.*
1921 Iser Freund, B. A., Pensacola, Fla.

stated, but are not officiating rabbis.

Union College.
History in Hebrew Union College.
and Educational Federation.


xJewish Chaplain, Chicago Federation of Synagogues, Chicago, Ill.


9oo6







HEBREW UNION COLLEGE.


1893 Aaron Friedman, M. D., Hoboken,
N. J.*
1917 Benjamin Friedman, B. A., Syracuse,
N. Y.
1904 Harry G. Friedman, Ph. D., New York,
N. Y.*
1889 William S. Friedman, LL. D., Denver,
Col.
1904 Ephraim Frisch, B. A., New York,
N. Y.
1890 Alexander H. Geismar, B. L., Brook-
lyn, N. Y.*
1894 Abram Gideon, Ph. D., New York,
N. Y.*
1904 Alfred T. Godshaw, B. A., Waco, Tex.*
1904 Samuel H. Goldenson, Ph. D., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
1916 Raphael Goldenstein, B. A.
1905 Sidney E. Goldstein, B. A., New York,
N. Y.
1906 Nathan Gordon, M. A., Montreal, Can.*
1894 Bennett Grad, B. A., Milwaukee, Wis.
1891 Samuel Greenfield, B. L., New York,
N. Y.
1889 Moses J. Gries, B. A.t
1909 Louis D. Gross, M. A., Brooklyn, N. Y.
1884 Louis Grossmann, D. D., Cincinnati, O.
1889 Rudolph Grossman, D. D., New York,
N. Y.
1918 Samuel M. Gup, M. A., Providence,
R. I.
1889 Adolf Guttmacher, Ph. D.t
1915 Julius Halprin, A. B., Newark, N. J.
1920 Samuel J. Harris, B. A., Toledo, Ohio.
1920 Bernard Heller, M. A., Scranton, Pa.
1916 James G. Heller, M. A., Cincinnati,
Ohio.
1884 Max Heller, M. L., New Orleans, La.
1921 Carl N. Herman, B. A., Canton,
Ohio.
1898 Abram Hirschberg, B. A., Chicago, Ill.
1891 Samuel Hirshberg, M. A., Milwaukee,
Wis.
1916 Abraham Holtzberg, B. A., Chatta-
nooga, Tenn.
1921 Hyman lola, B. A., Wheeling, W. Va.
1914 Isadore Isaacson, Ph. B., Sioux City,
Iowa.


1919 Edward L. Israel, A. B., Evansville,
Ind.
1900 Pizer W. Jacobs, B. A., Gary, Ind.
1886 Moses Perez Jacobson, B. A., New
York, N. Y.*
1904 Joseph Jasin, B. A., New York, N. Y.*
1891 Israel Joseph.t
1899 Theodore F. Joseph, B. A., Rockville
Center, N. Y.
1902 Emanuel Kann, 8. A., Piqua, O.*
1914 Israel L. Kaplan, 1* A., Jacksonville,
Fla.
1902 Jacob H. Kaplan, Ph.D., Cincinnati, O.
1920 Samuel S. Kaplan, M. A., Meridian,
Miss.
1919 Max Kaufman, A. B.


1899
1902
1909


Israel Klein, B. A., Philadelphia, Pa.
Samuel Koch, M. A., Seattle, Wash.
Louis J. Kopald, M.A., Buffalo, N.Y.


1898 Joseph S. Kornfeld, B. A.x
1903 Solomon L. Kory, B. A., Vicksburg,
Miss.
1903 Nathan Krass, Litt. D., New York,
N. Y.
1883 Joseph Krauskopf, D. D., Philadelphia,
Pa.
1914 Jacob B. Krohngold, B. A., Indian-
apolis, Ind.*
1903 Louis Kuppin, B. A., Chicago, Ill.*
1906 Isaac Landman, B. A., Far Rockaway,
N. Y.
1920 Solomon Landman, B. A., Springfield,
Ill.
1914 Charles B. Latz, M. A., Tulsa, Okla.
1914 Morris S. Lazaron, M. A., Baltimore,
Md.
1902 Maurice Lefkovits, Ph. D., Minne-
apolis, Minn.*
1900 David Lefkowitz, B. L., Dallas, Tex.
1916 Julius Leibert, B. A., Spokane, Wash.
1900 Emil W. Leipziger, B. A., New Or-
leans, La.
1914 Lee J. Levinger, M. A., New York,
N. Y.II
1889 Charles S. Levi, B. A., Milwaukee, Wis.
1897 Harry Levi, B. A., Boston, Mass.
1890 Clifton H. Levy, B. A., New York,
N. Y.*
1907 Felix A. Levy, Ph. D., Chicago, I11.


Those marked with an are located in places stated, but are not officiating rabbis.
t Deceased.
[| Executive Director, Y. M. H. A. of New York City.
x United States Minister to Persia.


9007







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


1916 Morris Lichtenstein, M. A., Athens,
Ga.
1918 Harry S. Linfield, Ph. B., Philadel-
phia, Pa. x
1890 Gustave H. Loewenstein, B. A., New
York, N. Y.*
1905 Meyer Lovitch, B. A., Peoria, I11.
1901 Solomon C. Lowenstein, B. A., New
York, N. Y.i
1921 Alvin S. Luchs, B. A., Duluth, Minn.
1891 Alexander Lyons, Ph. D., Brooklyn,
N. Y.
1918 Wolfe Macht, A. B., Waco, Texas.
1900 Juda Leon Magnes, Ph. D., New York,
N. Y.*
1914 Edgar F. Magnin, B. A., Los Angeles,
Cal.
1914 Louis L. Mann, Ph. D., New Haven,
Conn. *
1902 Eugene Mannheimer, B. A., Des
Moines, la.
1899 Leo Mannheimer, Ph. D., New York,
N. Y.*
1920 Jacob R. Marcus, B. A., Cincinnati,
Ohio.1
1894 Isaac E. Marcuson, B. L., Macon, Ga.
1901 Elias Margolis, Ph. D., Mt. Vernon,
N. Y.
1921 Harry S. Margolis, B. A., Bridgeport,
Conn.
1918 Jerome Mark, A. B., Knoxville, Tenn.
1894 David Marx, B. L., Atlanta, Ga.
1910 Israel I. Mattuck, A. M., London, Eng-
land.
1902 Eli Mayer, Ph. D.t
1896 Harry H. Mayer, B. A., Kansas City,
Mo.
1917 Samuel S. Mayerberg, M. A., Dayton,
Ohio.
1912 Maurice M. Mazure, M. A.
1917 Samuel Felix Mendelsohn, B. A.,
Chicago, Ill.
1906 Louis D. Mendoza, B. A., Norfolk, Va.
1903 Max J. Merritt, B. A., Montreal, Can.


1897 Julius H. Meyer, B. A., Chicago, Ill.*
1901 Martin A. Meyer, Ph. D., San Fran-
cisco, Cal.
1917 Jacob I. Meyerovitz, M. A., St. Paul,
Minn.
1921 Myron M. Meyerovitz, B. A., Alexan-
dria, La.
1900 Jacob Mielziner, M. A., Copenhagen,
Denmark.*
1906 Julian H. Miller, B. A., St. Louis,
Mo.
1919 Albert G. Minda, A. B., South Bend,
Ind.
1918 Louis A. Mischkind, M. A., New York,
N. Y.
1918 Arthur S. Montaz, Ph. B., Uniontown,
Pa.
1902 Julian Morgenstern, Ph. D., Cincin-
nati, 0.$
1901 Alfred G. Moses, B. A., Mobile, Ala.
1898 Leon M. Nelson, B. A., Richmond, Va.*
1895 Morris Newfield, A. B., Birmingham,
Ala.
1898 Simon Peiser, B. A., Cleveland, Ohio.*
1883 David Philipson, D. D., LL. D., Cin-
cinnati, O.
1912 Jacob B. Pollak, M. A., New York,
N. Y.xx
1900 Jacob S. Raisin, Ph. D., D. D., Charles-
ton, S. C.
1903 Max Raisin, LL. D., Paterson, N. J.
1914 Marius Ranson, B. A., Albany, N. Y.
1905 Joseph Rauch, B. A., Louisville, Ky.
1921 Irving F. Reichert, B. A., Jamaica,
L. I., N. Y.
1906 Max Reichler, B. A., New York, N. Y.
1915 Harold F. Reinhart, A. B., Baton
Rouge, La.
1902 Abraham B. Rhine, D. D., Hot Springs,
Ark.
1909 William Rice, T. M., San Francisco,
Calif.*
1917 Harry R. Richmond, B. A.
1917 Jerome Rosen, M. A., Louisville, Ky.


Those marked with an are located in places stated, but are not officiating rabbis.
t Deceased.
SExecutive Secretary N. Y. Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Soc's.
t Acting President, Hebrew Union College.
|I Instructor in Bible and Rabbinics in Hebrew Union College.
xxAsst. Director of Synagog and School Extension in New York City.
x Director, Dept. of Information and Statistics of Bureau of Jewish Social Research.


9008







HEBREW UNION COLLEGE.


199

1909

1913

1894

1908

1904

1885
1891

1921

1889

1919
1919

1893

1919
1916

1880

1909
1921

1906

1918
1920
1904

1915
1916


William Rosenau, Ph. D., Baltimore,
Md.
David Rosenbaum, Ph. D., Austin,
Tex.
Adolf Rosenberg, B. A., Trinidad,
Colo.
Isidor E. Rosenthal, B. A., Lancaster,
Pa.*
Herman Rosenwasser, A. M., San
Francisco, Cal.
Leonard J. Rathstein, B. A., Pine
Bluff, Ark.
Isaac Rubepstein.t
Charles A. Rubenstein, M. A., Balti-
more, Md.*
Frederick I. Rypins, B. A., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
Isaac L. Rypins, B. L., St. Paul,
Minn.*
Joseph E. Sales, A. B.t
Meyer Salkover, A. B., Cincinnati,
Ohio.**
Marcus Salzman, Ph. D., Wilkes-
Barre, Pa.
Ira E. Sanders, A. B., Allentown, Pa.
Israel J. Sarasohn, M. A., Amsterdam,
N. Y.
Tobias Schanfarber, B. A., Chicago,
Ill.
Samuel Schwartz, T. M., Chicago, Ill.
William B. Schwartz, B. A., Mont-
gomery, Ala.
Jacob D. Schwarz, B. A., Cincinnati,
Ohio.
Alexander Segel, A. B., Fresno, Cal.
Abraham I. Shinedling, Joplin, Mo.
Mendel Silber, B. A., M. D., New Or-
leans, La.
Abba H. Silver, M. A., Cleveland, O.
Maxwell Silver, B. A., New York,
N. Y.


1884

1894

1909
1921
1895
1893

1921

1904
1884
1904

1915
1913

1918
1901

1914

1902
1918

1909

1918
1897
1920

1903
1903
1909

1899
1921

1900
1899


Those market with an are located in places stated, but are not officiating rabbis.
t Deceased.
** Instructor in Mathematics, University of Cincinnati.
Assistant Secretary, Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Cincinnati, Ohio.
tt Superintendent Jewish Orphans' Home.
$I Secretary, Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Cincinnati, Ohio.
|1 In Poland with Relief Commission.


Joseph Silverman, D. D., New York,
N. Y.
Abram Simon, Ph. D., Washington,
D. C.
Jacob Singer, M. A., Lincoln, Neb.
Jacob H. Skirball, Cleveland, Ohio.
George Solomon, B. A., Savannah, Ga.
Michael G. Solomon, B. L., Corsicana,
Texas.
Bernhard J. Stern, M. A., Jackson,
Mich.
Nathan Stern, Ph. D., New York, N. Y.
Joseph Stolz, D. D., Chicago, Ill.
Joseph H. Stolz, M. A., Oak Park,
Ill.*
Jacob Tarshish, B. A., Yonkers, N. Y.
Sidney S. Tedesche, B. A., San An-
tonio, Tex.
Jacob Turner, A. B., Chicago, Ill.*
Leon Volmer, B. A., New Orleans,
La.tt
Elkan C. Voorsanger, B. A., New
York, N. Y.II
Isidor Warsaw, B. A.
Philip Waterman, A. B., Kalamazoo,
Mich.
Aaron L. Weinstein, M. A., Fort
Wayne, Ind.
J. Max Weis, A. B., New York, N. Y.
Harry Weiss, B. A., Brooklyn, N. Y.
Harvey E. Wessel, M. A., Asheville,
N. C.
Jonah B. Wise, B. A., Portland, Ore.
Louis Witt, B. A., St. Louis, Mo.
Horace J. Wolf, M. A., Rochester,
N. Y.
Louis Wolsey, B. A., Cleveland, O.
Morris Youngerman, B. A., Lancaster,
Pa.
George Zepin, B. A., Cincinnati, O.tt
Martin Zielonka, M. A., El Paso, Tex.


9009






FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


Class of 1883
Israel Aaron
Henry Berkowitz
Joseph Krauskopf
David Philipson

Class of 1884
Louis Grossmann
Max Heller
Joseph Silverman
Joseph Stolz
Class of 1885
Isaac Rubenstein

Class of 1886
Moses Perez Jacobson
Tobias Schanfarber
Class of 1887
Edward N. Calisch

Class of 1888
None

Class of 1889
Heiman J. Elkin
William S. Friedman
Moses J. Gries
Rudolph Grossman
Adolf Guttmacher
Charles S. Levi
Wm. Rosenau
Isaac L1 Rypins
Class of 1890
Alexander H. Geismar
Clifton H. Levy

Class of 1891
Samuel Greenfield
Samuel Hirshberg
Israel Joseph
Alexander Lyons
Charles A. Rubenstein
Class of 1892
Leo M. Franklin
Class of 1893
Charles Fleischer
Aaron Friedman
Marcus Salzman
M. G. Solomon
Class of 1894
Abram Gideon
Bennett Grad
Isaac E. Marcuson
David Marx
Isidore E. Rosenthal
Abram Simon


The Alumni
Chronological Arrangement

Class of 1895
Seymour G. Bottigheimer
Morris Newfleld
George Solomon

Class of 1896
Frederick Cohn
Gustave H. Loewenstein
Harry H. Mayer

Class of 1897
Harry Levi
Julius Henry Meyer
Harry Weiss
Philip Wolf

Class of 1898
Max Cohen Currick
Hyman G. Enelow
Abram Hirschberg
Joseph S. Kornfeld
Leon M. Nelson
Simon Peiser

Class of 1899
Simon R. Cohen
Theodore F. Joseph
Israel Klein
Leo Mannheimer
Louis Wolsey
Martin Zielonka

Class of 1900
Abraham S. Anspacher
Abram Brill
Wm. H. Fineshriber
Charles J. Freund
Pizer W. Jacobs
David Lefkowitz
Emil W. Leipziger
J. Leon Magnes
Jacob Mielziner
Jacob S. Raisin
George Zepin

Class of 1901
David Alexander
Moise Bergman
Joseph Blatt
Henry Englander
Morris M. Feuerlicht
Solomon C. Lowenstein
Elias Margolis
Martin A. Meyer
Alfred G. Moses
Leon Volmer

Class of 1902
Solomon Foster
Emanuel Kahn
Jacob H. Kaplan
Samuel Koch


Maurice Lefkovits
Eugene Mannheimer
Eli Mayer
Julian Morgenstern
Abraham B. Rhine
Isidor Warsaw

Class of 1903
Morris Cahan
Henry M. Fisher
Solomon L.'Kory
Nathan Krass
Louis Kuppin
Max J. Merritt
Max Raisin
Jonah B. Wise
Louis Witt

Class of 1904
Harry W. Ettelson
Harry G. Friedman
Ephraim Frisch
Alfred T. Godshaw
Samuel H. Goldenson
Joseph Jasin
J. Leonard Rothstein
Mendel Silber
Nathan Stern
Joseph H. Stolz
Class of 1905
Frederick E. Braun
Sidney E. Goldstein
Meyer Lovitch
Joseph Rauch
Class of 1906
Louis Bernstein
Abraham Cronbach
Nathan Gordon
Isaac Landman
Louis D. Mendoza
Julian H. Miller
Max Reichler
Jacob D. Schwarz
Class of 1907
Felix A. Levy
Class of 1908
Joel Blau
G. George Fox
Herman Rosenwasser
Class of 1909
Louis D. Gross
Louis J. Kopald
William Rice
David Rosenbaum
Samuel Schwartz
Jacob Singer
Aaron L. Weinstein
Horace J. Wolf


9010









Class of 1910
Israel I. Mattuck

Class of 1911
None

Class of 1912
Israel Bettan
Samuel S. Cohon
Maurice M. Mazure
Jacob B. Pollak


Class of 1913
Irving M. Bloom
Adolf Rosenberg
David Fichman
Sidney Tedesche


Class of 1914
Isadore Isaacson
Israel L. Kaplan
Charles B. Latz
Morris S. Lazaron
Lee J. Levinger
Edgar F. Magnin
Louis L. Mann
Marius Rabson
Elkan C. Voorsanger


Class of 1915
Solomon B. Freehof
Julius Halprin
Harold F. Reinhart
Abba H. Silver
Jacob Tarshish


HEBREW UNION COLLEGE.

Class of 1916
Samuel J. Abrams
Hyman B. Cantor
Simon Cohen
Harvey B. Franklin
Raphael Goldenstein
James G. Heller
Abraham Holtzberg
Jacob B. Krohngold
Julius Leibert
Morris Lichtenstein
Israel J. Sarasohn
'Maxwell Silver



Class of 1917
Benjamin Friedman
Samuel S. Mayerberg
Samuel F. Mendelsohn
Jacob I. Meyerovitz
Harry R. Richmond
Jerome Rosen



Class of 1918
Nathan Barasch
Abraham J. Feldman
Samuel M. Gup
Harry S. Linfield
Wolfe Macht
Jerome Mark
Louis A. Mischkind
Arthur S. Montaz
Alexander Segel
Jacob Turner
Philip Waterman
J. Max Weis


9011


Class ,of 1919
Garry J. August
Barnet R. Brickner
Abraham Feinstein
Joseph Fink
Edward L. Israel
Max Kaufman
Albert G, Minda
Joseph E. Sales
Meyer Salkover
Ira E. Sanders

Class of 1920
Joseph L. Baron
Solomon Fineberg
Leon Fram
Samuel J. Harris
Bernard Heller
Samuel S. Kaplan
Solomon Landman
Jacob R. Marcus
Abraham I. Shinedling
Harvey E. Wessel

Class of 1921
Henry J. Berkowitz
Milton Ellis
Iser Freund
Carl Herman
Hyman Iola
Alvin S. Luchs
Harry S. Margolis
Myron M. Meyerovitz
Irving F. Reichert
Frederick I. Rypins
William B. Schwartz
Jacob H. Skirball
Bernhard J. Stern
Morris Youngerman






9012


SENIORS
Isserman, Ferdinand M., B. A., Newark N. J.
Mark, Julius, B. A., Cincinnati, Ohio.
Markowitz, Samuel, M. A., Pottstown, Pa.
Starrels, Elihu, B. A., Philadelphia, Pa.
Stern, Harry J., B. A., Steubenville, Ohio.
Sternseher, Wm., B. A., San Francisco, Cal.

JUNIORS
Aaronshon, Michael, Baltimore, Md.
Binstock, Louis, B. A., Memphis, Tenn.
Blank, Sheldon, M. A., Mt. Carmel, Ill.
Frankel, Benjamin M., B. A., Peoria, Ill.
Glueck, Nelson, B. A., Cincinnati, Ohio.
Rothman, Walter E., B. A., Detroit, Mich.
Wolk, Samuel, B. A., Baltimore, Md.
THIRD COLLEGIATE CLASS
Bazel, Solomon N., B. A., Youngstown, Ohio.
Bookstaber, Philip D., M. A., Cincinnati, O.
Bretton, Max, Ambridge, Pa.


Caplan, Harry N4 Baltimore, Md.
Feinberg, Abraham, B. A., Bellaire, Ohio.
Grafmian, Louis E., New York City.
Lifschitz, Theodore, New York City.
Lipman, Mayer, Ph. B., Cincinnati, Ohio.
Nathan, David S., Cincinnati, Ohio.
Urich, Morris, Milwaukee, Wis.

SECOND COLLEGIATE CLASS
Fineberg, Howard, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Finkelstein, Adolph H., Goldsboro, N. C.
Freed, Abraham, B. A., New York City.
Kronman, Harry L., New York City.
Peiser, Walter G., B. A., New York City.

FIRST COLLEGIATE CLASS
Gordon, Samuel H., Portland, Oregon.
Phillips, Samuel, 'Cincinnati, Ohio.
Schostak, Louis H., Cincinnati, Ohio.
Shillman, Samuel R., B. A:, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Taxay, Joseph, Pittsburgh, Pa.


Preparatory Department


GRADE A
Blackschleger, Eugene, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Dorfman, Bernard M., Cleveland, Ohio.
Eisendrath, Maurice N., St. Paul, Minn.
Kelson, Benjamin, B. A., Springfield, Mass.
Neumark, Martha, Cincinnati, Ohio.
GRADE B
Feibelman, Julian B., B. A., Jackson, Miss.
Glazer, Bable, Kansas City, Mo.
Regner, Sidney L., Rochester, N. Y.
GRADE C
Bernstein, Louis, Indianapolis, Ind.
Falk, Gus, New Orleans, La.
Feinberg, David L., Bellaire, Ohio.
Feuer, Leon, Cleveland, Ohio.
Francis, Abraham, Rochester, N. Y.
Greenwald, Milton, Louisville, Ky.
Kahn, Lawrence, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Liebman, Joshua, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Mallin, Herman, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Rosenzweig, Ephraim, Cincinnat, Ohio.
Unger, Sidney, New York City.
GRADE D
Abrams, Max R., Cincinnati, Ohio.
Berkowitz, Benjamin, Cincinnati, Ohio.


Finkelstein, Lionel, Goldsboro, N. C.
Freund, Elk L., Cincinnati, Ohio.
Goldberg, Harrison, Steubenville, Ohio.
Goldburg, Ariel L., Quincy, Ill.
Goldman, Mattis, Cleveland, Ohio.
Graff, Morris, Cleveland, Ohio.
Gumbiner, Joseph H., Detroit, Mich.
Harris, Melbourne, Oakland, Cal.
Hibshman, Eugene E., Cleveland, Ohio.
Hurwitz, Samuel, Ft. Wayne, Ind.
Jacobs, Myron W., Cleveland, Ohio.
Kagan, Henry, Washington, Pa.
Reichert, Victor E., B. A., New York City.
Shapero, David T., Cincinnati, Ohio.
Snyder, Herman E., Reading, Pa.
Spanel, Abraham N., Rochester, N. Y.
Stein, Bertram, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Tavel, Henry, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Taxay, George, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Zigmond, Maurice L., Denver, Colo.

VISITORS
Calisch, Edward N., Richmond, Va.
Shulman, Charles E., Cleveland, Ohio.
Woerner, Irving V., Jackson, Tenn.


FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


Register of Students
1921-22
Collegiate Department







HEBREW UNION COLLEGE.


Degrees Conferred

Doctor of Divinity

1886 David Philipson. 1888 Louis Grossmann. 1910 Abraham B. Rhine.
1887 Israel Aaron. 1894 Rudolph Grossman. 1913 Jacob S. Raisin.
Henry Berkowitz. 1898 Joseph Stolz. 1915 Abraham Cronbach.
Joseph Krauskopf. 1902 Hyman G. Enelow. Israel Bettan.
Joseph Silverman.




Honorary Degrees Conferred

Doctor of Divinity

1883 Solomon Eppinger, preceptor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, February 11, 1890.
1883 Aaron Hahn, rabbi at Cleveland, O.
1887 Benjamin Szold, rabbi at Baltimore, died at Berkeley Springs, W. Va., July 31, 1902.
1890 Henry Zirndorf, professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, December 17, 1893.
1891 David W. Marks, rabbi at London, England, died at London, May 3, 1909.
1892 David Davidson, preceptor H. U. C.
1894 Moritz Lazarus, professor University of Berlin, died at Meran, Austria, April 13,
1903.
1896 Moritz Steinschneider, professor, Berlin, died at Berlin, January 24, 1907.
1898 Moses Mielziner, professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, February 18, 1903.
1901 Emil G. Hirsch, rabbi of Sinai Congregation and professor in the University of
Chicago.
1902 Bernhard Felsenthal, rabbi emeritus, Chicago, died at Chicago, January 12, 1908.
1903 Jacob Voorsanger, rabbi, San Francisco, died at Monterey, April 27, 1908.
1909 Siegmund Mannheimer, professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, December 18, 1909.
1910 Ephraim Feldman, professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, November 16, 1910.
1912 Israel Abrahams, Cambridge, England.
1916 Gotthard Deutsch, Ph. D., professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, October 14, 1921.

Doctor of Hebrew Law

1920 Louis Marshall, LL. D.
1920 Jacob H. Schiff, D. C. S.
1922 Simon Wolf, Washington, D. C.


Bachelor of Theology

1894 Ephraim Feldman, professor H. U. C.
1895 Jacob Voorsanger, rabbi, San Francisco.


Rabbi

1885 Ignatz Mueller, rabbi, Louisville, Ky.


9013






Civil Rights







BOARD OF DELEGATES ON CIVIL RIGHTS.


ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

Board of Delegates on Civil Rights


To the Executive Board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
Gentlemen:
The annual report of the Board of Dele-
gates on Civil Rights is herewith submitted.
As in years gone by there have been prac-
tically the same activities on many subjects.
Immigration Legislation has been enacted
that limits the admission of aliens, and when
the quota has been reached, there are no
admissions until the time-limit has expired.
This has caused great hardships to Eastern
Europe and Polish Jews. The Board issued
some little time ago, the following informa-
tion published in the Jewish 'press:
THE NEW IMMIGRATION LAW
Some Important Points to be Remembered
"I deem it of importance that I should
inform you that the new Immigration Law,
in addition to the hardship of the literacy
clause, carries the hardship in the matter
of quotas. The law as it now stands gives
no discretion to the Department of Com-
merce and Labor, as other portions of the
Immigration Law. do, but the Depart-
ment does in its humane spirit use discre-
tion in certain cases, to-wit, where a wife
and minor children come to the husband
and father, or vice versa; where children
under eighteen years come to their parents;
or where old couples come to join their
children.
During the past week I had a case of a
girl twenty-two years of age coming to
join her sister; she was in every way
eligible to land, but the quota from Po-
land being exhausted she was excluded
and will have to return and await her
chances to come later. In this regard, per-
mission must be obtained by her from the
Secretary of Labor for her to return as
soon as possible after admissions are re-
sumed, otherwise she would have to wait
until an entire year has expired before at-
tempting to come here again.
In regard to the literacy test-the de-
partment has for sometime not only under


this but under the former administration,
been generous in temporarily admitting
aliens, who were illiterates, for short peri-
ods of time from three months to a year,
in order that they may pay a visit to their
relatives. At the end of the temporary
period, a re-examination of the alien is
made, and if in the meantime he or
she has been able to learn to read or
write (especially Yiddish), they are, all
other things being equal, admitted per-
manently. If, therefore, anyone is de-
ported under these conditions it is not the
fault of the Government, but the fault of
the individual.
These things are important and should
be made public in all parts of our country.
Very truly yours,
SIMON WOLF.

Washington, September 20, 1921."
Stays of deportation were secured for a
month, six months, or one year, at the end
of which time, the cases were reviewed, and
all conditions being equal, and if the immi-
grant had improved either mentally or physi-
cally or both, he or she was admitted per-
manently. A few, very few, had become
public charges, but having no relatives
abroad, and guarantees being given by the
Board, they were admitted under bond.
Many admissions to hospitals for treatment
were also secured.
The attempt to evade the laws of the
United States by certain ,people to cross the
Mexican and Canadian borders has caused
a great deal of work, especially to prevent
these people from being deported to Europe.
In the main they were permitted to go back
to either Mexico or Canada. The Depart-
ment of Labor, as in the past years, has
exercised in this matter a generous discre-
tion.
As an example of some of the heart-
rending and trying cases we cite the follow-
ing: In the early part of June last, one of
our friends in Columbus, Ohio, wrote us an
appealing letter regarding a girl of sixteen
years of age, who was mentally not quite up
to standard. She had been admitted to the


9017






FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


United States in December, 1920, for six
months only to visit her parents who lived
in Columbus. She was one of a very large
family. On June 2, 1921, she was ordered to
be taken to Ellis Island for deportation. All
can understand the feelings of the poor
mother. After much labor and argument, we
succeeded in having a further temporary
stay of three months granted, hoping that in
the meantime she would improve sufficiently
to secure a permanent admission. Instead
of this she grew steadily worse, physically,
and being too weak to travel, we again on
September 7, 1921, secured a further stay
of deportation for six months' time. Provi-
dence has now intervened and no further
stay will be necessary. The girl died about
two weeks ago.
The Board has received numerous re-
quests for aid and information from the
Council of Jewish Women, particularly from
New York City and Los Angeles, California,
and in the main we have been successful in
most of the cases sent to us for attention,
and have received 'their acknowledgment in
kind and appreciative terms. The corres-
pondence is too voluminous to quote here.
The Board also has done much work for
the Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid
Society, especially for the Baltimore branch,
which has, as usual, shown its appreciation
in writing and otherwise.
For general information, we wish to state
that aliens of the German race (as well as
those of the Austrian and Hungarian races)
are now admissible to the United States on
the same terms as other aliens are admissi-
ble. They must, of course, have properly
vised passports (as must all other aliens
coming to the United States, with certain
specified exceptions), and must, in addition,
meet the ordinary requirements of the im-
migration laws.
Natives of Russia are also admissible on
the same terms as other aliens are, ir-
respective of the route of their travel to the
United States.
An enormous amount of work has been
done by the Board in helping applicants to
secure passports and vises of passports. In
some instances, as in Polish cases, our Con-
suls abroad have absolute control of the
granting or refusing of vises. Thus in many
instances, cablegrams were sent uselessly,
and often against our advice, but the in-


sistence of the interested parties made need-
less expenditures.
The law requiring passports, vised by U.
S. Consuls from all aliens, which was con-
tinued indefinitely by Congress on March 2,
1921, has raised many serious problems.
While our Consular officials are supposed to
withhold vise of passports only to aliens of
bad character, opposed to our system of
government, and since the Act of May 19,
1921, when the annual or monthly quota of
certain nationalities has been exceeded,
many cases have come within our ken, in
which vise has been arbitrarily withheld on
the one hand and on the other issued with-
out any regard for the 3% quota provision,
resulting in wholesale deportations. That
many of our Consuls abroad are influenced
by unfounded and reckless anti-semitic preju-
dice clearly appeared from extracts from
their reports to the State Department,
coupled with a printed communication to the
House Committee on Immigration last
spring, which attracted wide attention.
Though Secretary Hughes' name appeared
on the letter of transmittal, he very properly
disavowed all responsibility for the extra-
ordinary utterances in question, evidently
intended to induce Congress to change our
national policy as to religious refugees. Our
experiences with this system of Consular
embargo on Immigration, created by the
War, also clearly shows the injustice and
folly of this method of permitting practic-
ally non-renewable exclusions to be made
in star-chamber fashion abroad, much as it
may be desirable to avoid exclusions here,
which ought to have taken place before em-
barkation abroad. Innumerable cases of
arbitrary and unjustified refusals of vises
seem to have taken place, and it seems to be
impracticable to compel Consuls to forward
the papers for revision by the State Depart-
ment here, even in the few cases where the
aliens or their friends 'have spiritt enough to
make much effort. Not infrequent blunders
in withholding vises take place, such as char-
acterized a case specially called to our at-
tention, involving a Polish Agriculturist,
with near relatives here, who had been do-
ing excellent farm labor in Germany for a
couple of years after being taken a prisoner
of war, and who produced unquestionable
certificates as to character, ability and dis-
position. Despite two refusals of vise be-
fore the 3% law limited arrivals of his na-


90go18






BOARD OF DELEGATES ON CIVIL RIGHTS.


tionality, our representative abroad even de-
clined to forward the paper to Washington,
probably to conceal his blunder. Yet the
restrictionists in Congress complain that
scarcely any farm laborers come over here,
though they shut their eyes to such blunders,
as also to the fact that it was freely pointed
out that this would be the natural effect of
the literacy test, as few people with book
learning care to be farm laborers.
Since our last annual report, Congress
has passed the temporary emergency 3%
Immigration Law, after President Wilson
had vetoed it; its support was so great that
President Harding doubtless realized that a
veto would be futile. A year ago, we pointed
out that we did not feel free to oppose a
brief emergency restrictive immigration law,
but we contented ourselves with asking cor-
rection of bad administration provisions.
The present emergency is a two-fold one;
conditions abroad are such among the per-
secuted Jews of Eastern and Central Europe
that the aliens feel that matters can not be
worse than they are at home, and hence all
arguments, characteristic of normal times,
fail at present, as to emigration being largely
automatically self-regulating and dropping
off with bad times here. Congressman
Chandler pointed out in the House that the
discrimination against southern and eastern
Europeans underlying the measure, were
suspected to emanate from a desire to re-
duce the migration of Catholics and Jews.
While some advocates, particularly among
the Immigration Protective League of Boston
may be thus influenced, the House of Repre-
sentatives refuted such claim by expressly
inserting an exception of religious refugees
in the bill in favor of Jews and Armenians,
but the Senate and the Conference Commit-
tee eliminated the clause. Mr. Max J.
Kohler, an active member of this Board, but
in this instance acting independently, has
brought three habeas corpus test cases re-
cently in order to prevent some of the great
hardships attending the enforcement of the
immigration law, and the regulations adopted
under it. A statement prepared by him for
the newspapers and which appeared in part
in the New York Times, Nov. 6, 1921, is
annexed hereto marked "Appendix A".
Since then Mr. Kohler has started, besides
the case therein referred to, involving a
Greek Jewess, two more, one on behalf of a
Greek Christian subject of Turkey from Asia


Minor, and another on behalf of a Russian
Jew, whom the Immigration Bureau insists
on classifying as a Persian because the first
few months of his life were passed in that
country, while his parents (Russian Jewish)
were visiting there. Both of these cases
are now pending undetermined. The ques-
tions involved are of particular importance
as there is grave danger that these un-
American principles will be embodied in per-
manent immigration legislation now being
framed.
But as was so tersely put on one occasion
by the late Jacob H. Schiff, in emphasizing
the importance of our vigorous long-contin-
ued fight for the abrogation of the Russian
passport discrimination against American
Jews-"The Russian Jewish question must
be solved in Russia!" No Pobiedonostzev
programme of killing off one-third of the
Russian Jews, forcing another third into ex-
ile, and the remainder into the bosom of
the church, can be countenanced by even
tacit approval of plans for en masse emi-
gration of East European Jewry. Even
Witte, in his recently published reminis-
cences, conceded that nothing remained for
the United States to do but to abrogate this
Russian treaty. Hence the supreme import-
ance of the "Minority Rights Clause" of the
Treaty at Versailles. It is interesting to
read in the chapter on this subject in "What
Happened in Paris", edited by Colonel House
and Prof. Seyward-which was prepared by
Prof. Morley O. Hudson, one of the legal
advisers of the American Peace Commission,
that these clauses are preeminently due to
President Wilson's initiative and persistent
efforts, while the chief credit for espousing
them vigorously at Paris, belongs to Mr.
Louis Marshall of New York.
We rejoice that our Chairman as early
as January 20, 1915, wrote to the President
of the United States, and not getting an im-
mediate reply, he again wrote on the 9th of
February, 1915, calling the President's at-
tention to the great war and the opportunity
that would be afforded him to secure equal,
political and religious rights to the Jews
when the final treaty would be made, to
which the President sent an answer on the
7th of April, 1915, wherein he said, "You
have my assurance that whenever and what-
ever way it may be possible for me to serve
the interests which you represent, I shall
conceive it a privilege to do so"; and on the


9019







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


12th of April, 1915, in answer to another
letter of your Chairman, he said, "You may
be sure that when we negotiate a new treaty
with Russia, we shall not be forgetful of the
very important matter to which you call my
attention."
Prior to the President's departure for
Paris, your Chairman wrote to him again,
among other things as follows:
"My dear Mr. President, do not forget that,
while Russia in her days of arrogance was
a constant source of persecution, Roumania
and Poland were even worse in afflicting the
Jews, and today, notwithstanding your
trumpet call, and notwithstanding all that is
in prospect for the welfare 'of the respective
peoples, the persecution of the Jew continues.
"It will be a very difficult problem to
handle, not only on account of geographical
and racial conditions, but on account of re-
ligious prejudice that has been handed down
from father to son. Thus you may weld
together certain nationalities, but the other
problem will remain unsolved."
To which the President answered:
"I have read your letter of November 16th
with the greatest 'attention, and you may be
sure that its subject matter has engaged and
is engaging my most serious and anxious at-
tention."
The chairman also rejoices at the fact that
one of his lieutenants, Mr. Kohler, was the
chief one to publish and expound at length
the precedents for such international sup-
port for civil, political and religious liberty
of the Jews the world over. Even Poland
has now, in her constitution, adopted these
minority right clauses, and is beginning to
accord to her Jews, on the basis thereof,
and under desirable conditions, pointed out
by Hon. Henry Morgenthau and Arthur L.
Goodhart, full legal rights, though the
economic boycott is still in force. Rouma-
nia presents a remarkable picture today.
As just pointed out by Dr. Gaster on Oc-
tober 30, 1921, before the Anglo-Jewish
Association, in describing a long visit of
inspection to Roumania, not only do Jews
now enjoy there, all civil, religious and
political rights, notwithstanding the bitter
earlier struggle of decades, 'but many have
been appointed professors, teachers, mem-
bers of the Ministry of Finance, Government
engineers, Mayors of towns, including even
Bucharest) and three were elected to the
legislature. The only trouble is caused-


as pointed out by this ex-Zionist-by a
small minority declining to enter themselves
as Roumanian citizens, claiming Jewish na-
tionality instead, and protesting at the de-
sire of the Jewish rank and file to treat Rou-
mania instead of Palestine, as their coun-
try. By the irony of fate, a prominent
American Jew of Roumanian extraction had
been the chief one to attack the American
Jewish Congress demands for "National
Jewish rights," knowing full well that
Eastern European Jewry understood this
demand to include special Jewish political
rights, and not merely cultural rights, as
a leader of the Congress defined the phrase.
Our organization, however, supplied nearly
all the names that followed those of Henry
Morgenthau and Julius Kahn, on the protest
to the peace conference against such "na-
tional Jewish political rights". The unfortu-
nate experience of the Jews in Palestine lat-
terly were also clearly predicted by us,
despite Zionistic will-o-the-wisps.
Prior to the change of administration, the
Board wrote to President Wilson, Secretary
of Labor Wilson, Assistant Secretary of La-
bor Post, and to Secretary of the Navy,
Daniels, thanking them for the good will
shown on each and every occasion during
the eight years of their incumbency, to which
each responded in appreciative terms.
The Chairman suggested to the President
of the Union to telegraph President Harding
on Armistice Day, which he did in most ad-
mirably selected words.
The following is a copy of that telegram:
"Speaking for the Union of American He-
brew Congregations, and its constituent
membership in all parts of the United States,
I beg to offer our sincere and heartfelt con-
gratulations upon the splendid achievement
of calling together the Nations of the world
to consider plans for beating their swords
into plowshares, their spears into pruning
hooks, and learning war no more. From the
beginning of Israel's history un'to today, its
priests, seers and prophets have visioned the
coming of the day when each man shall sit
in peace under his own vine and fig tree. The
hopes and prayers of Israel are that you may
be the instrument of God to hasten the dawn
of the world's new era of peace and con-
cord."
As evidence of our love of peace from
time immemorial, we quote herewith from
our Union 'prayer book:


9020







BOARD OF DELEGATES ON CIVIL RIGHTS.


"Grant us peace. Thy most previous gift,
O Thou eternal source of peace, and enable
Israel to be a messenger of peace unto the
peoples of the earth. Bless our country that
it may ever be a stronghold of peace, and
the advocate of peace in thie council of na-
tions. May contentment reign within its
borders, health and happiness within its
homes. Strengthen the bonds of friendship
and fellowship between all the inhabitants of
our land. Plant virtue in every soul, and
may the love of Thy name hallow every home
and every heart. Praised be Thou, O Lord,
Giver of peace."
President Harding wrote the following let-
ter to me at the Council at Buffalo:

White House
Washington
May 21, 1921.
My Dear Mr. Wolf:
When the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations holds its annual meeting in
Buffalo, I will be very glad if you will
communicate my greetings to those pres-
ent, and through them to the great Amer-
ican Hebrew community whom they repre-
sent.
Our Hebrew Americans have set a fine
example of patriotism and humanism dur-
ing the stressful years through which we
have been passing, and I want to express
to them the assurance that the Nation
knows and appreciates their great contribu-
tion.
Very sincerely yours,
Warren G. Harding.

Hon. Simon Wolf,
Washington, D. C.
The Board returns its thanks for kind
commendation of the Council as voiced by
the Committee at Buffalo.
In many cities and states our representa-
tives have made brave fights to prevent the
reading of the Bible in the Public Schools,
and to prevent the introduction of the Mer-
chant of Venice as part of the curriculum.
One of our main objects through the year
has been the Americanization of the refu-
gees, not only those of recent date, but those
no less, who have been born and reared here.
Citizenship is the Shibboleth of opportunity
and equality.


Although the subject of the Presidents'
Proclamations has for many years been a
question of vital importance to a large group
of American citizens, yet the insidious dis-
tinction has not been abrogated. Therefore,
as a matter of 'history, the following letter
to President Harding was written:
November 23, 1921.
To the President:
It is barely possible that you have never
given the matter of signing your Thanks-
giving and other Proclamations a thought.
You conclude with the words "In the year
of our Lord". Our Republic is founded on
the separation of Church and State, and
giving the year of our independence is his-
torically and chronologically sufficient.
The words above quoted arouse criti-
cism, not against the believers of Christ,
but as an unnecessary firebrand in a di-
rection where differences have aroused
prejudice.
I am sure you will appreciate my mo-
tives, which are inspired by the loftiest
conception of American citizenship.
Sincerely,
Simon Wolf.
The Henry Ford dastardly campaign of
slander and vituperation still continues, and
the only way of combating it to a finish is to
give him rope enough and he will hang him-
self. It has had one good result-the sober,
sane public opinion of the American people
have condemned this unamerican, cowardly
attack.
As in the past, we can not give too much
credit to our colleague Max J. Kohler, whose
constant unselfishness has been an inspira-
tion, and to whom we are again materially
indebted for many important matters con-
tained in this report.
The Board in common with American
Jewry at large deplores the death of our es-
teemed co-workers, J. Walter Freiberg,
President of the Union, Louis J. Goldman
and Prof. Gotthard Deutsch. They were
good men and true, whose memory will be
cherished by one and all.
The Union has been most fortunate in
electing ICharles Shohl as President. His
zeal for the cause gives assurance of com-
plete success.
Respectfully submitted,
SIMON WOLF, Chairman.


9021








FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


APPENDIX A
Wholesale Deportations Under Our Immi-
gration Laws Conceded to Have
Been Unlawful
To the Editor:
The newspapers during the past few days
have printed references to strong protests
lodged with our State Department by various
foreign Governments against the hardships
resulting from the "3% Immigration Law"
passed by Congress last May, after Presi-
dent Wilson's pocket veto had killed a simi-
lar one two months earlier. It fixes "na-
tionality quotas" for all nationalities, on the
basis of the 1910 U. S. Census (concededly
in order to discriminate against immigrants
not coming from North Western Europe and
who would have had larger quotas under the
census of 1920), and provides that not more
than 3% of each nationality per year may
enter and not more than 20% of this an-
nual quota in any month (with preferences
to certain classes largely exhausting the
quotas). England has made repeated diplo-
matic protests, and the matter was discussed
at length in the English House of Commons
on the 3d inst.; Poland, Italy and other na-
tions and the immigration section of the
League of Nations have also, it is understood,
lodged protests, as hundreds or probably
thousands of unfortunates have been de-
ported during the past few months for no
other reason than alleged excess of their
quotas, after burning all their bridges be-
hind them.
By a strange coincidence, some hours after
a writ of habeas corpus was served Thurs-
day the 3d inst., on the Commissioner at
Ellis Island on behalf of a Greek Jewess of
22, named Bienvenide Uziel, for whom I
was acting, the Immigration Department saw
new light. A new order was handed down
in Washington, purporting to have been is-
sued the day the writ was allowed, but which
was not received at Ellis Island till some
hours after it was served. It ordered that
where the immigrants applying in any month
were of Nationalities whose monthly quotas
had been exhausted, they should be admitted
the next month, and no longer deported
ruthlessly, as long as the annual quotas of
such nationalities were not exhausted. This
is directly in conflict with the Government's
harsh prior course of deporting such unfor-
tuhates, which had been sustained in Sep-


tember by a federal judge's decision in this
city in a case which had not been argued
adequately and the correctness of which I
challenged. It is not clear to me whether
the Department's new order was due to my
contentions, or resulted wholly from the pro-
tests of the foreign countries.
In my petition (which I am expanding
slightly now) I challenged the legality of
this extraordinary law and the departmental
regulations under it on a number of addi-
tional points, and claimed that they were
violative of treaties with a number of coun-
tries and were unconstitutional, because an
arbitrary effort to make admissibility depend
on wholly immaterial and unwarranted racial
distinctions, and to discriminate contrary to
treaty faith against countries of Southern
and Eastern Europe and Asia, such as Italy,
Greece, Spain, Poland, Turkey, etc. It was
also pointed out that Congress expressly
avowed its desire to avoid such treaty viola-
tions, but the Labor Department regulations
are drawn on inconsistent lines, and it is
studiously striving by hook and crook to
prevent judicial construction of these and
related questions in the courts, though the
result is thousands of unlawful deportations.
In my case and some others, it thwarted ef-
forts at judicial review by affecting after the
judicial proceeding started, the release of the
particular persons in question, so as to pre-
vent the courts from establishing that our
government is "a government of laws, and
not of men." In fact, in my client's case,
this young girl arrived on a Greek ship on
October Ist already, the very day a new
monthly quota for Greeks began. Through
some unexplained reason she was discrim-
inated against, and other cases of arrivals
of that day taken up ahead, and she was
entered as having arrived two days later,
after the monthly quota for Greece was ex-
hausted, and ordered deported for that rea-
son, and the Secretary of Labor affirmed the
order, but she was detained meantime at
Ellis Island all this time under oppressive
conditions. I pointed out that the order for
her deportation had involved not merely a
violation of the good old American rule
"first come, first served", and that the quotas
are erroneously figured as used up, by im-
properly including whole classes of persons
that ought not to be counted, but that the
debates in Congress show that no such un-
seemly rush by rival vessels into our ports


9022








BOARD OF DELEGATES u.


to arrive ahead of each other on the first of
the month, and clashes between unfortunate
individuals who reached here practically
simultaneously, was intended by our law-
makers. Mr. Johnson and Senator Colt,
Chairman of the House and Senate Commit-
tee on Immigration, repeatedly assured
members in the debates immediately preced-
ing the bill's passage that persons were not
to be turned back here at all, because the
quotas were exceeded, but immigration was
to be kept within quota limits simply by
having our consuls refuse vise of passport
when the quota was exceeded, under the
passport card. Congressman Siegel, who
strongly opposed the bill on other grounds,
also accepted and reiterated these assur-
ances, as did also others in Congress, but
the gross hardship and lawlessness in the
law's execution by the Immigration Bureau
caused Congressman Siegel to write a public
letter of protest to the President, a short
time ago, though the results were vain, as
the matter was simply remitted to the De-
partment of Labor. I must concede, how-
ever, that the law-which was primarily
fathered by Senator Dillingham-is so badly
phrased that Congressman Johnson should
have had it made definite, before giving
these unintentionally misleading assur-
ances. The matter was made worse be-
cause the Conference tCommittee of the
two houses at the llth hour transferred tw
large classes of returning resident ali( s
(estimated to embrace over a hundred th, -
sand persons, and naturally returning n
large numbers in the early fall) from e
exempt class to the quota class thol h


with a preference there-so that the preva-
lent theory that about 3% of "immigrants"
(strictly so called) were to be admitted each
year, and 20% thereof as a maximum
monthly quota, is entirely deceptive. It is
absolutely impossible for the steamship com-
panies to keep exact track of the aggregate
number of prospective arrivals of any na-
tionality to be charged against the monthly
quotas. Arbitrariness further prevails at
Ellis Island in refusing to let representa-
tives of immigrants transcribe the full re-
cords there, and efforts seem to be made by
overzealous subordinates to thwart service
of writs of habeas corpus, though the fed-
eral Constitution expressly guarantees this
right and to present appeals to the courts
by denying bail. It is to be hoped that
our distinguished Secretary of State-who
as justice of our highest court and Gov-
ernor of New York was particularly zealous
in maintaining the rights of immigrants and
of alien residents-will insist that arbitrari-
ness and efforts to prevent judicial review
in immigration cases shall cease, especially
when serious friction with other countries
results. It is hoped that public opinion, too,
will insist that the Immigration Bureau wel-
come a judicial determination of the serious
o .estions of law and treaty faith involved,
insteadd of harshly and ruthlessly enforcing
laws of doubtful constitutionality, and vio-
lative of treaties, and deporting thousands
of unfortunates illegally, and itself after-
wards from time to time, under pressure,
recognizing that its course has been lawless.
MAX J. KOHLER.
November 9th, 1921


9023






Synagog and School Extension







DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.


ANNUAL REPORT OF

Board of Managers of Synagog and School Extension


Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 31, 1921.
To the Executive Board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations:
Gentlemen: The Jews of the United
States live in considerable numbers in
about 250 large and moderately-sized cen-
ters, and in about 1,500 very small cities.
The scattered groups that inhabit the very
small centers are; for the most part, in-
capable of synagogal organization, because
of paucity of numbers. These groups rep-
resent the most difficult problem of syna-
gog extension.
The greatest aid in the solution of this
problem consists of the rabbis and congre-
gations in the moderately-sized cities. There
is a growing spirit of communal responsi-
bility in the Jewish congregations of our
land that contains the germs of a great
spiritual awakening. Jewish state organiza-
tions are forming. Just now they comprise
Sisterhoods, Religious School Teachers, etc.
Before long Young People's organizations
and congregations will follow this example.
One State Association of Women's Socie-
ties in North Carolina has appointed a Field
Secretary who visits the small hamlets. We
have corresponded with this Field Secre-
tary, supplying literature and guidance, and
have maintained correspondence with
schools and individuals referred to us by
this worker. Another State Organization of
Sisterhoods in Ohio has appointed a Field
Committee that is engaged in a similar
kind of activity.

SUMMARY OF WORK IN SMALL CITIES
The rabbis of congregations in the
smaller centers, and very many in the larger
cities as well, have been untiring in their
efforts to serve the smaller unorganized
groups. Our records contain the names of
48 rabbis who made 360 visits to 108 com-
munities, to conduct services, to teach chil-
dren, to confirm boys and girls, to lead
Study Circles, etc., etc. There have been
laymen also, whose interest in this work


has led them at their own expense to travel
to various points and render appreciable
service for the cause. The details of this
work are to be found in the Statistical
Summary that is appended to this report.
One great source of help to us is the
annual hegira of the students of the He-
brew Union College to the small centers,
where they conduct Holiday services on
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. In these
annual visits they endeavor to link these
small groups with the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations and the National
Federation of Temple Sisterhoods. They
also organize Religious Schools and Study
Circles. Many of the neighboring cities
have availed themselves of the services of
these undergraduates to maintain bi-weekly
congregational activities. Forty-two cities
were visited by the students of the College
this fear.
We are deeply indebted to a layman, Mr.
G. W. Kraker, of Sumter, S. C., who, in the
course of his traveling, has sent us statis-
tics of the Jewish population in 26 small
cities in North and South Carolina. He also
sent us the names of Jewish children of
school age in those towns. We put the
names of these children on our list to re-
ceive the Home Study Magazine. To their
parents we outlined a course of instruction
in Jewish History and Religion for their
children.

MR. MORRIS CLARK, FIELD SECRETARY
We were fortunate in securing the ser-
vices of Mr. Morris Clark in the capacity of
Field Secretary, for a period of eight
months. Mr. Clark visited 17 cities in Wis-
consin and one city in Minnesota. He held
public meetings in almost all of these cit-
ies, and organized congregations, schools,
and Sisterhoods in many towns. For a full
statement of Mr. Clark's activities, see the
Statistical Report. At the close of the sea-
son Mr. Clark severed connections with our
Department to undertake work in a differ-
ent field.


9027







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


JEWS ON FARMS
While the Jews that live in scattered
groups in small towns form a considerable
portion of the field of Synagog Extension,
there are no less than 5,000 Jewish families
living on farms. Some authorities estimate
this group far in excess of the number here
mentioned. Work for this class is extremely
difficult and expensive. We still maintain
our monthly magazine for Jewish children
on farms, to whom it is distributed without
charge, as is also all children's literature
that we publish.

UN-SCHOOLED JEWS IN METROPOL-
ITAN CENTERS

New York City
The largest number of Jews in the
United States live in a few very large cen-
ters. Here, conditions of living and con-
gestion have produced problems unequaled
elsewhere. In New York City the problem
is so great that we maintain a separate of-
fice for this purpose. Rabbi Jacob B. Pol-
lak is in charge of the work, and his task
consists in finding ways of opening Reli-
gious Schools in New York City. Three
have thus far been opened with a com-
bined registration of 1,000 pupils. We en-
joy the cooperation of Temples Emanu-El
and Beth El in these ventures, and our
work is in the hands of a committee of
representative men of. New York. A sepa-
rate report made by the New York Com-
mittee for School Extension forms part of
this report.
Chicago, Ill.
Chicago is another metropolitan center
where we have been at work. Conditions
here have led to a separate line of devel-
opment. The work in the past season has
been conducted by Dr. Abraham Cronbach,
who devoted himself to the inmates of the
many hospitals and correctional institutions
in and around Chicago. Dr. Cronbach's re-
port, which is appended, enumerates 29 in-
stitutions where he has ministered at regu-
lar intervals.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Pittsburgh, Pa., is the center of a very
large group of industrial cities and villages
where many Jewish families reside. Local
activity has opened up 16 schools varying
in size from 20 pupils to 100. Our assist-


ance has been asked in this work and we
have participated in the solution of the
problems presented through our Supervisor
of Synagog Extension in that district, Dr.
Samuel H. Goldenson, of Pittsburgh.

Philadelphia, Pa.
The Department cooperated with the
Board of Jewish Ministers of Philadelphia,
Pa., in arranging for Passover services for
the High School boys and girls of Phila-
delphia. The services were' held in B'rith
Shalom Hall on Saturday and Sunday, April
23d and 24th, and Friday -and Saturday,
April 29th and 30th.

UNIVERSITY RELIGIOUS WORK
Synagog Extension is, however, concerned
not only with the work of organization in
large and small cities, but counts among
its tasks a number of specialized activities.
One of these is Synagog Extension at uni-
versities. We have been engaged in this
work for a number of years, and the gen-
eral principles of this activity are well-
known and generally recognized.
We work with groups in all stages of or-
ganization, Student Synagogs, Student Study
Circles and Jewish Student Bodies that
meet on special occasions. One kind of
work is pursued in universities situated in
large cities which have the cooperation of
the local congregations and resident rabbis.
Altogether a different form of activity must
be cultivated in university centers that are
remote from Jewish surroundings. During
the last year student congregations were
active at the following universities: Cor-
nell, Dickinson, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri,
Princeton and Wisconsin. At many others
Study Circles were formed. About 105 ser-
vices were held at 74 universities by 82
rabbis. The students held Rosh Hashanah
-and Yom Kippur services at Cornell, Mis-
souri, Princeton and Wisconsin. Prayer-
books, Hymnals and Sermon Pamphlets
were supplied by our Department.
Prize Oration Contest
We conducted a Prize Oration Contest
among the Jewish university students dur-
ing the past season in the districts of
three supervisors: Rabbi Harry Levi, of
Boston, Mass., Rabbi Louis J. Kopald, of
Buffalo, N. Y., and Dr. Leon Harrison, of
St. Louis, Mo. A number of orations were


9028








DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.


submitted and the awards made as fol-
lows: A first prize of $50.00 to Mr. Israel
Levine, of Cambridge, Mass., for his essay
on "A Bird's Eye View of Jewish His-
tory"; second prizes of $25.00 each to Miss
Zara Leona Meyers, of Dorchester, Mass.,
for her essay on "How Shall We Interest
Our Jewish Students in Judaism?", and to
Miss Evelyn Grosbayne, of Roxbury, Mass.,
for her essay on "The Jews in the World
War". We are now engaged in extending
this contest to ten districts.

INSTITUTIONAL WORK
Synagog Extension finds a field of work
among the Jewish inmates of hospitals and
correctional institutions. We have men-
tioned above the activity of Dr. Cronbach.
We also have the cooperation of the rabbis
who gave their voluntary services in this
work. Twenty-nine .rabbis made 680 visits
to 62 hospitals and correctional institutions
last year. We cooperate not only in paying
the expenses of these visits but in supply-
ing the inmates with literature in the shape
of magazines, Jewish papers and books.

SUMMER SERVICES
In past seasons most of our work for or-
ganization in connection with Summer Ser-
vices was directed to the States of Michi-
gan and Wisconsin and to a number of
summer resorts in the East. The popular-
ity of the services in Michigan and Wis-
consin had, in most places, reached a stage
where it was no longer necessary to send
organizers to arrange for the services.
During the past summer 275 services
were held in 36 places by 58 rabbis and
laymen. This compares very favorably
with our records of past years. In fact, the
number of services and the number of rab-
bis and laymen conducting them show a
fair increase over the records of previous
seasons.
Following our usual practice, our office
placed at the disposal of the summer con-
gregations, prayer-books and hymnals and
leaflet reprints of portions of the same, to-
gether with placards announcing the ser-
vices at the various summer resorts.
12,759 copies of these leaflet reprints and
of the complete books were distributed.
Rabbis Felix Levy and Leon Fram, of


Chicago, had charge of filling the summer
pulpits in Michigan and Wisconsin.

At many of the summer resorts collec-
tions were made to defray the expense of
the services, and also for various worthy
causes in which the reporters were inter-
ested. The amount received by the De-
partment from this source during the past
season was $522.41.

An innovation in this respect was intro-
duced at Sacandaga Park, Adirondack
Mountains, N. Y., by Rabbi Simon R. Co-
hen, of Temple Beth Elohim, Brooklyn, N.
Y. Rabbi Cohen sent a check for $565.00
for the Dormitory Fund of the Hebrew
Union College. This amount was half. of
the proceeds of a social affair held at that
summer resort.

In transmitting the check Rabbi Cohen
suggested that in the future each Summer
Congregation with which we cooperate be
requested each year to have an affair for
the benefit of one of the Union's activities,
A detailed statement of the services held
during the past summer, together with the
names of those who participated in these
services, is contained in the Statistical
Summary.

THE PUBLICATION OF RELIGIOUS
LITERATURE

Text-Books
We maintain an extensive publishing ana
an active book sales department. We pub-
lish and sell 30 items under the general
category of text-books and accessories.
These are now used by 479 schools, repre-
senting an excellent increase over the pre-
ceding year. In addition to this, we sell
our text-books to many book-sellers and in-
dividuals.
Our text-books are distributed free of
charge to many institutions for juveniles
where religious classes are held. Through,
an arrangement with the National Federa-
tion of Temple Sisterhoods we distribute
books to the free religious schools which
they establish and maintain.
During the last school year we sold and
distributed 31,325 text-books and accesso-
ries; an increase of 4,587 over the preced-
ing year.


9029








FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT


We have published two new items in the
past year, a Bible Game, by Rabbi Louis
Witt, and a pageant, "Ruth", by Miss Eva
Herbst. Our Department has also handled
the publication and sale of a book bearing
the imprint of the Hebrew Union College
Press, "Intimate Glimpses of the Rabbi's
Career", by Dr. Henry Berkowitz.
Three new books are now in the pro-
cess of publication, two of them being He-
brew text-books. When they will have been
published we will have a comprehensive
and modern system for the instruction of
Hebrew in the religious school.
A more detailed account of the status of
publications in preparation and in press
will be found in the report of the Commis-
sion on Jewish Religious Educational Lit-
erature which is submitted as part of this
report.
Home Study Magazine
In February, 1920, we began to sell the
Home Study Magazine to religious schools,
while continuing our practice of distributing
it without cost to children living on farms
and in isolated communities. The magazine
has proved to be very popular with the
children, and the teachers have found it
very valuable to supplement the work in
the classroom.
In our last annual report we noted the
fact that 41 religious schools had become
subscribers for the magazine. In Septem-
ber, 1921, we had 111 school subscribers,
while in October, 1921, 157 schools sub-
scribed for the magazine. We have also
been sending the magazine free to 134 in-
stitutions. In the last fiscal year we dis-
tributed 141,100 copies. The magazine is
published during ten months of the year,
its publication being suspended during July
and August.

Reprints of Prayer-Book and Hymnal
Through the courtesy of the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis we have pub-
lished in pamphlet form extracts from the
Union Prayer-book and the Hymnal. These
reprints contain brief services for Friday
evening, Saturday morning, week-day eve-
ning and week-day morning. We distributed
these pamphlets to student congregations,
summer congregations, to institutions, and
to rabbis for the first service in organizing


a congregation. A number of complete
prayer-books have been sent to institutions
to be placed in their libraries for the use
of the Jewish inmates. During the fiscal
year we have distributed 14,159 reprints,
prayer-books and hymnals.

PUBLICATIONS OF TRACT COMMISSION

The Tract Commission, which is composed
of representatives of the Union and of the
Central Conference of American Rabbis, has
been unusually active in its publications
this year, having resumed the publication of
Tracts.
Sermon Pamphlet
Before the High Holy Days we printed a
pamphlet containing sermons for the Holi-
days of the year. We distributed the
pamphlet to 310 communities without reli-
gious leaders and the balance of the edi-
tion to rabbis and to others on request.

Holiday Press Notices
In advance of each holiday we printed a
description of the holiday and sent the no-
tice to 338 morning papers and 580 evening
papers in the United States and Canada in
the cities that have a large Jewish popula-
tion.

Holiday Calendar
In May, 1921, we printed a calendar con-
taining a list of the most important Jewish
Holy Days. This calendar, together with a
letter, was sent to the presidents of col-
leges and universities and -to superintend-
ents .of schools, asking them to arrange, as
far as possible, that the dates of examina-
tions be fixed on days other than those
listed in the calendar.

The superintendents of institutions for
delinquents and detectives were also circu-
larized, and permission to abstain from work
and observe the holy days was solicited
from the authorities.

Tracts
We have distributed two tracts during
the past season to a newly-constructed
mailing list of 23,000 names of the leaders
of public affairs throughout the country.
Two additional tracts are ready for distribu-
tion in November, 1921, and in February,
1922.


9030






DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.


The annual report of the Tract Commis-
sion is appended herewith as part of this
report.
IN MEMORIAL
J. Walter Freiberg
We have during the past season sus-
tained the loss of a devoted member of this
Board, whose interest in our work and
whose activity in its behalf was an inspira-
tion to his fellow-workers. Mr. J. Walter
Freiberg was a member of the Board of
Managers since 1907. He encouraged every
step in its progress. He was its spokesman
and sponsor on all occasions. We mourn
his loss but cherish his memory.


THE THANKS OF THE BOARD

The thanks of the Board is herewith ex-
tended to the many workers whose names
are mentioned in the appended Statistical
Report and the members of Commissions
and Committees who have labored zealously
for the cause of Israel. The Board claims
no credit for the work described, but trusts
that in recounting what these men have
done, it may be the source of inspiration to
others to do likewise.
Respectfully submitted,

CHARLES SHOHL, Chairman,
GEORGE ZEPIN, Secretary.


9031






FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


Annual Report
of the New York Committee
for School Extension


New York, October 31, 1921.
To the Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension,
Gentlemen:
When in 1916 our Committee, after a
careful survey of religious educational con-
ditions in the Boro of the Bronx, decided
to establish the Ezra Hebrew School at
1745 Washington Avenue, in the very heart
of the Jewish population of that neighbor-
hood, it was our aim to remedy the crying
need for religious facilities in the Bronx.
For a period of five years the Ezra Hebrew
School has been conducted as a daily reli-
gious school, and very soon after its in-
ception, it became one of the most impor-
tant Jewish educational institutions, not
only in the Boro of the Bronx, but in the
entire city.
That our work is now past the experi-
mental stage is attested by the fact that
during the past year two similar schools
have been organized. On April 1, 1921, at
953 Southern Boulevard, we organized
the Beth El Hebrew School, in conjunction
with Temple Beth El. In September, 1921,
we established our third school, the Emanu-
El Hebrew School, in cooperation with
Temple Emanu-El. Our three schools now
have over 750 children in attendance.

EZRA HEBREW SCHOOL
We are working under great difficulties
at the Ezra Hebrew School. The physical
accommodations are becoming poorer each
year. The building, occupied ever since the
organization of this school, has deterio-
rated very rapidly. It is absolutely neces-
sary, if we are to continue our good work,
that new and better quarters be found, or
that the building which it is at present oc-
cupying be improved so as to meet with the
requirements of a school of its size.


Registration and Attendance
The average registration of the Ezra He-
brew School during the past year has been
about 435, a decrease of forty from the pre-
vious year. This is due to the poor condi-
tion of our building and the establishment
of several new schools in the neighborhood.
The very satisfactory record of attendance,
however, has been maintained, averaging
between 85% and .95%, as a result of our
system of investigating absentee pupils.
Sessions
Sessions are held, as heretofore, from 4
to 8 p. m. on week-days and from 9 to 1
on Sunday. During the first three years
the children attend one hour daily and
from the fourth to the sixth year inclusive
they receive one and one-half hours of in-
struction daily. An assembly is held every
Sunday morning, at which. English and He-
brew hymns are sung and recitations by
the children given. A short talk by one of
the teachers or the principal concludes the
service. Weekly assemblies of the same
character are also held at our other schools.
Sabbath Services
A Sabbath Service is conducted on Satur-
day afternoons. The average attendance
has been between 75 and 100. The service
is conducted by the children entirely, under
the supervision of one of our teachers.

Parents' Association
The Parents' Association, which has been
in existence almost since the beginning of
our school, has continued to function as
heretofore. It is taking a marked interest
in all the activities. Parents' Association
Committees visit the classes frequently.
The Association continued to extend a help-
ing hand to the poor children of the school.
It arranged an outing for the children and


9032








DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.


supplied all the refreshments. Several
medals were awarded by it at the closing
of the last school year in June, 1921, to
the best children in the school who distin-
guished themselves in conduct and deport-
ment. The Association numbers over 125
active members.

Graduation Exercises
On June 22, 1921, the second graduation
exercises of our school were held. A very
impressive program was arranged, and ad-
dresses were delivered by Mr. Daniel P.
Hays, Mr. Henry M. Toch and Mr. Ludwig
Vogelstein of our Committee. The hall was
well filled by parents and friends. Diplo-
mas were awarded to three boys and two
girls, and certificates to three boys who
had completed their post-graduate courses.

Students' Organization
One of the most important events during
the year was the formation of a Students'
Organization at the Ezra Hebrew School.
We have always realized that the most ef-
fective method of teaching is to create an
interest in and a desire on the part of the
child to participate in the activities of the
school. School spirit is a great incentive
to good scholarship. As a result of this
organization, all the extra-curricula activi-
ties are now united under one head, and
self-government among the pupils was in-
stituted. More than 75% of the pupils
joined the Students' Organization; they
elected their own officers and their own
monitors. Inter-class and inter-school ac-
tivities resulted. This organization has
been of vast assistance in improving the
work of our school.

BETH EL HEBREW SCHOOL
The Beth El Hebrew School was organ-
ized April 1, 1921. One of the large rooms
located on the third floor of the Hunt's
Point Palace, 163d Street and Southern
Boulevard, was converted into three class-
rooms and an office. It will accommodate
200 children. At the present time 170 are
registered and are in daily attendance.
Sessions are conducted daily from 4 to
7 p. m. except on Sundays, from 9 to 12.
Parents' Association
A Parents' Association has been organ-
ized and two meetings held, at which mat-


ters affecting the welfare of the school
were discussed. School Clubs and a Stu-
dents' Organization are now being formed.

EMANU-EL HEBREW SCHOOL
This is the youngest of our three schools,
and was organized on September 3, 1921.
It is located in the New State Bank Build-
ing, 809 Westchester Avenue. Although
only two months old, 172 children are en-
joying its benefits. This school also meets
every afternoon from 4 to 7, except on Sun-
days, from 9 to 12. Nine classes are in
session every day. It is already winning
for itself a place in the neighborhood and
the parents speak encouragingly of its work.

Curriculum
During the past year several changes
have been made in the curriculum used in
our schools. Heretofore the course of
study covered a period of eight years. It
was found, however, that this was imprac-
tical, as very few children continued to at-
tend so long a period. The curriculum was
therefore modified to cover six years. Dur-
ing the six years the ground covered is as
follows:

Hebrew
Our course in Hebrew aims to teach our
children to read fluently and become thor-
oughly familiar with the Prayer-book and
Bible. During the first year the Reshith
Daath is used; this is followed by Rabbi
Reichler's Manual, which serves as an in-
troduction to the Prayer-book.
Prayer-book
Great emphasis is put on this subject.
Since practically all our children attend or-
thodox synagogues where the service is
conducted entirely in Hebrew, it is neces-
sary that they read fluently and understand
the prayers. The structure and contents of
the Prayer-book are explained and almost
all the prayers are translated.
Bible
During the second year the translation of
the Bible is begun. Commencing with the
simple narrative portions, the more diffi-
cult sections are translated until the whole
Pentateuch is completed. In the higher
grades the Books of Samuel, Isaiah and the
Psalms are studied.


9033








FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


History
The aim of this course is to give our
children a thorough and comprehensive
knowledge of the history of our people.
During the first year only stories and le-
gends from Jewish Literature are told.
From the second to the sixth year, the en-
tire history of Israel from creation to mod-
ern times is presented. The sixth year is
devoted to a general review, based on the
great characters of Jewish history.

Religion and Observance
These subjects are taught largely in con-
nection with history, Bible and the Prayer-
book. The meaning of all the Jewish holi-
days, customs and ceremonials of the home
and synagogue are carefully explained.
This course aims primarily to point out the
beauties of all Jewish customs, ceremonials
and practices.

CONCLUSION
The past year has been an important one
in the history of our movement. It marks


the beginning of a new period. Until a
year ago we were merely experimenting.
We had only one school in the Bronx. Now
we are expanding. The new schools have
been organized and plans for the organi-
zation of a third new school are rapidly
maturing.
Through the establishment of these
schools, the New York Committee for School
Extension is helping solve the problem of
religious education in New York City. Un-
til practically every Jewish child in New
York has been afforded an opportunity to
attend a Hebrew School, where he can re-
ceive instruction in the history and ideals
of Israel, we must not relax, but on the
contrary, increase our endeavors to attain
the great object we had in view when the
first Bronx school was organized.

Respectfully submitted,
DAVID LEVENTRITT,
Chairman.
JACOB B. POLLAK,
Assistant Director.


9034







DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.


Annual Report of the
Commission on Jewish Religious
Educational Literature


Cincinnati, O., Oct. 31, 1921.
To the Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension.
Gentlemen:
Your Commission is pleased to report a
year of fruitful activity.

New Publications
Two new publications have appeared dur-
ing the year just concluded:
(a) A Bible Game, by Rabbi Louis
Witt, which is intended to serve as a sup-
plementary aid to class-room instruction.
(b) Ruth-A Pageant, by Miss Eva
Herbst, for Succoth or Shabuoth.

In Press
Two books are in press and will appear
during the next few months.
(a) Rabbinic Wisdom-a Midrashic
Miscellany, by Miss Jennie Reizenstein,
is suitable for the class-room and 'also as
a gift book. It is now at the bin" -5.
(b) Hebrew Primer, I Max
Reichler, consists of prrctically three
books, a Teacher's Book, a Pupil's Book
and a set of Perception Cards. The book
is now being plated.

Manuscripts Accepted
Your Commission has accepted Rabbi
Reichler's manuscript on "The Ten Com-
mandments", which is Part III of the He-
brew Manual. With the publication of this
book, the Commission will have placed on
the market a complete course in Hebrew for
religious schools, beginning with instruction
and practice in reading, imparting a knowl-
edge of the Prayer-book, and concluding
with a course on the Ten Commandments
*in Hebrew.


Manuscripts in Committee

Various sub-committees of the Commis-
sion are reading ten manuscripts, including
text-books on Post-Exilic History for
Teacher and Pupil, a Bible Reader for
Teacher and Pupil, a Book on Holiday En-
tertainments, and several Tableaux, Plays
and Pageants.

Two manuscripts, of which sample chap-
ters have been submitted to the Commis-
sion, are in the process of completion. One
is on "The History of the Jews in America",
and the other on "Synagog Service".

Meeting of the Commission
Your Commission held one meeting dur--
ing the past year, in February, 1921, at
New York City. A full day was devoted to
the discussion of the business at hand,
and many principles for further action were
decided upon. Committees were appointed
to seek writers of text-books, Bible Readers,
and Hand Books for teachers covering Bible
History. A special Committee was ap-
pointed to investigate the subject of pub-
lishing books for domestic reading and gift
purposes.
The Commission recommended to the De-
partment of Synagog and School Extension
that it look into the practicability of hand-
ling slides and films for religious schools.
The members of the Commission take
this means of extending their sincere thanks
to the Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension for their invaluable as-
sistance and cooperation.

Respectfully submitted,

DAVID PHILIPSON,
Chairman.


9035







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


Annual
The Tract
Cincinnati, O., October 31, 1921.
To the Board of Managers of
Synagog and School Extension.
Gentlemen:
The outstanding features of our work
during the past year 'were the construction
of an up-to-date mailing list and the be-
ginning of the distribution of Tracts.

MAILING LIST
A mailing list was constructed consisting
of about twenty-three thousand names of
Judges, Legislators and State Executives;
of Presidents and Professors of about fifty
Universities and Colleges; the Editors of
Morning and Evening Newspapers; Editors
of Religious Publications; Public Libraries
and Libraries of Universities and Colleges;
the leading Ministers of the Catholic, Meth-
odist, Lutheran and Unitarian Denomina-
tions; members of the Executive, Legislative
and Judicial Departments of the United
States Government.

DISTRIBUTION OF TRACTS.
Two tracts were distributed during the
past year as follows:
Tract No. l-"What Do Jews Believe?"
by Dr. H. G. Enelow, was distributed on
May 1, 1921.
Tract No. 2-"The Jew in America", by
Dr. David Philipson, was distributed on
August 1, 1921.
Tract No. 3-"Jew and Non-Jew", by Dr.
Martin A. Meyer, is to be distributed Nov-
ember 1, 1921.
Tract No. 4-"Jewish Ethics", by Dr..
Samuel Schulman, is to 'be distributed Feb-
ruary 1, 1922.
During the course of the year the Com-
mission voted on the selection of subjects
for subsequent tracts. A list of proposed
subjects was forwarded by the Chairman
of the Commission to each member thereof,
asking him to indicate which subjects he
deems of first importance for the prepara-
tion of tracts. The assignment of these sub-


Report of
Commission
jects to writers is still in the hands of the
Commission.
By a vote of the Commission authority
was granted to sell tracts to congregations
or sisterhoods for general distribution.
Thus far sixteen congregations have availed
themselves of this privilege and have pur-
chased 8,675 tracts.

SERMON PAMPHLET
Before the high holidays the Commis-
sion, through its sub-committee on Annual
Sermon Pamphlet, under the chairmanship
of Rabbi Samuel Hirshberg, of Milwaukee,
Wis., published a pamphlet containing thir-
teen sermons for the various holidays of
the year. This pamphlet was distributed
to 310 communities that were without reli-
gious leaders.
The pamphlet contained the following
sermons:
The New Year and the New Life, Rabbi
Frederick Cohn, Omaha, Neb.
Faith-A World Moving Force, Rabbi
Tobias Schanfarber, Chicago, Ill.
Life-A Round Trip, Rabbi Jacob H. Kap-
lan, Cincinnati, O.
The Royal Crown, Rabbi Nathan Krass,
New York, N. Y.
The Eleventh Hour, Rabbi Harry Levi,
Boston, Mass.
Israel's Opportunity and Call, Rabbi
Alexander Lyons, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Let Us Rejoice, Rabbi Richard M. Stern,
New Rbchelle, N. Y.
Burdens and Burden Bearing, Rabbi
David Goldberg, Wichita Falls, Texas.
Our Greatest Modern Need, Rabbi Sam-
uel J. Abrams, Boston, Mass.
Mordecai, the Jew-And Some Jews,
Rabbi Abraham J. Feldman, Philadel-
phia, Pa.
What Is Equality? Rabbi Edward N.
Calisch, Richmond, Va.
The Inspiration of the Past, Rabbi George
Solomon, Savannah, Ga.
At Sinai, Rabbi Samuel Thurman, St.
Louis, Mo.


9036







DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.


HOLIDAY PRESS NOTICES
In advance of each Holiday, press notices
descriptive of the Holiday were sent to 338
morning papers and to 580 evening papers
in the United States and Canada, in cities
that have a large Jewish population.

HOLIDAY CALENDAR
A Calendar containing the most important
Jewish Holy Days of the year was sent, to-
gether with a letter, to presidents of Col-
leges and Universities and to superinten-
dents of Public Schools asking that examin-
ations be scheduled on days other than
those mentioned in the calendar.


The same calendar together with a letter
was sent to superintendents of institutions
for delinquents and detectives who were re-
quested to permit the Jewish inmates to
abstain from work on those Holy Days.
The thanks of the Tract Commission are
gratefully tendered to the Board of Man-
agers of Synagog and School Extension
whose office was at the disposal of the
Tract Commission in carrying on the va-
rious activities enumerated above.
Respectfully submitted,
H. G. ENELOW,
Chairman.


9037







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


Report of Rabbi Abraham Cronbach

Jewish Chaplain

FOR THE PERIOD NOVEMBER 1, 1920 TO NOVEMBER 1, 1921


This report will be, in some respect, a
reiteration of the report for the period end-
ing January 1, 1921, covering the first four-
teen and a half months of my activity. The
endeavors enumerated in that report have
been continued and most of the plans form-
ulated therein have been carried out.
The schedule of visits as it stood No-
vember 1, 1921, will be found in Appen-
dix I. The classification of institutions,
with Jewish population figures as they stood
November 27, 1921, for those institutions
for which a list could be kept, will be
found in Appendix II.
During the year I have reduced my visits
to the Home for Incurables from once a
fortnight to once a month owing to the
shrinkage of the Jewish population.
Regular visits to the Deborah Club have
been discontinued for the following reasons:
1. Unavailability of a suitable hour.
All of the boys spend their days at work
or at school. Many of them spend their
evenings at work, study or recreation.
2. The boys have ready access to Sinai
Temple, which is one block from the
Club. Other excellent Temples are with-
in walking distance. The Club is neither
a prison nor a hospital, the inmates be-
ing free to come and go. I deem it ad-
visable to reserve my time and strength
for institutions less favorably situated in
this regard.
Further mention is made of the Deborah
Club elsewhere, enumerating plans for the
future.
On August 8, 22, September 5, 19, 26,
invited by the Council of Jewish Women, I
visited the Council Home at Western
Springs, Illinois. This is an institution op-
erated during the summer only. I plan to
visit once a week during the summer of
1922.


On August 4, at the invitation of the
Jewish Home Finding Society, I added to
my itinerary the town of Marengo, to in-
struct the seven dependent Jewish boys re-
siding on farms in that vicinity. We are
still grappling with the difficulty occasioned
by the necessity of bringing the boys over
bad roads from distant farms.

INSIDE WORK
By this I mean duties performed inside
of the institutions as distinguished from
visits to homes, correspondence, publicity,
solicitations, conferences, etc., carried on
outside of the institutions, and called in this
report "Outside Work". The six types of
inside ministration enumerated in the pre-
vious report have been continued.

1. Children's Classes.
These classes have been continued at all
of the juvenile institutions listed as "penal"
and at the following listed as "curative":
Frances Juvenile Home, Municipal Tuber-
culosis Sanitarium, Chicago-Winfield Sani-
tarium and, as occasion required, at Rest
Cottage. The gatherings at Park Ridge,
Glenwood, Marengo and, in part, at Coun-
cil Home, are also juvenile. The subjects
have been Bible Narrative, Holiday His-
tory, Jewish Customs and Jewish Ethics.
The object has been religious inspiration.
This phase of the work has developed many
gratifying features. Singing has become a
regular part of the work at Winfield and at
the Municipal Sanitarium. Singing was dis-
continued at the Geneva School for lack of
time and of population.

2. Adult Assemblages.
These are held at all of the adult penal
institutions, at Rest Cottage, Rest Haven,
Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium, Chicago
-Winfield Sanitarium and at the Council
Home. The assemblages at the Home for
Incurables were discontinued for lack of


9038







DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.


population. Those at Oak Forest were dis-
continued owing to the refusal of the syna-
gogue-keepers to allow me the use of the
Orthodox Synagogue and my inability to
gain access to Mr. Paul Rissman, President
of the Chicago Aid Society for Incurable
Orthodox Jews, which owns the synagogue.
Further reference to this. matter is made
elsewhere in this report.
These adult meetings, without many ex-
ceptions, have been successful both in point
of attendance and of interest. There has
been particular improvement over last year
at the Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium-
thanks to Mr. Israel Cowen, President of
the Chicago Federation of Synagogues, who,
together with Mr. Charles Weinfeld, ac-
companied me to the institution on March
16, 1921, where a brief interview with Supt.
Happel adjusted the difficulty about "holi-
day passes", for which I had been obliged
to bear the blame, somewhat to the detri-
ment of my work. Almost immediately a
more gracious spirit asserted itself at the
institution.
Where feasible, the Union Prayer-book is
used at the adult gatherings. The discus-
sions, which are often conversational, touch
institutional problems and questions of the
day, as well as questions of moral and re-
ligious import.

3. Bed-Visiting.
Visiting of the bed-ridden occurs at the
three general Hospitals, at the Oak Forest
Infirmary, and at all of the institutions for
the tubercular, although only on a very
small scale at Winfield. Eucouragement,
consolation and religious inspiration are the
objects.

4. Welfare Work.
This comprises the treats provided by co-
operating societies and individuals; coopera-
tion with the Jewish Consumptives' Aid So-
ciety in its fruit and clothing distribution at
the Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium; holi-
day dietary at the Joliet Penitentiary, in con-
nection with the Freda Robinson Circle; holi-
day dinners at the Pontiac Reformatory;
Chanukah, Purim, Pesach and Succoth
treats at all of the juvenile and some of the
adult institutions; incidental gifts of cloth-
ing, car-fare, tobacco, candy, cake, money,
soap, candles, pictures, stamps, etc.; matzos
at all of the institutions on Pesach, etc.


Other phases of Welfare Work, such as
visits, communications and conferences are
mentioned under "Outside Work".

5. Rabbinic Officiation.
This is the most meager part of my work,
and desiredly so, my object being not reli-
gious conformity but religious inspiration.
My record shows an emergency marriage
on March 8, 1921, at the Oak Forest Tu-
berculosis Hospital, and funerals of insti-
tutional inmates on November 17, 1920,
April 15 and April 19, 1921. Kaddish is,
on rare occasions, recited at the New
Prison, at the Penitentiary, and at the Mu-
nicipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium, and was
part of the Atonement Services at the
House of Correction and at the Pontiac
Reformatory. Seder was conducted for the
children at the Municipal Tuberculosis
Sanitarium and for the convicts at the Jo-
liet Penitentiary. The Chanukah light
kindling is ceremonially performed at all of
the institutions visited on, or near Chanu-
kah, and the Lulab and Etrog either cere-
monially utilized or simply displayed at the
institutions visited on or near Succoth.
Rosh Hashanah services were conducted
by me at Rest Cottage, Rest Haven, Chi-
cago Home for Girls, the Boys' Parental
School, House of Correction, Geneva School,
St. Charles School, Joliet Penitentiary and
Pontiac Reformatory. Mr. Jacob Rosenthal
assisted at the House of Correction.
Yom Kippur Services were conducted by
me at Boys' Parental School, Chicago Home
for Girls, Pontiac Reformatory, Joliet Peni-
tentiary, Rest Cottage, Rest Haven, Munici-
pal Tuberculosis Sanitarium, Winfield Sani-
tarium, Geneva School, St. Charles School.
Mr. Jacob Rosenthal assisted me at the
House of Correction, and conducted two
services, an evening service and an after-
noon service, at the Michael Reese Hospital.
Mr. Rosenthal has returned the check sent
him for his labors.
By means of my welfare fund, I was en-
abled to have the Glenwood boys attend the
services at the Chicago Home for Jewish
Orphans, where they received attentions for
which the Superintendent, Dr. Leopold Deu-
telbaum, deserves great thanks.
Mr. Julian Gusfield conducted the Pesach
service at the House of Correction, and
Rabbi Tobias Schanfarber at Rest Haven.
Rabbi S. Felix Mendelsohn officiated on


9039







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


Succoth at the Municipal Tuberculosis
Sanitarium and Dr. Joseph Stolz on Sim-
hath Torah at the Winfield Sanitarium.

6. Presentation of Reading Matter.
An immense amount of reading matter
was distributed. The $171.04 spent on
books and periodicals represents only a
minor part of the reading matter loaned or
presented. The Department of Synagog
and School Extension has supplied me lib-
erally with its Bulletins, Study Magazines
and leaflets, all of which are careful used.
The list of donors indicates the copious sup-
ply of old books and periodicals which I
have at my disposal. The number of Yid-
dish books lent me or given me by the
Public Library has reached the total of 130.
My endeavor is to leave some reading mat-
ter with every English-reading inmate I meet,
and to provide Yiddish, German or Hebrew
reading matter for all who desire it.

OUTSIDE WORK
1. Publicity.
Every week a paragraph is sent to the
Chicago Israelite, the Chicago Sentinel, the
Jewish Chronicle, Urpila and the Reform
Advocate. Twenty-four of the public ad-
dresses which I have made during the year
dealt with my work. An article on my
work appeared in the Union Bulletin of Oc-
tober, 1920, issued November, 1920. My
Hebrew Union College addresses of Decem-
ber, 1920, were published in the Hebrew
Union College Monthly of February, March
and April, 1921. In these articles will be
found numerous details touching the Chap-
laincy which are beyond the scope of an
annual report.

2. Communications.
A large part of my welfare work consists
in communicating by mail or wire with
friends or relatives of inmates or others
whose sympathy, counsel or assistance is
desired. The 1,839 letters sent during the
year, mounting as high as 217 during the
holiday month, September 15 to October 15,
1921, represents only a part of my corre-
spondence. Circular correspondence is per-
formed for me by the stenographer of Mr.
Immanuel Olshansky, local representative
of the U. A. H. C. Included in "circular
correspondence" are the notices of meetings
frequently sent to institutional inmates.


Such notices are almost indispensable, con-
sidering the fluctuations of institutional
population. The 1,839 letters also say
nothing of the more than 600 New Year
cards sent in September, 1921.
There were 809 telephone messages, be-
sides long distance messages and telegrams
costing $18.51. This does not include vari-
ous message charged to the Welfare Fund
and to the Jewish Welfare Board, as men-
tioned below.

3. Interviews.
This has grown to be a considerable part
of my work. Ex-inmates of institutions fre-
quently wish to see me for various reasons,
usually assistance. I plan to keep a record
of such interviews in the future. The num-
ber is considerable. Occasionally I meet
relatives of inmates not only in behalf of
the inmates but also in behalf of the rela-
tives themselves. The number of home
visits this year was 29; considerably smaller
than during the previous year owing to the
prohibition of such visits by several insti-
tutional heads.
Mention has already been made of the
interview of March 16 with Supt. Happel
of the Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium,
Mr. Israel Cowen, Mr. Charles Weinfeld, as
well as myself participating.
On September 21st, I met with Rev. Nor-
man H. Camp, of the Hebrew Mission, and
five other men representing organizations
endeavoring to convert Jews to Christianity,
and entered my protest against proselytism
in public institutions. The meeting passed
in a friendly spirit. The men consented to
heed my protest, but pleaded inability to
control the zeal of their less expert subor-
dinates. They made the reciprocal request
that Jewish preachers refrain from abusing
the missionaries.
On August 17th, I conferred with Mr.
Morris Karpf, head of the Social Service
Bureau, Mr. Karpf having invited me to
discuss with him closer cooperation between
his work and mine. On September 15th I
sent Mr. Karpf my proposals in writing, the
receipt of which was acknowledged Septem-
ber 16th.
On October 28th, I met with a Committee
of the Council of Jewish Women's Organi-
zations to work out plans for avoiding
duplication.


9040







DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.


4. Reciprocity.
Under this I include "Outside Work" not
immediately concerned with my institutional
duties, yet devolving upon me by virtue of
my rabbinic functions. For a number of
months, April to July, 1921, acting for the
Chicago Rabbinic Association, I attempted
organization work for the Jewish Welfare
Board at Ft. Sheridan, Great Lakes and
Camp Grant. Besides the 24 addresses
dealing With my work, I have delivered 10
addresses on other subjects at various
places during the year.
More closely allied to my work was the
address on "Dancing" delivered under my
auspices by Miss Neva L. Boyd to all of
the inmates, non-Jewish as well as Jewish,
of the Geneva School on October 23, 1921.
Similarly, an address delivered by me to all
of the Joliet Penitentiary inmates on Oc-
tober 23, 1921, at the invitation of Chaplain
Andrew J. Patrick. I wish that similar in-
vitations were extended me by other insti-
tutions.

PLANS
Of last year's plans all have been car-
ried out excepting that of obtaining a Chap-
lain's Choir. Mrs. Henry' A. Klein, repre-
senting the Council of Jewish Women, is at
present endeavoring to organize such a-
choir.
The plan of having Yiddish speakers at
Oak Forest proceeded successfully until
April 12th, Rabbis Fram, Aaron, Cohen,
Mendelsohn and Fischer having, under my
auspices, addressed the inmates most ac-
ceptably. On April 12th Rabbi Lassen, a
conservative colleague, was to speak. En-
tering the synagogue a few hours before
Rabbi Lassen's expected arrival, I found a
new custodian in charge who peremptorily
informed me that the synagogue was not
at my disposal. The new custodian neither
knew nor cared about the permission duly


granted me by the synagogue officials, or
about the complete satisfaction all of my
speakers had given to everyone concerned,
or about the awkwardness of cancelling a
meeting for which all arrangements had
been completed.
I have done everything in my power to
have the privilege restored, but thus far
unsuccessfully. Letters sent to the presi-
dent of the organization have not been an-
swered. Telephone connections have been
unobtainable. Even a personal call has
failed to secure access. The protracted and
serious illness of Mr. Rissman, the presi-
dent, is undoubtedly among the causes of
this difficulty.
I continue, however, in my endeavor.
Should I be refused the privilege of bring-
ing Yiddish-speaking colleagues, I shall ask
for permission to conduct gatherings for
the English-speaking, non-Orthodox in-
mates of whom the number is considerable.
Friendlier cooperation with the Chicago Aid
Society for Incurable Orthodox Jews is
much to be desired.*
Among my plans for the coming year is
work at the Ruth Club for Girls and the
Deborah Club for Boys, notwithstanding
the difficulties enumerated. My new plan
is to visit both clubs on or near Chanukah,
Purim, Pesach, Shabuoth, perhaps Tisha
B'ab, Full Moon of Ellul and Succoth, to in-
struct the residents regarding the several
holidays. I have already paid the Succoth
visit to the Ruth Club.
The following appendices give detailed
information:
Appendix I. Schedule.
Appendix II. Classifications.
Appendix III. Receipts and Disbursements.

Since writing the above, I have heard
from Mr. Rissman, who informs me that
his own organization intends to provide
speakers both in Yiddish and in English.


9041







FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT.


APPENDIX I

Schedule of Institutional Visits
November 1, 1921


Weekly


Fortnightly or Monthly


9:00 a. m. Rest Cottage
9:00 a. m. Rest Cottage (Past and future plans involve visits
11:00 a. m. Council Home (Summer to Ruth and Deborah Clubs at in-
Monday only) tervals not yet regularized;
2:00 p. m. Michael Reese Hospital Also to the Edward Heines Hospital
5:00 p. m. Rest Haven

8:15 a. m. Glenwood
8:15 a. m. Oak Forest T. B. Hosp.
Tuesday 10:30 a.m. Oak Forest Infirmary
2:30 p.m. Presbyterian Hosp.


9:00 a. m. County School The Chicago Home for Girls is
Wednesday 12:00 noon House of Correction visited monthly at any convenient
enesay 2:00 p. m. County Hospital hour that may present itself.
5:00 p. m. Juvenile Detention

9:30 a. m. New Prison, Lockport
12:00 noon State Penitentiary, Jo-
liet
3:00 p. m. State Reformatory,
Thursday Pontiac
10:00 a.m. Marengo
1:15 p. m. St. Charles School
4:00 p.m. Geneva School

9:00 a.m. Frances Juvenile Home
10:00 a.m. Home for Incurables
(Monthly)
2:00 p. m. Girl's Parental School
Friday 4:45 p.m. Boy's Parental School 3:00 p. m. Fresh Air Hospital
3:00 p.m. Adult Meeting, Munici-
pal Tuberculosis San-
itarium

8:00 a.m. Municipal Tuberculosis 1:15 p.m. Park Ridge School
Sanitarium 2:00 p.m. Winfield Sanitarium.
Saturday 10:00 a. m. Same. Children's Meet- Children's Meeting.
ing 4:00 p. m. Same. Adult Meeting.


9042




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