• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Form of application for member...
 Executive board
 Proceedings of the executive...
 President's report
 Financial report
 Report of the board of governors...
 Report of delegates on civil...
 Report of the board of managers...
 The work of the supervisors and...
 Boards and commissions of...
 The executive board
 List of constituent congregati...
 Memorial tablets
 Index






Group Title: Proceedings of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations ...
Title: Annual report of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072104/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations
Alternate Title: Annual report, <197475>
Physical Description: v. : ; 21-26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Union of American Hebrew Congregations
Publisher: May & Kreidler
Place of Publication: Cincinnati Ohio
Publication Date: 1892-
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Reform Judaism -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 19th (1892)-
General Note: Vols. for 1891/92-<, 1921/22> include Proceedings of the 7th-<28th> biennial council.
General Note: Imprint varies.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072104
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: The Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica
Holding Location: The Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 04750396
lccn - 06007872
issn - 8755-0652
 Related Items
Preceded by: Proceedings of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Form of application for membership
        Unnumbered ( 3 )
    Executive board
        Unnumbered ( 4 )
    Proceedings of the executive board
        Page 8207
        Page 8208
        Page 8209
        Page 8210
        Page 8211
        Page 8212
        Page 8213
    President's report
        Page 8214
        Page 8215
        Page 8216
    Financial report
        Page 8217
        Page 8218
        Page 8219
        Page 8220
        Page 8221
        Page 8222
        Page 8223
        Page 8224
        Page 8225
        Page 8226
        Page 8227
        Page 8228
        Page 8229
        Page 8230
        Page 8231
        Page 8232
        Page 8233
        Page 8234
        Page 8235
        Page 8236
        Page 8237
        Page 8238
        Page 8239
        Page 8240
        Page 8241
        Page 8242
        Page 8243
        Page 8244
        Page 8245
        Page 8246
    Report of the board of governors of the Hebrew Union College
        Page 8247
        Page 8248
        Page 8249
        Page 8250
        Page 8251
        Page 8252
        Page 8253
        Page 8254
        Page 8255
        Page 8256
        Page 8257
        Page 8258
        Page 8259
        Page 8260
        Page 8261
        Page 8262
        Page 8263
        Page 8264
        Page 8265
        Page 8266
    Report of delegates on civil rights
        Page 8267
        Page 8268
        Page 8269
        Page 8270
        Page 8271
        Page 8272
    Report of the board of managers of synagog and school extension
        Page 8273
        Page 8274
        Page 8275
        Page 8276
        Page 8277
        Page 8278
        Page 8279
        Page 8280
        Page 8281
        Page 8282
        Page 8283
        Page 8284
        Page 8285
        Page 8286
        Page 8287
        Page 8288
        Page 8289
        Page 8290
        Page 8291
        Page 8292
    The work of the supervisors and deputies of synagog extension
        Page 8293
        Page 8294
        Page 8295
        Page 8296
        Page 8297
        Page 8298
        Page 8299
        Page 8300
        Page 8301
        Page 8302
        Page 8303
        Page 8304
        Page 8305
        Page 8306
        Page 8307
        Page 8308
        Page 8309
        Page 8310
    Boards and commissions of the Union
        Page 8311
    The executive board
        Page 8312
        Page 8313
        Page 8314
        Page 8315
        Page 8316
        Page 8317
        Page 8318
        Page 8319
        Page 8320
        Page 8321
        Page 8322
        Page 8323
        Page 8324
        Page 8325
        Page 8326
    List of constituent congregations
        Page 8327
        Page 8328
        Page 8329
        Page 8330
        Page 8331
        Page 8332
        Page 8333
        Page 8334
        Page 8335
        Page 8336
        Page 8337
        Page 8338
    Memorial tablets
        Page 8339
        Page 8340
        Page 8341
        Page 8342
        Page 8343
        Page 8344
        Page 8345
        Page 8346
        Page 8347
        Page 8348
        Page 8349
        Page 8350
        Page 8351
        Page 8352
    Index
        Page 8353
        Page 8354
Full Text






|rnoreeing0

OF THE


niton of Ameritra


1,4ebrew
(!nngregationa




3torty-fourtlh Annual portt
ontieuber 1, 1916, to (ctober 31. 1917


PRINTED AND PUBLISHED
JANUARY. 1918






















Table of Contents


EXECUTIVE BOARD, PROCEEDINGS.

PRESIDENT'S REPORT.

FINANCIAL REPORT.

BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE, REPORT.

BOARD OF DELEGATES ON CIVIL RIGHTS, REPORT.

BOARD OF MANAGERS OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION, REPORT.

NATIONAL FEDERATION OF TEMPLE SISTERHOODS, REPORT.

BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS OF THE UNION.

LIST OF CONSTITUENT CONGREGATION.

MEMORIAL TABLETS.

INDEX.
















FORM OF APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP.


(D a te ).................................................................. ............................

To the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations:

C on g regation .... ............................... ..... .. .........................................

of................................... .................................................... .................................hereby m akes
application to be admitted to membership in the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.

........................................... .......... ................. P resid en t.
ATTEST:

.......................................................................................S secretary


The above application, under seal of the Congregation, can be sent to
the Secretary of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Cincinnati,
Ohio. No membership fee is required.





FORM OF BEQUEST.


I give and bequeath to the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, for the support of its institutions, the sum


.........Dollars.










Executive Board

FOR 1918
Term Expires
January J. WALTER FREIBERG, President
216 East Front Street
Cincinnati, Ohio

1919 N. HENRY BECKMAN, First National Bank Building ................ Cincinnati, O.
1921 ISAAC W. BERNHEIM, 5TH VICE-PRES., 626 W. Main Street.........Louisville,. Ky.
1919 FRED E. BRUML, 902 Society for Savings Building ................Cleveland, O.
1921 JUDGE JOSIAH COHEN, Court House..............................Pittsburgh, Pa.
1921 HARRY CUTLER, 3RD VICE-PRES., 7 Eddy Street................. Providence, R. I.
1921 DR. DAVID W. EDELMAN, 520 W. Seventh Street .................Los Angeles, Cal.
1919 GUSTAVE A. EFROYMSON, 10 W. Washington Street.............Indianapolis, Ind.
1921 J. WALTER FREIBERG, PRESIDENT, 216 E. Front Street .............Cincinnati, O.
1919 ISAAC GOLDBERG, 222 Forest Avenue............................... Detroit, Mich.
1919 SIMEON M. JOHNSON, Wiggins Block...............................Cincinnati, O.
1919 ADOIF KRAUS, 7 South Dearborn Street ............................Chicago, Ill.
1921 MAX LANDAUER, 218 East Water Street.......................Milwaukee, Wis.
1921 ,ALBERT L. LEVI, 343 Stuyvesant Avenue..........................Brooklyn, N. Y.
LIPMAN LEVY, HONORARY MEMBER, 2000 Wendover Street.........Pittsburgh, Pa.
1919 JESSE W. LTLIENTHAL, 6TH VICE-PREs., Holbrook Bldg., 58 Sutter St.,
'San Francisco, Cal.
1921 BARUCI MAHLER, 711 Electric Building..............................Cleveland, O.
1919 JuDGE MAX B. MAY, Court House................................ Cincinnati, O.
1919 HENRY MORGENTHAU, 30 E. Forty-second Street ................New York City
1919 JACOB R. MORSE, 31 Bedford Street................................ Boston, Mass.
1919 EMIL NATHAN, 2018 Market Street................................St. Louis, Mo.
1919 ADOLPH S. OCHS, "The Times"...................................New York City
1921 WILI.AM ORNSTEIN, 13 West Third Street...........................Cincinnati, O.
1921 MARCUS RAUH, 951 Penn Avenue................................... Pittsburgh, Pa.
1921 SIGMUND RHEINSTROM, Union Trust Building.....................Cincinnati, O.
1921 MAURICE D. ROSENBERG, Commerce and Savings Bldg............Washington, D. C.
1919 SIMON W. ROSENDALE, 57 State Street............................. Albany, N. Y.
1921 JULIUS ROSENWALD, 4TH VICE-PRES., C/o Sears,.Roebuck & Co.........Chicago, Ill.
1919 JACOB H. SCHIrr, 52 Williams Street............................. New York City
1921 Louis SCHLESINGER, 31 Clinton Avenue..........................Newark, N. J.
1919 JACOB SCHNADIG, 220 West Lake Street..............................Chicago, I11.
1921 ISAAC SCHOEN, 323 Decatur Street...................................Atlanta, Ga.
1921 CHARLES SHOHL, 1ST VICE-PRES., First National Bank Bldg.........Cincinnati, O.
1921 SIGMUND SICHEL, 92 Third Street.................................. Portland, Ore.
1919 MAURICE STERN, 840 Union Street.............................New Orleans, La.
1921 SAMUEL STRAUS, Traction Building ................................ Cincinnati, O.
1921 JosErP WIESENFELD, 300 W. Baltimore Street.....................Baltimore, Md.
1919 HERMAN WILE, Ellicott and Carroll Streets........................Buffalo, N. Y.
1919 ALBERT WOLF, 330 N. Twelfth Street........................... Philadelphia, Pa.
1919 WILLIAM B. WOOLNER, 1700 South Washington Street................. Peoria, Ill.

GEORGE ZEPIN, Secretary
62 Duttenhofer Bldg.
Cincinnati, Ohio










Proceedings
of the
Executive Board































June, 1917
December, 1917













Proceedings of the Executive Board


Hebrew Union College,
Cincinnati, June 3, 1917.
Pursuant to the order of the President,
the Executive Board met in semi-annual
session at half past nine o'clock, A. M.
Present: Mr. N. Henry Beckman, Mr.
Fred E. Bruml, Mr. J. Walter Freiberg, Mr.
Edward L. Heinsheimer, Mr. Simeon M.
Johnson, Mr. Baruch Mahler, Judge Max B.
May, Mr. Emil Nathan, Mr. William Orn-
stein, Mr. Sigmund Rheinstrom, Mr. Maurice
D. Rosenberg, Mr. Charles Shohl, Mr.
Samuel Straus, Mr. Joseph Wiesenfeld, Mr.
Herman Wile.
President Mr. J. Walter Freiberg, pre-
sided.
Secretary Rabbi George Zepin recorded the
minutes of the meeting.

EXCUSES FOR NON-ATTENDANCE
Excuses for not attending this meeting
were presented from Mr. Isaac W. Bern-
heim, Mr. Harry Cutler, Mr. Isaac Goldberg,
Mr. Adolf Kraus, Mr. Max Landauer, Mr.
Albert L. Levi, Mr. Jesse W. Lilienthal, Mr.
Henry Morgenthau, Mr. Jacob R. Morse, Mr.
Simon W. Rosendale, Mr. Julius Rosenwald,
Mr. Jacob Schnadig, Mr. Isaac Schoen, Mr.
Maurice Stern, Mr. Solomon Sulzberger.

RESIGNATION OF SECRETARY
MR. LIPMAN LEVY
The President announced the receipt of a
letter of resignation from Mr. Lipman Levy,
Secretary of the Union for forty-four years.
It was moved by Mr. Charles Shohl and
duly carried, that the resignation be ac-
cepted and that Mr. Lipman Levy be elected
an honorary member of the Executive Board.
Mr. Levy was thereupon elected an hon-
orary member of the Executive Board of
the Union.
Mr. Charles Shohl, in behalf of the indi-
vidual members of the Executive Board, the
Board of Managers, and the Board of Gov-
ernors, presented to Mr. Lipman Levy a
gift of a set of the Encyclopedia Britannica.
Mr. Levy responded to the address, ex-
pressing his deep appreciation and thanks
for the courtesies extended him.


ELECTION OF SECRETARY
It was moved by Mr. Charles Shohl and
duly carried, that Rabbi George Zepin be
elected Secretary of the Executive Board of
the Union of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions.
ADDITIONS TO MEMBERSHIP
The Secretary reported that since the last
meeting of the Executive Board, the follow-
ing congregations had applied for member-
ship in the Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations:
*Bikur Cholim Congregation, of San Jose,
California.
Sherith Israel, of San Francisco, California.
It was moved and duly carried, that the
Secretary be instructed to address a letter
of welcome to the officers of these congre-
gations and to enroll them as members of
the organization.

COMMITTEE ON MEMORIAL
RESOLUTION
Upon motion the President appointed the
following committee to frame a set of reso-
lutions in memory of Dr. J. Leonard Levy:
Judge Max B. May, Mr. Edward L. Heins-
heimer, Mr. Simeon Johnson, Mr. Adolph
S. Ochs, and Mr. Julius Rosenwald.

COMMITTEE ON ARBITRATION
It was moved by Judge Max B. May and
duly carried, that the President of the Exec-
utive Board be empowered to appoint two
additional members to the above-named
committee.

ELECTION OF BOARDS
The Executive Board then proceeded to
the election of members to the Board of
Governors, Board of Managers and the Board
of Delegates.
The following Nominating Committees
were named:
For the Board of Governors: Mr. Edward
L. Heinsheimer, Mr. Maurice D. Rosenberg,
and Mr. Samuel Straus.
For the Board of Managers: Mr. Charles
Shohl, Mr. Baruch Mahler, and Mr. William
Ornstein.








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


For the Board of Delegates: Mr. Simeon
M. Johnson, Mr. Joseph Wiesenfeld, and Mr.
Herman Wile.

ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF BOARD OF
GOVERNORS OF THE HEBREW
UNION COLLEGE
The following persons whose names were
presented by the Nominating Committee were
duly elected members of the Board of Gov-
ernors, term of office beginning January 1,
1918, and in accordance with the provisions
of the constitution were elected for three
years, two years, and one year respectively:
For three years:
Mr. Marcus Aaron,* Pittsburgh, Pa.
Mr. A. G. Becker, Chicago, Ill.
Dr. Henry Berkowitz, Philadelphia, Pa.
Dr. Jos. Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa.
Mr. Simon Lazarus, Columbus, Ohio.
Rabbi Charles S. Levi, Milwaukee, Wis.
Mr. Alfred Mack, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Dr. David Philipson, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Dr. Jos. Silverman, New York, N. Y.
Dr. Jos. Stolz, Chicago, Ill.
For two years:
Mr. Ralph W. Mack, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Mr. Carl E. Pritz, Cincinnati. Ohio.
For one year:
Mr. Oscar Berman, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Mr. Felix Kahn, Cincinnati, Ohio.

ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF BOARD OF
MANAGERS OF SYNAGOG AND
SCHOOL EXTENSION
The following persons, whose names were
presented by the Nominating Committee,
were duly elected members of the Board of
Managers, term of office beginning January
1, 1918, and in accordance with the provi-
sions of the constitution were elected for
three years, two years, and one year re-
spectively:
For three years:
Hon. Harry Cutler, Providence, R. I.
Mr. J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Mr. Fred L. Guggenheimer, New York, N. Y.
Judge Irving Lehman, New York, N. Y.
Judge David Leventritt, New York, N. Y.
Mr. Sigmund Rheinstrom, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Mr. Julius Rosenwald, Chicago, Ill.


Mr. Alfred Selligman, Louisville, Ky.
Mr. Herman Wile, Buffalo, N. Y.
Mr. Otto Irving Wise, San Francisco, Cal.
For two years:
Mr. Joseph J. Corn, New York, N. Y.
Mr. Daniel B. Freedman, New York, N. Y.
Mr. Abraham Lewenthal, Cleveland, Ohio.
Mr. Adolph Lewisohn, New York, N. Y.
Judge Julius M. Mayer, New York, N, Y.
Mr. Max L. Schallek, New York, N. Y.
Mr. Jos. Schonthal, Columbus, Ohio.
Mr. Abraham J. Sunstein, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Mr. Ludwig Vogelstein, New York, N. Y.
For one year:
Mr. Mortimer Adler, Rochester, N. Y.
Mr. Maurice Berkowitz, Kansas City, Mo.
Mr. Israel Cowen, Chicago, Ill.
Mr. Gustave A. Efroymson, Indianapolis, Ind.
Mr. Nathaniel H. Levi, New York, N. Y.
Judge Max B. May, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Mr. Wm. Ornstein, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Mr. Chas. Shohl, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Mr. Samuel Straus, Cincinnati, Ohio.

ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF BOARD OF
DELEGATES OF CIVIL RIGHTS
The following persons, whose names were
presented by the Nominating Committee,
were duly elected members of the Board of
Delegates, term of office beginning January
1, 1918:
Mr. Isaac Adler, Birmingham, Ala.
Mr. Milton L. Anfenger, Denver, Colo.
Mr. Ralph Bamberger, Indianapolis, Ind.
Mr. Lee Baumgarten, Washington, D. C.
Mr. Leon Block, Kansas City, Mo.
Dr. E. N. Calisch, Richmond, Va.
Judge Josiah Cohen, Pittsburgh, -Pa.
Mr. Myer Cohen, Washington, D. C.
Mr. Morris M. Cohn, Little Rock, Ark.
Mr. Nathan Cohn, Nashville, Tenn.
Mr. Israel Cowen, Chicago, Ill.
Hon. Harry Cutler, Providence, R. I.
Mr. Felix J. Dreyfous, New Orleans, La.
Hon. Abram I. Elkus, New York, N. Y.
Mr. Harry Franc, Washington, D. C.
Mr. Nathan Frank, St. Louis, Mo.
Rabbi Leo M. Franklin, Detroit, Mich.
Mr. J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati, Ohio,
ex officio.
Mr. Jacob Furth, St. Louis, Mo.
Hon. Henry M. Goldfogle, New York, N. Y.


Mr. Marcus Aaron is also to serve the unexpired term of Dr. J. Leonard Levy, to
January 1, 1918.


[JUNE


8210








1917J PROCEEDINGS OF TE

Mr. Louis J. Goldman, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Mr. Joseph B. Greenhut, New York, N. Y.
Rabbi Moses J. Gries, Cleveland, Ohio.
Mr. Wm. B. Hackenburg, Philadelphia, Pa.
Mr. Henry Hanaw, Mobile, Ala.
Mr. Henry Hess, Mobile, Ala.
Mr. Joseph Hirsh, Vicksburg, Miss.
Mr. Marcus Jacobi, Wilmington, N. C.
Hon. Julius Kahn, San Francisco, Cal.
Mr. Max J. Kohler, New York, N. Y.
Mr. Adolph Kraus, Chicago, Ill.
Judge Julian W. Mack, Chicago, Ill.
Judge Lewis M. Marcus, Buffalo, N. Y.
Rabbi David Marx, Atlanta, Ga.
Mr. T. M. Mordecai, Charleston, S. C.
Rabbi Jacob Nieto, San Francisco, Cal.
Mr. Julius I. Peyser, Washington, D. C.
Judge M. Warley Platzek, New York City.
Dr. Wn,. Rosenau, Baltimore, Md.
Hon. Simon W. Rosendale, Albany, N. Y.
Mr. Julius Rosenwald, Chicago, Ill.
Rabbi Charles A. Rubenstein, Baltimore, Md.
Mr. Alfred Selligman, Louisville, Ky.


EE EXECUTIVE BOARD


8211


Mr. Charles Shohl, Cincinnati, O., ex officio.
Dr. Abram Simon, Washington, D. C.
Mr. Lucius L. Solomons, San Francisco, Cal.
Mr. Moses Sonneborn, Wheeling, W. Va.
Mr. Samuel Ullman, Birmingham, Ala.
Mr. Isaac M. Ullmann, New Haven, Conn.
Mr. Henry Wallenstein, Wichita, Kans.
Mr. M. H. Wascerwitz, San Francisco, Cal.
Mr. Jonas Weil, Minneapolis, Minn.
Mr. Lionel Weil, Goldsboro, N. C.
Mr. Eugene F. Westheimer, St. Joseph, Mo.
Mr. Joseph Wiesenfeld, Baltimore, Md.
Mr. Leo Wise, Cincinnati, O.
Mr. Edwin Wolf, Philadelphia, Pa.
Hon. Simon Wolf, Washington, D. C.,
Chairman.
Mr. Adolphe Wolfe, Portland, Ore.
It was moved by Judge Max B. May and
duly carried, that the Hon. Simon Wolf be
appointed Chairman of the Board of Dele-
gates and that the city of Washington, D. C.,
be designated as the seat of the Board of
Delegates.


APPROPRIATIONS
The following appropriations for the next fiscal year were voted:
For the Board of Governors of the Hebrew Union College:
For General Expenses.....................................$55,000.00
For Scholarships Fund.................................... 15,000.00
$ 70,000.00
For the Board of Managers of Synagog and School Extension:
For work of Synagog and School Extension ................ $55,000.00
For various activities of Executive Board..................... 10,000.00
$ 65,000.00
For the Expenses of the Board of Delegates ......................$ 2,100.00 $2,100.00
$137,100.00


NEW OFFICE
Mr. Charles Shohl, Chairman of the spe-
cial committee to secure a new office, where
the various activities of the Union, includ-
ing the Executive Office, Department of Syn-
agog and School Extension, and the office of
the National Federation of Temple Sister-
hoods could be combined, reported that he
had secured space in the Duttenhofer Build-
ing, Room 62. Upon motion duly carried the
action of the committee was approved.

PROPAGANDA FUND COMMITTEE
It was moved and duly carried, that a
Propaganda Fund Committee to consider
ways and means for raising additional funds
for the enterprises of the Union be created and
that it should consist of the President of the


Executive Board, the President of the Board
of Governors, the Chairman of the Board of
Managers, the President of the National Fed-
eration of Temple Sisterhoods, and the Pres-
ident of the Alumni Association of the He-
brew Union College.

REPORT OF COMMISSION ON SYNAGOG
PENSION FUND
Mr. Edward L. Heinsheimer, Chairman of
the Commission on Synagog Pension Fund,
reviewed the work of the past season, and
touched upon the fact that the Union was
in receipt of a gift of $100,000 for the work
of the Commission from Mr. Jacob H. Schiff;
also that statistics were being gathered for
the use of Mr. S. H. Wolfe, Consulting
Actuary, who would soon be able to hand in







FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


a report advising the Commission as to the
best course to pursue under the circum-
stances. Upon motion duly carried, the re-
port was received with thanks, and the Sec-
retary was instructed to forward the same
to the Central Conference of American
Rabbis.

PARTICIPATION IN THE AMERICAN
JEWISH CONGRESS
A communication from the Hon. Harry
Cutler with reference to the election of dele-
gates to the American Jewish Congress was
presented to the Board. The President, Mr. J.
Walter Freiberg, having requested an ex-
pression of opinion from the members of the
Executive Board, by mail, the replies to this
questionnaire were read at this meeting.
The following resolution presented by Mr.
Simeon M. Johnson was then adopted:
"Since the first call for an American Jew-
ish Congress was issued, there have been


momentous changes in public affairs at home
and abroad. Russia has become a Democ-
racy, and our own country has entered upon
a great and just war. Until that contest is
over, and settled in the interest of Liberty,
Justice and Freedom for all peoples, the
holding of any Congress in this country to
debate, or determine like questions, in the
interest of any particular group of people,
would, in our judgment, be unwise and use-
less.
"We are therefore opposed to the holding
of any Jewish Congress until the-war is
over. For these reasons we decline the in-
vitation to send delegates to the proposed
Jewish Congress, and withdraw from any
participation therein, if it should be held."
Adjourned.


J. WALTER FREIBERG,
President.
GEORGE ZEPIN,
Secretary.


Proceedings of the Executive Board


Hebrew Union College,
Cincinnati, December 16, 1917.
Pursuant to the order of the President, the
Executive Board met in semi-annual session
at half-past nine o'clock, A. M.
Present: Mr. N. Henry Beckman, Mr. J.
Walter Freiberg, Mr. Isaac Goldberg, Mr.
Simeon M. Johnson, Mr. J. R. Morse, Mr.
William Ornstein, Mr. Sigmund Rheinstrom,
Mr. Maurice D. Rosenberg, Mr. Louis Schles-
inger, Mr. Charles Shohl. The meeting was
presided over by Mr. J. Walter Freiberg,
President. The minutes were recorded by
Rabbi George Zepin, Secretary.

LETTERS FROM MEMBERS NOT IN
ATTENDANCE
Letters were presented from the following
members who were prevented from attending
the meeting: Mr. Isaac W. Bernheim, Mr.
Fred E. Bruml, Judge Josiah Cohen, Dr.
David W. Edelman, Mr. Gustave A. Efroym-
son, Mr. Adolf Kraus, Mr. Lipman Levy, Mr.
Baruch Mahler, Mr. Henry Morgenthau, Mr.
Adolph S. Ochs, Mr. Marcus Rauh, Mr. Simon
W. Rosendale, Mr. Julius Rosenwald, Mr.


Jacob Schnadig, Mr. Isaac Schoen, Mr. Mau-
rice Stern, Mr. Samuel Straus, Mr. Solomon
Sulzberger, Mr. Joseph Wiesenfeld, Mr. Her-
man Wile, Mr. Albert Wolf, Mr. William B.
Woolner.

MEMORIAL COMMITTEE
It was moved by Mr. Sigmund Rheinstrom,
duly seconded and carried, that the Vice-
President be authorized to appoint a Memo-
rial Committee of five,,the Vice-President to
be a member of the Committee, for the pur-
pose of arranging a memorial service in
honor of Mr. Edward L. Heinsheimer. This
Committee was further instructed to coop-
erate with other local organizations.
The following Committee was appointed:
Sigmund Rheinstrom, Chairman; N. Henry
Beckman, Simeon M. Johnson, William Orn-
stein, Charles Shohl, Samuel Straus.

PRESENTATION OF REPORTS
The following annual reports were then
presented, and upon motion duly carried were
ordered to be incorporated in the printed an-
nual report of the organization:


8212


[DECEMBER









PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD


(a) President.
(b) Secretary.
(c) Public Accountant.
(d) Board of Governors of the Hebrew
Union College.
(e) Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension.
(f) Board of Delegates on Civil Rights.

THE XXVI COUNCIL OF THE UNION
It was moved and duly carried that the
matter of fixing the time and place of the
XXVI Council be left to the June meeting of
the Executive Board.

CENTENARY CELEBRATION OF THE
BIRTH OF ISAAC MAYER WISE
A letter was presented from Dr. Louis
Grossmann, President of the Central Confer-
ence of American Rabbis, requesting the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations
to join with the Conference in celebrating the
one hundredth anniversary of the birth of
Isaac Mayer Wise, in March, 1919, in the city
of Cincinnati.
It was moved and duly carried that the
President be authorized to appoint a Com-
mittee to cooperate with the officers of the
Central Conference, or with such a Commit-
tee as they might appoint, to arrange for a
suitable celebration for the one hundredth
anniversary of the birth of Isaac Mayer Wise.
In accordance with the above resolution,
the following Committee was appointed:
J. Walter Freiberg, Chairman; Sigmund
Rheinstrom, Charles Shohl, George Zepin
(ex officio).


It was moved and duly carried that it is
the opinion of the members of the Executive
Board that it would not be feasible to hold
the biennial meeting of the Union at the same
time and place as the annual meeting of the
Central Conference of American Rabbis.

A JEWISH PUBLICITY BUREAU
Letters from Dr. Chas. A. Rubenstein, of
Baltimore, together with a detailed plan for
establishing a Jewish Publicity Bureau under
the supervision of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations were laid before the
Executive Board.
It was moved and duly carried that in view
of present war conditions, the Board does not
think it advisable at this time to extend the
activities of the Union in this direction.

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE
Mr. Charles Shohl reported, in behalf of
the Finance Committee, that he had under-
taken to make arrangements with Mr. Isa-
dore Sobel, of Erie, Pa., for the purpose of
conducting a campaign to raise funds.
It was moved and duly carried that this
matter be left to a Committee consisting of
the President, Vice-President and Secretary,
and that they be given full power to act in
this connection.
The foregoing minutes were read and ap-
proved. Adjourned.

S J. WALTER FREIBERG,
President.
GEORGE ZEPIN,
Secretary.


1917J


8213








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT




President's Report


Cincinnati, December 16, 1917.
To the Executive Board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations:
I beg herewith to hand you my annual
report.

MEMBERSHIP
During the year, we have admitted two
new congregations, as follows: Bikur Cholim,
San Jose, California; Temple Israel, Port-
land, Maine, and have readmitted congre-
gation Sherith Israel, San Francisco, Cali-
fornia, which was formerly a member.
The membership reported by the constit-
uent congregations shows a slight increase
over last year. It is again important to
report that the congregations are showing a
more liberal spirit in the matter of report-
ing their membership for the purpose of
paying dues. During the past year, a num-
ber of congregations have donated to the
Union an amount equal to the annual dues.
This is very gratifying, and it is hoped that
other congregations will follow this example.


THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE
The college opened this year, with a stu-
dent body numbering about the same as at
the opening of the last year, with the excep-
tion that eleven of the students have joined
the colors, by enlisting in the various
branches of military and naval service. The
details, giving the names of the students
thus enlisting, will be found in the report
of the Board of Governors, to which you are
referred for all matters connected with the
college.


BOARD OF DELEGATES
The report of the Board of Delegates is
before you. Its chairman, the Hon. Simon
Wolf, has been very earnest in looking after
all the affairs of the Board, and while for-
tunately, not as many cases as usual have
been presented for his attention, he has
given all matters coming within the duties
of the Board, his careful and earnest con-
sideration.


DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND
SCHOOL EXTENSION
It is probably not necessary to call your
attention to the increased activities of this
department. New questions present them-
selves continually, and require solution at
the hand of the Board of Managers and the
Director of Synagog and School Extension.
Much new work could be done, if we but
had the funds with which to carry it on,
but as matters now stand, we must be con-
tent to do as well as possible, the duties
that lie before us.
During the past year, Mr. Lipman Levy,
who had been secretary of the Union since
its organization, more than forty years ago,
resigned, and removed his residence to Pitts-
burgh. The Executive Board elected in his
place Rabbi George Zepin. Rabbi Zepin now
fills the two places of Secretary of the
Union and Director of Synagog and School
Extension. All of the activities of the Union
except the Hebrew Union College, are taken
care of in one suite of offices in the Dutten-
hofer Building, at Sixth and Sycamore
Streets. This change has made for increased
efficiency, and I wish here to express my
appreciation of the fidelity and industry with
which Rabbi Zepin performs the tasks that
are set before him.


WAYS AND MEANS
The statement that the Union is suffering
for lack of sufficient income is becoming
somewhat stale, but it is necessary to call
your attention to that fact, here and now.
Various plans are considered and undertaken
from time to time, to increase the income of
the Union, but under present conditions,
this is becoming more and more difficult
It is my duty to ask that the Board give
this matter serious consideration at this
meeting. We must increase our income or
reduce our expenditures. Both seem equally
difficult. It would mean a serious loss to
the standing and prestige of the Union were
we to decrease our activities, but unless we
can keep our income at least equal to our
present expenditures, something of this kind


[DECEMBER


8214










PRESIDENT'S REPORT


may have to be done. The shortage in our
funds has been accumulating from year to
year, and we ought to endeavor to arrange
for sufficient annual collections to do all the
work that should be done, and to replace as
much as possible of the money that has been
borrowed from the endowment fund in past
years.


NATIONAL FEDERATION OF TEMPLE
SISTERHOODS
Your attention is called to the very inter-
esting report of this auxiliary organization.
The Federation has been of great assistance
to the Union, not only in the matter of
actual contributions, but in the moral sup-
port that it has brought about in the various
communities.


ADVISORY AND PARALLEL BOARDS
The Commission on Superannuated Minis-
ters' Fund is still at work, but has not vet
reported a detailed plan. At the biennial
council held in Baltimore, in January, 1917,
Mr. Jacob H. Schiff, on the occasion of his
seventieth birthday, presented this fund, One
Hundred Thousand Dollars. This has been
invested temporarily, and will be turned over
to the trustees, whenever the plan of the
Commission may be adopted, and the trustees
appointed.
The Tract Commission has announced its
program for the coming year. The Board of
Editors connected with the Department of
Synagog and School Extension, is regularly
at work, and the Advisory Board of the
Board of Governors meets periodically with
the Board. We believe that we now have a
very efficient system of parallel Boards, rep-


resenting the Union, the Central Conference
of American Rabbis, and the alumni of the
Hebrew Union College.


NATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD
Not all the congregations affiliated with
the Union have appointed members of the
National Advisory Board, but it may be
stated that a number of congregations have
done this within the past year. It is to be
hoped that during the coming year, every
congregation holding membership in the
Union, will have appointed such members,
so that the National Advisory Board will be
complete. The Union needs local represen-
tation such as this would give, and many
questions arise that should be submitted to
the congregations themselves, and acted upon
by the members of the Advisory Board.


NATIONAL BOARD FOR WELFARE WORK
IN THE UNITED STATES ARMY
SAND NAVY
The Union has taken part in the organi-
zation of this Board, which has set out to
do a work very important at this time. It is
to be hoped that this National Board will
succeed in getting all the funds that it re-
quires, so as to be able to carry on the
necessary religious and social work among
the Jews in various branches of service in
the cantonments in this country, and among
the expeditionary forces.
In conclusion, permit me to say a word of
appreciation and thanks to the members of
this Board for their kind cooperation.
Respectfully submitted,
J. WALTER FREIBERG, President,
Union of American Hebrew Congregations.


8215








Financial Report









SECRETARY'S REPORT


SECRETARY'S REPORT.

To the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew Congre-
gations :

GENTLEMEN:-I have the honor of presenting the following


STATEMENT
OF RECEIPTS FOR THE FISCAL'YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31, 1917,



DUES FROM CONGREGATIONS.


1916 Name Place Amount


Hebrew Reformed .........
Adath Israel ...............
Em anuel ..................
Hebrew Benevolent........
Bene Israel ..............
Beth-ha-Tephila...........
Beth E l....................
B'rith Sholem ..............
Oheb Zedakah ...........
Shaare Shamayim..........
Ryhim Ahoovim ...........
M izpah ....................
Shomer Emunim.........
B'nai Israel................
Ahavath Chesed ...........
Shaare Emeth ............
Beth Israel ...............
Shaare Shamayim...........
Adath Israel..............
Adath Israel ...............
Hebrew Union .............
Ohavai Sholom ...........
Gates of Mercy D. O. J.....
B'nai Zion ................
Sons of Israel ..............
Isaiah Temple ............
Rodeph Sholem............
Emanuel ........... ........
Kehal Montgomery........
Reform ...................
Beth E l...................
Temple Israel .............
Gates of Prayer ..........
Em anuel............... ..
Oheb Shalom.............

Mickva Israel.............
Bene Israel................
Emanuel ..................
Em anuel ..................
Anshe Chesed..............
Rodof Sholom ............
Mickva Israel.............
Ahabath Shalom...........
Keneseth Israel............


Altoona, Pa.............
Louisville, Ky ...........
Wichita, Kansas...... ....
Atlanta, Ga...............
Sacramento, Cal.........
Asheville, N. C...........
Knoxville, Tenn..........
Easton, Pa ...............
Springfield, 0............
Lancaster. Pa............
Stockton, Cal. ..........
Chattanooga, Tenn........
Toledo, 0 ...............
Bridgeport, Conn..........
Jacksonville, Fla..........
St. Louis, Mo............
Plattsburgh, N. Y...... ..
Mobile, Ala..............
Henderson, Ky ..........
Boston, Mass ............
Greenville, Miss..........
Nashville, Tenn..........
New Orleans, La..........
Shreveport,La...........
Bellaire, O ..............
Chicago, Ill ...............
W aco, Tex................
Dallas, Tex...............
Montgomery, Ala.........
Danville, Ill .............
Lincoln, Ill...............
Terre Haute, Ind.........
New Orleans, La..........
Birmingham, Ala.........
Sandusky, 0.............

Savannah, Ga............
Albany, Ga................
Denver, Colo.............
Enid, Okla...............
Bay City, Mich............
Anderson, Ind............
Savannah, Ga............
Ligonier, Ind.............
Allentown, Pa............


8219


Nov. 1
2
4
4
7
8
9
9
13
13
14
14
14
14
15
16
17
17
22
Dec. 1
4
41


1917
Jan.


$ 12 50
176 00
10 00
157 00
44 00
14 00
14 50
12 50
23 00
31 00
12 50.
60 00
44 00
52 50
50 00
107 50
10 00
87 50
13 00
55 00
25 00
150 00
37 50
100 00
7 50
140 00
17 50
87 50
50 00
14 50
8 00
41 50
37 50
75 00
9 00

50 00
17 50
200 00
7 50
7 50
7 50
50 00
12 00
60 00









FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


DUES FROM CONGREGATIONS-Continued.


1917


Jan.











Feb.






















March


Name


8 Bene Jeshurun ............
8 New Synagog ..............
10 Beth El .................
11 Gemillus Hassodim ........
13 United Hebrew............
16 Bene Israel ................
16 Indianapolis Hebrew......
16 Bene Israel ...............
17 Anshe Maarab ...........
24 Beth E l ....................
24 Bene Jeshurun ...........
25 Sons of Israel and David ..
25 Hebrew Educational Society
31 Bene Israel......... ....
2 Temple of Israel ......
16 Rodeph Shalom...........
16 Adath Israel..............
19 Anshe Israel.............
19 Hebrew Reform Society....
19 Emanuel ......... ... .....
19 Bene Israel ..............
19 Beth Israel ................
19 Temple Israel.............
19 Shaare Shamayim.........
19 Greensboro Hebrew........
19 United Hebrew ..........
20 B'nai Israel ................
23 Beth El ....................
23 B'nai Israel ................
23 Bene Israel ................
26 Anshe Maarab ............
26 Oheb Shalom.............
26 Temple Beth El............
27 North Chicago Hebrew.....
27 Zion of West Chicago ......
27 Bene Brith................
27 Shomer Emunim..........
27 Beth E l ....................
27 Emanuel ..................
28 Oheb Shalom ............
1 Temple Emanuel..........
1Beth Israel ...............
1Bene Jeshurun ...........
1 Temple Adath Joseph.....
1 Emanuel.................
2 Moses Montefiore..........
2 Beth Ahaba...............
2 Oheb Shalom ............
2 Beth Elohim.............
2 Beth El. ...................
2Beth El ....................
2Beth-ha-Tephila............
5 Bene Israel ...............
5Beth El. ..................
5 Shaare Shamayim.........
5 B'nai Israel......... .......
SEm anuel...................
Beth El ...................
5 Mt. Sinai ..................
6 Bene Israel ................
6 Temple Emanuel .. .....
6 Keneseth Israel...........
7 Israel .......................
7Bene Jeshurun............


Place Amount


Lincoln, Neb ... ........
New York City..........
Corsicana, Texas ........
Alexandria, La...........
Fort Smith, Ark..........
Galveston, Tex...........
Indianapolis, Ind. ........
Columbus, Ga............
Chicago, Ill ..... .....
M uncie, Ind..............
Des Moines, Iowa .......
Providence, R. I .........
Charleston, W. Va........
Evansville, Ind. ..........
Far Rockaway, N. Y.....
W abash, Ind .............
Madison, Ind............
Mt. Vernon, Ind..........
Binghamton, N. Y........
Statesville, N. C.........
East Liverpool, O........
Lim a, O ............. ....
Paducah, Ky. ............
Kokomo, Ind ............
Greensboro, N. C.........
Gainesville, Tex..........
Davenport, la. ........
Alexandria, Va .........
Little Rock, Ark..........
Kalamazoo, Mich .........
Chicago, Ill..............
Huntington, W. Va......
Niagara Falls, N. Y......
Chicago, Ill...............
Chicago, Ill ..............
Wilkes Barre, Pa........
Toledo, 0 .. ..........
Saginaw, Mich............
Grand Rapids, Mich......
Goldsboro, N. C...........
New York City. .........
Hazleton, Pa............
Cincinnati, 0...........
St. Joseph, Mo..........
W ichita, Kan.............
Bloomington, Ill..........
Richmond, Va............
Baltimore, Md............
Charleston, S. C.......
New York City ...........
South Bend, Ind..........
Asheville, N. C............
Cincinnati, 0.........
Lincoln, Ill .............
Mobile, Ala..............
Salt Lake City, Utah .....
San Francisco, Cal........
SSan Antonio, Tex.........
Sioux City, Iowa..........
Hamilton, 0.............
Clarksburg, W. Va ......
Philadelphia, Pa.........
Omaha, Neb .............
Newark, N. J............


$ 28 00
50 00
20 00
25 00
25 00
75 00
135 00
65 00
102 50
15 00
25 00
62 50
26 00
37 50
100 50
14 00
3 50
14 50
11 00
5 00
5 50
10 00
40 00
4 00
12 50
3 50
31 00
9 50
50 00
20 00
95 00
17 00
18 00
95 00
25 00
50 00
50 50
15 00
21 00
13 00
451 00
22 50
200 00
55 00
10 00
8 00
75 00
82 00
25 00
230 00
12 50
14 00
241 50
8 00
87 50
52 50
215 00
76 00
34 00
10 00
11 00
253 00
50 00
104 00


[NOVEMBER


8220








SECRETARY'S REPORT


DUES FROM CONGREGATIONS-Continued.


1917


,March





9


12
12
12
12
12
12
12
13
14
14
14
14
15
15
16
16
19
19
19
19
19
20
20
20
21
21
22
22
23
23
26
26
26
28
29
30
April 2









11
2





3
13
4
5
5
6
6
9
9
11
12
13
16
16
16
16


Name


7 Temple Sinai............
3 Rodef Sholem.............
8 Temple Beth Israel .......
SOheb Sholem..............
8 Sheerith Israel Ahabath
Achim:. .................
8 Ahabath Shalom ........
Rodef Shalom ...........
Anshe Chesed.............
Anshe Chesed. ...........
Anshe Emeth.............
Berith Kodesh ............
H ar Sinai .................
Anshe Chesed.............
Society of Concord.......
Rodeph Shalem...........
Bene Israel ...............
Em anuel ..................
Bene Jehudah............
Beth El..................
Shaare Shamayim....... .
Beth El....................
Temple Israel of Harlem...
Tifereth Israel ............
Mishkan Israel ..........
Anshe Emeth..............
Em anuel ...................
Temple Beth Zion.........
Indianapolis Hebrew ......
Montefiore .................
Ohabei Shalom ...........
Adath Israel ...............
Sons of Israel..............
M t. Sinai..................
Bene Israel ...............
Beth Israel ...............
United Hebrew............
B'ne Jeshurun ............
Temple Israel..............
Mishkan Israel.............
Beth El ..................
Free Synagog .............
Temple de Hirsch..........
E m eth .....................
Achduth Veshalom.........
Temple Beth Elohim ......
Beth Emeth ...............
B'nai B'rith............. ..
Leshem Shamayim.........
Temple Israel ..............
Temple Israel .............
Mt. Zion Hebrew............
Temple Sinai...............
Bene Jeshurun ............
Rodef Sholom .............
Canton Hebrew ...........
Anshe Chesed ..............
Bene Abraham............
Sons of Israel and David....
Ahavath Sholom............
Ahabath Achim............
Bair Chayim ...............
Kehal Montgomery ........
Congregation Beth Elohim..


. New Orleans, La.........
SYoungstown, 0...........
SPortland, Ore.............
Reading, Pa..............

Cincinnati, 0.............
Ligonier, Ind.............
.Pittsburgh, Pa............
Scranton, Pa... ..........
La Crosse, Wis ............
.Piqua, O0 ..................
SRochester, N. Y..........
Baltimore, Md...........
.Cleveland, 0 ..............
SSyracuse, N. Y............
.Philadelphia, Pa..........
SSacramento, Cal...........
SChicago, Ill ...............
. Kansas City, Mo.........
Knoxville, Tenn .........
Kokomo, Ind .............
Helena, Ark..............
New York City ..........
Cleveland, O.............
New Haven Conn........
Peoria, Ill.................
Milwaukee, Wis..........
Buffalo, N. Y. ..........
Indianapolis, Ind .........
Cairo, Ill ................
Boston, M ass.............
Louisville, Ky............
Bellaire, O ................
El Paso, Tex.............
Natchez, Miss.............
Hartford, Conn. .........
St. Louis, Mo. ..........
Milwaukee, Wis........
Brooklyn, N.Y............
Selma, Ala. .............
Anniston, Ala...........
New York City..........
Seattle, Wash............
Ardmore. Okla...........
Fort Wayne, Ind.........
Brooklyn, N. Y...........
Albany, N. Y ............
Los Angeles, Cal ........
Wheeling, W. Va..........
Columbus, 0..............
St. Louis, Mo ............
St. Paul, Minn............
Lake Charles, La ........
Dayton, 0...... .......
Petersburg, Va..........
Canton, 0............. .
E rie, Pa..................
Portsmouth, 0...........
Providence, R. I..........
Brooklyn, N.Y............
Lafayette, Ind ..........
Cumberland, Md..........
Montgomery, Ala.........
Brooklyn, N.Y............


Place Amount


$ 191 50
96 00
124 50
22 00

50 00
13 00
245 00
39 00
4 50
9 00
193 50
25 00
175 00
41 00
180 00
40 00
25 00
112 50
13 50
4 00
36 00
60 00
213 50
115 00
41 00
100 00
139 50
135 00
10 50
25 00
179.00
10 00
70 00
100 00
69 00
62 50
124 00
34 00
40 00
11 50
250 00
90 00
8 50
40 00
32 50
125 00
135 50
37 50
90 00
166 50
80 00
5 00
90 00
5 00
9 00
37 50
9 00
65 00
12 50
30 00
12 00
50 00
61 00


1917]


8221








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


DUES FROM CONGREGATIONS-Continued.


1917 Name Place Amount


April 16
17
23
23
23
26
May 2
3
4
4
4
4
7
8
9
21
21
31
June 1
1
1
4
6
8
18
25
25
July 2
3
3
9
16
23
Aug. 10
13
13
14
14
15
15
15
16
16
17
17
17

17
17
20
2C
2C
2C
20
21
21
22
22
23
23
24
24
27
27


Beth Israel...............
Adath Israel .............
Beth El................
Shaare Shamayim.........
Sinai.......................
B'nai Jeshurun ............
Bene Sholom Temple Israel
Beth Israel ................
Shaare Dmeth .............
Rodof Sholom.............
Beth El ...................
Adath Israel..............
Emanuel ...............
Temple of Israel...........
Beth Israel................
Ryhim Ahoovim ..........
B'nai Israel.................
Anshe Chesed.............
Hebrew Reformed.........
Chicago Sinai........ ....
Temple of Israel...........
Bene Israel................
Bene Israel ...............
Oheb Zedakah..............
Em anuel ..................
Gates of Prayer...........
Bene Israel ...............
Em anuel...................
Beth Israel.................
Isaiah Temple .............
Bene Jeshurun...........
Brith Sholem ............
B'nai Israel ................
Adath Israel .............
Ahabath Shalom ..........
Bene Abraham............
Moses Montefiore ..........
Temple Beth El...........
Hebrew Reform Society....
Beth Elohim..............
Rodeph Shalom...........
Emeth .................
Berith Kodesh ............
Beth-ha-Tephila............
Ahavath Sholom...........
Sheerith Israel Ahabath
Achim ...................
Beth El ....................
Bene Israel................
Tifereth Israel............
Meadville Hebrew Society..
Beth El ....................
Beth Israel ................
Temple Israel .............
Bikur Cholim ............
Temple de Hirsch.........
Akron Hebrew.............
Bene Brith ............... .
Temple Beth Zion .......
Beth El ............... .....
Anshe Israel...............
Em anuel...................
United Hebrew...........
Bene Israel ...............


York, Pa. ..... ...........
Owensboro, Ky ...........
Detroit, Mich ...........
Lancaster, Pa.............
Champaign & Urbana, Ills
Paterson, N.J.............
Chicago, 111............
Meridian, Miss............
St. Louis, Mo. ...........
Anderson, Ind... ......
South Bend, Ind.......
Henderson, Ky..........
Denver, Colo..............
Amsterdam, N. Y.........
Plattsburg, N. Y..........
Stockton, Cal............
Salt Lake City, Utah....
Bay City, Mich...........
Altoona, Pa...........
Chicago, 11 ...........
Far Rockaway, N. Y.....
Albany, Ga...............
Evansville, Ind..........
Springfield, O...........
Dallas, Tex ............
New Orleans, La.........
Monroe, La.. .........
Birmingham, Ala.........
Houston, Tex............
Chicago, Ill ............
Lincoln, Neb .............
Springfield, Ill..........
Galveston, Tex ...........
Boston, Mass.............
Ligonier, Ind .............
Portsmouth, 0...........
Bloomington, Ill.........
Niagara Falls, N. Y.......
Binghamton, N. Y. .......
Charleston, S. C ..........
Wabash, Ind.............
Ardmore, Okla............
Rochester, N. Y.. ........
Asheville, N. C. ........
Brooklyn, N. Y...........

Cincinnati, 0............
Alexandria, Va..........
East Liverpool, 0........
Cleveland, O.............
Meadville, Pa ......... ..
San Antonio, Tex ........
Tacoma, Wash...........
Terre Haute, Ind .......
San Jose, Cal.............
Seattle, Wash ...........
Akron, 0 .............
Wilkes Barre, Pa.........
Bradford, Pa.............
Muncie, Ind.... .......
Mt. Vernon, Ind.........
Statesville, N. C..........
Gainesville, Tex .........
Hamilton, 0............


7 50
6 00
273 00
31 00
12 00
43 50
110 00
75 00
106 00
10 00
12 50
13 00
200 00
20 00
10 00
12 50
53 50
7 50
12 50
383 00
90 00
17 50

37 50
22 50
87 50
37 50
15 00
75 00
50 00
144 50
28 00
12 50
75 00
177 00
13 00
9 00
8 00
18 00
11 00
25 00
14 00
8 50
193 50
24 00
12 50

50 00
9 50
5 50
213 50
4 00
76 00
12 00
86 00
10 00
90 00
80 00
50 00
.17 00
15 00
14 50
5 00
3 50
10 00


[NOVEMBER


8222








SECRETARY'S REPORT

DUES FROM CONGREGATIONS-Continued.


Name


1917


Aug. 27
28
28
29
29
31
31
31
31
Sept. 1
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
10
10
10
10
10
10
11
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
14
14
14
14
14
14
18
18
18
18
18
20
20
24
24
24
24


Place


Beth Israel .................
Emanuel...................
Shaare Shamayim.........
Oheb Shalom.............
Em anuel ..................
Temple Emanuel..........
Mishkan Israel............
Oheb Sholom.............
Oheb Shalom.............
Temple Israel.............
Oheb Shalom ...............
Beth El ...................
Beth El.................
Ohef Sholom ..............
Emanuel ..................
Washington Hebrew .......
Gates of Mercy D. 0. J......
Bene Jeshurun ...........
Shomer Emunim ......:..
Anshe Chesed.............
Children of Israel .........
Israel .....................
Rodef Sholem.............
Har Sinai ..................
North Chicago Hebrew.....
Adath Israel .............
Anshe Emeth.............
Mt. Sinai ..................
Rodef Sholem.............
Zion of West Chicago ......
Beth Israel........... ..
Temple Israel.............
Rodeph Shalom ............
Beth El....................
Mt. Zion Hebrew...........
Bene Israel ...............
M izpah ..................
Em anuel.................. ..
Anshe Maarab ............
Beth Israel ............
Bene Jehudah.............
Beth El....................
Anshe Chesed..............
Congregation Beth Elohim.
Temple Israel ..............
Beth Israel ................
Rodeph Sholem............
Bene Israel ................
Anshe Chesed.............
Reform ... ................
Beth El ....................
Ahavath Chesed...........
Bene Israel.............
Montefiore.................
Canton Hebrew...........
B'naiIsrael................
M t. Sinai ..............
Indianapolis Hebrew.......
B'nai Jeshurun.............
Keneseth Israel............
Hebrew Reformed .........
Beth Israel ...............
United Hebrew ...........
Shaarai Shamayim ........


Honesdale, Pa............
Enid, Okla ..............
Kokomo, Ind.............
Huntington, W. Va.......
Wichita, Kans...........
New York City..........
New Haven,Conn.........
Reading, Pa..............
Baltimore, Md;...........
Columbus, O. ..........
Goldsboro, N. C...........
Knoxville, Tenn..........
New York City ..........
Norfolk, Va....... .......
San Francisco, Cal........
Washington, D. C.........
New Orleans, La..........
Cincinnati, O.............
Toledo, O0 .................
LaCrosse, Wis............
Memphis, Tenn...........
Omaha, Neb.............
Petersburg, Va............
Baltimore, Md............
Chicago, Ill ..............
Henderson, Ky..........
Peoria, Ill...............
Sioux City, Ia ..........
Youngstown, 0...........
Chicago, Ill..............
Jackson, Miss............
Paducah, Ky............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Saginaw, Mich............
St. Paul, Minn............
Cincinnati, 0..............
Chattanooga, Tenn.......
Chicago, Ill...............
Chicago, Ill...............
Hartford, Conn..........
Kansas City, Mo..........
Rockford, Ill.............
Erie, Pa................
BrooklynN.Y............
Gary, Ind................
Portland, Ore............
W aco, Tex...............
Albany, Ga...:.........
Cleveland, 0............
Danville, Ill..............
Fort Worth, Tex..........
Jacksonville, Fla .........
Kalamazoo, Mich ........
Cairo, Ill .. ...............
Canton, Ohio........ .....
Davenport, la............
El Paso, Tex.............
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Paterson, N. J............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Altoona, Pa..............
Atlantic City, N. J........
Fort Smith, Ark .........
Lancaster, Pa............


Amount


$ 21 00
15 00
8 00
17 00
10 00
451 00
115 00
22 00
82 00
90 00
13 00
13 50
230 00
93 00
215 00
316 00
37 50
200 00
50 50
4 60
236 00
50 00
5 00
25 00
95 00
13 00
41 00
34 00
96 00
25 00
43 50
40 00
180 00
15 00
80 00
241 50
60 00
25 00
90 00
69 00
112 50
15 00
37 50
61 00
20 00
124 50
17 50
17 50
175 00
33 00
40 00
133 50
20 00
10 50
9 00
31 00
70 00
135 00
43 50
253 00
12 50
75 00
25 00
31 00


1917]


8228












8224 FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

DUES FROM CONGREGATIONS-Concluded.


1917 Name Place Amount


Sept. 24 Sherith Israel ............. San Francisco, Cal........ $ 57 50
25 Bene Jeshurun ........... Newark, N. J............. 104 00
25 Beth Ahaba................ Richmond, Va............ 75 00
27 Beth Israel Haeton,.............. Hazleton,Pa ........ 22 50
27 Ahabath Achim........... Lafayette, Ind.... ....... 30 00
27 B'nai Israel ............... Little Rock, Ark.......... 50 00
27 Rodef Shalom............. Pittsburgh, Pa............ 245 00
28 Rodef Sholom............. Anderson, Ind........... 10 00
28 Temple Beth Elohim...... Brooklyn, N. Y.......... 32 50
Oct. 3 Temple Israel............. St. Louis, Mo............. 166 50
3 Achduth Veshalom......... Fort Wayne, Ind......... 40 00
3 Chicago Sinai ............. Chicago, 111.............. 383 00
3 Temple Israel of Harlem... New York City.. ........ 60 00
3 Anshe Chesed ............. Scranton, Pa.............. 39 00
3 Adath Israel.............. Boston, Mass. ............ 177 00
3 B'nai Brith ............... Los Angeles, Cal.......... 135 50
3 Beth El. .................. Detroit, Mich............ 273 00
3 Temple of Israel ........... Far Rockaway, N. Y .... 90 00
4 Adath Joseph............. St. Joseph, Mo.......... 55 00
4 Sinai ..................... Champaign & Urbana, Ills 12 00
5 Society of Concord ....... Syracuse, N. Y............ 24 50
5 Leshem Shamayim........ Wheeling, W. Va......... 37 50
5 B'nai Israel ............... Salt Lake City, Utah...... 53 50
5 Hebrew Benevolent........ Atlanta, Ga .............. 160 00
10 Shaare Emeth.............. St. Louis, Mo............ 106 00
10 B'nai Israel ............... Sacramento, Cal.......... 40 00
10 Sons of Israel ............. Bellaire, 0............... 10 00
10 Sons of Israel andDavid.... Providence, R. I......... 65 00
10 Beth Emeth .............. Albany, N. Y ............ 125 00
11 Ahabath Chesed Shaar
Hashamayim ........... New York City........... 32 00
15 Beth Israel ............... Plattsburgh, N. Y ........ 10 00
15 Beth Israel ................ York, Pa .................. 7 50
15 Temple Beth Zion......... Buffalo, N.Y.............. 139 50
16 Bair Chayim ............... Cumberland, Md..... .... 12 00
16 Greensboro Hebrew........ Greensboro, N. C......... 12 50
18 Baltimore Hebrew......... Baltimore, Md.......... 175 00
18 Beth El .................... Helena, Ark ................ 12 00
22 Temple Israel............. Brooklyn, N. Y............ 34 00
22 Adath Israel .............. Louisville, Ky............ 179 00
22 Bene Jeshurun ............ Des Moines, Ia........... 50 00
22 Beth Israel ................ Tacoma, Wash............ 12 00
23 B'nai Israel ............... Galveston, Tex. ......... 75 00
23 Bene Sholom Temple Israel Chicago, Ill .............. 110 00
29 Emanuel................... Grand Rapids, Mich..... 21 00
29 Kehal Montgomery ........ Montgomery, Ala......... 50 00
29Anshe Emeth.............. Piqua, 0.................. 9 00
29 Ohabei Shalom ............ Boston, Mass............. 25 00
31 Brith Sholem .............. Springfield, 111............ 12 50
Total........................... ........... $22,556 50








SECRETARY'S REPORT

ANNUAL CONTRIBUTIONS.


1917 Name Residence Amount


Jan. 1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5


6
5

5
5
5
5

6
5
5
5


6
5
5

6
6
6
6
6
6
6
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
9
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10


Lipman Levy.............
Isador L. Baer..............
S. D. Peyser ..... ........
Sig. Straus.................
Samuel Wolfstein ........
Max Silberberg ..........
A. R. DeLeon.............
Rev. George Zepin........
Moses E. Greenebaum .....
Albert H. Loeb ...........
Leon Block ...............
H. C. Ezekiel ..........
J. Garfield Trager..........
Barney Dreyfuss..........
Marcus Rauh..............
M. J. Frankel ............
M Sonneborn.............
Morris Adler.............
Max Adler. ...............
Bernhard Freiberg ........
A. Freiberg Co., ..........
J. Walter Freiberg........
Maurice J. Freiberg........
Geiershofer Clothing Co. ..
Mrs. Dan Hessberg........
M. E. Moch ...............
Charles Straus ...........
L. Wise ...................
Leo W ise ..................
Mrs. Daniel Huebsch ......
Morris D. Sachs ..........
Rev. A. Brill ........... ..
Max Landauer ...........
Rev. Charles S. Levi ......
Wm. B. Hackenburg........
A. J. Seasongood .........
Rev. William Armhold.....
W. B. Klee..............
Eli Winkler ...............
Samuel Straus ...........
Alfred Hahn...............
Nathan Goodman.........
Montrose Strasburger......
Myer Cohen..............
Harry Hart ................
Sidney E. Pritz.............
Rev. David Alexander.....
Dr. S. Wolfenstein ........
Meyer Hollander ..........
Samuel W. Trost .... ....
Fred. Rauh & Co..........
Jesse D. Oppenheimer......
'Mrs. Jacob Frank ..........
A. Lincoln Fechheimer.....
Dr. Albert H. Freiberg.....
Sigmund Rheinstrom ......
Edward Senior............
Joseph Baum .............
Mrs. A. Lobenstein.........
Mark M. Cohn............
Adolph Landauer .........
Albert G. Morganstern.....
Speyer & Sons.............
Julius S. Glaser.............


Cincinnati, 0.............


it



Chicago, Ill .............

Cincinnati, .............

Pittsburgh, Pa............

South Bend, nd.........
Wheeling, W. Va.........
Birmingham, Ala.........
Chicago, Ill ...............
Cincinnati, 0 ............








Cleveland, .............
Louisville, Ky............
Meridian, Miss............
Milwaukee, Wis..........

Philadelphia, Pa..........
New York City..........
Atlantic City, N. J........
Pittsburgh, Pa.............
Cincinnati, 0.............

New York City...........


Washington, D. C.........
Chicago, I1..............
Cincinnati, .............
toledo, 0 ........ .......
Cleveland, 0.............
Baltimore, Md............
Cincinnati, .............
San Antonio, Tex.........
Cincinnati, 0.............



Ft. Wayne, Ind..........
Knoxville, Tenn .........
Little Rock, Ark.........
Milwaukee, Wis.........
New York City...........
Lexington, Ky............
Cincinnati, 0............
Cincinnati, 0..............


50 00
10 00
10 00
5 00
20 00
10 00
10 00
25 00
100 00
100 00
10 00
5 00
5 00
25 00
25 00
2 00
5 00
50 00
50 00
5 00
25 00
50 00
50 00
25 00
10 00
25 00
10 00
5 00
12 50
10 00
10 00
5 00
10 00
50 00
10 00
25 00
5 00
25 00
125 00
25 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
5 00
25 00
50 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
50 00
10 00
5 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
50 00
25 00
5 00
2 50
5 00
5 00
5 00
10 00
10 00


1917]


8225









FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT

ANNUAL CONTRIBUTIONS-Continued.


Name


1917


Jan. 11
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
15
16
16
17
24
24
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
29
29
30
Feb. 1
2
5
5
5

14


17
20
20
21
March 2
6
8

13
15
16
16
27
April 9
May 9
9
28
June 8


Residence


Simon Kuhn...............
Isaac A. W yler.............
Jonas Weil .................
Sim W ell ..................
Samuel Mayer .............
S. E. Rauh ...............
David A. Rosenthal........
Kaufman, Straus & Co ......
Jesse W. Lilienthal ........
Rev. Harvey B. Franklin...
Louis Block...............
S. Sokolowski..............
Phil. Straus ................
Rev. S. Hecht ..............
David M. Hyman.........
Max J. Kohler............
H. S. Livingston ..........
Wm. Goldstein ............
Nathan Drucker .... ......
Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz..
Leo F. Westheimer .......
Julius Reis ................
E. Lowenstein..............
Jacob Kronacher ..........
M. H. Eisman..............
Henry Kaufman ..........
Simon Wolf ..............
Gus. Grabfield .............
Lester A. Rothschild .......
Joseph Wineman ..........
Louis M. Alexander........
L. Shere....................
Aaron S. Stern............
Henry Kahn .............
Fred Lazarus. ............
August Goldsmith........
Myer Oettinger ............
A. J. Sunstein..............
Herbert H. Lehman........
Isaac Bloom................
Irwin M. Krohn............
Alfred T. Godshaw .........
M orris M iller ..............
Mrs. E. L. Miller and Mrs.
Ralph Mack, in memory
of Rev. M. Goldstein ....
Edgar J. Kohler............
David M. Hyman ..........
Jacob Schottenfels.........
Michael Bamberger .......
Simon Heller ............
Mrs. Leon Kahn...........
Samuel A. Lewisohn .....
Jacob H. Schiff.............
Rev. Simon Peyser........
Simeon M. Johnson .......
Alfred M. Cohen...........
Mr. & Mrs. Sidney C. Borg..
Herman Kauffer ..........
Edward L. Heinsheimer ..
Louis Katz ................
Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf
Charles B. Sommers.......
Rev. Alexander Lyons......


[NOVEMBER


Cincinnati, 0. ............

Lexington, Ky...........

Cincinnati, 0 ............
Indianapolis, Ind..........
Knoxville, Tenn .........
Louisville, Ky ...........
San Francisco, Cal.......
Btockton, Cal............
Galveston, Tex. .........
Abbeville, La ...........
Lexington, Ky............
Los Angeles, Cal.........
New York City...........
it
Cincinnati, 0. ............
Shelbyville, Ills..........
Cincinnati, 0. ............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Cincinnati, 0.............

Memphis, Tenn..........
New Orleans, La.........
Susquehanha, Pa.........
New York City. .........
Lexington, Ky............
Cincinnati, 0. ............

Indianapolis, Ind .........
San Francisco, Cal.......
Richmond, Va...........
New York City .........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Columbus, O ............
New York City. .........
Cincinnati, 0...........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
New York City ..........
Cincinnati, 0............

Waco, Tex...............
Milwaukee, Wis .........

Cincinnati, 0 ...........
New York City. .........

Cincinnati, 0. ............
Indianapolis. Ind........
Milwaukee, Wis..........
Baltimore, Md.............
New York City...........
"
Cleveland, 0..............
Cincinnati, 0............

New York City...........
Milwaukee, Wis..........
Cincinnati, 0. ............
M attoon, Ill.............
Philadelphia, Pa.........
Indianapolis, Ind ........
Brooklyn,N.Y............


Amount


$ 10 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
20 00
100 00
2 50
25 00
100 00
10 00
50 00
3 00
5 00
10 00
25 00
10 00
50 00
5 00
10 00
100 00
25 00
25 00
100 00
10 00
3 00
100 00
10 00
5 00
5 00
50 00
2 00
10 00
20 00
25 00
50 00
10 00
25 00
50 00
50 00
10 00
25 00
10 00
5 00


25 00
10 00
500 00
20 00
10 00
10 00
25 00
100 00
1000 00
25 00
25 00
100 00
250 00
5 00
500 00
2 00
100 00
50 00
15 00


8226








1917] SECRETARY S REPORT 8227,

ANNUAL CONTRIBUTIONS-Concluded.


1917 Name Residence Amount


June 8 Rev. A. Brill .............. Meridian, M iss............ $ 5 00
July 11 Samuel Kaplan ........... Sandusky, O ............. 25 00
Aug. 13 Bloch Publishing Co....... New York City........... 10 00
13 May & Kreidler ............ Cincinnati, 0. ........... 10 00
13 Saul Isenberg.............. Memphis, Tenn........... 10 00
13 Gimbel Bros. ............. Milwaukee, Wis.......... 5 00
13 Victor Levy............... Oklahoma City, Okla .... 1 00
13 Sol. Cohn................... Pulaski, Tenn............ 2 00
14 M. Jaffa................... Alexandria, Va. .......... I 00
15 Charles Shohil... ........ Cincinnati, O............. 25 00
20 J. Albert Goldman......... ............ 10 00
20 1. Levi ................ .. Omaha, Neb... .......... 2 00"
20 D. & A. Oppenheimer ...... San Antonio, Tex. ........ 5 00
21 [. Sulzbacher ............. Steubenville, 0........... 100 00
23 J. J. Hochstadter .......... Cincinnati, 0............. 10 00
Sept. 5 Henry Jonap .............. ........... 15 00
12 Abe Segal .................. ........... 10 00
18 Louis S. Levi.. ............ ........... 25 00
18 1. Newton Trager .......... ........... 5 00
27 Samuel Spiro............. South Bend, Ind.......... 5 00
Oct. 10 Dr. C. J. Rosenham ........ Louisville, Ky...........: 5 00
18 Mose Simon................ Paducah, Ky ............. 5 00
Total......................................... $5,640 50



CONGREGATIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS.

1917
April 10 Congregation B'nai Jeshurun, Newark, N. J............$ 100 00
1 Congregation Emanuel. San Francisco, Cal............ 425 00
July 2 K. K. Bene Jeshurun, Cincinnati, O0................... 100 00
17 K. K. Bene Jeshurun, Dayton, O ...................... 50 00
Oct. 3 K. K. Bene Jeshurun, Cincinnati, 0 ................... 100 00
5 Hebrew Benevolent Congregation, Atlanta, Ga......... 150 00
Total............. .....................$ 925 00



TEACHERS' INSTITUTE.

1917
Jan. 3 Jacob H. Schiff donation ............................ $1,000 00
June 7 ............... ............ 1,000 00
Aug. 13 Congregation Anshe Chesed, Cleveland, 0.............. 100 00
15 Jacob H. Schiff donation ............................. 500 00
Oct. 1 Tifereth Israel Congregation, Cleveland, 0.............. 100 00
Total ................... ................ $2,700 00



SYNAGOG PENSION FUND.

1917
June 21 Louis Marshall, New York City ........................ $ 250 00
21 Julius Rosenwald, Chicago, Ill.......................... 250 00
Total................. .. .................... $ 500 00
See footnotes, pages 8232 and 8235.









2ORT~t-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS.


Name


1916


Nov. 4

13
20
27
27
28
Dec. 4
15

26
28
1917
Jan. 5


Place


Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, 0..............
Indianapolis, Ind..........

Washington, D. 0.........
Bellaire, O0................
Cincinnati, 0.............


Detroit, Mich ...........
Pittsburgh, Pa............

Washington, D. C.........

Philadelphia, Pa..........
Cleveland, 0..............
Cincinnati, 0..............


Estate of B. Baumgarden,
dec'd ....................
Estate of Lena Stadler, dec'd
Henry Rauh ..............
Edward A. Kahn ..........
S. Kann Sons & Co..........
Max L. Herzberg .......
Isaac Joseph .............
Estate of Carrie B. Adler,
dec'd ...................
Emanuel Wodic ...........
Mrs. Jacob Kaufman ......

Simon Wolf .............
Mrs. Simon Wolf .........
Wolf Bros.................
B. Mahler.................
Fred. A. Johnson..........
Joseph Guggenheim........
Rev. Dr. Louis Grossmann..
Daniel Guggenheim ........
Adam Lessnpr .............
Morris F. Westheimer......
Ernst Troy .................
Abe Segal .................
Samuel Block.............
Prof. Henry Englander ....
Estate of Sol. Fox, dec'd ...
Mrs. Sol. Fox .............
Master George Sol. Fox ....
Miss Ruth J. Mack .........
Master William J. Mack....
Mrs. Alvin H. Lauer........
Jesse N. Wolfstein...........
Isaac W. Bernheim ......
Judge Josiah Cohen .......
Judge Julian W. Mack......
Mrs. Ida May Bing.........
William Ornstein ..........
Emil Pollak................
Benjamin Loewenstein ....
Frank Muhlhauser .........
Alfred Selligman...........
Samuel Hessberg ........
Mrs. Benj. F. Brown........
Charles S. Moch............
Mrs. Charles S. Moch ......
Louis L. Rauh.............
Rev. George Zepin..........
Maurice Stern..............
Rev. Dr. Nathan Stern ...
S. Lipinsky ..............
Benj. E. Rice ..............
William Salomon ..........
Felix Kahn ................
L.Migel .................
Adolph S. Ochs ............
Mrs. Effie Wise Ochs.......
Mrs. Philip Stein ...........
Samuel Rollman ..........
Estate of Jacob Ottenheimer
Mrs. Jacob Ottenheimer ....
Estate of Sol Rauh, dec'd ..
Ed Rauh ..................


Louisville, Ky ............
Pittsburgh, Pa...........
Chicago, Ill ..............
Cincinnati, 0............


Cleveland, 0.............

Louisville, Ky.............
Albany, N. Y.............
Cincinnati, 0.............




New Orleans, La.........
New York City. ....... .
Asheville, N. C .........
Cincinnati, O..............
New York City ..........
Cincinnati, 0.............
W aco, Tex........ ......
New York City..........

Chicago, Ill. .............
Cincinnati, 0.............


Dayton, 0..............
. .. . .


it
It
Dayton, O...
Cincinnati, O.



I"




"


Amount



$1400 00
52 00
25 00
25 00
50 00
10 00
100 00

100 00
100 00
300 00

12 50
12 50
150 00
100 00
20 00
50 00
100 00
50 00
50 00
50 00
20 00
100 00
100 00
20 00
100 00
50 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
10 00
100 00
50 00
25 00
100 00
20 00
100 00
50 00
25 00
25 00
50 00
10 00
50 00
25 00
25 00
50 00
100 00
50 00
25 00
10 00
2000 00
50 00
25 00
1000 00
100 00
25 00
S50 00
25 00
10 00
160 00
75 00


8228


[NOVEMBER


. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
I . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .









SECRETARY'Ia REPORT


8229


DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS-Continued.


1917 Name Place Amount


Jan. 16
16
16
17
17
23
23
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
S24

24
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
27

29
29
29
30
30

30
31
31
31

31
31
Feb. 1
1
2
2
5

5
5
5
5


Joseph Rollman............
Max Fruhauf ..............
Mrs. A. S. Leopold.........
Harry W. Strouse.........
Mrs. Emma Eckhouse......
Max B. May ..............
Estate of Joseph Hays, dec'd
James J. Reis..............
Isaac E. Harris ............
H aas Bros .................
Harold Loeb Gernsbacher...
Paul Sidenberg ..........
Adam A. Kramer .........
William F. Wolfner .......
B. F. Flesher ..............
The Misses Frank ........
Estate of Jacob Shartenberg,
dec'd ................ .
Estate of Max Adler, dec'd.
Mrs. Bernard Selligman...
Robert L. Block............
Ike Adler.................
A. W. Goldsmith ...........
Mrs. A. W. Goldsmith .....
E. N. Newburger ..........
Miss Mollie Rauh ..........
Isaac W. Frank ............
Isaac S. Long ............
Samuel Sachs .............
Richard Sidenberg .......
Alfred Mack..............
Isaac N. Seligman.. ......
Leo W ise ..................
Isadore Mendel ......... ..
Edgar Weininger .........
Maurice J. Freiberg........
Bernhard Freiberg ........
Mrs. Herman J. Unger .....
Sol. Sulzberger ............
Estate of Samuel B. Lipp-
m an ......... .. .....
Charles T. Abeles ..........
Mrs. Kaufmann Kohler ...
Abe Rubel & Co............
Myer Oettinger ............
Estate of Charles M. Thurn-
auer, dec'd .............
Harry Lehman.............
Rev. Dr. David Philipson...
Joseph E. Block .... ......
Estate of Simon Wildberg,
dec'd ....................
Samuel Straus .............
Ralph W. Mack ...........
Rev. Harry W. Ettelson....
Joseph Lazarus.............
Cyrus L. Sulzberger.......
Samuel Grabfelder.........
Estate of Ferdinand Philips,
dec'd ..................
Daniel Guggenheim........
Benjamin Cohen............
Jefferson Seligman ........
Adolph Lewisohn ..........


Cincinnati, 0..............

Pittsburgh, Pa............
Baltimore, Md............
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Cincinnati, 0 .............
Cleveland, 0... ........
Cincinnati, 0.............
Buffalo, N. Y..............
Cincinnati, 0.............
Fort Worth, Tex.......
Milwaukee, Wis. .........
Cincinnati, 0..............
Peoria Ill .............. .
Denver, Col...............
Cincinnati, 0 .............

Pawtucket, R. I..........
New Haven, Conn........
Louisville, Ky...........
Cincinnati, 0..............
Birmingham, Ala.........
Cincinnati, 0..............

Cleveland, 0... .........
Indianapolis. Ind ........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Wilkesbarre. Pa ..........
New York City ..........

Cincinnati, 0..............
New York City ...........
Cincinnati, O ...........

Washington, D. C.......
Cincinnati, O...........

New York City...........


Cincinnati, 0........... .
Little Rock, Ark..........
Cincinnati, 0..............
Corinth, Miss.............
Cincinnati, .. ...........


Dayton, O ................
Cincinnati, 0..............
it



Hartford, Conn...........
Cincinnati, 0...........
New York City..........
Atlantic City, N. J........

Cincinnati, 0...... ....
New York City...........
Baltimore, Md.............
New York City...........
............


1917]


$ 50 00
50 00
5 00
20 00
25 00
25 00
500 00
10 00
25 00
200 00
5 00
60 00
200 00
100 00
10 00
100 00

100 00
600 00
20 00
10 00
50 00
25 00
25 00
100 00
10 00
200 00
100 00
150 00
200 00
50 00
250 00
25 00
25 00
1 00
200 00
20 00
100 00
25 00

100 00
50 00
25 00
100 00
100 00

50 00
15 00
100 00
100 00

100 00
50 00
25 00
50 00
25 00
25 00
200 00

20 00
1000 00
25 00
100 00
500 00









]VORTY-POURTH ANNtAt PtfoRt


[NOVEMBER


DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS-Continued.


8230




191


Feb.


Place


17 Name


5 Mrs. Fred E. Bruml........
5M N. Jacobs ..............
6 A. J. Daneman............
6 Frank S. Mannheimer.....
6 Max Heavenrich .........
6 Mrs. Emanuel Mandel......
6 Sigmund Silberman........
6 Charles Straus ..........
7 S. R. Guggenheim..........
7 L Vogelstein .............
7 Henry M. Toch ..........
7 J. S. Levi .................
7 Murray Guggenheim .....
.7 laniel P. H ays ...........
8 Simon Guggenhpim........
8 iernard M. Baruch........
8 Mrs. P. K. Stichler.........
9 Benjamin L,,ewenstein ...
9 Isaac Guggenheim ........
9 Nathan J. Miller .........
9 Frank V. Strauss ..........
9 Louis W elt ................
12 Gustave A. Efroymson....
12 "Sabbath School".........
12 Emil Nathan .............
12 Rev. Isaac L. Rypins ......
13 Jacob Daneman ...........
13 Henry Veit ................
14 Charles Schaffner .........
14 S. Salabes..................
14 Maurice Dreifuss..........
15 Estate of M. H. Marks, dec'd
15 Leo. R. Marks .............
15 Dr. Samuel Rothenberg....
15 Sol. S. Kiser................
15 W olf Bros ..................
16 Max Breslauer ............
16 Louis I.Waldman ..........
16 Mrs. Shalah Silverman Rom-
b erg .....................
19 Estate of Myer Heldman,
dec'd ....................
19 Estate of Jacob Ottenheimer,
dec'd ....................
19 Samuel Seitner ...........
19 B. D. Eisendrath ..........
20 Morris Schaffner ...........
20 Rev. Moses J. Gries .......
20 Estate of Solomon Weil,
dec'd ....................
21 Rev. Louis Bernstein.......
21 R. Jackson ................
23 Max Guggenheim ..........
23 A. W. Goldsmith ..........
23 Mrs A. W. Goldsmith......
23 1. Fleischer .............
23 Mrs. Alfred Mack .........
23 Aaron Maass ..............
23 Harry Cutler .............
23 Myer Oettinger ............
23 H. Oettinger ............
23 N. Henry Beckman ........
23 Charles Shohl ............
23 Simon C. Adler ............


Cleveland, 0..............
Dayton, 0........... ..


Saginaw, Mich...........
Chicago, II1..... ....... .

Richmond, Va...........
New Yoik City............

Kokomo, Ind............
New York City..........

Dyton, ...............
Dayton, 0 ................
Cleveland, 0 ..... .......
New York City..........


Detroit, Mich ...........
Indianapolis, Ind ........
Kansas City, Mo.........
St. Louis. Mo.............
St. Paul, Minn.... .......
Dayton, O..............
Milwaukee, Wis.........
Chicago, Ill........... .
Baltimore, Md............
Detroit, Mich...........
Cincinnati, ..........

. . .
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Philadelphia, Pa ........
Milwaukee, Wis..........
Albany, N. Y.............

Chicago, Ill .............

Baltimore, Md...........

Cincinnati. 0...............
Saginaw, Mich...........
Chicago, Ill........... ...
E rie, Pa............. ....
Cleveland, 0.............

Goldsboro. N: C..........
St. Joseph, Mo ..........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
New York City...........
Cincinnati, 0.............


Baltimore, M ............
Providence, I..........
Baltimore, Md.............

Cincinnati, 0..............



Baltimore, Md............


Amount


$ 20 00
5 00
5 00
1 00
25 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
1000 00
200 00
100 00
20 00
1000 00
100 00
1000 00
1000 00
S500
50 00
1000 00
200 00
200 00
.50 00
50 00
20 00
25 00
25 00
5 00
100 00
100 00
50 00
25 00
40 00
20 00
100 00
25 00
850 00
100 00
200 00

100 00

190 00

100 00
50 00
50 00
25 00
100 00

200 00
25 00
30 00
100 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
50 00
50 00
50 00
50 00
50 00
100 00
50 00
50 00









SECRETARY'S REPORT


DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS--Continued.


1917 Name Place Amount


Feb. 23
23
26
26
26
26
26
26
28

28
28
March I

2
5
5
5
5


David Kemper .............
Max Silberherg ............
Milton D. Greenbaum......
3. Rothenberg ............
Rev. Dr. Samuel Schulman.
Jacob B. Cahn.............
Bernard Wiesenfeld........
Mrs. Jacob Kaufman .....
Temple Beth El Sabbath
School...................
Alexander Hecht .........
Stanley M. Krohn..........
Philip Stein ................
Mrs. Moses Goldenberg ....
Samuel Straus .............
Philip Stein................
Jacob Furth ...............
Barney Dreyfuss ..........
Samuel Spitz .............
Max L. Kleeman ..........
Henry Oppenheimer .......
Toby Rubovits ...........
David I. Johnson ..........
"A friend of the College" ...
Lee Harburger.............
Daniel Greenbaum ........
Ephraim Rosenfeld .......
Jewish Ladies Aid Society..
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Hassen-
busch ....................
Ben E. Rice, in memory of
of his father and mother,
Jacob and Hannah Rice..
Mrs. Leon Lauer .........
Carl Freudenthal ..........
Walter Emmerich.........
Charles Israel ..............
Benjamin B. Levy.........
Julian S. Stein ............
Bernhard Freiberg ........
Jacob Frank ...............
William Ornstein ..........
H. M. Benjamin ...........
Mrs. Henrietta W. Liebman.
Estate of David S. Lehman,
dec'd ....................
A. J. Baer..................
Miss Lena Baer ............
M. J. Baer..................
Lou Baer ..................
Simon W olf ................
Mrs. Simon Wolf..........
E. Millard Mayer ..........
Isaac Davidson ............
Henry Castleberg .........
George Harsh ............
Rev. Abram Simon .......
Estate of Fred. Lazarus, dec'd
B. L. Horwitz ..............
ErnestLoeb ................
Congregation Beth Israel ..
Simon W. Rosendale ......
Estate of Fanny Lockey,
dec'd ....................


Baltimore, M d.............
Cincinnati, 0.............
Baltimore, iMd...........
Dayton, O ...............
New York City...........
Baltimore, M d.............

Pittsburgh, Pa............

Detroit, M ich ...........
Washington, D. C........
Dayton, 0 ...............
Chicago, Ill. .............
Baltimore, iMd..........
Cincinnati, 0.............
Chicago, 111...............
St. Louis, Mo .............
Pittsburgh, Pa ...........
Chicago, 11 ..............
Springfield, 0.... ......
Baltimore, Md...........
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, 0.............
Baltimore, Md...........
Cincinnati, 0........ .....
Baltimore, Md...........

Springfield, 0............

St. Joseph, Mo...... ....


Cincinnati, 0.............
Baltimore, iMd............

New York City ...........
Cincinnati, O.'............
Dayton, O0...............
Baltimore, Md ...........
Cincinnati, 0.............


Milwaukee, Wis ..........
Shreveport, La............

Denver, Colo..............
Dayton, O0...............


Washington, D. C........

Cincinnati, O.............
Baltimore, Md.............
Washington, D.C. .......


Columbus, O.............
Cincinna ti, 0 .............
YorkBaltimore, P.............
Washington, D. C.........
Columbus, 0 ...... .......
Lafayette, Ind ... ........

Y ork, Pa ..................
Albany, N. Y..............

Chicago, Ill...............


$ 100 00
50 00
50 00
10 00
10 00
100 00
25 00
100 00

25 00
50 00
50 00
150 00
100 00
50 00
50 00
25 00
300 00
50 00
20 00
50 00
100 00
50 00
250 00
10 00
50 00
50 00
10 00

50 00


100 00
75 00
10 00
100 00
10 00
10 00
50 00
20 00
25 00
100 00
25 00
100 00

50 00
12 50
6 25
3 75
2 50
12 50
12 50
10 00
25 00
100 00
100 00
25 00
2000 00
5 00
5 00
7 50
100 00

480 40


12
12
12
12
12
12
14
14
14
19
19
26

April 3
3
3
3
4
4


1917]


8231








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS-Continued.


1917 Name Place Amount


April 18 Congregation Emanuel*.... Milwaukee, Wis.......... $ 100 00
23 Solomon Loeb.............. Lafayette, Ind............ 25 00
24 L. A. Braham .............. Cleveland, 0.............. 25 00
27 Levi Gottschalk............ Baltimore, Md............. 100 00
May 3 Rev. Joseph Rauch......... Louisville, Ky............ 25 00
3 John W. Keiler............. Paducah, Ky.............. 200 00
4 Mrs. Dot Kleeman LeBolt.. Springfield, 0............. 30 00
4 Philip L. Seasongood ...... Cincinnati, 0............. 50 00
7 Estate of Simon Fishel, dec'd Cleveland, 0.............. 250 00
8 Estate of Leopold Scheuer-
man, dec'd ............... Des Moines, la............ 1000 00
10 Rev. David Marx .......... Atlanta, Ga.............. 25 00
10 Estate of Mrs. Regina Nel-
son, dec'd ................ Richmond, Va.. ......... 100 00
15 Henry Kahn ............... Indianapolis, Ind ........ 25 00
15 Isaac Yassenoff .......... Dayton, O ................. 5 00
26 D. Glaser ............... San Francisco, Cal ........ 6 00
28 David M Levy............. Cincinnati, 0.............. 25 00
June 1 Rev. Sol. Foster............. Newark, N. J............ 25 00
7 Max L. Herzberg .......... Bellaire, 0................. 10 00
7 Rev. Tobias Schanfarber.... Chicago, Ill.... ............ 100 00
SRev. Dr. Joseph Stolz....... ............ 100 00
8 Mrs. Blanche Rauh Stolz .... 25 00
8 Rev. Louis J. Kopald ...... Buffalo, N. Y............. 125 00
11 Children of Leopold Loeb,
dec'd .................. Cincinnati, 0.............. 100 00
11 A M. Fischel ............. Washington, D. C ........ 50 00
11 Leslie V. Marks ........... Cincinnati, 0 ........... 50 00
12 S. Hamburger ............. Los Angeles, Cal......... 5 00
13 S. Marcus Fechheimer. Cincinnati, 0.............. 50 00
18 Anshai Emetl Sabbath School Peoria, Ill............... 25 00
22 Children of Mrs. Theresa
Berman .................. Cincinnati, 0............. 100 00
25 Estate of Bernhard Bett-
m ann .................... .... 50 00
July 5 Simon Wolf ............. Washington, D. C.......... 12 50
5 Mrs. Simon W olf.......... ............ 12 50
5 Isaac Bear ............... Lafayette, Ind............. 5 00
11 Cong. Bene Abraham....... Portsmouth, 0........... 60 00
13 Miss Ophelia Ehrman, in
memory of Mr. 1. Ehrman Helena, Ark.............. 100 00
13 Estate of Florence N. Schles-
inger .................... New York City........... 200 00
Aug. 13 J. Walter Freiberg ........ Cincinnati, O. ............ 250 00
13 Bamberg-r & Feibelman ... Indianapolis, Ind.......... 50 00
14 Simon Lehman ............ Cincinnati, 0.............. 50 00
14 A G. Becker ............. Chicago, Ill.............. 250 00
17 Rabbi Louis Wolsey........ Cleveland, 0.............. 25 00
17 Dr. Leo Mannheimer ...... New York City............ 25 00
20 A. Eisenberg .............. Baltimore, Md........... .15 00
20 Philip K ahn .... ......... ............ 25 00
20 Joseph Wiesenfeld ........ ........ 50 00
21 Rabbi Jonah B. Wise ...... Portland, Ore............. 50 00
22 harles Eisenman.......... Cleveland, 0.............. 100 00
23 Mrs. Nora Gusky .......... ........... 5 00
24 Louis Schlesinger .......... Newark, N. J............. 100 00
27 Geo. T. Skirble ...... .... Canonsburg, Pa.......... 10 00
29 Estate of Mrs. Helen Speier,
dec'd ........... ........ Lincoln, N eb.............. 100 00
30 Mrs M Kleiner ............ Denver, Col............... 10 00
Sept. 7 Felix Kahn.............. .Cincinnati, 0............. 50 00
7 Rabbi David Lefkowitz .... Dayton, 0................ 25 00
*After books were closed, this contribution claimed for"Congregational Contribution."
See page 8227.


8232


[NOVEMBER







SECRETARY'S REPORT

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS-Concluded.


1917


Sept. 10

10
11

12
18
20

24
27


27


27
27
Oct. 4
4
11
15
15
22
23
23
24


Place


Name


Mrs. N. E. Ory, in memory
of Mrs. Henrietta Sterne .
Dr. S. Pearlman............
Mr. & Mrs. A. Holtz, in mem-
ory of Max Holtz ........
Estate of Julia H.Wolf, dec'd
Philip Stein ................
Isaiah Temple Sabbath
School ..................
Henry Moses .............
Mrs. Sarah Martin, in mem-
ory of her husband Solo-
mon Martin...........
Miss Rose L. Martin, in
memory of her brother,
Abe L. Martin. .........
Nathan Flax .............
Congregation B'nai Zion....
Simon W olf ................
Mrs. Simon Wolf...........
Robert Lee Straus ........
Rev. Dr. Rudolph Grossman
Gus M Salzer ..............
Jacob Schottenfels ........
Dr. Emil G. Hirsch.........
Mrs. Emil G. Hirsch........
Estate of Leon Block .......


Total................................... $35,238 90


TRACT COMMISSION.

1916 Name Residence Amount


Nov. 10 Congregation Temple Israel Springfield, Mo ........... $ 3 00
15 Congregation Beth Israel .. Hartford, Conn.. ........ 10 00
15 Ralph W. Mack........... Cincinnati, 0.............. 10 00
27 James Lobsitz ............. Perry, Okla............... 10 00
1917
Jan. 30 Albert G. Morgenstern...... New York City............ 5 00
March 2 Sam Hexter...... ......... Grand Island, Neb ........ 5 00
20 Jacob H. Schiff ............ New York City ........... 3 75
Sept. 12 Henry Freund.............. Honesdale, Pa ............ 1 00
Oct. 4 S. Kemp .................. I azlehurst, M iss .......... 2 50
10 Mrs. G. Loewenberg........ Kosciusko, Miss .......... 1 00
Total ................... .......... .......... $51 25


ENDOWMENT FUND.


1916 Name Place


Dec. 12 Estate of Solomon May, dec'd Cincinnati, 0.............
1917
Aug. 6 Children of Sophia Shonin-
ger, dec'd............... .Chicago, Ill...............


Amount


$10000 00

100 00


Total................... .................. .. $10,100 00


Anniston, Ala ...........
Lafayette, Ind............

Minneapolis, Minn.......
Mt. Vernon, Ind..........
Chicago, Ill ...............


Cincinnati, 0........... .


Evansville, Ind...........


Paintsville, Ky ..........
Danville, Pa ............
Washington, D. C........

Cincinnati, O...........
New York City...........
Springfield, O.........
Cincinnati, O...........
Chicago, 11l.............

Kansas City, Mo .........


Amount



$ 1 00
5 00

100 00
50 00
50 00

25 00
50 00


100 00


1917]


" 8233








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.


Name


1916


Nov. 2
27
27
28
28
29
Dec. 1
1
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
6
11
12
18
20

22
28
29
1917
Jan. 2
2
2
3
5
5
9
9
10
10
10
13
13
13
16
16
24
24
24
25
25
25
25
25
25
26
26
26
Feb. 1
6
8
12
14
15

16
21


Residence


Buffalo, N.Y...... .......
Baltimore, Md ............

Charlevoix, Mich..........
Pittsburgh, Pa...........
Baltimore, Md............











Louisville, Ky............
Baltimore, Md...........


Stamford, Conn...........
Baltimore, Md............


Samuel L. Fechenbach .... ............
L. Federlicht ............. ............
Simon M Hanline......... ............
Nathan Epstein ............ ............
Henry Sonneborn .......... ............
J. S. Goldsmith & Bro ...... .......
Charles Shohl............. Cincinnati, 0.............
S. Shapinsky .............. Louisville, Ky ..........
A. G. Becker............... Chicago, 111..............
Jacob Schnadig .......... ... .
Marcus Rauh .............. Pittsburgh, Pa...........
"A friend" ................. .... .. .. ............
Philip Hamburger........ Pittsburgh, Pa............
Bernard Bernheim ........ Louisville, Ky............
Rev. Dr. J. Leonard Levy... Pittsburgh, Pa............
Joseph Michaels ........... Chicago, Ill.............
A. M Hast ................ Pittsburgh, Pa............
Isaac W Frank ............ ........ ...
Mrs. Isaac W Frank ....... ............
Mrs. Merla Thalheimer..... Baltimore, Md............
William M. Benesch........ ........
V. J. Burger .......... .... Louisville, Ky ............
Ben Harris ................ St. Louis, M o........ ....
Milton E. Marcus .......... Richmond, Va............
Julius Rosenwald ......... Chicago, Ill...............
Sam uel Spitz ............ ......
J. Walter Freiberg ....... Cincinnati, 0.............
J. E.Goldberg .............. Detroit,,M ich.............
A. J. Sunstein ............. Pittsburgh, Pa ..........
Jacob H. Schiff............ New York City ..........
Herman Wile .............. Buffalo, N. Y. ...........
Mrs. Julius Rosenwald .... Chicago, Ill...............
Nathaniel Spear ............ Pittsburgh, Pa............
National Federation Temple
Sisterhoods ............. .....................
Leslie V. Marks........... Cincinnati, 0.............
M. Rothschild. ............ Pittsburgh, Pa...........


E. D. Hofeller..............
Julius Goldenberg ..........
Abraham I. Weinberg......
"Summer Congregation"....
M. Gluckoff ..............
Levi Goldenberg ..........
Hochschild, Kohn & Co ....
Solomon Frank............
Sim on Greif................
A. Eisenberg ..............
Jacob Engel ...............
Myer Heldman.............
Moses Goldenber...........
Mrs. Martha Bloch........
Miss Florence Bloch........
A. R K atz ................
Max Greif..................
Isaac Gusdorf ..............
Sidney Lansbureh..........
Hirsch Bros. & Co..........
H J. Cahn .................
Rev. Dr. Charles A. Ruben-
stein .....................
Monroe L. Bickart .........
Jacob Epstein ..............
Philip Kahn ..............


Amount


$ 15 00
50 00
25 00
16 75
50 00
20 00
100 00
100 00
40 00
50 00
10 00
10 00
100 00
25 00
5 00
15 00
50 00
10 00
30 00
100 00
5 00

10 00
25 00
100 00
20 00

10 00
25 00
10 00
7 50
100 00
25 00
50 00
30 00
250 00
200 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100'00
150 00
50 00
50 00
100 00
100 00
50 00
100 00
20 00
100 00
25 00
5000 00
100 00
250 00
25 00
100 00
3700 00
50 00
200 00
100 00

500 00
30 00
100 00


8234"


[NOVEMBER








SECRETARY'S REPORT


SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION-Continued.


1917 Name


Feb. 21 Marcus Aaron ...........
21 M. Oppenheimer ..........
23 William Loeb..............
March 9 Charles H. Joseph .........
12 Isidor Cohen.............
14 Milton Shroder.:...........
15 Simon Fleischmann........
19 Louis Weill ..............
21 A. Spangenthal ...........
23 Jacob H. Schiff............
23M.M Kann ...............
23 Mrs. M. M. Kann...........
28 Otto Irving Wise .........
April 2 M. Fox ...................
9 Albert A. Brager...........
13 A. Joe Levy ................
19 Miss B. Crailsheimer ......
May 3 Temple Sholom*...........
10 Meyer Joseph.............
11 Louis J. Affelder...........
11 C. H. Friend...............
14 Enoch Rauh ..............
14 Mrs: A. J. Sunstein........
14 A. Leo Weil...............
14 Mrs. A. Leo Weil..........
14 Felix W eil .................
14 Isaac DeKaiser............
14 Edgar K. Frank...........
14 Jacob Raphael ...........
14 Oscar W. Oppenheimer ..
14 Julius Weiss ..............
15 Samuel A. Berger .........
15 Miss Bertha Strauss.......
15 M. Bonn .................
15 Herman Cerf..............
15 Alexander Silverman.......
15 Estate of Jacques Weil,dec'd
15 Mrs. Jacques Weil........
15 Mrs. J. Siesel .............
17 Edgar G. Seeman .........
21 A. L. Rauh................
22 Sigmund Falk.............
22 M. Oppenheimer ........
23 Isaac Kaufmann............
25 Max Wolf................
28 Estate of Chas. Ruben, dec'd
29 William K. Frank.........
29 Herman Hirsch...........
June 1 K. Solomon ..............
4 L. H. M eth .............. .
4 Leo E. Einstein ..........
4 Isidore Rothstein ..........
4 Morris S. Wertheimer......
4 Isaac Guckenheimer .......
6 Maurice Falk.............
6 Robert Lewin ..............
6S.D. Waxman.........
8 B'nai Israel Congregation*.
11 Congregation B'nai Israel*.
11 Joseph DeRoy..............
11 Abe J. DeRoy..............
11 Al. J. DeRoy...............


Resid


Pittsburgh, Pa.........

New York City........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Sacramento, Cal ........
Buffalo, N. Y..............


New York City............
Pittsburgh, Pa............

San Francisco, Cal. ......
Buffalo, N. Y.............
Baltimore, Md............
Springfield, 0.............
Pittsburgh, Pa ...........
Chicago, Ill.............
Pittsburgh, Pa...........






Wilkinsburg, Pa..........
New York City............
it
DavenportT.............
Little Rock, Ar..........
Pittsburgh, Pa...........
New York City...























Davenport, Ia .............
Littsbule Rokgh, Ark..........
.Pittsburgh, Pa...........














.. . .


*After books were closed, this contribution claimed for"Congregational Contribution.'
See page 8227.


ence Amount


$ 100 00
200 00
10 00
20 00
25 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
20 00
1300 00
25 00
10 00
100 00
5 00
100 00
5 00
100 00
50 00
50 00
10 00
25 00
50 00
25 00
200 00
5 00
10 00
10 00
20 00
10 00
10 00
5 00
5 00
5 00
20 00
10 00
5 00
50 00
10 00
10 00
2 50
50 00
50 00
100 00
100 00
25 00
25 00
10 00
10 00
100 00
10 00
5 00
5 00
50 00
50 00
300 00
50 00
5 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
10 00


19171


8235








PORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION-Continued.


1917 Name Residence Amount


June 11
11
11
12
13
15
18
19
19
20
26
July 2
5
5
5
5
56
5
5
10
10
11
16
26
27
27
30
30
Aug. 6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
8


L. J. DeRoy...............
B. White ... .............
S.W. Straus...............
Isaac Wertheimer..........
Leon Falk ................
Louis V. Barach...........
Aaron Cohen..............
M. M. Levy................
Henry Weiskopf .........
M Coblins.................
Miss Carrie David..........
Miss Rosa Kann............
A. Leo W eil ................
Isaac Kaufmann ..........
Philip Hamburger.........
Maurice Falk ..............
Marcus Aaron..........
Louis I. Aaron .............
Marcus Rauh .............
Mrs. Cass Sunstein ........
Leon Falk .................
Mayer Forst...............
M. R. Scharff..............
"Summer Congregation"....
8. B. Goldsmit ...........
Robert Lewin............
A. J. Sunstein .............
Meyer Sunstein ...........
"Summer Congregation"...
A. Spangenthal ...........
P. D Block ................
W S. Blau .................
Ben New ..................
Salmon P.Halle...........
H. M. Fechimer...........
Edward Sachs .............
L. Salomon ............ ..
Morris D. Sachs...........
R. A. Grabfelder ..........
I. W. Bernheim...........
B. Bernheim ...............
A. Gansman ..............
E. Boasberg................
Nicholas Davies............
Charles Eisenman..........
A. J. Farber...............
H. Friedman .... ........
Sam Haas ...............
J. J. Blum .................
M. B. Hirsch .............
Adolph Finsterwald........
Theodore Hofeller .........
A. W. Goldsmith ..........
Felix Kahn ........... .
Sam Ullman ..............
Isaac Goldman............
M. Littmann ..............
Louis Renard ............
Robert Thai.......... ..
Bouvier Specialty Co. .....
Morris Half ..............
Montrose Strasburger .....
lucien S. Loeb ..........
Charles H. Joseph .........


Pittsburgh, Pa...........

Chicago, Ill..............
Pittsburgh, Pa...........




Atlantic Cit, N.........
Pittsburgh, Pa...........











Ottawa Beach, Mich.
Pittsburgh, P..........


Ottawa Beach, Mc....
Buffalo, N. Y............
Chicano, Ill..........
Cleveland, 0 ............


Detroit, Mic ...........
Louisville, Ky...........




Lancaster, Pa.............
Buffalo, N. Y...........
Detroit,. Mich...........
Cleveland, O............


Louisville, Ky...........

Lancaster, Pa ..........
Detroit, Mich..........
Buffalo, N. Y. ..........
Cin innati, O...............

Louisville, Ky...........
St. Louis, Mo............


Louisville, Ky............
Pittsurh, Pa ..........
New York City..........
Montgomery, Ala.........
Pittsburgh,Pa............


$ 10 00
10 00
100 00
50 00
300 00
5 00
50 00
5 00
20 00
5 00
5 00
10 00
50 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
25 00
5 00
9 50
100 00
100 00
100 00
100 00
16 50
10 00
25 00
10 00
10 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
100 00
100 00
10 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
10 00
5 00
25 00
10 00
10 00
25 00
10 00
5 00
10 00
10 00
50 00
50 00
50 00
20 00
15 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
10 00


8236


[NOVEMBER








1917] SECRETARY'S REPORT 8237

SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION-Continued.

1917 Name Residence Amount


Aug. 13 Eugene L. Falk.......... Buffalo, N.Y............. $ 5 00
13 Harry New .......... ..... Cleveland, 0.............. 10 00
13 M. C. W eil .............. Detroit, Mich............. 10 00
13 J. E. Opper......... ........ Louisville, Ky............ 10 00
13 W m.Trost ............ ........... 10 00
13 Ben Altheimer ............ New York City .......... 50 00
13 M. J. Ehrlich ............. St. Louis, Mo.............. 20 00
13 Aaron Fuller .............. .. 100 00
13 David Sommers ............ ........... 25 00
14 I. H Lesem ............... ............ 30 00
14 Sidney M. Shoenberg ...... ........... 10 00
14 A. Wineman .............. Detroit, Mich............. 10 00
14 L.W ineman............... ......... .. 50 00
14 Henry Wineman.......... ............ 10 00
15 "Summer Congregation" ... Ottawa Beach, Michi...... 9 40
15 August Keiser ............ Buffalo, N. Y. .......... 25 00
15 Nathan Bry............... St. Louis, Moe............. 20 00
15 Col. M. Shoenberg.......... ............ 100 00
15 E. M. Rothman ........... Detroit, Mich............. 25 00
16 Leonard A. Hecht.......... Baltimore, Md............ 25 00
16 Carl E. Pritz .............. Cincinnati, 0 .............. 25 00
17 Sam Kahn ........ ...... 10 00
17 Abe C. Levi ............... Louisville, Ky............ 10 00
17 Ralph G. Wolff ............ St. Louis, Mo............. 5 00
20 Joseph Wiesenfeld ........ Baltimore, Md............ 50 00
20 Simon Fleischmann ....... Buffalo, N. Y.............. 10 00
20 Henry Ittleson............ New York City.......... 50 00
20 Morton J. May ........... St. Louis, Mo............. 50 00
20 Jesse W. Lilienthal ....... San Frr cisco, Cal........ 10 00
21 Joseph Schonthal ........ Columbus, O0............ a1000 00
21 Sam T. Goldberg ......... Detroit, Mich............. 25 00
21 L. Sim on .................. ... 5 00
21 "Summer Congregation"... Elkhart Lake, Wis.. ..... 11 45
21 Mrs. Sigmund Schwabacher dan Francisco, Cal........ 20 00
22 "Summer Congregation".... Ottawa Beach, Mich...... 5 60
22 M. J. Streng ... ..... Louisville, Ky............ 10 00
24 Mrs. H Goldberg ......... Detroit, Mich............. 50 00
24 Henry Kaufmann.......... New York City........... 100 00
27 E. D. Hofeller............ Buffalo, N. Y.............. 15 00
27 Isadore Hirsch ........ .... Louisville, Ky............ 10 00
27 Henry Fromme ......... Braddock, Pa............ 5 00
27 Max Harris ................ Pittsburgh, Pa ........ 25 00
27 Meyer N. Jacobs ...................... 10 00
27 Irvin F. Lehman ........... ............ 25 00
28 The Joseph & Feiss Co.... Cleveland, 0.............. 100 00
31 Joseph Block ............. Buffalo, N. Y.............. 20 00
Sept. I Herman W ile............. ........... 25 00
4 "Summer Congregation".... Cedar Lake, Wis ........ 29 31
5 Mose Grabfelder ........... Louisville, Ky... ........ 25 00
7 M. W ile ................... Buffalo, N. Y.............. 25 00
7 Isaac Goldberg............. Detroit, Mich............. 100 00
7 Eugene Straus ........... Louisville, Ky............ 10 00
10 "Summer Congregation".... Lake Placid, N. Y......... 25 00
10 0. H. Enggass.............. Detroit, Mich. ............ 15 00
10 Joseph M. W elt ............ ............ 10 00
10 Louis Samler............... Lancaster, Pa............. 10 00
10 Mrs. M. Tachau............Louisville, Ky............ 10 00
1 Wm. Thalheimer .......... ............ 10 00
11 Ben Straus ................. ............ 30 00
11 A. Waldheim .............. St. Louis, Mo. ........... 100 00
1 Bemjamin L. Lambert...... Detroit, Mich............. 10 00
(a) This donation is given in memory of Hermine Schonthal and is to be known as the
"Hermine Schonthal Publication Fund," and is to be used for the publication of text-
books for religious schools.










8238


FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER


SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION-Concluded.


1917 Name Residence Amount


Sept. 13 J. L. Selling ............... Detroit, Mich ........... $ 25 00
14 Elias Frank................ ..... 15 00
14 Albert Kahn... ........... ............ 50 00
14 Sabbath School Teachers of
Congr. Rodeph Shalom.. Pittsburgh, Pa ........ 25 00
14 M. N. Jacobs .... ... .. ............ 20 00
18 Jacob Siegel ............... Detroit, Mich ............ 100 00

18 E. H. Wolff ............... St. Louis, Mo ....... .. 25 00
20 George G. Epstean ........ Detroit, Mich........... 50 00
24 Mrs. Sol Fox, in memory of
herhusband,Solomon Fx,
and her son, George Fox Cincinnati, 0............. 200 00
27S. A. Sloman ............. Detroit, Mich.... ....... 25 00
Oct. 3 Morris Forst .............. Pittsburgh, Pa.......... 20 00
3 Sam. W. Trost.............. Cincinnati, 0............. 20 00
10 Maurice Rosenthal........ Lancaster. Pa.......... 10 00
10 W iliam Pirossh ........... ........... 10 00
22 W. E. Rosengarten ...... Detroit, Mich............ 10 00
29 "Summer Congregation". Charlevoix, Mich ....... 82 50
29 Estate of Simon Grief ..... Baltimore, Md............. 40 00
Total.............. ..... ..... ........ $22,786 01







FROM BOARD OF MANAGERS SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL
EXTENSION.


1916
Nov. 8
15
22
Dec. 1
13
20
1917
Jan. 6
25
Feb. 9
23
March 8
22
April 20
May 11
June 12
2g
July 11
26
Aug. 7
Sept. 12
2O
Oct. 1R


Sale of Leaflets............
S............
S............

( 'it



S............
1 . . .



S............

S............
( . . ..








Total. . .. .
44 44


44 .4
44 44


.. ... ...... ............ $ 191 15
............................ 229 6 1
....................... ... 352 32
................. 209 82
......... ....... .. 310 13
............................ 193 54

................. .. 255 02
............... 232 88
............................ 160 15
............................ 134 88
........................ 156 33
..................... ..... 150 73
..... ....... ............... 141 39
....... ..................... 82 11
............................ 107 81
............................ 42 50
............................ 11 30
............................ 23 24
............................ 62 41
............................ 32 15
............................ 21 51
...................... ... 2 15 48
............. ........... 80 08
..... ............... .. 9 1 77

...................... $3,488 31








SECRETARY'S REPORT


SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN NEW YORK CITY.


Ezra Hebrew School ....... New Yo
." "t t


Nov. 19
Dec. 7
8
29
1917
Jan. .6
27
31
Feb. 1
8

8
16
27
March 6
12
19
20
27
April 6
17
17
17
27
27
May 8
18
21
21
22
22
29
29
June 1
8
8
21
July. 11
18
30
Aug. 13
Sept. 1
12
20
24
Oct. 10
17
25
26
26
29
31


Daniel B. Freedman........
Ludwig Vogelstein ........

Ezra Hebrew School......



Collected by Ludwig Vogel-
stein from "A friend" ....
Ezra Hebrew School........
S....




Miss Lucille Schamberg ....
Ezra Hebrew School........


Hon. Irving Lehman ......
Henry M. Toch ..........
Daniel B. Freedman........
Ezra Hebrew School........

Temple Emanuel .........
Alexander Ungar ..........
Ezra Hebrew School........
Judge David Leventritt ...
P. J. Goodhart ..............
Ezra Hebrew School........
Seth Bers ...............
Mrs. Lewis M. Schamberg..
Abraham Erlanger .......
Ezra Hebrew School........

44 4 44


Adolph S. Ochs .........

Leopold Stern ..............




David Oberndorf ...........
Milton S. Guiterman ......
Ezra Hebrew School........
44 44 4
44 44 4
44 44 4








Ezra Hebrew School.....


T otal.......................


1916 Name


LOANS.

1916
Dec. 1 Fourth National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio ............. $6,000 00
1917
June 1 ............... 3,000 00
July 12 ................ 1,000 00
Aug. 1 ................. 7,000 00
Total.......................................... $17,000 00


If


",





I(



it
(1

t,
t"

I






11
"1
It






It


)


1917]


8239


Residence Amount


rk City........... $ 33 25
............ 196 50
............ 240 00
............ 600 00

............ 232 08
........ 153 80
.......... 27 45
............ 19 25

............ 25 00
............ 57 08
............ 61 35
........... 49 55
............ 51 70
............ 44 35
........... 46 55
.......... 10 00
.......... 76 95
..... ... ... 70 40
............ 37 80
........... 1000 00
........... 25 00
............ 240 00
........... 83 50
............ 85 45
........... 1000 00
............ 12 50
............ 69 45
........... 200 00
............ 100 00
............ 108 65
............ 25 00
........... 100 00
............ 100 00
............ 48 90
...... .... 149 80
............ 158 60
............ 60 85
............ 93 80
...... .... 91 20
......... 88 80
*.......... 134 10
............ 246 80
............ 200 00
............ 60 33
............ 643 35
..... ...... 500 00
........ ... 100 00
............ 25 00
............ 10 00
........... 119 40
................... $7,913 54







8240 FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

INCOME FROM SECURITIES.
1916
Nov. 1 Dividend on Gimbel Bros. Stock................... .. $ 30 00
14 Interest on Rothschild & Co. bonds ..5................ 40 00
Dec. 19 Interest on St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. Co. bonds .. 540 18
28 Interest on Northern Pacific R. R. Co. bonds............ 110 00
28 Interest on C. H. & D. R. R. Co., bonds ................. 450 00
28 Interest on Choctaw & Memphis R. R. Co. bonds......... 400 00
28 Interest on Southern Pacific R. R. Co. bonds............ 300 00
28 Interest on Newport & Cincinnati Bridge Co., bonds.... 460'00
28 Interest on Northern Ohio Light and Traction Co. bond. 25 00
28 Interest on Reading, O., bonds ......................... 75 00
28 Interest on Seattle, Wash., bonds ..................... 225 00
28 Interest on Clarksville, Tenn., bonds ................. 100 00
28 Interest on Charleston, W. Va., bonds ................ 225 00
28 Interest on Rothschild & Co. bonds .................... 180 00
1917
Jan. 2 Interest on Illinois Central Stock Interest Certificates.. 200 00
29 Interest on New York Central R. R. Co. bonds.......... 210 00
29 Interest on Penn. Co. Trust certificates ............... 140 00
Feb. 1 Dividend on Gimbel Bros. Stock ...................... 30 00
26 Interest on Delaware, O., bonds ...................... 150 00
26 Interest on Pomeroy, 0., bonds ...................... 112 50
26 Interest on Union Pacific R. R. Co. bonds ............. 220 00
26 Interest on Lake Shore & Mich. South. R'y Co. bonds... 200 00
March 29 Interest on Northern Pacific R. R. Co. bonds........... 110 00
29 Interest on St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. Co. bonds .. 51 00
29 Interest on Lakewood, 0., bonds ..................... 180 00
29 Interest on Collinwood, 0., bonds..................... 400 00
29 Interest on Cleveland, 0., bonds ....................... 120 00
29 Interest on K. K. B'nai Yeshurun, Cincinnati, 0., bonds. 200 00
April 24 Interest on Schaengold Realty Co. mortgage .......... 125 00
27 Interest on Cincinnati, Lebanon & North. Ry. Co. bonds 500 00
27 Interest on Western Union Telegraph Co. bonds........ 225 00
27 Interest on K. K. Bene Israel, Cincinnati, O., bonds .... 345 00
27 Interest on Jewish Hospital Ass'n, Cincinnati, O., bonds 40 00
May 1 Dividend on Gimbel Bros. stock.......... ........... 30 00
22 Interest on Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Co. bonds .......... 250 00
June 28 Interest on Reading, O., bonds ............. ........... 75 00
28 Interest on Northern Ohio Traction & Light Co. bonds.. 25 00
28 Interest on Newport & Cincinnati Bridge Co., bonds.... 450 00
28 Interest on Clarksville. Tenn., bonds ................. 100 00
28 Interest on Choctaw & Memphis R. R. Co. bonds ....... 400 00
28 Interest on Cin., Ham., & Dayton R. R. Co. bonds ...... 450 00
28 Interest on Southern Pacific R. R. Co. bonds............ 300 00
28 Interest on Seattle, Wash., bonds ..................... 225 00
28 Interest on Rothschild & Co. bonds ................... 180 00
28 Interest on Northern Pacific R. R. Co. bonds............ 110 00
28 Interest on St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. Co. bonds .. 20 00
28 Interest on St. Louis &'San Francisco R. R. Co. bonds .. 10 00
July 2 Interest on Illinois Central Stock Interest Certificates.. 200 00
30 Interest on Penn. Co. trust certificates ................ 140 00
30 Interest on New York Central R. R. Co. bonds ......... 210 00
Aug. 2 Dividend on Gimbel Bros. Stock .......... .......... 30 00
30 Interest on Lake Shore & Mich. South. R'y bonds....... 200 00
30 Interest on Pomeroy, O., bonds....................... 112 50
30 Interest on Delaware, O., bonds ...................... 150 00
30 Interest on Union Pacific R. R. Co. bonds .............. 300 00
Sept. 27 Interest on Lakewood, O., bonds ...................... 180 00
27 Interest on Collinwood, O., bonds .................... 400 00
27 Interest on K. K. B'nai Yeshurun, Cincinnati, O., bonds. 200 00
27 Interest on Parkersburg, W. Va., bonds ............... 400 00
27 Interest on Cleveland, 0., bonds ... ................... 120 00
27 Interest on Northern Pacific R. R. Co. bonds .......... 110 00
27 Interest on'St. L. & San Francisco Ry Co. adjustment bonds 51 00
27 Interest on St. L. & San Francisco Ry Co. income bonds.. 180 00
Oct 16 Interest on Schaengold Realty Co. mortgage........... 125 00
30 Interest on Western Union Telegraph Co. bonds........ 225 00
30 Interest on Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern Ry Co. bonds 500 00
30 Interest on K. K. Bene Israel, Cincinnati, Ohio, bonds .. 345 00
30 Interest on Jewish Hospital Assn., Cincinnati, O., bonds.._ 40 00
Total .................. .........................$14,052 18










1917] SECRETARY'S REPORT 8241

STIPENDIARY FUND.

1916
Nov. 3 Refunded loan to student .......................... $ 5 00
7 .................... 15 00
13 ....................... ..... 10 00
19 ...................... .... 10 00
20 ............................. 10 00
Dec. I Congr. Rodeph Sholem (scholarship), Philadelphia, Pa. 100 00
6 Refunded loan to student ........................... 5 00
6 ... .. ............. ... 5 00
12 Rodeph Shalom Sisterhood (scholarship), Pittsburgh,
Pa........... ................................... 300 00
13 Refunded loan to student ........................... 10 00
19 ........... .. 10.00
19 Emanuel Theological Seminary Ass'n, New York City 200 00
1917
Jan. 5 Refunded loan to student ........................... 200 00
23 '.. .................... ..... 100 00
23 ......................... ... 5 00
23 .......... ..... .. .. 10 00
27 Scholarship of Temple Women's Ass'n, Cleveland, O... 250 00
Feb. 2 Congr. Rodeph Sholem (scholarship), Philadelphia, Pa. 100 00
7 Refunded loan to student ........................... 5 00
15 ............................. 10 00
19 ...................... ..... 10 00
M arch 7 ............................ 5 00
21 Emanuel Theological Seminary Ass'n, New York City 325 00
21 Refunded loan to student .......................... 10 00
April 6 ............... .... .... 5 00
13 Adath Israel Sisterhood (scholarship), Louisville, Ky. 300 00
13 District No. 1, National Federation Temple Sisterhoods
(scholarship) ................................ 300 00
13 National Federation Temple Sisterhoods (scholarships) 1200 00
20 Bene Israel Sisterhood (scholarship), Cincinnati, O .. 300 00
May 2 Congr. Rodeph Sholem (scholarship), Philadelphia, Pa. 100 00
17 Refunded loan to student .......................... 10 00
18 ............ 20 00
28 Sisterhood of Washington Hebrew Congregation (schol-
arship),Washington, D. C..... .... ........... 300 00
June 6 Sisterhood Oheb Shalom Temple, (Szold-Kaiser schol-
arship). Baltimore, Md...... .................. 300 00
6 Baltimore Hebrew Congregation Sisterhood (scholar-
ship in memory of Dr. Adolf Guttmacher), Balti-
more, Md................................. ...... 300 00
6 Refunded loan to student ........................... 30 00
7 Estate of Adolphus W. Rich, dec'd, Milwaukee, Wis.. 250 00
7 Refunded loan to student ........................... 5 00
8 ................ ... 50 00
11 Plum Street Temple Sisterhood (scholarship), Cincin-
nati, 0........ ............................ 300 00
11 Har Sinai Congregation, Baltimore, Md............... 22 70
13 Refunded loan to student ............................ 17 50
21 ................... ........ 10 00
Aug. 13 .. .................. ... 30 00
Sept. 27 ........................... 220 00
27 .......................... .. 15 00
Oct. 16 ........ .. 65 00
17 Emanuel Theological Seminary Ass'n, New York City 200 00
24 Congregation Emanuel, (scholarship), San Francisco,
Cal ............. ... ........................... 300 00
Total ............. ......................... $6,360 20










FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


TREASURY REPORT.

GENERAL FUND.
Dr. Balance November 1, 1916 ..................... $182,216 16
Paid orders amounting to........................ 128,970 46

311,186 62
Received for General Fund......................... 139212 39


Present Dr. Balance ............... ........


$171,974 23


ENDOWMENT FUND.
Cr. Balance November 1, 1916...................... $180,983 90
Received for Endowment Fund ..................... 10,100 00

191,083 90
Paid orders amounting to .......................... 23,988 99
-- 167,094 91
Due Treasury (overdrawn) .............................. 4,879 32

Respectfully submitted,
GEORGE ZEPIN,
CINCINNATI, November 1, 1917. Secretary.


8242


LNOVEMBER









ACCOUNTANTS' REPORT


Report of Public Accountants


Cincinnati, November 30, 1917.
To the President and Executive Board,
The Union of American Hebrew Congre-
gations, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Sirs: In accordance with your instruc-
tions, examination has been made of the
receipts and disbursements of The Union of
American Hebrew Congregations, for the
year ended October 31, 1917, and we sub-
mit herewith the following report:
EXHIBIT 1-Statement of Cash and Recon-
ciliation of Bank Account at October
31, 1917.
SCHEDULE "A"-Statement of Receipts
and Disbursements for the year ended
October 31, 1917.


SCHEDULE "B"-Statement of Securities
on Hand, at October 31, 1917.
Receipts have been checked and we find
same properly entered. Disbursements have
been checked in detail and are in accord
with vouchers on file.
Securities on hand, as shown by Schedule
"B," were examined in detail, and are de-
posited in vault of The Central Trust and
Safe Deposit Company, all interest collected
on said securities having been regularly
accounted for.
Respectfully submitted,
A. L. ZIMMERMAN & CO.,
Public Accountants and Auditors.


Statement of Cash and Reconciliation of Bank Account
at October 31, 1917


Balance at Fourth National Bank............................... $ 5,744.56
Less-Outstanding Checks:
No. 4251 ............................................. $6,062.15
No. 4252 ............................................. 62.50
No. 4254 ............................................ 175.00
No. 4255 ............................................ 74.06
No. 4256 ................ ........................... 1,061.50
No. 4257 ............................................ 3,188.67

Total Outstanding Checks .................................. $10,623.88

Cash Overdraft ............. .............................. $ 4,879.32


Exhibit 1


1917]


8243










8244 FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER


Statement of Receipts and Disbursements
For Year Ended October 31, 1917


RECEIPTS
Annual Contributions ....................................$ 5,640.50
Borrowed Money ....................................... 17,000.00
Donations and Bequests ................................... 35,238.90
Dues from Congregations.................................. 22,556.50
Endowment Fund ........................................ 10,100.00
Income from Securities. .................. ............. .... 14,052.18
Sale of Books and Leaflets................................. 3,488.31
Stipendiary Fund ................. ...................... 6,360.20
Synagog Pension Fund..................... .............. 500.00
Synagog and School Extension.............................. 30,699.55
Teachers' Institute ....................................... 2,700.00
Tract Commission ........................................ 51.25
Congregational Contributions .............................. 925.00

Total Receipts ....................................... $149,312.39

DISBURSEMENTS
Advertising ............................... ........... $ 250.00
Auditing ........................... ...................... 50.00
Call Loans Paid............... .... .. .................... 6,000.00
Clifton Avenue Assessment................................. 254.04
Expense of Board of Delegates on Civil Rights................. 2,100.00
Fire Insurance Premium.................................... 526.53
Tornado Insurance Premium................................. 240.00
Interest on Call Loans................ ...................... 239.47
Periodicals ............................................... 13.00
Payments ordered by Board of Governors Hebrew Union College. 67,342.36
Payments ordered by Board of Managers of Synagog and School
Extension ............... ............... ........... 46,219.48
Printing, Postage, Stationery, etc.............................. 2,178.37
Purchase of Bonds............................... ... .... 23,988.99
Safety Deposit Box Rent ................................... 50.50
Salary of Secretary..................................... .. 1,750.00
Security Bond Premium..................................... 195.49
Court Cost ....................................... ........ 7.15
Synagog Pension Fund ................................. .... 78.06
Rent..................................................... 125.00
Office Partitions ........................................ 1,158.80
Expense-Twenty-fifth Council .............................. 155.61
Stenographic Services ...................................... 21.60
Expenses New York Conference ............................. 15.00

Total Disbursements ................................. $152,959.45

Excess of Disbursements over Receipts ........................ 3,647.06
Cash Overdraft at October 31, 1916 .......................... 1,232.26

Cash Overdraft at October 31, 1917.......................... 4,879.32

Schedule "A"





Securities on Hand October 31, 1916, and Otober 31, 1917


Penna. Co. Trust Securities.............. ....... ............
Illinois Central R. R. Stock, Interest Certificates....................
Western Union Telegraph Co., Real Estate Bonds....................
Lakewood, Ohio, Bonds........................... .... ........
Collinwood, Ohio, Bonds............................... ..........
Reading, Ohio, Bonds ............................................
Newport & Cincinnati Bridge Co. Bonds ...........................
K. K. Bene Yeshurun School Building Bonds........................
K. K. Bene Israel Temple Bonds ......................... .......
Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern Ry. Co. Bonds......................
Choctaw and Memphis R. R. Co. Bonds.............................
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton R. R. Bonds .................. .....
*Northern Ohio Traction & Light Co. Bonds .......................
Delaware, Ohio, School Bonds........................ ........
Clarksville, Tenn., W ater Works Bonds.............................
Pomeroy, Ohio, Refunding Bonds. ................................
Parkersburg, W. Va., School Bonds. ..........................
Southern Pacific Ry. Refunding Bonds .............................
Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry. Co. Bonds ....................
New York Central & Hudson River R. R. Co. Bonds.....................
Charleston, W Va., Refunding Bonds..............................
Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio, Bonds..........................
Cleveland, Ohio, Park Bonds................................ :.....
*Gimble Bros., Stock, 20 Shares ..................................
*Two Paid-up Life Insurance Policies ..............................
*Jewish Agricultural Aid Society Bond .............................
Schaengold Realty Co., Mortgage..................................
Port of Seattle, Washington, Bonds ..............................
*Rothchild & Co., Chicago, Store Bldg. Bonds.......................
Northern Pacific Prior Lien Bonds ...............................
Union Pacific R. R. Co. Bonds.....................................
Baltimore & Ohio R.'R. Co., Bonds.............................

St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. Co. Bonds .......................
St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. Co. Income Mortgage Bonds.........
St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. Co. Adjustment Mortgage Bonds.....
St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. Co. Prior Lien Mortgage Bonds......
* Donated Totals ................................... .


On hand
Oct. 31, 1916

$ 8,000 00
10,000 00
10,000 00
9,000 00
20,000 00
3,000 00
20,000 00
10,000 00
17,250 00
25,000 00
16,000 00
20,000 00
1,000 00
6,000 00
5,000 00
5,000 (0
10.000 00
15,000 00
10,000 uO
12.000 00
5,000 00
2,000 00
6,000 00
2,000 00
2,000 00
100 00
5.000 00
10,000 00
6,000 00
11,000 00


6,000 00



$287,350 00


On hand Rate of Income
Oct. 31, 1917 interest


Sold Bought

. . . . .



























........ $ i5,000 CO
........ 0,000 00
Exchanged
$6,000 00
... .... .3,000 00
....... ....1,700 00
.. . 1,00 00
. . 0 31,200 00
I . . . ..


$ 8,000 00
10,000 00
10,000 00
9,000 00
20,000 00
3,1,00 00
20,000 00
10,000 00
17,250 00
25,000 00
16,000 00
20,000 00
1,000 00
6,000 00
5,000 00
5,000 00
10,000 00
15,000 00
10,000 00
12,000 00
5,000 00
2.000 00
6,000 00
2,000 00
2,000 00
100 00
5,000 00
10,000 00
6,000 00
11,000 00
15,000 00
10,000 00


3,000 00
1,700 00
1,500 00
$312,550 00


3.50%
4
450
4
4
5
4.50
4
4
4
5
4.50
5
5
4
4.50
4
4
4
350
4.50
4
4
6


5
4.50
6
4
4
5

5
6
6
4


. ..... $14,052 18


Schedule "B"


$ 280 00
400 00
450 00
360 00
t00 00
150 00
900 00
400 00
690 00
1,000 00
800 00
900 00
50 00
300 00
200 00
225 00
400 00
600 00
400 00
420 00
225 00
80 00
240 00
120 00


250 00
450 00
900 00
440 00
520 00
250 00

852 18










The Hebrew Union College








ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

Board of Governors Hebrew Union College


Cincinnati, November 30, 1917.
To the Executive Board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations:
Gentlemen: Another year of activity in
the annals of the Hebrew Union College has
passed and with it there have come inci-
dents, both pleasant as well as sad. These,
your Board of Governors presents to you in
this brief report, covering a period from
November 1, 1916, to October 31, 1917.
During this period we lost by death our
faithful and conscientious member, Rev. Dr.
J. Leonard Levy, of Pittsburgh, who entered
into his eternal rest on April 26, 1916. The
honor and praise that is due to his indom-
itable spirit is aptly expressed in the me-
morial adopted by this Board:

In Memoriam
Dr. J. Leonard Levy
The death, on April 26, 1917, of our dis-
tinguished colleague, Rev. Dr. J. Leonard
Levy, is an irreparable loss to this Board. Dr.
Levy was a devoted servant of the Hebrew
Union College and gave to the work and
deliberations of its Governors, a full measure
of his great ability and zeal. Though a
nonresident member of our body, with
many duties requiring his attention, our
friend so managed his affairs as to attend
our meetings with the greatest frequency.
His voice in our councils was always kindly;
his judgment sound and his labors in behalf
of the College, unremitting. We adopt and
repeat what he wished said of him in the
letter to his wife constituting his will: "He
strove to be a teacher of God's word and to
live it." And, quoting from his noble ora-
tion at the celebration in February, 1917, of
the fiftieth anniversary of dedication of
Temple K. K. B. Y. of Cincinnati, we say
of him what he quoted from Wordsworth
to say of Dr. Wise:
"To live in hearts we leave behind
Is not to die."


We also lost by death, on December 15,
1916, our fellow member, Jacob Ottenheimer,
who gave to the work assigned to him during
the period of thirteen years his best efforts.
A gift of $10,000 by the late Solomon May
of this city was indeed a pleasant incident,
and not less so a gift of $1,000 by Robert
Lee Straus, a student of the College, who is
now in the service of his country. With this
sum he has established a prize in honor of
his mother, Selma Straus.
Notwithstanding the fact that all of our
students are exempt from military service,
by reason of being divinity students, no less
than twenty-three, which represents thirty-
nine per cent. of those who are of military
age, volunteered for service. Eleven were
accepted; the remainder being rejected on
grounds of physical disability.
The Department of Hygiene established
last year through the kindness of Dr. Greene-
baum and his able colaborers, has shown
splendid results. The students have derived
benefits of such a nature that they have be-
come able assistants to the medical super-
visor and they fully appreciate the work done
for them in this direction. No more apt
illustration of the splendid work accom-
plished could be given than the report re-
cently submitted to your Board by Dr.
Greenebaum, which is here annexed:

REPORT OF HYGIENE COMMITTEE
June 19, 1917.
Mr. Isaac Bloom, Secretary,
Board of Governors,
Hebrew Union College,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
Dear Sir: Herewith is submitted the re-
port of the year's work carried out by your
physician appointed by the Board to make
a survey of and to supervise medically the
students of the College for the year 1916-17.
A complete survey of the entire student
body was made and each of the eighty-six
students was examined.








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


An office hour was held every Tuesday
afternoon at 4:30 at the College throughout
the year. My office and home were open to
the students at any time. Students who were
ill were visited in their homes or sent to the
Jewish Hospital where private rooms were
assigned to them. Individual conferences
were held with eighty-three students (the re-


maining three enlisted in government service
before this part of the work began), at which
the defects and abnormalities of each were
explained and their correction planned. For-
ty-three physicians signified their willingness
to cooperate in the correction of these defects.
Of this number twenty-four were called upon,


S. E. Allen
H. W. Bettmann
Wm. A. Bettmann
J. E. Benjamin
R. B. Cofield
W. Forchheimer
H. Frankel
A. H. Freiberg


A. Friedlander
M. Gruenebaum
M. L. Heidingsfeld
L. G. Heyn
S. Iglauer
L. J. Krouse
L. H. Landman
S. J. Rauh


Dr. Wm. Ravine
Dr. J. Ransohoff
Dr. L. Ransohoff
Dr. S. Rothenberg
Dr. L. Stricker
Dr. M. Scholtz
Dr. J. S. Wyler
Dr. S. Zielonka


Close cooperation was maintained through-
out the year with the Welfare Committee.


Below follows a summary of the monthly
reports sent to the Chairman of the above
committee:


Number of students examined ............................ .... ........... 86
Total number of students seen .................. ....................... 328
Office visits ......:... ................... .......................... 177
Home visits ............. .................. ............... ............ 79
College office consultations held Tuesday afternoons ....................... 174
Individual conferences ................ ................................. 83
Visits at my home ..................................................... 1
Total services rendered .................................................. 554
Number of students in Jewish Hospital................................... 15
Hours of work ...................................... .................. 164
Number of students referred to Consulting Staff .......................... 72
Operations ........................................................... 13-
Number of physicians to whom students were sent ........................ 24
Total number of defects found in the 86 students ....................... 244
Total number of defects found corrected or under observation ............ 213 or 87%
Total number of defects uncorrected....................................... 31 or 13%


As the result of the year's work the fol-
lowing recommendations are. submitted for
your consideration and approval:
1. There is definite need for medical super-
vision of the students and the work should
be continued from year to year.
2. A careful and complete survey of the
students' rooming quarters should be made
in order to determine the relation of hygiene
.and dietaries to the general health.
3. A college dormitory providing adequate
quarters for sleeping, study, and eating, espe-
cially for the students in the first five classes
would undoubtedly solve most of the per-
plexing problems which were met this year.
I hereby express my deep appreciation for
the sympathetic support and encouragement


extended by your Board and evidenced by
the Faculty and the entire Student Body in
carrying out this work. I also wish to thank
the members of the Consulting Staff for
their efficient and enthusiastic cooperation
without which the work of the College physi-
cian would have been seriously handicapped.
Respectfully submitted,
J. VICTOR GREENEBAUM.

The graduation exercises for 1917 took
place on Saturday, June 2, on which occasion
the degree of Rabbi was conferred upon six
students. Dr. Abram Simon of Washington,
D. C., was the Baccalaureate Orator and
Rabbi Jacob I. Meyerovitz delivered the
Valedictory. These six students have secured
positions as follows:


8250


[NOVEMBER







REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Benjamin Friedman, Niagara Falls, N. Y.
Samuel S. Mayerberg, Detroit, Michigan.
Jacob I. Meyerovitz, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Samuel Felix Mendelsohn, Huntington, W. Va.
Jerome Rosen, Spokane, Washington.
Harry R. Richmond, Trinidad, Colorado.
Twenty students received scholarship hon-
ors for excellence in studies and for excep-
tional fitness for the Jewish ministry. These
were:
D Grade Harry Kronman
Harry J. Stern
C Grade Morris Urich
B Grade Sheldon H. Blank
A Grade Albert Goldman
I Coll. Samuel Rosenberg
Milton M. Elischak
Hyman Iola
Arthur S. Kling
Myron M. Meyerovitz
II Coll. Morris Youngerman
Leon Fram
Abraham I. Shinedling
III Coll. Abraham Feinstein
Edward L. Israel
Jacob R. Marcus
Joseph E. Sales
Meyer Salkover
Junior Harry S. Linfield
Louis A. Mischkind
The Oscar A. Berman prize awarded for
excellence in studies during his entire Col-
legiate course was granted to Harry R. Rich-
mond.
Founder's Day was observed by appropriate
exercises on Sabbath afternoon, March 24.
Rabbi David Lefkowitz of Dayton, Ohio, de-
livered the address.
Twenty-five applications for admission
were filed with the registrar up to the time
limit, June 1. Eleven of these were declined,
eleven were certified to the Faculty for ad-
mission, two of these returned to their homes
before examinations, and three were per-
mitted to enter as special students.
The registration now shows an enrollment
of eighty-six students, distributed in the fol-
lowing classes:
Collegiate Department
Seniors ................... 12
Juniors ................... 11
III Collegiate .............. 11
II Collegiate .............. 14
I Collegiate ............... 7 55


Preparatory Department
A Grade .................. 8
B Grade .................. 10
C Grade .................. 8
D Grade .................. 5 31 86

Of these thirty-six are postgraduates of
Universities; thirty-five are students in the
University of Cincinnati; eleven are attend-
ing High School; four are devoting all their
time to College work.
During the month of October, Dr. Hirsch
of Chicago delivered four lectures to the stu-
dents of the College, and arrangements have
been completed for another course by Dr.
Berkowitz of Philadelphia.
In the course of the year Rabbi Jacob
Singer of Lincoln, Nebraska, delivered four
lectures on the subject of "Synagogal Music."
Three of these were delivered in the chapel
of the College Building and one before a
larger public in the assembly room of the
Rockdale Avenue Temple. In the latter lec-
ture he was assisted by Miss Bertha Marks.
The publication of Dr. Kohler's work on
"Jewish Theology, Systematically and His-
torically Considered" is now under way and
we have no doubt will shed luster upon our
institution.
The work of the College is being extended
through the engagement of students who are
serving congregations on alternate Satur-
days. Ten of these are now filling positions
of this kind:

Anderson, Ind..........Abraham Feinstein
Cincinnati, O...........Wolfe Macht
Hamilton, O............Louis A. Mischkind
Muncie, Ind........... Philip Waterman
Portsmouth, O..........Max Weis
Portsmouth, O..........Joseph Sales
Springfield, ............Samuel Gup
Wabash, Ind............Jerome Mark
Zanesville, O...........Abraham J. Feldman
Knoxville, Tenn........ Garry J. August
The Teachers' Institute has undergone
some changes in its curriculum, but is extend-
ing its work in other directions. Two sum-
mer schools were again held during the
month of July, one in Chicago and the other
in Cleveland. Both of these were well at-
tended. A number of extension lectures
were also held as in previous years.
The Graduation Exercises of the Teachers'
Institute took place on Sabbath afternoon,


8251







8252 FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

June 9. Five students received diplomas as The annual meeting took place in the
teachers in religious schools, month of January and the election of officers
Our Library continues to improve and in- resulted in the selection of your present staff.
crease. We have now engaged an assistant In conclusion we desire to thank the Na-
to Mr. Oko, our librarian, of whom we expect tional Federation of Temple Sisterhoods for
to report favorable results later on. its labors in behalf of the College. These
The Advisory Board met in joint session have resulted in the collection of a consider-
with your Board of Governors on the evening able fund in aid of indigent students. These
of October 23. Five of the six members gifts and others of a different nature received
were present; the absentee presented the this year are enumerated in the following
meeting with a letter containing many valu- tabulation:
able suggestions.

DONATIONS
Mrs. Carrie G. Seeman, Cincinnati, in memory of her husband, George Seeman.....$ 200.00
Mrs. Sol Nathan, Mrs. Benj. D. Bing, Mrs. Ely Oppenheimer, Buffalo, N. Y., in mem-
ory of their father, Abraham Nathan................ .................. 100.00
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Joseph, Cincinnati, in memory of their son, Robert............. 100.00
Emanuel Wodick, Detroit, Mich., in memory of his wife, Mrs. Katie Wodick...... 100.00
Samuel N. Lippman, Cincinnati, in memory of his sister, Mrs. David Kaufman..... 100.00
Children of the late Leopold Loeb, Cincinnati ................................ 100.00
Children of the late Theresa Berman, Cincinnati .............................. 100.00
Rabbi Tobias Schanfarber, Chicago, in memory of Lee W. Rosenfleld............... 100.00
Mrs. Ophelia Ehrman, Helena, Ark., in memory of her father, Isaac Ehrman...... 100.00
Children of Mrs. Sophia Shoninger, Chicago, in memory of their mother.......... 100.00
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Holtz, Minneapolis, Minn., in memory of their son, Max Holtz... 100.00
Mrs. Sarah Martin, Evansville, Ind., in memory of her husband, Solomon Martin..... 100.00
Miss Rose L. Martin, Evansville, Ind., in memory of her brother, Abe L. Martin..... 100.00


BEQUESTS
Philip London ................................. .. ......................... $ 500.00
Henry Straus, Cincinnati (additional).......................................... 100.00
Max Guggenheimer, Cincinnati.............................................. 1000.00
Mrs. Carrie B. Adler, Cincinnati ............... ............................. 100.00
Joseph Hays, Cleveland, Ohio ............................................... 500.00
Simon Wildberg, Cincinnati ................................... ............. 100.00
Jacob Ottenheimer, Cincinnati .............................................. 100.00
Myer Heldman, Baltimore, Maryland........................................ 200.00
Fannie Locky, Chicago, Illinois .............................................. 500.00
Fred Lazarus, Columbus, Ohio ............................... ... ......... .. 2000.00
Mrs. Regina Nelson, Richmond, Virginia..................................... 100.00
Simon Fischel, Cleveland, Ohio ..................................... ........ 250.00
Leopold Sheuerman, Des Moines, Iowa............................................. 1000.00
Mrs. Florence N. Schlesinger, N. Y. C., in memory of herself and her husband,
Louis Schlesinger .............................................. ........ 200.00
Mrs. Helen Speier, Lincoln, Nebraska ....................................... 100.00

SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS

Emanuel Theological Seminary Association....................................$1100.00
Max Heavenrich (Lilienthal)................................................ 250.00
Congregation Emanuel, San Francisco, California ............................. 300.00
Mrs. W. B. Wdolner, Peoria, Illinois......................................... 350.00
Sol May, Cincinnati,,.., ................ .... .. ............................. .10000.00











REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Sisterhood, Rodef Shalom Congregation, Pittsburgh (for Josiah Cohen) ..........
Sisterhood, Plum St. Temple, Cincinnati.......................................
Sisterhood, Rockdale Ave. Temple, Cincinnati.................................
Sisterhood, Adath Israel, Louisville, Kentucky.................................
Sisterhood of District No. 1 ...............................................
Sisterhoods in Districts 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 ..........................
Isaiah Women's Club, Chicago...............................................
Sisterhood, Euclid Ave. Temple, Cleveland.....................................
Temple Women's Association, Cleveland......................................
Sisterhood, Washington Hebrew Congregation, Washington, D. C ...............
Sisterhood, Baltimore Hebrew Congregation (Adolf Guttmacher) ...............
Sisterhood, Ohef Shalom Congregation, Baltimore (Szold-Kaiser) ...............
Adolphus W. Rich, Milwaukee, Wisconsin......................................
Oscar A. Berman (prize)..................................................
Robert Lee Straus (endowment for Selma Straus prize) .......................
Rodeph Shalom Congregation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ......................


300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
1200.00
300.00
250.00
250.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
250.00
50.00
1000.00
300.00


DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR WERE
Faculty and Instructors

Dr. Kaufmann Kohler, President ................................$ 6,000.00
Prof. Gotthard Deutsch .................... .................. 4,000.00
Prof. David Neumark............................. ..... .......... 3,833.30
Prof. Moses Buttenwieser.................................. ...... 3,433.30
Prof. Julian Morgenstern....................................... 3,333.33
Prof. Henry Englander.......................... .............. 3,133.33
Prof. Jacob Z. Lauterbach................................ ..... 2,850.00
Asst. Prof. Solomon B. Freehof ................................. 1,350.00
Cora Kahn, Instructor in Public Speaking......................... 400.00
Dr. Englander, fee as Registrar .................................. 200.00
Dr. Boris D. Bogen, Lecturer on Sociology......................... 350.00
Rabbi Jacob Singer, Lectures on Synagogal Music ............... 76.72
$29,059.98

Library

Adolph S. Oko, Librarian......................................... $ 3,000.00
David Wolfe, Asst. Librarian ..................................... 160.00
Sarah B. Grad .................................................. 680.00
Ida L. Schaefer ........................... .................. .. 610.00
H. S. Linfield (part time) ................ ......... ... ............ 147.00
Solomon Fineberg (part time)................................... 52.00
Morris Youngerman (part time)................................. 72.00
Michael Aaronsohn (part time).................................. 10.00
Purchases (including text books)................................ 1,241.35
Maintenance ................................................... 1,601.61
American Library Association Meeting ............................ 75.00
A. S. Oko, petty cash ................... ...................... 106.69
$ 7,755.65

Secretary's Office

Isaac Bloom .......................... ........................ $ 866.70
Nanette Bloom ................... .............................. 5 540.00
-. $ 1,406.70


8253


1917]








8254 FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

Buildings and Grounds
Robert Miller ..........................................$ 1,245.00
W ages of other employees ........................................ 4,404.29
Light, power and gas .......................................... 619.66
Water .......................... ....................... 260.88
Telephone .................. .................. ................. 141.96
Coal ................................................ 1,015.65
Supplies ............... ... ................................ 1,232.06
Repairs and improvements................ .................... 926.04
$ 9,845.54

Sundries
Printing, postage and stationery................................... $ 838.87
Publicity ................ .................................... 191.25
Graduation ................ .................................. 65.05
Special meetings ............................................... 114.50
Insurance ............................................. 73.72
Organ and choir........................................ 140.53
Athletics ..................................................... 45.00
Return of students ............................................ 86.44
$ 1,555.36

Stipendiary Items
+Scholarships and Student Loans...............................$14,399.50
+Tuition Fees at the University.................................... 337.50
$14,737.00

Teachers' Institute

Salaries ..................................... ................. $ 1,100.00
Extension lectures ............................................. 320.00
*Summer schools ............. .......................... 1,178.44
Printing and stationery ........................................ 123.35
Textbooks ................ ................................... 42.89
$ 2,764.68

$67,124.91
Contributed by Rabbis Silver and Wolsey, $200.00.
t Refunded by alumni and students, $912.50.
(In hands of Secretary as disbursing officer, $317.43.)
Respectfully submitted,

EDWARD L. HEINSHEIMER,
President.

ISAAC BLOOM,
Secretary.








REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS



General Plan of Instruction of the Hebrew Union College

BY DR. KAUFMANN KOHLER. PRESIDENT


One of the fundamental rules of academic
instruction admittedly is, that freedom of
thought and independence of research be
granted to all the teachers.
Still, a rabbinical school, however progres-
sive in its tendency, must necessarily have a
positive Jewish character.
There must be unity and harmony in the
system of instruction, and the various
branches of study must be so inter-related as
to lead to, and culminate in the inculcation of
the doctrines of Judaism as a living'faith and
as the life mission of the Jew.
Accordingly the system of instruction at the
College, based as it is upon a nine years'
course (four years of the Preparatory and
five years of the Collegiate department) is
an organic unit. The instruction proceeds
methodically from the mastery of the form to
the full comprehension of the subject-matter,
and from an encyclopedic to the specific and
systematic knowledge of the branches taught.
In the Preparatory department all stress is
laid upon the elementary knowledge. A thor-
ough familiarity with the grammar and the
vocabulary, which enables the student to read
the unpunctuated text of the Pentateuch with
the commentaries, as well as easy portions of
the Mishnah, must be combined with a gen-
eral knowledge of the contents of rabbinical
literature and history of the Prayerbook and
the Psalms and of the doctrines and ceremo-
nies of Judaism. The Collegiate department
divides itself again into two parts, the three
lower grades being devoted more to the ac-
quisition of material, the upper two to sys-
tematic and specific theological knowledge.
The principal subjects taught at the Hebrew
Union College are:
Bible Exegesis, which, while following the
purely scientific methods of our age, is to
maintain its historical continuity with the
past by the consultation of the medieval Jew-
ish commentators and the ancient interpreta-
tions.
The study of the Talmud divides itself into
three successive stages. A complete study
of the Mishnah within the few years of col-
lege life being a matter of impossibility, a


fair acquaintance with the principal treatises
is aimed at in the first stage, Bertinoro's
Commentary being used as a substitute for
the Gemarah. In the next stage select por-
tions of the Gemara are read. In the third
the Halakah is studied in its development
from the Midrash, Baraitha and Gemarah to
the Codes and the selections are made with a
view to the practical value of the subjects for
the rabbi of today.
The Haggadic portion of the Talmud, as
well as the Midrash, are studied with a view
to their paramount value and importance for
the rabbi owing to the ethical and theological
teachings they contain and supplemented by
lectures on the history of the Haggadah and
Haggadists.
The Apocryphal, Apocalyptic and Hellen-
istic literatures receive special attention, in-
asmuch as they hold the key to a full under-
standing of the Haggadic and mystic lore of
Judaism. Without familiarity with the Hel-
lenistic propaganda and the Pseudepigraphic
literature of the pre-Talmudic epoch no his-
torical perception of the rabbinical develop-
ment of Judaism is possible. Still less can
the New Testament, which no rabbi of today
can afford to ignore, be understood without
these studies.
The study of the philosophic literature of
the medieval Jew is still indispensable to
the modern rabbi as offering him the aid and
suggestions for solving the great problems
of life in the light of modern principles of
thought. The works of Saadyah, Gabirol, Juda
Halevi, Maimonides, Crescas and Albo have
been instrumental in shaping the Jewish mind
and still form the sources of inspiration for
the regeneration of Judaism.
The ancient Prayer Book forms as essen-
tial a factor of Judaism as does the Talmud,
and a thorough knowledge of .Jewish
Liturgy and its history is indispensable to
the rabbi, however small the portion is that
is still in use today.
The History of the Jewish People divides
itself mainly into two parts. The one is the
history of the nation from its beginning to
the fall of Jerusalem under Rome, which in


8255


1917]








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


its general outline is taught in the Prepara-
tory department. The other is the history of
the Jewish people from the time of their
dispersion throughout the Roman empire
until our own time. This latter part of Jew-
ish history, extending over nearly 2,000 years
of European history, presents problems on
the solution of which depends the right esti-
mate of the Jew as a citizen and as a factor
of human civilization.
The History of Judaism and its sects comes
within the province of historical theology. Its
study is to trace the origin and development
of the Mosaic and Rabbinical Judaism with
its institutions and lead over to a deeper un-
derstanding of Prophetic or Reform Judaism.
It thus paves the way to Systematic Theology
which endeavors to sum up in positive form
the essential beliefs of Judaism in conso-
nance with the religious consciousness of the
modern Jew.
Alongside of this goes a course of study of
Comparative Religion and especially of the
sources of Christianity and Islamism to form
the scientific basis for Jewish Apologetics.
Practical Theology divides itself into two
branches of study: The first and foremost
part consists of Jewish Homiletics. As the
sermon constitutes an integral part of the
divine service, it must, both as to its tenor
and its choice of text and of subject, bear the
stamp and reflect the view and atmosphere
of synagogal life by showing its continuity
with the past. It is therefore studied in con-


nection with the Midrash and the Homiletic
literature of the past as well as of modern
times. The second part consists of a his-
torical study of the rites and ceremonies of
Judaism with a view to their aptitude and
applicability to modern time, particularly as
far as the public functions of the modern
rabbi are concerned.
Jewish Ethics is studied as a special sys-
tem of thought different from Christian ethics
in principle and character, based upon genu-
inely Jewish sources while in harmony with
the broad psychological and historical views
of our day.
Pedagogy, too, inasmuch as the religious
instruction of the young is one of the most
important and difficult tasks entrusted to the
rabbi, forms one of the branches taught.
Questions such as how to conduct a religious
school, how to teach religion and ethics and
particularly how to use the Bible as a source
of inspiration and religious instruction for
the child require a thorough training and fine
psychological observation.
Last but not least does Applied Sociology
or the Science of Philanthropy form a part of
the curriculum, since upon the modern rabbi
often devolves a large part of the charitable
work in a Jewish community, and he must
know how to combine the new method with
the ancient spirit of Judaism in the field of
practical righteousness (Zedakah) and Social
Service.


8256


[NOVEMBER







1917]


Purpose of the Teachers' Institute
The purpose of the Teachers' Institute of
the Hebrew Union College is to supply
trained teachers to Jewish religious schools.
It aims to serve especially such congregations
.as are members of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations.

Organization of the Teachers' Institute
The Teachers' Institute of the Hebrew
Union College is in charge of a Principal
elected by the Board of Governors. The
Principal of the Teachers' Institute, in co-
operation with the President of the Hebrew
Union College, nominates instructors as they
become necessary, subject to the approval of
the Board of Governors. The Principal of
the Teachers' Institute is responsible for the
proper conduct of the Teachers' Institute
and reports from time to time to the Presi-
dent of the College as to its progress, such
report being submitted to the Board of Gov-
ernors. The salaries and the terms of office
of the Principal and of the Professors are
fixed by the Board of Governors of the He-
brew Union College.

Admission of Students
Any young man or woman, who has gradu-
ated from a High School or school of similar
standard and is known to be of good charac-
ter, may be admitted to the Teachers' Insti-
tute after having given evidence of knowledge
of Biblical History. The tuition is free.
During their attendance at the Teachers'
Institute the students are expected to register
as students of the College for Teachers of the
University of Cincinnati and to take courses
in Pedagogy and Psychology, unless such
courses have been taken by them elsewhere.

Students of the Hebrew Union College
Students of the Hebrew Union College re-
ceive credit for Hebrew and other studies at
the College while taking special courses at
the Teachers' Institute, from which they may
graduate with the rest of the students.


The Course of Study
The Course of Study of the Teachers' In-
stitute comprises the following Departments
of Subjects:
Methods of Teaching in Jewish Religious
Schools.
History of Jewish Education and Jewish
Ethics.
Class Management and Organization of
Religious Schools.
Model Lessons and Practice in Teaching.
The History of Biblical Literature.
Biblical History before the Exile, Biblical
Geography and Archaeology.
Biblical History after the Exile.
The History of the Jews in Modern Times.
Jewish Literature.
The Doctrines and Institutions of Judaism,
its Liturgy and Ritual.
Hebrew Grammar, Translations and Read-
ings.
Graduation in 1917 took place on May 19.
Sessions of the academic year 1918-1919
will begin November 4, 1917, and will close
May 22, 1919.

Graduate Department
In 1916 a Graduate Department was opened
for Teachers in the Public Schools and teach-
ers in Religious Schools, interested in teach-
the History of the Bible, Biblical History,
Hebrew, Jewish Ethics, Jewish Education
and Methods of Teaching.
The Graduate Department is designed to
meet the needs of those who are engaged in
teaching in Religious Schools, and those who
desire to do advanced work and to make fur-
ther studies.
Classes, composed of Graduates of the
Teachers' Institute, were in operation during
1916-1918 and did Post Graduate work in
the History of the Bible, Biblical History,
Judaism, History of the Jews and Hebrew.

Courses for Public School Teachers
Teachers of the Public Schools registered
in these Courses receive Professional Credit
in accordance with the Rules of the Univer-


REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNOES


SThe Teachers' Institute

Of the Hebrew Union College

BY DR. Louis GROSSMANN


8257








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


sity of Cincinnati (College for Teachers) and
the Superintendent of Public Schools.
Dr. Grossmann's Courses under this ar-
rangement comprise the following subjects:
"The Growth of Morality in the Child" and
"Methods of Teaching Morals."
The Courses of Lectures to be delivered
will be:
Course I. "Child-morality, its stages of
growth." "The moral character of children
in each Grade of the Public School."
Course II. "History of Ethics Among Jews."
(a) "Morality of the Bible."
(b) "Morality of the Talmud."
(c) "Morality of the Jews in the Middle
Ages."
(d) "Ethical Thought of the 'Jews in
Modern Times."
Course III. (a) "The History of Thought on
the Subject of Peace."
(b) "War and Religion." "Peace
and Religion."
1. "The Bible and War and
Peace."
2. "The Religions and
War." "The Religions
and Peace."
Course IV. "The History of Civilization and
War."
(a) "Their Interdependence."
(b) "The Influence of War on Progress."
Those who register should designate the
Course or Courses of Lectures which they
wish to attend.
Blanks for Registration can be had upon
request either by mail or in person.
Registration in this Department for the
Sessions of 1918-1919 will take place Septem-
ber 23-24, 1918.
Applications should be addressed to Dr.
Louis Grossmann, Principal Teachers' Insti-
tute, Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati,
Ohio.

Summer Courses
A Summer Course was opened in July,
1915, and was held July 12 to 23, 1915, in
Chicago, Ill. Students from Alabama, Ar-
kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania
and Wisconsin were registered for nine
Courses of Lectures delivered by Drs. Gross-
mann, Deutsch and Englander.
A second academic year was added to the
Summer Sessions in 1916.


An additional Summer Session was opened
in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1916, with six Courses
by Drs. Grossmann, Lauterbach and Morgen-
stern.
In 1917 two Summer Sessions were held,
one in Chicago, at which Courses of Lectures
were given by Drs. Grossmann, Jacob Z.
Lauterbach and Julian Morgenstern, and an-
other in Cleveland with lectures by Drs.
Grossmann, Gotthard Deutsch and Henry
Englander.

Work in Residence
Attendance is required at three Summer
Sessions of the Teachers' Institute. This
need not, however, be continuous at sessions
in the same place. At least one course must
be taken in each Department.
Students are requested to submit, when
they register, the Courses they wish to attend.


Work in Absentia
In addition to this, the students are re-
quired to complete other work prescribed by
the Course of Study of the Teachers' Insti-
tute under the direction of the respective
Professors.
Detailed information as to the require-
ments of these Continuation Courses outside
of the Summer Sessions may be obtained by
consultation with the Professors of the re-
spective Departments.

Certificates and Diplomas
A Certificate is awarded upon the comple-
tion of a Course in a Department and the pre-
sentation of satisfactory evidence that the
applicant has attended the lectures, has done
the prescribed collateral reading and has
passed a satisfactory examination.
Diploma-The possession of Certificates
of all the Courses in the curriculum of the
Teachers' Institute entitles the holder to a
Teachers' Diploma, as Teacher in Religious
Schools.
Applicants for a Diploma must satisfy the
Faculty as to their academic qualifications.

The Academic Year
The academic year begins in November
and ends in May.
After the completion of the courses and
after having successfully passed the final ex-


8258


[NOVEMBER







REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


aminations the students receive a Diploma
qualifying them as Teachers of Religious
Schools.
The Diploma bears the seal of the Teach-
ers' Institute of the Hebrew Union College,
the signatures of the President of the Board
of Governors, of the President of the Hebrew
Union College and of the Principal of the
Teachers' Institute, and is conferred upon
the graduates on Commencement Day.

Extension Courses
The Extension Department for lectures
outside of Cincinnati was opened in 1911. It
provides for lectures to teachers of Religious
Schools on the subjects of Bible, Judaism,
Jewish History and Methods of Teaching, by
Drs. Grossmann, Deutsch, Englander, Lau-
terbach and Morgenstern. Lectures were de-
livered to the Teachers of Religious Schools
in Birmingham, Ala., Atlanta and Savannah,
Ga.; New Orleans, La., Houston, Fort
Worth, Dallas and El Paso, Texas; Detroit
and Saginaw, Mich.; Louisville, Ky.; Akron,


Canton, East Liverpool, Columbus, Dayton,
Springfield, Middletown, Youngstown, To-
ledo and Cleveland, Ohio; Buffalo, N. Y.1
Milwaukee, Wis.; Nashville and Memphis,
Tenn.; Charleston, S. C.; Newark, N. J.; St.
Louis, Mo.; Danville and Chicago, Ill.; Terre
Haute and Indianapolis, Ind.; Pittsburgh,
Pa.; Washingt6n, D. C.; Baltimore, Md.; New
York City; to the Jewish Religious Education
Association of the State of Ohio; the Jewish
Religious Teachers' Association of Kentucky;
the Jewish Teachers' Association of Western
Pennsylvania; the Jewish Religious Teachers'
Association of Louisiana, Mississippi and
Tennessee; the Jewish Teachers' Association
of Arkansas; the Southeastern Jewish Re-
ligious School Union (Georgia, Florida and
South Carolina); the Jewish Teachers' Asso-
ciation of Texas, and the Religious School
Union of New York.
Arrangements for these Extension Lec-
tures for Religious Teachers in the various
cities throughout the country can be made
by addressing the Principal, Dr. Grossmann.


The Library
Of the Hebrew Union College

BY ADOLPH S. OKO. LIBRARIAN


The Library now contains over 40,000 vol-
umes and 10,000 pamphlets. About 38,000
of the volumes and nearly all of the pamph-
lets are along the lines of Hebraica, Judaica
and Semitica; the remainder are works of
reference and general philosophy. More
than 25,000 volmes and several thousand
pamphlets are now (July, 1917) catalogued
and classified. The catalogue now in process
of preparation is a bibliographical one, and
in the classification of the books a very close
scheme is being followed.
The controlling purpose in the develop-
ment of the Library is twofold: (1) to fur-
nish the tools for the regular work of the
College; (2) to supply the literature in the
various departments of Hebraica, Judaica
and Semitica as a basis for original construc-
tive work. Thus we are specializing in the
matter of acquisitions. The Library is a dis-
tinctly Jewish collection, limiting itself to the
above-mentioned branches and, to facilitate
the work of the student, to the closely allied
field of comparative religion.


The Library has a large number of old
printed books. It possesses a wealth of mod-
ern literature bearing on every phase of Jew-
ish life and Judaism, and is well provided
with sets of old Jewish periodicals. Of cur-
rent periodicals more than a hundred are
regularly on file. They include Jewish news-
papers (dailies and weeklies) in various lan-
guages to furnish information about current
Jewish affairs and opinions in all the coun-
tries in which Jews live; and also a fairly
large number of the leading scholarly Jour-
nals, Reviews and Transactions in such fields
as Hebrew and Semitic languages, Bibliog-
raphy and Archaeology, Biblical criticism and
exegesis, Jewish history, Theology and Phil-
osophy.
The Library is especially rich in Jewish
history and "Rabbinic" literature, depart-
ments which are provided with a good bib-
liographical apparatus. It is also a good
working library for the Biblical student. It
contains a great number of editions of the
Hebrew Bible as well as ancient and modern
translations, introductions and commentaries.


1917]


8259







FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


The Alumni of the Hebrew Union College
Alphabetical arrangement and present residence

In order to insure correctness of this list the Alumni are urgently requested to send notification of
any change in their position or in their academic degrees to
DR. HENRY ENGLANDER, Registrar, H. U. C., Cincinnati, O.


1883 Israel Aaron, D. D.t
1916 Samuel J. Abrams, M. A., Kalamazoo,
Mich.
1901 David Alexander, B. A., Toledo, O.
1900 Abraham S. Anspacher, Ph. D., New
York, N. Y.
1901 Moise Bergman, B. A., Albuquerque,
N. M.
1883 Henry Berkowitz, D. D., Philadelphia,
Pa.
1906 Louis Bernstein, B. A., St. Joseph, Mo.
1912 Israel Bettan, D. D., Charleston, W.
Va.
1901 Joseph Blatt, B. A., Oklahoma City,
Okla.
1908 Joel Blau, B. A., Rochester, N. Y.
1913 Irving M. Bloom, B. A., Springfield,
Ill.
1895 Seymour G. Bottigheimer, B. A., Pe-
oria, Ill.
1905 Frederick E. Braun, B. A., Brooklyn,
N. Y.
1900 Abram Brill, B. A., Meridian, Miss.
1903 Morris Cahan, B. A., New York, N. Y.*
1887 Edward N. Calisch, Ph. D., Richmond,
Va.
1916 Hyman B. Cantor, M. A., New York,
N. Y.
1916 Simon Cohen, B. A., Providence, R. I.
1899 Simon R. Cohen, B. A., Brooklyn, N. Y.
1896 Frederick Cohn, Ph. D., Omaha, Neb.
1912 Samuel S. Cohon, B. A., Chicago, Ill.
1906 Abraham Cronbach, D. D., Akron, O.
1898 Max Cohen Currick, B. A., Erie, Pa.
1889 Heiman J. Elkin, B. A., Washington,
D. C.*
1898 Hyman G. Enelow, D. D., New York,
N. Y.


1901 Henry Englander, Ph. D., Cincinnati,
Ohio.t
1904 Harry W. Ettelson, Ph. D., Hartford,
Conn.
1901 Morris M. Feuerlicht, B. A., Indian-
apolis, Ind.
1913 David Fichman, B. A., Monroe, La,
1900 William H. Fineshriber, B. A., Mem-
phis, Tenn.
1903 Henry M. Fisher, B. A., Atlantic City,
N. J.
1893 Charles Fleischer, B. A., Boston,
Mass.*
1902 Solomon Foster, B. A., Newark, N. J.
1908 G. George Fox, Ph.D., Fort Worth,
Texas.
1916 Harvey B. Franklin, Ph. B., Oakland,
Cal.
1892 Leo M. Franklin, B. L., Detroit, Mich,
1915 Solomon B. Freehof, A. B., Cincin-
nati, Ohio.j]
1900 Charles J. Freund, B. S., B. L., Grand
Rapids, Mich.
1893 Aaron Friedman, M. D., Hoboken,
N. J.*
1917 Benjamin Friedman, B. A., Niagara
Falls, N. Y.
1904 Harry G. Friedman, Ph. D., New York,
N. Y.
1889 William S. Friedman, LL. D., Denver,
Col.
1904 Ephraim Frisch, B. A., New York,
N. Y.
1890 Alexander H. Geismar, B. L., Brook-
lyn, N. Y.*
1894 Abram Gideon, Ph. D., New York,
N. Y.V
1904 Alfred T. Godshaw, B. A., Waco, Tex.*


Those marked with a are located in places stated but are not officiating rabbis.
t Deceased.
t Professor of Biblical Exegesis and Biblical History in Hebrew Union College.
[ Assistant Professor of Rabbinies in Hebrew Union College.
Statistician for Public Service Commission.
Newspaper representative, Simplified Spelling Board, New York, N. Y.


8260


[NOVEMBER







REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


1904 Samuel H. Goldenson, Ph. D., Albany,
N. Y.
1916 Raphael Goldenstein, B. A., Pine Bluff,
Ark.
1905 Sidney E. Goldstein, B. A., New York,
N. Y.
1906 Nathan Gordon, M. A., Montreal, Can.*
1894 Bennett Grad, B. A., Milwaukee, Wis.
1891 Samuel Greenfield, B. L., New York,
N.. Y.
1889 Moses J. Gries, B. A., Cleveland, O.*
1909 Louis D. Gross, M. A., Brooklyn, N. Y.
1884 Louis Grossmann, D. D., Cincinnati, O.
1889 Rudolph Grossman, D. D., New York,
N. Y.
1889 Adolf Guttmacher, Ph. D.t

1915 Julius Halprin, A. B., San Diego, Cal.
1916 James G. Heller, M. A., Philadelphia,
Pa.
1884 Max Heller, M. L., New Orleans, La.
1898 Abram Hirschberg, B. A., Chicago, Ill.
1891 Samuel Hirshberg, M. A., Milwaukee,
Wis.
1916 Abraham Holtzberg, B. A., Davenport,
Iowa.
1914 Isadore Isaacson, Ph. B., Selma, Ala.
1900 Pizer W. Jacobs, B. A., Helena, Ark.
N. Y.
1886 Moses Perez Jacobson, B. A., Shreve-
port, La.
1904 Joseph Jasin, B. A., Schenectady, N. Y.
1891 Israel Joseph.t
1899 Rabbi Theodore F. Joseph, B. A.

1902 Emanuel Kahn, B. A., Piqua, O.*
1914 Israel L. Kaplan, B. A., Jacksonville,
Fla.
1902 Jacob H. Kaplan, Ph. D., Cincinnati, O.
1899 Israel Klein, B. A., Chicago, Ill.
1902 Samuel Koch, M. A., Seattle, Wash.
1909 Louis J. Kopald, M. A., Buffalo, N. Y.
1898 Joseph S. Kornfeld, B. A., Columbus,
Ohio.
1903 Solomon L. Kory, B. A., Vicksburg,
Miss.
1903 Nathan Krass, Litt. D., New York, N. Y.
1883 Joseph Krauskopf, D. D., Philadelphia,
Pa.
1916 Jacob B. Krohngold, B. A., Lexington,
Ky.
1903 Louis Kuppin, B. A., Chicago, HI.*


1906 Isaac Landman, B.A., Far Rockaway,


1914

1914

1900
1902

1916
1900

1914
1889
1897
1890

1907
1916

1890

1905
1901

1891


1900

1914

1914

1902

1899

1894

1901
1894
1910

1902
1896

1917

1912


N. Y.
Charles B. Latz, M. A., Fort Smith,
Ark.
Morris S. Lazaron, M. A., Baltimore,
Md.
David Lefkowitz, B. L., Dayton, O.
Maurice Lefkovits, Ph. D., Duluth,
Minn.
Julius Leibert, B. A., South Bend, Ind.
Emil W. Leipziger, B. A., New Or-
leans, La.
Lee J. Levinger, M. A., Paducah, Ky.
Charles S. Levi, B. A., Milwaukee, Wis.
Harry Levi, B. A., Boston, Mass.
Clifton H. Levy, B. A., New York,
N. Y.*
Felix A. Levy, Ph. D., Chicago, 111.
Morris Lichtenstein, B. A., Amster-
dam, N. Y.
Gustave H. Loewenstein, B. A., New
York, N. Y.
Meyer Lovitch, B. A., Scranton, Pa.
Solomon C. Lowenstein, B. A., New
York, N. Y.:
Alexander Lyons, Ph. D., Brooklyn,
N.Y.

Juda Leon Magnes, Ph. D., New York,
N. Y.*
Edgar F. Magnin, B. A., Los Angeles,
Cal.
Louis L. Mann, M. A., New Haven,
Conn.
Eugene Mannheimer, B. A., Des
Moines, Ia.
Leo Mannheimer, Ph. D., New York,
N. Y.*
Isaac E. Marcuson, B. L., Terre Haute,
Ind.
Elias Margolis, Ph. D., New York, N. Y.
David Marx, B. L., Atlanta, Ga.
Israel I. Mattuck, A. M., London, Eng-
land.
Eli Mayer, B. A., Philadelphia, Pa.
Harry H. Mayer, B. A., Kansas City,
Mo.
Samuel S. Mayerberg, M. A., Detroit,
Mich.
Maurice M. Mazure, M. A., Pittsburgh,
Pa.


Those marked with a are located in places stated, but are not officiating rabbis.
t Deceased.
1 Superintendent Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the city of New York.


1917]


8261







FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


1917 Samuel Felix Mendelsohn, B. A., Hunt-
ington, W. Va.
1906 Louis D. Mendoza, B. A., Norfolk, Va.
1903 Max J. Merritt, B. A., Evansville, Ind.
1896 Abraham J. Messing, B. A., LL. B.,
Chicago, Ill.*
1897 Julius H. Meyer, B. A., Chicago, Ill.*
1901 Martin A. Meyer, Ph.D., San Fran-
cisco, Cal.
1917 Jacob I. Meyerovitz, M. A., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
1900 Jacob Mielziner, M. A., Copenhagen,
Denmark.*
1906 Julian H. Miller, B. A., Chattanooga,
Tenn.
1902 Julian Morgenstern; Pl. D., Cincin-
nati, O.4
1901 Alfred G. Moses, B. A., Mobile, Ala.
1898 Leon M. Nelson, B A., Richmond, Va.*
1895 Morris Newfield, A. B., Birmingham,
Ala.
1898 Simon .Peiser, B. A., Cleveland, 0.
1883 David Philipson, 1. D., LL. D., Cincin-
nati, 0.
1912 Jacob B. Pollak, M. A.,II
1900 Jacob S. Raisin, Ph. D., D. D., Charles-
ton, S. C.
1903 Max Raisin, LL. D., Brooklyn, N. Y.
1914 Marius Ranson, B. A., Paterson, N. J.
1905 Joseph Rauch, B. A., Louisville, Ky.
1906 Max Reichler, B. A., New York, N. Y.
1915 Harold F. Reinhart, A. B., Baton
Rouge, La.
1902 Abraham B. Rhine, D. D., Hot Springs,
Ark.
1909 William Rice, T. M., Salt Lake City,
Utah.
1917 Harry R. Richmond, B. A., Trinidad,
Colo.
1917 Jerome Rosen, M..A., Spokane, Wash.
1889 William Rosenau, Ph, D., Baltimore,
Md.
1909 David Rosenbaum, Ph. D., Austin, Tex.
1913 Adolf Rosenberg, B. A., Kingston,
N. Y.
1894 Isidor E. Rosenthal, B. A., Lancaster,
Pa.


1908 Herman Rosenwasser, A. M., San
Francisco, Cal.
'1904 J. Leonard Rothstein, B. A., Alexan-
dria, La.
1885 Isaac Rubenstein.i
1891 Charles A. Rubenstein, M. A., Balti-
more, Md.
1889 Isaac L. Rypins, B. L., St. Paul, Minn.
1893 Marcus Salzman, B. A., Wilkes-Barre,
Pa.
1916 Israel J, Sarasohn, M. A., Natchez,
Miss.
1886 Tobias Schanfarber, B. A., Chicago, Ill.
1909 Samuel Schwartz, T. M., Montreal,
Canada.
1906 Jacob D. Schwarz, B.A., Cincinnati,
Ohio .
1904 Mendel Silber, B. A., M. D., New Or-
leans, La.
1915 Abba H. Silver, B.A., Cleveland, O.
1916 Maxwell Silver, B. A., Lafayette, Ind.
1884 Joseph Silverman, D. D., New York,
N. Y.
1894 Abram Simon, Ph. D., Washington,
D. C.
1909 Jacob Singer, M. A., Lincoln, Neb.
1895 George Solomon, B. A., Savannah, Ga.
1893 Michael G. Solomon, B. L., Gary, Ind.
1904 Nathan Stern, Ph. D., New York, N. Y.
1884 Joseph Stolz, D. D., Chicago, Ill.
1904 Joseph H. Stolz, Ph.B., Chicago, Ill.*
1915 Jacob Tarshish, B. A., Allentown, Pa.
1913 Sidney Tedesche, B. A., Brooklyn, N. Y.
1901 Leon Volmer, B, A., New Orleans, La.x
1914 Elkan C. Voorsanger, B.A., with our
army in France.
1902 Isidor Warsaw, B. A., Waco, Tex.
1909 Aaron L. Weinstein, M. A., Fort
Wayne, Ind.
1897 Harry Weiss, B. A., Macon, Ga.
1903 Jonah B. Wise, B. A., Portland, Ore.
1903 Louis Witt, B. A., Little Rock, Ark.
1909 Horace J. Wolf, M. A., Rochester, N. Y.
1897 Philip Wolf, B. A.
1899 Louis Wolsey, B. A., Cleveland, O.
.1900 George Zepin, B. A., Cincinnati, O.:t
1899 Martin Zielonka, M. A., El Paso, Tex.


t Deceased.
SProfessor of Bible and Semitic Languages in the Hebrew Union College.
Superintendent Jewish Orphan Asylum, Cleveland, O.
I Superintendent B'nai B'rith Orphanage, Erie, Pa.
T Assistant Director Synagog and School Extension.
x Superintendent Jewish Orphans' Home.
S:Director of Synagog and School Extension of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations.


8262


[NOVEMBER







REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Class of 1883
Israel Aaron
Henry Berkowitz
Joseph Krauskopf
David Philipson

Class of 1884
Louis Grossmann
Max Heller
Joseph Silverman
Joseph Stolz

Class of 1885
Isaac Rubenstein

Class of 1886
Moses Perez Jacobson
Tobias Schanfarber

Class of 1887
Edward N. Calisch

Class of 1888
None

Class of 1889
Heiman J. Elkin
William S. Friedman
Moses J. Gries
Rudolph Grossman
Adolf Guttmacher
Charles S. Levi
Wm. Rosenau
Isaac L. Rypins

Class of 1890
Alexander H. Geismar
Clifton H. Levy

Class of 1891
Samuel Greenfield
Samuel Hirshberg
Israel Joseph
Alexander Lyons
Charles A. Rubenstein

Class of 1892
Leo M. Franklin


The Alumni
Chronological arrangement


Class of 1893
Charles Fleischer
Aaron Friedman
Marcus Salzman
M. G. Solomon

Class of 1894
Abram Gideon
Bennett Grad
Isaac E. Marcuson
David Marx
Isidore E. Rosenthal
Abram Simon

Class of 1895
Seymour G. Bottigheimer
Morris Newfield
George Solomon

Class of 1896
Frederick Cohn
Gustave H. Loewenstein
Harry H. Mayer
Abraham J. Messing

Class of 1897
Harry Levi
Julius Henry Meyer
Harry Weiss
Philip Wolf


Class of 1898
Max Cohen Currick
Hyman G. Enelow
Abram Hirschberg
Joseph S. Kornfeld
Leon M. Nelson
Simon Peiser


Class of 1899
Simon R. Cohen
Theodore F. Joseph
Israel Klein
Leo Mannheimer
Louis Wolsey
Martin Zielonka


Class of 1900
Abraham S. Anspacher
Abram Brill
Wm. H. Fineshriber
Charles J. Freund
Pizer W. Jacobs
David Lefkowitz
Einil W. Leipziger
J. Leon Magnes
Jacob Mielziner
Jacob S. Raisin
George Zepin


Class of 1901
David Alexander
Moise Bergman
Joseph Blatt
Henry Englander
Morris M. Feuerlicht
Solomon C. Lowenstein
Elias Margolis
Martin A. Meyer
Alfred G. Moses
Leon Volmer


Class of 1902
Solomon Foster
Emanuel Kahn
Jacob H. Kaplan
Samuel Koch
Maurice Lefkovits
Eugene Mannheimer
Eli Mayer
Julian Morgenstern
Abraham B. Rhine
Isidor Warsaw


Class of 1903
Morris Cahan
Henry M. Fisher
Solomon L. Kory
Nathan Krass
Louis Kuppin
Max J. Merritt
Max Raisin
Jonah B. Wise
Louis Witt


1917]


-8263,









FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


Class of 1904
Harry W. Ettelson
Harry G. Friedman
Ephraim Frisch
Alfred T. Godshaw
Samuel H. Goldenson
Joseph Jasin
J. Leonard Rothstein
Mendel Silber
Nathan Stern
Joseph H. Stolz

Class of 1905
Frederick E. Braun
Sidney E. Goldstein
Meyer Lovitch
Joseph Rauch

Class of 1906
Louis Bernstein
Abraham Cronbach
Nathan Gordon
Isaac Landman
Louis D. Mendoza
Julian H. Miller
Max Reichler
Jacob D. Schwarz

Class of 1907
Felix A. Levy

Class of 1908
Joel Blau
G. George Fox
Herman Rosenwasser


Class of 1909
Louis D. Gross
Louis J. Kopald
William Rice
David Rosenbaum
Samuel Schwartz
Jacob Singer
Aaron L. Weinstein
Horace J. Wolf

Class of 1910
Israel I. Mattuck

Class of 1911
None

Class of 1912.
Israel Bettan
Samuel S. Cohon
Maurice M. Mazure
Jacob B. Pollak

Class of 1913.
Irving M. Bloom
Adolf Rosenberg
David Fichman
Sidney Tedesche

Class of 1914.
Isadore Isaacson
Israel L. Kaplan
Charles B. Latz
Morris S. Lazaron
Lee J. Levinger


Edgar F. Magnin
Louis L. Mann
Marius Rasinsky
Elkan C. Voorsanger


Class of 1915.
Solomon B. Freehof
Julius Halprin
Harold F. Reinhart
Abba H. Silver
Jacob Tarshish


Class of 1916.
Samuel J. Abrams
Hyman B. Cantor
Simon Cohen
Harvey B. Franklin
Raphael Goldenstein
James G. Heller
Abraham Holtzberg
Jacob B. Krohngold
Julius Leibert
Morris Lichtenstein
Israel J. Sarasohn
Mawell Silver

Class of 1917
Benjamin Friedman
Samuel S. Mayerberg
Samuel F. Mendelsohn
Jacob I. Meyerovitz
Harry R. Richmond
Jerome Rosen


[NOVEMBER


8264








REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Register of Students
1917-18

Collegiate Department


SENIORS
Barasch, Nathan, B.A., Bayonne, N. J.
Feldman, Abraham J., B. A., New York, N. Y.
Gup, Samuel M., M. A., Mobile, Ala.
Linfleld, Harry S., Ph. B., Fort Scott, Kan.
Macht, Wolfe, B. A., New York, N. Y.
Mark, Jerome, B.A., Cincinnati, O.
Mischkind, Louis A., M. A., New York, N. Y.
Montaz, Arthur S., Ph.B., Chicago, Ill.
Segel, Alexander, B. A., Cincinnati, O.
Turner, Jacob, B. A., Chicago, Ill.
Waterman, Philip, B.A., San Francisco, Cal.
Weis, Max, B.A., Homestead, Pa.

JUNIORS
August, Garry J., B. A., Cleveland, O.
Brickner, Barnett R., M.A., New York, N. Y.
Feinstein, Abraham, M. A., New York, N. Y.
Finkelstein, Joseph, M. A., Dayton, O.
Israel, Edward L., B.A., Cincinnati, O.
Kaufman, Max, New York, N. Y.
Marcus, Jacob R., B. A., Farmington, W. Va.
Minda, Albert G., Kansas City, Mo.
Sales, Joseph E., B.A., Brockton, Mass.
Salkover, Meyer, B.A., Cincinnati, O.
Sanders, Ira E., Kansas City, Mo.

THIRD COLLEGIATE CLASS
Baron, Joseph Louis, M. A., New York, N. Y.
Fineberg, Solomon, B. A., Cincinnati, O.
Fram, Leon, Baltimore, Md.


Harris, Samuel J., Oakland, Cal.
Heller, Bernard H., B. A., Philadelphia, Pa.
Kaplan, Samuel S., M. A., Greenport, L. I.
Krim, Isidore A., A. M., Newark, N. J.
Landman, Solomon, B. A., Cincinnati, O.
Shinedling, Abraham I., Paterson, N. J.
Skirboll, Jacob H., Cincinnati, O.
Wessel, Harvey E., B.A., New York, N. Y.

SECOND COLLEGIATE CLASS
Berkowitz, Henry J., Philadelphia, Pa.
Elischak, Milton M., Cincinnati, O.
Freund, Iser, Cincinnati, O.
Herman, Carl N., Cincinnati, O.
Iola, Hyman, Rochester, N. Y.
Kling, Arthur S., Louisville, Ky.
Luchs, Alvin S., Bellaire, O.
Margolis, Harry S., Dayton, O.
Meyerovitz, Myron M., New Orleans, La.
Rypins, Frederick I., B. A., Omaha, Neb.
Schwartz, William B., New York, N. Y.
Stern, Bernhard J., M. A., Chicago, Ill.
Youngerman, Morris, Cincinnati, O.

FIRST COLLEGIATE CLASS
Goldman, Albert, Chicago, Ill.
Isserman, Ferdinand M., Newark, N. J.
Mark, Julius, Cincinnati, O.
Reichert, Irving F., New York, N. Y.
Rosenberg, Samuel, Zanesville, O.
Starrels, Solomon A., Philadelphia, Pa.
Sternseher, Wm., San Francisco, Cal.


Preparatory Department


GRADE A
Brown, Lewis Phillip, Portland, Ore.
Blank, Sheldon H., Mt. Carmel, Ill.
Glueck, Nelson, Cincinnati, O.
Grafman, Louis E., New York, N. Y.
Herskovitz, Melville J., Erie, Pa.
Morris, David J., Springfield, O.
Rothman, Walter E., Detroit, Mich.

GRADE B
Bretton, Max, Latrobe, Pa.
Cohen, Harry H., Washington, D. C.
Dubinsky, Max, Boston, Mass.
Frankel, Benjamin, Peoria, Ill.


Lipman, Mayer, Chicago, Ill.
Nathan, David S., Cincinnati, O.
Silverman, Leon, Cincinnati, O.
Stern, Harry J., Steubenville, O.
Urich, Morris, Milwaukee, Wis.
Wolk, Samuel, Baltimbre, Md.

GRADE C
Aaronsohn, Michael, Baltimore, Md.
Cantor, Nat, Buffalo, N. Y.
Feinberg, Abraham L., Bellaire, O.
Fineberg, Isidore H., Cincinnati, O.
Finkelstein, Adolph H., Goldsboro, N. C.
Freed, Abraham, New York, N. Y.
Kronman, Harry, New York, N. Y.


1917]


8265










FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


GRADE D SPECIAL STUDENTS
Goldberg, Maurice J., Dayton, O. Bazel, Solomon N., Braddock, Pa.
Peiser, Walter, Brooklyn, N. Y. Schillman, Samuel H., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Stricker, Louis J., Cincinnati, O. Markowitz, Samuel H., Pottstown, Pa.








Degrees Conferred

DOCTOR OF DIVINITY
1886 David Philipson. 1888 Louis Grossmann. 1910 Abraham B. Rhine.
1887 Israel Aaron. 1894 Rudolph Grossmann. 1913 Jacob S. Raisin.
Henry Berkowitz. 1898 Joseph Stolz. 1915 Abraham Cronbach.
Joseph Krauskopf. 1902 Hyman G. Enelow. Israel 'Bettan.
Joseph Silverman.


Honorary Degrees Conferred

DOCTOR OF DIVINITY

1883 Solomon Eppinger, preceptor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, February 11, 1890.
1886 Aaron Hahn, rabbi at Cleveland, O.
1887 Benjamin Szold, rabbi at Baltimore, died at Berkeley Springs, W. Va., July 31, 1902.
1890 Henry Zirndorf, professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, December 17, 1893.
1891 David W. Marks, rabbi at London, England, died at London, May 3, 1909.
1892 David Davidson, preceptor H. U. C.
1894 Moritz Lazarus, professor University of Berlin, died at Meran, Austria, April
13, 1903.
1896 Moritz Steinschneider, professor, Berlin, died at Berlin, January 24, 1907.
1898 Moses Mielziner, professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, February 18, 1903.
1901 Emil G. Hirsch, rabbi of Sinai Congregation and professor in the University of
Chicago.
1902 Bernhard Felsenthal, rabbi emeritus, Chicago, died at Chicago, January 12, 1908.
1903 Jacob Voorsanger, rabbi, San Francisco, died at Monterey, April 27, 1908.
1909 Siegmund Mannheimer, professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, December 18, 1909.
1910 Ephraim Feldman, professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, November 16, 1910.
1912 Israel Abrahams, Cambridge, England.
1916 Gotthard Deutsch, Ph. D., Professor H. U. C.


BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY
1894 Ephraim Feldman, professor H. U. C.
1895 Jacob Voorsanger, rabbi, San Francisco.

RABBI
1885 Ignatz Mueller, rabbi, Louisville, Ky.


[NOVEMBER


8266







Civil Rights







REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DELEGATES


Report of the Board of Delegates on Civil Rights


To the Executive Board of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations:
Gentlemen: The activities of the Board
of Delegates for the fiscal year have been in
some respects, materially different from all
those preceding. The terrible war that has
for the last three years raged in the greater
part of Europe, and into which the United
States has now been plunged, has created
many distressing and harrowing cases, to
the relief of which the Board, through its
Chairman, has had an untold amount of work.
At no time in the history of the Board have
cases of such peculiar and distressing hard-
ship arisen.
As stated in the report of last year, a
great many of these immigrants have come
from Palestine, Greece, Roumania and Russia
-the latter coming by the circuitous route
of Siberia and Manchuria, trying to land in
Seattle and San Francisco. The good people
of these, two cities have, within the past
year, instituted branches of the Hebrew Shel-
tering and Immigrant Aid Society, and co-
operative branches of the Independent Order
of B'nai B'rith, to aid these unfortunate
refugees, and the demands on the part of
these organizations have been made, and
fortunately adjusted to the satisfaction of all.
The Seattle Branch particularly has been
overwhelmed with cases of great hardship
and suffering, and has discharged its
duty in each and every case, with signal
ability. Many of the cases held for depor-
tation were appealed and naturally came to
the Board for prompt and remedial action.
As far as was possible under the law and
the humane sympathy that has actuated the
Department of Labor and the Bureau of Im-
migration, these cases received instant con-
sideration, and wherever possible, relief was
granted either by paroling until after the
war is over, or admitting under bond or
outright.
Naturally under the new law containing
the illiteracy test, a few cases of that char-
acter have attempted to land, and parole
admission was secured, their deportation at
this time being impossible. While the de-
partment has not established a uniform rule
to be used as a precedent in any of these


cases, yet the temporary stay has given an
opportunity to educate the alien sufficiently
so that upon the expiration of the parole
period, he or she was competent under the
law to be admitted. In this direction the
Board urges the various organizations
throughout the country to establish night
schools to educate these aliens on parole so
that when the time for deportation shall
come, the department can exercise its discre-
tion in admitting or rejecting the applicant.
Too much stress can not be laid upon this
aid and assistance to the unfortunate immi-
grant who may be one of a group, and whose
deportation would inflict misery not only
roon the individual but upon the whole fam-
ily.
In this connection, the Board takes great
pleasure in quoting from a few of the letters
received from the Seattle Branch, showing
the appreciation of that office for the work
so far accomplished:
"Permit us to say that we are fully aware
of the amount of incessant work you have in
Washington to get every one of these immi-
grants released. The few of our directors
who come in daily contact with the office of
this branch, know full well your work and
appreciate it."
"My dear Mr: Wolf, in all sincerity, per-
mit us to say to you that we realize that
the credit for these many legal victories be-
longs to you, and not to us."
Mr. Bernstein, the President of the Hebrew
Sheltering and Immigrant Aid Society, re-
cently wrote to the Chairman as follows:
"I need not add that in my own opinion
the Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid
Society owes you a debt of gratitude which
it can never repay."
As anticipated in last year's report, Con-
gress during the short session, again intro-
duced the Immigration Bill containing the
illiteracy test, which, in spite of all opposition
and argument, passed both Houses, and when
it reached the White House, President Wilson
again vetoed the bill as on the previous
occasion. Nevertheless, the fight was re-
newed, the bill passing both Houses and
again being vetoed by the President, but
unfortunately became a law by being passed
over the veto.


8269








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


To show the unselfish and cosmopolitan
character of the work which is being done,
work which is a splendid antidote to anti-
Semitism, the Seattle office took up cases of
non-Jews, and the Chairman of your Board
took a keen interest in securing the admis-
sion of a Greek Catholic woman and her
children, the husband living in New England.
It is humane acts of this character that
should reconcile differences, and bring home
to each and every citizen, no matter of what
nationality or creed, that after all there is
but. one class of human beings, including
those who can help and those who deserve
to be helped.
We could quote case after case of
extreme hardship and misery. Naturally im-
migration to the port of New York has been
very light during the past six months at
least, owing to the war conditions, the United
States having become a party to the great
conflict, but whatever cases arose in the East,
whether in New York, Philadelphia, Boston
or other cities, and were brought to our
attention, were promptly and in the main,
satisfactorily adjusted.
In this connection, we submit a statement
sent to us through the courtesy of one of
our members, Mr. Max J. Kohler, written
by Miss Winkler of the Council of Jewish
Women stationed at Ellis Island, which is
very interesting and gives an intelligent re-
sume of conditions there and shows what a
valuable adjunct to the Hebrew Sheltering and
Immigrant Aid Society that Association has
been. Miss Winkler in her annual report
to the Jewish Women's Council recently held,
gives generous recognition for the aid and
support given her and her Society by the
Chairman of this Board. The statement re-
ferred to is as follows:
"When the United States entered the
war and Ellis Island became a detention
camp for interned enemy aliens as well as
an immigration station, the congestion
brought about by this unhappy condition
added to the hardships that had already been
endured by the new arrivals from war-racked
Europe. And too, when Ellis Island took on
this military aspect, the Government, in its
adjustment to the new conditions, ruled off
practically all efforts to give friendly aid to
newcomers on Ellis Island. This made it
doubly hard to bring the help of fellowship
to the immigrant. But when, last May, a
sudden large influx of Jewish and other immi-
grants, who for weeks had been held up at
the port of Rotterdam, arrived at Ellis Island,
the humane impulse of our Goveranment


created a small committee of six represent-
ing varying denominations and races, and
selected from all the societies that had been
doing social work on Ellis Island, to bring
the welcome and help which was never more
urgently needed and more eagerly looked for,
which appointment was made through the
personal efforts of the Honorable Simon
Wolf, Chairman of the Board of Delegates."

A large number of Russian Jews coming by
the way of Siberia and Manchuria have land-
ed in Japan. Their condition is most deplor-
.able from every standpoint. The facts sur-
rounding their condition were cabled to the
State Department. The Hebrew Sheltering
and Immigrant Aid Society took up the mat-
ter and concluded to send Mr. Samuel Mason,
a member of the Board of Directors, to Japan,
to see what could be done to aid these people
and to prevent all possible distress. Mr.
Jacob H. Schiff, with his usual good will,
aided and advised Mr. Mason and the
President of the Society, Mr. Bernstein,
came to Washington for the purpose of
securing passports and letters of credence
to aid Mr. Mason in his contemplated work.
The Chairman of our Board succeeded in
securing letters from the State Department,
the Department of Labor, from the Russian
Embassy, the Japanese Embassy, and also
succeeded in having the Department of Labor
cable the Vice-Consul General at Shanghai,
a former employee of the Immigration Bureau,
Mr. Lester Schnare, to come to Yokohoma to
assist Mr. Mason to straighten out matters,
not only to the satisfaction of the individuals,
but prospectively to the Government of the
United States, as many of these people will
no doubt immediately come to this country.
We can not repeat too often, what has been
stated heretofore in print as well as on the
forum, regarding the splendid cooperation
and humane spirit displayed on the part of
the Department of Labor and the Bureau of
Immigration in all these vexing cases. It is
an object lesson to the world to see how the
lofty spirit of American citizenship comes to
the fore, and while the number of immigra-
tion cases in nowise can compare with those
in years past, yet the character of each case,
and the gravity of the ailments of the dif-
ferent aliens, made the work hard and inces-
sant, but it was discharged gladly, the result
gratifying, and of vast benefit to the immi-
grant and all those most concerned.
It will be remembered that in each annual
report for many years past, the attention of


[DECEMBER1


8270











REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DELEGATES


one and all has been called to the import-
ance of naturalization, which at no time in
the history of the Board has become more
significant than during the past fiscal year.
In almost every community of the country
since the war was declared between the
United States and Germany, residents who
had lived for twenty and thirty years in the
city or town, were found to be, if not alien
enemies, at least aliens who had never be-
come naturalized. Those people of seventy
and eighty, and one or two cases we have in
mind, ninety years of age, were subject to
immediate removal from the precluded zone.
Young men had to register, and have been
drafted without having been naturalized-
in many instances the only wage earner of a
family, destitute of means, and yet there are
critics who blame the Government instead
of imposing the blame where it rightfully
belongs. The greatest boon that any one can
possess, especially of Jewish faith, is citizen-
ship of the country in which he resides, for
that in-itself implies patriotism of the high-
est order. Again this year, as in so many
past years, relief was sought by relatives
who had no standing in court, not having
become naturalized.
Statements came to your Board from many
sources regarding discrimination by officers
in the army and navy against soldiers, sail-
ors and officers of the Jewish faith. After
careful investigation made through official
sources, we are happy to state that no such
general discrimination exists; sporadically it


turns up, as it does in almost every phase
of social and civil life. It seems that we
must bear this badge of distinction, for after
all it is a privilege to be out of the ordinary,
for only those who are to be envied are
discriminated against. We.are htppy to say
from personal knowledge and careful inves-
tigation, that no class of citizenship enjoys
a higher distinction in the army and navy
and civil service of the Government, than
does the American citizen of Jewish faith.
As during the Civil and Spanish wars, so
again in this world-war, we are not in the
rear, but in the lead. May it ever so con-
tinue.
Since our last report, the unparalleled has
happened-the revolution in Russia, from
which for some time a great deal was ex-
pected, especially for our suffering coreli-
gionists. At this present writing, no one
can tell as to the future condition, political
or otherwise, of that vast country. Let us
hope and pray that democracy in that land
as in our own blessed republic, will eventu-
ally be victorious, to the end of unifying
all the inhabitants thereof on the mission
of true civilization. Naturally it goes, with-
out laying too much emphasis on the fact,
that if conditions in Russia improve, the
Jewish question, as well as the immigration
question to a large extent, will practically
be settled.
Respectfully submitted,
SIMON WOLF,
Chairman.


1917]


8271







Synagog and School Extension










ANNUAL REPORT


OF THE


Board of Managers of

Synagog and School Extension


To the Executive Board of The Union of
American Hebrew Congregations:
Gentlemen: The Board of Managers of
Synagog and School Extension begs to sub-
mit the following report for the fiscal year
ending October 31, 1917.
It is our sad duty to chronicle the loss of
a most devoted spirit and enthusiastic cham-
pion of our cause, Dr. J. Leonard Levy. His
enthusiasm and his unselfishness led him to
travel from one end of the country to the
other in behalf of Synagog and School Ex-
tension. He made many friends for our
cause and his untimely taking away fills us
with sorrow. His work will long be remem-
bered not only by this small circle of friends
with whom he labored, but by the larger
family of the House of Israel where he was
equally known and appreciated.
Our work this season has been of a larger
volume than in the preceding years. This,
in spite of the fact that our office force has
been broken up by Rabbi Schwarz's departure
early in the year for New York and Rabbi
Egelson's departure in September for San
Francisco. Both are conducting branch of-
fices of the Department for the supervision
of various forms of Synagog Extension.
While this has entailed a curtailment of
activities in the central office, the visible
effects will probably only appear in the report
for the following year. We have this year
pursued our activities in more cities, colleges
and institutions than in preceding years.
The work that we do is cumulative in its
nature and for that reason the report of
one year may chronicle the result of pre-
paratory activities extending over several
years.
We now have three offices: one in Cincin-
nati and two more of a temporary character
for the accomplishment of specific aims.
One is in New York and one in San Fran-
cisco. We have added one more worker to


our force, Miss Elsa Weihl. Our small army
of volunteer workers numbers no less than
250 persons, and consists of 41 supervisors,
142 deputies, and 67 lay workers, who have
visited 146 towns, 42 colleges, 10 camps, 73
institutions and 20 summer resorts. This
group of volunteer workers constitutes our
unofficial advisory board on matters pertain-
ing to Synagog Extension. Two other Boards
give their volunteer services in conducting
two other important enterprises in which the
Department is engaged: the Board of Editors
of Religious School Literature and the Tract
Commission. The members of both are ap-
pointed jointly by the Board of Managers
and the Central Conference of American
Rabbis.
A detailed account of the work accom-
plished in each city, town, college, institu-
tion, summer resort, etc., etc., has been pre-
pared in condensed form and appears as
Appendix A of this report. The following
descriptive paragraphs are summaries under
specific heads. The three general divisions
of our work are Synagog Extension, School
Extension and Propaganda Literature.

SYNAGOG EXTENSION
In Rural Communities
Our work in rural communities where
single Jewish families reside, consists in
disseminating literature for adults and for
children, in maintaining a limited correspond-
ence course where we find the recipients
responsive, in arranging holiday services and
furnishing printed sermonic literature; also
in placing our literature and services at the
disposal of those supervisors and deputies
who desire to maintain similar work in their
own districts under their own direct super-
vision. As last year, our operations included
1,070 towns and hamlets. In 293 small cities
we helped to arrange holiday services.








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


Scattered Jewish Groups in Small Cities
Our work in small cities has increased by
thirty-three per cent. In 146 towns congre-
gations, schools and Sisterhoods have been
organized in accordance with the needs of
each locality. Of these 146 towns, 55 rep-
resent new towns in which we did not oper-
ate last year. It is only fair to say that the
work accomplished is a very insignificant
part of the work waiting to be accomplished.
Our progress is limited by the funds at our
disposal and the number of active workers
in available positions.


In Metropolitan Centers
We operate in New York City through a
subcommittee of this Board known as the
New, York Committee. These activities of
the New York Committee have now lasted a
year and a half and are set forth at length
in a special report which is submitted to-
gether with this one. In brief, the results
are as follows. We have maintained an office
to study the problems involved. Rabbi Zepin
and Rabbi Schwarz have given their atten-
tion to this work, which has resulted in an
exhaustive and valuable survey of one dis-
trict in New York-the Bronx. A day school
with 500 pupils has been opened and oper-
ated for about a year and a half. As this
is also a pay school for those who can
afford to pay, many problems of finance,
curriculum and management have presented
themselves. These have been solved and the
experience and information thus gathered can
be made the basis for the establishment of
more schools. Dr. L. Leonard Levy's activi-
ties resulted in raising money sufficient for
the first year's upkeep of the experimental
school. Our work in New York is therefore
quite completed. We are about to turn the
school and office over to the New York Com-
mittee, leaving the enterprise to the people
of New York for continuance and elaboration.


Sinai Congregation of the Bronx
Sinai Congregation of the Bronx, organized
by the Department in 1910, is now in posi-
tion to care for itself. Subsidies were with-
drawn six months ago. The congregation
has built a basement structure with a seating
capacity of 800, where it conducts its many
activities. Its membership is now 250, its
school numbers 410 pupils. Sinai Congre-


gation has two Sisterhoods and eleven sub-
sidiary societies for its young people and for
the pupils of the religious school.

Cooperation of National Federation of
Temple Sisterhoods
Through the National Federation of Tem-
ple Sisterhoods we have cooperated in Balti-
more, Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, New
Haven and Washington; where we have as-
sisted in the organization or the maintenance
of free religious schools.


Summer Services
There was a marked falling off in the
number of places where we conducted sum-
mer services this season. This, because the
number of people at summer resorts this
year was noticeably less. The interest
shown in the work was, however, just as
great as in former years, and the services
were characterized by religious fervor and
enthusiasm. Thirty-one rabbis and laymen
conducted over one hundred services in twen-
ty summer resorts.


Students' Religious Welfare
Our program of religious welfare work
among Jewish students attending universi-
ties and colleges has been carried out as
usual. This work is varied in its nature and
is entered into by congregations, Sisterhoods
and Rabbis. It aims to secure for the stu-
dents a measure of religious and social life.
The Rabbis lead classes and in many cases
conduct services for groups of students at
educational institutions which are removed
from Jewish centers. This season we have
operated .in forty-two colleges, seventeen of
which were not included in last year's work.


Army and Navy Religious Welfare Work
In former years we conducted work for
soldiers under our own auspices. This year
we have cooperated with a number of other
national organizations in creating a Jewish
Board for Welfare Work in the United States
Army and Navy, under whose direction this
work is now conducted. Our congregations
and Sisterhoods have given their cooperation
locally in performing various tasks assigned
by the Jewish Board for Welfare Work,


8276


[NOVEMBER








DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION


Welfare Work for Delinquents and
Defectives
Our work for delinquents in institutions
has increased ten per cent.; our work for
detectives fifty per cent. Every agency at
our disposal has been drawn upon to serve
in this capacity. Rabbis acting as volunteer
chaplains have visited these institutions,
taught and befriended the inmates. The
Sisterhoods have supplied various comforts
and delicacies for special occasions. Our
operations were conducted in fifty-one penal
institutions and twenty-two hospitals and
asylums.

SCHOOL EXTENSION
We pursue the work of School Extension
by the organization of religious schools, the
publication and sale of textbooks, the free
distribution of textbooks to Jewish children
on farms and in institutions, the organiza-
tion of Jewish Teachers' Associations with
which we cooperate in the conduct of their
meetings and in sending them exhibits of
religious textbooks, reference books and
other paraphernalia.


Textbook Publications
The selection of manuscripts for publi-
cation is under the direction of the Board
of Editors of Religious School Literature,
whose individual report is submitted together
with this one. The Board has accepted
three manuscripts during the past season.
One is "The Faith of Israel," a Guide for
Confirmation, by Dr. H. G. Enelow; another
is a Hanukkah play of unusual merit, by
Mr. L. Broido; the third is a Hebrew man-
ual by Rabbi Max Reichler. The first two
have already appeared and the third is short-
ly to be placed on the market. The Hebrew
Manual is published out of the funds of the
Hermine Schonthal Publication Fund, to
which Mr. Joseph Schonthal has very gener-
ously contributed another thousand dollars
this year. With these three new books, we
now have fourteen publications. In the
course of the school year ending July, 1917,
we sold to 370 schools and to 100 individuals;
36 more schools than during the preceding
school year. The number of items sold was
19,997.


Teachers' Associations' Meetings
Owing to the absence of Rabbis Schwarz
and Egelson from the city for the larger
part of last year, we have been compelled
to decline a number of invitations to par-
ticipate in meetings of State Teachers' Asso-
ciations. We participated, however, in the
meeting of the Jewish Education Association
of Alabama, held in Birmingham, Ala., where
Mr. Barnett Brickner lectured on "A Survey
of Textbooks Used in Jewish Religious
Schools," and in the meeting of the Ken-
tucky Association for Jewish Religious Edu-
cation, held in Henderson, Ky., where Mr.
Brickner spoke on the same subject.

Religious School Exhibits
Our several exhibits have remained prac-
tically the same as last year and have been
forwarded to two meetings, the Jewish Edu-
cation Association of Alabama, which met
at Birmingham, Ala., and the Kentucky Asso-
ciation for Jewish Religious Education, which
met at Henderson, Ky.


PROPAGANDA LITERATURE
The publication of propaganda literature is
in the hands of the Tract Commission. This
Commission publishes educational tracts on
Jewish subjects for the information of non-
Jews as well as Jews. Each year a booklet
of sermons for all the holidays is published.
This is intended for small communities that
are without ministers but which desire to
conduct services. In advance of every holi-
day, articles pertaining to the same are cir-
culated to the Jewish and non-Jewish press.
In the fall of each year and in the spring,
calendars giving the dates of the principal
Jewish holidays are sent to schools, colleges
and institutions in which Jews are present.
This is part of a campaign for holiday ob-
servance and is intended to secure for Jews
the privilege of such observance wherever
this is possible.
A number of attempts have been made to
secure second-class postal rates from the
Post Office Department for our tracts. These
attempts have thus far been unsuccessful
on account of technicalities. It is probable,
however, that the privilege will be secured
within the next few months.


8277


1917J








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


Twelve hundred Sermon Pamphlets are
printed and distributed each year. Fifteen
thousand Holiday Press Notices are distrib-
uted to morning and evening daily papers, to
Jewish weeklies, to Sisterhoods, and to other
institutions requesting same. Three thou-
sand Holiday Calendars are distributed as de-
scribed in a preceding paragraph. This year
we also cooperated with the United States
Food Conservation Bureau in distributing
propaganda literature to Rabbis and com-
munal leaders and in giving space ih the


Union Bulletin for the publication of various
items, prepared by the Washington Bureau.

FINANCIAL REPORT
Although the Department of Synagog and
School Extension receives all money for
disbursement directly from the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations, it has
maintained a propaganda office and has de-
veloped certain avenues of income which are
listed below. These are in all cases turned
over to the Union upod receipt.


Collections
November 1, 1916-October 31, 1917
Contributions made directly
For Synagog and School Extension........................................ $22,580.00
For Synagog and School Extension in New York .......................... 7,913.54
Sale of Textbooks.. ....................................................... 3,488.31
Summer Services .. .................................................... 206.01
Tract Commission......................................................... 51.25
National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods for General Office ................. 250.00
National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods for Union Bulletin (Two Years)..... 1,500.00
National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods for Scholarships ................... 3,871.00

$39,860.11


Disbursements
November 1, 1916-October 31, 1917
OVERHEAD CHARGES ......................................... $18,765.97
Stationery and Office Supplies..................................$ 828.15
Telephone .................................................. .. 120.00
Postage and Telegrams ........................................ 348.16
Rent ....................................................... 1,261.66
Salaries .................................................. .. 15,775.38
Office Furniture ............................................ 424.82
Industrial Insurance ............................................ 7.80
SYNAGOG EXTENSION (DIRECT EXPENSES) ................. $ 5,226.65
Supervisors' Expenses .......................................$ 962.32
New York Synagog ....... ............................ .............. 1,957.25
Farmers' W welfare .......................................... .. 134.97
Summer Services ............................................. .. 414.84
Traveling Expenses-Director ..................... .......... 960.33
Traveling Expenses-Mr. Schwarz ................................ 84.75
Traveling Expenses-Mr. Egelson ............................... 651.46
Traveling Expenses-Mr. Brickner ............................... 60.70
RELIGIOUS PUBLICATIONS ................................... $ 3,754.15
Expressage (on Publications) ....................................$ 362.57
Publications .................................................. 3,278.46
Sabbath School Exhibit ................................ ......... 108.93
Board of Editors ...... ............. ............................. 4.19
$27,746.77


8278


[NOVEMBER









1917]


DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION

Special Activities
Of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations
Conducted by the Department of Synagog and School Extension
tin ............................................. .$ 3,856.56
Office ......................................... .. 600.00
uncil ......................................... .. 376.71
mpaign ......................................... .. 573.10
mission ............................................ 517.02
visory Board.......................................... 65.42
committee .......................................... 13,137.95


Respectfully submitted,
CHAS. SHOHL,
Chairman.
GEORGE ZEPIN,
Director.


8279













$19,126.76


Union Bullet
Propaganda
Biennial Cot
Western Cat
Tract Comm
National Ad'
New York C








ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE

New York Committee


New York City, October 31, 1917.
To the Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension:
Gentlemen: The New York Committee for
School Extension hereby begs to submit to
you its Second Annual Report.

SCHOOL EXTENSION IN NEW YORK
CITY
The work of school extension in New York
City was undertaken at the invitation of a
number of influential rabbis and congrega-
tional leaders in the city. As the first step
to carrying out the proposed program, the
Union established an office, which was to be
the center of all subsequent organizing and
supervising activity. The work of this office
has consisted of three parts, (1) studying
the problem, (2) organizing and successfully
operating an experimental plant for the pur-
pose of demonstrating how the problem can
be met, (3) making propaganda and collect-
ing funds.
In this work we have had the guidance and
assistance of three men, placed at our dis-
posal by the Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations. Dr. J. Leonard Levy, of sainted
memory, was appointed on our New York
Committee, and took charge of making propa-
ganda for the cause in New York City and
of gathering funds. His untimely taking
away in the midst of his work lays upon us
the twofold burden of continuing a labor of
love associated with his memory, and that
of applying ourselves to secure the funds
for its continuance. Rabbi George Zepin,
Director of Synagog and School Extension
for the Union, came here in January, 1916,
and took the initial steps for opening the
office and making a survey of Jewish educa-
tional conditions in the Bronx. Rabbi Jacob
D. Schwarz, Assistant Director of Synagog
and School Extension, came here in April,
1916, and has remained in New York since
that time. He completed the work begun by
Rabbi Zepin, organized the Ezra Hebrew
School and installed the system of operation
and administration which will be described in
detail in this report. Rabbi Zepin has made
numerous trips to New York at times when


the situation has required his personal at-
tention. The expense of supervising the
work, represented by the salaries and ex-
penses of these two rabbis, has been gener-
ously borne by the Department of Synagog
and School Extension. The Department has
also paid the cost of maintenance of the New
York Office. The New York Committee takes
this occasion to express its appreciation of
the services rendered, and trusts soon to be
in position to raise in New York the total
amount needed for the continuance of the
work.
The initial enterprise of the New York
Office was to make a thorough investigation
of religious conditions in the Bronx from the
standpoint of the work to be done, for the
purpose of outlining the scope of the problem
and indicating where the work was most
needed. This analysis of conditions, showing
the need for our movement, was practically
exhaustive. It became the basis of our sub-
sequent organizing work in the first neigh-
borhood selected and should prove equally
adequate as the basis for future work along
similar lines throughout the Bronx.
Our experimental school was opened in a
district selected because its peculiar con-
ditions, while increasing the difficulty of
the task, would tend to render its suc-
cess more conclusive, and would make
more certain the possibility of extending
it successfully into other neighborhoods.
This district is marked by three unfa-
vorable characteristics; namely, its almost
extreme poverty, the rigorously orthodox atti-
tude of the parents and the increasing num-
ber of juvenile delinquents. On the other
hand, the large number of children from
which to draw and the intense desire for
religious education contributed to increase
the practicability of building up a large and
successful school. Within a few weeks of
the opening of the Fall term of Ezra Hebrew
School (October 22, 1916), the school was
the largest in the Bronx. The number of
pupils, which could probably be considerably
increased with little difficulty, has been kept
down to five hundred, owing to the fact that
receiving a larger number would necessitate








DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION


increasing the present facilities of the school,
with a corresponding increase in expense.
Today we have an institution which ap-
parently constitutes in every essential respect
an experiment successfully carried out.
Around the school have already sprung up a
Congregation, Parents' Association, school
clubs and a number of similar activities.
Neighborhood activities on a more extensive
scale have not been encouraged by us for no
other reason than because the necessary
financial means have not been available.
Judging from the experiences of the first
year, we are safe in saying that the people
of the neighborhood, who are most kindly dis-
posed toward us, are embracing eagerly all
the opportunities which we are creating for
them, and that therefore the extent and
variety of activities which could be carried on
in our building and on its playground are
limited only by the amount of money which
such extensive activities would require. The
payment of tuition, considering the poverty
in the neighborhood, has on the whole been
very gratifying, both in amount and in
promptness of payment. In other words, we
have found the neighborhood thoroughly re-
sponsive to our efforts.
This successful outcome of our initial ex-
periment is dwelt upon, not to make a point
of the fact that we have built up a successful
institution, but to make the more important
point that the Union has proved itself capable
of doing this work and that the work can be
duplicated as many times and as rapidly as
the financial support secured for it will
permit. From the point of view of the Union,
the outstanding fact is that we have done
successfully and thoroughly the work which
we were invited to do and which we under-
took to do, namely, we have conducted a
successful experiment disclosing the need of
increasing the facilities for religious educa-
tion and showing how this need can be effect-
ually and economically met.

THE CENTRAL OFFICE AND THE
SCHOOL
This report will deal with the work of the
Central Office .as well as with the work of
the school which we have established. These
two bodies of facts must be differentiated.
The work of the school will be treated under
such general heads as administration, school
curriculum, school finances, physical equip-
ment, efficiency in the teaching staff and in


the method of instruction, etc., and will
include the consideration of such problems
as cost of religious education, amount of
tuition paid by the parents, percentage of
free pupils, the previous Jewish educational
history of our pupils, the proportion of boys
and girls and methods of securing efficiency
in the teaching staff. The report will have
to deal separately with the work of the
Central Office because this work, in itself
divided into three departments, is of an alto-
gether different nature. The first function
of the Central Office was making propaganda
and collecting funds. The second function
was gathering the data necessary for a solu-
tion of the general problem of Jewish edu-
cation in New York City, such as population
surveys, school surveys, and neighborhood
survey. The third function consisted in car-
rying out successfully a number of experi-
ments which -can safely become the norm
and guide in the organization of future
schools. These experiments embraced the
following tasks: creating a practical curricu-
lum, creating a flexible organization con-
sisting of a number of subsidiary societies
necessary for the efficient working of the
and school and installing a method adapted
to our particular problem for collecting and
keeping the accounts of tuition fees.
The following is a chronological record of
the tasks and problems as they have pre-
sented themselves and as they have been dis-
posed of.

Preparatory Tasks
1. A survey of the Jewish child population
of the Bronx with reference to its distribu-
tion, the same to serve as a basis for the
work of religious school extension.
2. A survey of the Jewish religious schools
of the Bronx with reference to the number
of children reaclied by them, the character
of the instruction given and the nature of
the surroundings, with special reference to
sanitation, safety and the moral influences
of the neighborhood.
3. A survey of the synagogs of the Bronx
for the purpose of ascertaining to what ex-
tent these synagogs make it part of their
function to support or encourage religious
schools.
4. A detailed survey of one thousand fam-
ilies in the neighborhood selected for the
experimental school. The families investi-.
gated were families whose children were not


8281







FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


attending the religious schools of the neigh-
borhood. The information sought dealt with
living conditions and earning capacity for
the purpose of ascertaining the average
amount of tuition that ought to be paid by
families of this class.

Organizing Tasks
5. Selecting from a number of buildings
offered for the purpose, a building properly
located with reference to the Jewish popu-
lation, and which conformed or could be
made to conform to the fire and building
laws of the city of New York. Owing to
local conditions, it took two months to com-
plete this task.
6. Rebuilding the lower floor of our build-
ing to provide adequate school rooms.
7. Creating a system for collecting tuition
through paid collectors, who make weekly
visits to the homes and investigate causes
of nonpayment.
8. Installing a system for tracing absentees
and late pupils, which has resulted in pro-
ducing an attendance averaging under normal
conditions between eighty-five and ninety
per cent. This information is of value when
compared to the highest average attendance
of the public schools, which is eighty-five
per cent.
9. Establishing, with the cooperation of the
Committee on Teachers of the New York
Board of Supervisors, a standard of Jewish
and general education for teachers in our
religious schools. Conducting teachers' ex-
aminations and maintaining a regularly con-
stituted eligible list, from which our teachers
are appointed as needed
10. Formulating a curriculum, establish-
ing rules for registration, grading and pro-
motion and fixing the hours of attendance.
11. Organizing a Local Committee consist-
ing of representative men: of the neighbor:
hood for the purpose of securing a desirable
measure of participation in the management
of our institution by the people for whose
benefit it was established. This Local Com-
mittee has already justified its existence by
inaugurating a number of enterprises which
have been of value to the school and of
benefit to the neighborhood. It should be
stated, however, that while the enterprises
mentioned below (No. 15) were organized
under the auspices of the Local Committee,
they represent in a large measure the activity
of the Central Office.


12. Organizing and maintaining school
clubs for four groups of our pupils, under
the leadership of four of our teachers, one
of whom acts as supervisor of clubs.
13. Organizing a Parents' Association with
committees on school visiting, school enter-
tainments, providing clothing for needy chil-
dren, etc., and in general .representing, the
personal desires of the parents of our pupils
with regard to the policy and management of
the school. The committees have been active
and the association has given entertainments
to raise funds for the above mentioned
purposes.
14. We conduct classes in the morning as
well as in the afternoon. We draw the bulk
of our pupils from four public schools.
Some of these schools are operated on the
so-called Gary plan, others have a large num-
ber of part-time pupils. The difficulty of
securing homogeneous groups of children
for organized class work presented a very
difficult problem, requiring the establishing
of relations with a number of principals and
teachers, as well as periodic conferences.
The relationships established by these means
have proven to be mutually helpful in many
ways.

Enterprises of the Local Committee
15. (a) The Local Committee organized
and is successfully managing a People's Syn-
agog, which conducts services throughout
the year on Friday evenings and Saturday
mornings and on holidays, with the exception
of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. This
synagog is self-supporting.
(b) The Local Committee organized Holy-
day Services (Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kip-
pur), in the fall of 1916 and again in the
fall of 1917, for the purpose of providing
decorously conducted services for the neigh-
borhood at a minimum cost. This enterprise
is also self-supporting.

Cooperative Activities
16. Establishing relations with the Chil-
dren's Court, Jewish Children's Welfare
League of the Bronx, the Bronx Branch of
the United Hebrew Charities of the City of
New York, the Widowed Mothers' Fund As-
sociation, and the General Tuberculosis Com-
mittee, for the purpose of cooperating with
them in receiving special pupils and in caring
for the general welfare of our pupils.


[OCTOBER


8282








DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION


Supervisory Activities
17. Supervising the school through regu-
lar reports of teachers' and pupils' attend-
ance, class term reports on work covered,
etc., by personal visits and inspection by the
directing head and by periodical conferences
with the teachers collectively and individ-
ually.

Preparatory Activities for Future Work
18. Making a detailed survey of a new
neighborhood, together with a preliminary
inquiry among 166 families, to determine
the sentiment with regard to the organization
of a new school in accordance with a propo-
sition made by a New York congregation,
and preparing a detailed report showing pub-
lic and religious school conditions in the
district selected, buildings available for the
purpose and estimated cost of organization
and maintenance.

PROGRESS OF EZRA HEBREW SCHOOL
Our experimental school in the Bronx, to
which we gave the name Ezra Hebrew
School, opened its doors on July 2, 1916.
From the first day the children came in
gratifying numbers to be enrolled in the new
school. The epidemic of infantile paralysis
which became virulent a short time there-
after reduced our growing registration during
the remainder of the summer to the average
small number of sixty, with five classes and
two teachers.
The reopening of the school after the Holy-
days in the Fall under more normal condi-
tions demonstrated the eagerness of parents
and children to avail themselves of the op-
portunity offered.

Growth
The rapid growth of the school from the
commencement of the Fall term on October


22, 1916, is shown by the following sum-
mary of the enrollment:
By the'end of the first week 112 pupils
were attending 9 classes with 3 teachers.
By the end of the second week 210
pupils were attending 12 classes with 3
teachers.
By the end of the first month 430
pupils were attending 16 classes with 4
teachers.
By December 1, 1916, 500 pupils were
attending 20 classes with 5 teachers.
Since that date, but with fluctuations from
time to time resulting from withdrawals-
which are due to many causes and are espe-
cially numerous at the close of a term and
during Jewish holiday periods, as at Pass-
over and in the Fall-the enrollment has re-
mained in the neighborhood of. 500. This
represents our capacity with our present
schedule of hours and our present equip-
ment of five classrooms and an equal number
of teachers.


Register
The following table shows the register on
May 9, 1917, in the second term of the school
year 1916-1917, by which time the school
was running smoothly on the present basis.
On that day the enrollment was precisely
500.
Attention is called to the large percentage
of pupils who entered our school without
any previous religious instruction. Sixty-six
pupils came to us without previous instruc-
tion except that which they had received in
a Sunday school conducted under our aus-
pices before the opening of our present
school. This Sunday school held its sessions
in the London Casino, a hall not far from
our present location. The large percentage
of girls attending our school, in a neighbor-
hood in which the religious education of
girls is sadly neglected, is also significant.


Total Per cent Per cent Total
May 9, 1917 Register Boys Girls Boys Girls Per cent

Actually attending. ... 500 281 219 56.2% 43.8%
Without previous in-
struction ........... 246 10R 188' 38.4% ".. 49.2%,
Without previous in- 312 134 178 476 81.6 62.4
struction except Lon- % 1 % %/o
don Casino ........ 6 26) 40) 9.2% 18.% 13.2%


1917]


8283








8284


FORTY-FOURTH A


Accommodations
The school occupies an unused two-story
church building which we have rented for
this purpose. We have divided the ground
floor into five classrooms, a school office and
pupils' waiting room and a teachers' room.
The auditorium on the upper floor is used
for school assembly purposes, as well as for
school entertainments, for entertainments
given by the Ezra Hebrew School Parents'
Association and for services conducted on
Sabbaths and holidays by the Ezra People's
Synagog. The property includes two large
plots of ground, lying to right and left of the
building, which afford ample playground
space for our pupils.

Sessions
The school meets five times a week. The
classes have sessions lasting one hour, with
an additional half hour assembly period on
Sunday morning.
In the second term there were twenty
classes meeting in five shifts. Three classes
met from 9 to 10 A. M., two classes from
10:40 to 11:40 A. M., and fifteen classes from
3:10 to 6:10 P. M. The morning classes
were made up of pupils attending the public
schools on part-time. Later in the term a
special Bar Mitzvah class was added, meet-
ing from 6:10 to 7:10 P. M. In compliance
with the wishes of the parents, the school is
closed at noon on Friday, the afternoon
classes meeting on Sunday morning instead
of on Friday afternoon.
During the summer term, the public schools
being closed, the sessions were held in the
morning.

The Staff
The school staff consists of a registrar and
five teachers, an attendance investigator and
two tuition collectors. The investigator and


ANNUALL REPORT [OCTOBER

collectors are college students giving part-
time to this work. The attendance investi-
gator visits the homes of pupils absent for
one week without known cause, of irregular
and of habitually late pupils, on information
furnished regularly each week by the teach-
ers. This plan has resulted in a high stand-
ard of attendance. As may be easily under-
stood, it took considerable time to bring this
system of investigation to the point of effi-
ciency, so that its beneficial results did not
become marked until the middle of the sec-
ond term.
The administrative, as well as the curricu-
lum and teaching staff of the school, have
been under the general supervision of the
Central Office.

Attendance
The two regular terms, commencing after
the Fall Holydays and on the first Sunday
in February respectively, correspond to the
two terms of the public school year. In
addition we kept the school open throughout
the summer, following the custom of schools
in that neighborhood. Owing to the fact
that many children leave the city for vaca-
tions lasting one or two weeks, or are sent
away for the same purpose by philanthropic
organizations, the attendance during the
summer is somewhat less regular than dur-
ing the two regular terms.
The following table shows the average
weekly attendance during the second term,
namely, from February 4 to June 29, 1917.
Owing to the readjustment of classes inci-
dental to the commencement of a new term,
no accurate attendance record could be kept
during the first week of the term (week of
February 4). It usually takes two or three
weeks after the beginning of a term until
the enrollment and attendance become
normal.


Average Weekly Attendance
Register
February 11 to June 29.............................. 461
Lowest average, week of February 11.................. 419
Highest average, week of June 3 ...................... 508


Tuition Fees
The parents of our pupils are conforming
with the Jewish traditional practice of pay-
ing for the religious education of their chil-
dren wherever possible. Children whose


parents are unable to pay are admitted free.
We have been admitting free pupils up to
twenty-five per cent of the total enrollment.
So far it has not been necessary to turn
away any pupil through inability to pay for


Present
391
.311
467


Per cent.
84.9
74.3
92.0








DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION


instruction. We have extended a welcome
to all who came, so that only unwillingness
on the part of parent or child could exclude
any child from our school. On the other
hand, we have insisted on payment wherever
payment could be made, and have instituted
a system of investigation of doubtful cases
in the homes for the purpose of keeping the
number of pay pupils and the rate of pay-
ment at as high a level as the circumstances


of the people would justify. Owing to
the poverty in the neighborhood, tuition
in the large majority of cases must be col-
lected weekly. This accounts for the com-
paratively high cost of collecting, which aver-
ages about fifteen per cent.
The following digest gives the details
under this head. The figures are based on
the register of May 9, 1917, given above.


Digest of Payments, May 9, 1917


Total Pupils
500


Pay Pupils
380


Rate
Paying 25c per week
20c "
15c "
10c "
$1.00 per month
80c "
60c "
50c "
40c "


Amount
Per Week
$68.60


Free Pupils
120


Per cent. Free Pupils


Number
119
24
100
83
37


Per cent.
31.3
6.3
26.3
21.8
9.7


Average Total Collected for Cost of Collecting
Per Pupil Four Weeks to May 4 Same Period


$231.60


$33.60


Per cent.
Cost
14.5%


Curriculum
The classes which were conducted during
the past year represent four years of work.
Our plans contemplate a seven or eight
years' course, the classes of the years suc-
ceeding the fourth'to be added as the pupils
in our present highest grade progress.
The general plan of instruction and the
outline of curriculum for the first four years
are given below.

General Plan
Hebrew. The Hebrew language is taught
for the specific purpose of enabling the pupil
to read the traditional Prayerbook and the
Hebrew Bible in the original, selections for
reading and translation being made to keep
pace with the progress of the pupil. This
is supplemented later with selected passages
from other Hebrew literature, such as Pirke
Aboth (Sayings of the Fathers).
Jewish History. The course in history
contemplates covering the entire range of


Jewish history and continuing through the
post-biblical, mediaeval and modern periods
to the present day. The Bible itself is the
textbook for the Biblical narratives, ample
time being afforded to cover the whole of
the Biblical material. The object is to impart
a thorough instead of a fragmentary knowl-
edge of the Bible. The instruction in the
later Jewish history is confined to a general
survey covering the most important events
and personages.
Religion. A continuous emphasis of the
moral values of all the instruction given in
the other branches. Practical ethics with
special reference to the daily conduct of the
children. The duties of good citizenship.
The Jewish holidays and the religious prac-
tices and duties pertaining thereto. Incul-
cation of other religious habits, such as
morning and evening prayers, Grace at meals,
etc., including the memorization of the ritual
forms for such practices. Systematic teach-
ing of the principles of Judaism in the higher
grades.


1917]


8285







FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


Outline by Grades
First year. Hebrew. Elements of Hebrew
reading; reading and translation of selections
from the Prayerbook.
History. The Biblical narratives from Cre-
ation through Samuel, with special emphasis
on the moral implications.
Religion. Ethics of every day conduct;
Jewish holidays and home practices ex-
plained; selected prayers and benedictions
from the Prayerbook with interpretation.
Second year. Hebrew. Daily prayers
translated and interpreted; reading and trans-
lation of selected passages from the book
of Genesis.
History. The Biblical narratives from the
Kingdom through the first Exile.
Religion. Ethical and religious instruc-
tion along the same lines as above.
Third year. Hebrew. Translation and in-
terpretation of the Prayerbook continued; se-
lections from the Pentateuch with practice
in sight reading and translation.
History. From the Return to the destruc-
tion of the second Temple.
Religion. Ethical instruction along the
same lines as above; ethical principles based
on Pirke Aboth; Jewish beliefs based on the
thirteen creeds of Maimonides.
Fourth year. Hebrew. Translation and in-
terpretation of the Prayerbook continued; se-
lections from the Pentateuch with practice in
sight reading and translation as above, to-
gether with easy passages from the Com-
mentators.
History. From the Dispersion through the
Talmudic period.


Religion. Ethical instruction as above;
fundamentals of Jewish belief and practices;
the Synagog and its services; the Prayers
with reference to time and purpose.

Supplementary School Activities
In addition to the class work, all pupils
have a weekly assembly period on Sunday
morning lasting half an hour and consisting
of Jewish songs and prayers, appropriate
recitations and musical numbers by pupils
of alternate classes and a moral lesson or
sermonette. The floor of our auditorium,
seating three hundred persons, is too small
to accommodate the whole school at one
time. Pupils accordingly attend the assembly
period in two shifts.
From time to time school entertainments
are held to which the parents and friends of
the pupils are invited. These entertainments
are usually given in commemoration of the
Jewish holidays, as at Hanukkah, Purim and
Shabuoth. On such occasions the program
is given entirely by the pupils of the school,
under the direction of the school staff. Owing
to the limited capacity of the auditorium
each entertainment has to be given twice,
usually on Saturday evening for the parents
and on Sunday morning for the pupils. The
auditorium balcony takes care of the over-
flow.
Four school clubs made up of groups of
pupils of various ages were organized for the
purpose of promoting the moral and social
development of our pupils in other ways
than in the classroom. These clubs have met
on Sunday afternoons and have been con-
ducted under the direction of four of the
teachers as follows:


'School Clubs
Membership


Name


Purpose


Daughters of Ezra........... Girls over 12 years of age...........Social and Cultural
Youths of Ezra.............. Boys 11 to 13 years of age .........Literary and Athletic
Ezra Dramatic Club......... Girls 10 to 12 years of age..........Dramatic and Literary
Shoshanath Ezra..............Girls 8 to 10 years of age...........Mothers' Help


The Parents' Association
The Ezra Hebrew School Parents' Asso-
ciation was organized on March 24, 1917.
This association holds regular meetings twice
a month and corresponds in a general way
to the parents' associations of the public
schools. It fulfills two important functions.
On the one hand it represents the interest


and cooperation of the parents in the work
which the school is actually doing, and on
the other hand it keeps the administrative
staff in touch with the wishes and aims of
the parents themselves.
The Parents' Association has already been
of great assistance in many directions, such
as visiting the school, cooperating with the


[OCTOBER


8286








DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION


teachers in improving attendance and class
work, taking charge of the social features of
school entertainments, providing clothing for
needy children in the school and in general
representing the desires of the parents with
regard to the policy and management of the
school. From time to time public meetings
are held, at which some form of entertain-
ment is provided, for the promotion of socia-
bility among the parents and others inter-
ested in the success of the school. The Ezra
Hebrew School Local Committee is usually
represented at these gatherings.

Supervision
The school has been operating under the
constant supervision of the Central Office.
This supervision has concerned itself prin-
cipally with three things: the attendance,
the curriculum and the standard and method
of instruction. The two former have already
been dealt with in detail in this report. The
hst mentioned, which related to the import-
ant task of securing efficiency in the teaching
staff, has been given the largest amount of
time and attention, as it should be.
Teachers' meetings have been held from
time to time for the purpose of comparing
experiences and of securing a desired meas-
ure of uniformity in the scope, standard and
method of instruction. Many of the prac-
tical details of the curriculum have been


worked out at these meetings. Periodic
visits have been made to all of the classes
by the directing head to study the work of
the teachers at close range. These visits
have been followed by conferences with indi-
vidual teachers and by discussions of im-
portant classroom problems at subsequent
teachers' meetings. Where there are two or
more classes in one grade, the teachers of
these classes have held separate meetings
to standardize the requirements and subject-
matter of instruction in that grade. Our
work is still too new to have fixed grade
requirements or definite regulations with re-
gard to the subject-matter of instruction,
such as have been developed in the course
of time in the public schools. It has there-
fore seemed best to allow the'teachers to
work out many of the details themselves,
under the supervision of the directing head.
Reading courses in Jewish history and ethics,
along the lines of the instruction given in
the classroom, have been prescribed for all
teachers.

THE COST OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
The cost of the school during the second
term, a period of five months extending from
February 4 to June 29, will give a fairly ac-
curate idea of the average cost of operation
on the present basis. The figures are given
below.


Expenditures of Ezra Hebrew School-February 4 to June 29, 1917
Rent .............................................................. ... ....... $ 500.00
Salaries of Registrar and Five Teachers..................................... 1,640.20
Collection of Tuition. ..................................................... 152.15
Home Investigation in connection with Tuition Payments ....................... 8.75
Attendance Investigation ...................................................... 14.44
Desks, Blackboards and Other Equipment.... ................................. 244.49
Stationery and Office Supplies............................................... 31.64
Printing .................................... ................ .. .......... 46.97
School Books ........................................................... 69.19
Heat and Light ......................... ....... ............................ 77.30
Janitor. .................................. ................................ 158.78

Total ....... ...... .... ........................................... $2,943.91

The average registration for the same pe- the receipts from tuition are derived from
riod was 461, making the cost for each child the sale of textbooks. Pupils whose parents
for the five months' term $6.39 or approxi- can not afford to pay for their books receive
mately $15 per year. This does not include the free use of textbooks, owned by the
supervision, which is included in the cost of school for that purpose. The receipts from
the Central Office. tuition and sale of books paid 36.1 per cent
The only receipts from the parents besides of the cost of the school, as is shown below:


1917]


8287








FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT


Net Cost-February 4 to June 29,
Refunded Refund Books
by Tuition Sale ofed from
$1034.45 $29.00


1917
Refunded
Per cent.
36.1%


Financial Statement-November
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
The total cost of the school for the fiscal
year from November 1, 1916, to October 31,
1917, was $7,535.40. The cost of the Central
Office during the same period was $4,867.37.
The cost of Holiday Services in the school
building, which amounted to $734.68, was
more than counterbalanced by the receipts
from sale of seats, totaling $1,007.50.


1, 1916, to October 31, 1917
The total receipts from all sources were
$7,809.42. The total expenditures were
$13,137.45, leaving a deficit of $5,328.03,
which has been advanced 'by the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations from its
national treasury. A campaign to raise addi-
tional funds in New York City is under way
at the present time.
The details of receipts and disbursements
are given below:


RECEIPTS
Contributions Collected ................................... ................$ 4,212.50
Tuition, Ezra Hebrew School............................................... 2,473.76
Sale of Books, Ezra Hebrew School ........................................ 68.66
Ezra People's Synagog (Heat, Light and Janitor Expense) .................... 47.00
Holyday Services ...... ................................................ 1,007.50

Total .................................,.................... ......... $ 7,809.42

DISBURSEMENTS
Rent ................................................................. $ 949.98
Telephone ...................... .......................................... 74.55
Office Furniture .................................................................... 17.60
Stationery and Office Supplies................................................. 215.49
Postage and Telegram ...................................................... 113.58
Expressage .......... ................................................... .. 2.21
Office Salaries .... .. ......................................... ............ 3,465.06
Carfare and Miscellane nus.............. ................................... 28.90
Ezra Hebrew School ............... ....... .......... ..... ........... 7,535.40
Holiday Services .. ......................................... ............ 734.68

Total ......... ................... .................................. $13,137.45
Respectfully submitted,
DAVID LEVENTRITT,
Chairman.
IRVING LEHMAN,
Vice-Chairman.


8288


Gross Cost

$2,943.91


[OCTOBER


Net Cost

$1,880.46











ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

Board of Editors of Religious School Literature


To the Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension:
Gentlemen:-On behalf of the Board of
Editors of Religious School Literature, I beg
to report that five new publications have been
issued during the past year:
The Faith of Israel, by Dr. H. G. Enelow.
A Confirmation Manual for children
of confirmation age and for adult
study circles.
The Enemies of Israel, by Louis Broido.
A Hanukkah Fantasy in one act.
Hebrew Manual, by Rabbi Max Reichler.
This volume serves as an introduction
to the Prayerbook. It is published
both in the form of Pupil's and Teach-
er's Textbook, and also a Set of Per-
ception Cards.

READY FOR PUBLICATION
Kindergarten Manual, by Eva Landman.
This Manual is published in the form
of a Teacher's Textbook with illustra-
tive stories, poems, songs, games and
directions for dramatization and hand-
work.
Kindergarten Pupil's Portfolios and Pictures,
by Eva Landman.
A set of five Pupil's Portfolios and
twenty-seven Pictures to be used in
connection with a Kindergarten Man-
ual.
A number of manuscripts have been pre-
sented from time to time. Several of these
are ready for publication pending certain
changes.
Selections from Talmudic Literature, by Jen-
nie Reizenstein.
Jewish Post-Biblical History through Great
Personalities, by Adele Bildersee.
The Book of Genesis, by Dr. Julian Morgen-
stern.


Reconstructed Bible Text (to accompany
Teacher's on the Stories of Genesis), by
Dr. Julian Morgenstern.

A number of other'volumes have been con-
tracted for by the Board of Editors and are
in preparation at the present time.
History of the Jews in America, by Albert M.
Friedenberg.
Talmudic Reader, by Dr. Jacob Z. Lauterbach.
Jewish Holiday Book, by Rabbi David Lef-
kowitz.
Bible Game, by Rabbi Louis Witt.
Jewish History from the Exile to the De-
struction.
First Collaborator, Dr. Henry Eng-
lander. Second Collaborator, Esther
Godshaw.
The Genesis Stories-A Teacher's Manual, by
Elsa Weihl.
Reconstructed Bible Reader-Saul to the
Exile, by Rabbi Jacob D. Schwarz.

It has been planned to publish a Year Book
of Jewish State Teachers' Associations, giv-
ing a Directory of Organizations, Programs
of Meetings and the like. A considerable
amount of material has already been sub-
mitted for this purpose, but owing to national
conditions very few State Conventions are
being held at present, and it has therefore
been decided to postpone publication.
In placing its office facilities at our dis-
posal, the Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension has considerably lightened
the work of the Board of Editors. We desire
to express our appreciation of the assistance
which has always been readily accorded us
and to offer our thanks to the Department for
its cordial cooperation.
Respectfully submitted,
DAVID PHILIPSON,
Chairman.










ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE


Tract Commission


To the Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension:
Gentlemen:-The Joint Tract Commission
of the Union of American Hebrew Congre-
gations and the Central'Conference of Amer-
ican Rabbis begs to submit its annual report.
In accordance with its usual practice the
Tract Commission has published during the


past year a Set of Holiday Sermons, a Holi-
day Calendar and a series of Holiday Press
Notices under the auspices of sub-committees
of the Tract Commission appointed for these
purposes.
The Holiday Sermon Pamphlet for 5677
published in August, 1917, contained the fol-
lowing sermons:


The New Year's Offering ................ Rev. Dr. Rudolph Grossman, New York.
Life ................................. Rev. Dr. J. Leonard Levy, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Religion's Appeal to History.............. Rev. Dr. Joseph Rauch, Louisville, Ky.
Light Ahead...................... ...... Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa.
Atonement and the Call from Within........Rabbi Leo M. Franklin, Detroit, Mich.
The Future of Our Jewish Religion......... Rev. Dr. H. H. Mayer, Kansas City, Mo.
The Symbolism of the Succah............. Rabbi Samuel S. Cohon, Chicago. Ill.
Conclusion or Beginning-Which?.........Rabbi M. M. Eichler, Boston, Mass.
The Meaning of Passover .................Rev. Dr. Alfred G. Moses, Mobile, Ala.
The Song of Moses ......................Rabbi Louis D. Gross, Wheeling, W. Va.
The Revelation .................. ........Rabbi Harry Weiss, Macon, Ga.
Loyalty .................................Rabbi Sidney S. Tedesche, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Is the Jew Different? ....................Rabbi David Fichman, Monroe, La.


Twelve hundred copies were distributed.
Fourteen Holiday Notices, prepared by Dr.
.Harry W. Ettelson and Rabbi Solomon Free-
hof, were distributed to the Jewish weeklies
and to morning and evening daily newspapers
in cities where Jews reside. The Commis-
sion has received many letters indicating the
wide use made of these notices by the gen-
eral press.
A Jewish Holiday Calendar, for the use of
school superintendents and the heads of in-
stitutions where there were Jewish inmates,
was printed and widely distributed.
We cooperated with the National Bureau
for Food Conservation by including sermon
material on this subject in our sermon
pamphlet and by furnishing five hundred ad-
ditional copies of this material in pamphlet
form for distribution by the bureau.
Your Committee had hoped to report the
publication of two tracts, "What Do, Jews
Believe?" by Dr. H. G. Enelow, and "The


Jew in America," by Dr. David Philipson,
and had arranged for the publication of a
tract on "Jewish Ethics," by Dr. Samuel
Schulman. As it has been impossible to se-
cure second-class mailing rates up to the
present time, the publication of these tracts
has been necessarily delayed.
The requirements of the United States Gov-
ernment for securing second-class mailing
rates may be complied with, however, if the
tracts be published as a quarterly magazine
with a regular list of subscribers.
In order to meet these demands on the
part of the postal authorities, the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations and the
National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods
have provided in their respective constitu-
tions that $.05 be appropriated from the an-
nual dues of each member as a subscription
to the Jewish Educational Tracts. A. sub-
scription list is thus provided for and your
Committee confidently hopes to secure the









DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION


requisite postal privileges and to proceed
with the publication of tracts during the com-
ing year.
Sixty thousand copies of the tracts are to
be published by the Union of American He-
brew Congregations and the National Fed-
eration of Temple Sisterhoods. These will
be mailed first to the members of the two
organizations and afterwards to the general
public in the shape of gift copies according
to a plan that shall be determined by the
Tract Commission.
Although only a limited number of sub-
jects are under consideration at present, the
Tract Commission contemplates issuing tracts
covering a wide range of subjects and dealing
with such general themes as Jewish History,
Religion, Modern Jewish Problems, Ceremo-
nials, Literature, Education, etc. It is ex-


pected that the distribution of pamphlets of
this nature will constitute an effective means
for public enlightenment and will prove of
valuable assistance in the educational work
of the Union.
In closing, the thanks of the Tract Com-
mission are extended to the members of the
Board of Managers of Synagog and School
Extension for the interest they have always
manifested in our work and the generous
support they have given to our enterprise.
Respectfully submitted,
EMIL G. HIRSCH,
Chairman.
JULIAN MORGENSTERN,
Vice Chairman.
GEORGE ZEPIN,
Secretary.







The Work of the
Supervisors and
Deputies of
Synagog Extension













The Work of the Supervisors and Deputies of


Synagog Extension



DISTRICT No. 1.
Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts. Supervisor, Harry Levi, Boston, Mass.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN METROPOLITAN CENTERS.
Boston, Mass.-Department of Synagog and National Federation of Temple Sister-
School Extension in cooperation with the hoods, assisted in the maintenance of a
free Religious School.

JEWISH SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.
Boston, Mass.-Marines at Charleston Navy
Yard attended Public Seder conducted by
Rabbi Harry Levi.

SUMMER SERVICES.
Cedar Crest, Maine-10 Services. Conducted Kennebunkport, Mnine-5 Services. Con-
by Rabbi Jos. Gorflnkle, Mt. Vernon, New ducted by Rabbis Harry Levi, Boston,
York. Mass.; L. Bernstein, St. Joseph, Mo.
Kohut, Oxford, Maine-10 Services. Conducted
by Mr. G. A. Kohut.

DISTRICT No. 2.
Connecticut, Rhode Island.
JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Hartford, Conn.-Trinity College. Students students to meet Jews of New Haven.
mostly from Hartford.' Rabbi Harry Et- Cooperated with Menorah Society. Some
telson, cooperated with the "Agudath of the students teach in religious schools.
Rayim" an organization of Jewish Stu- Providence, R. I.-Brown University. Rabbi
dents, gave them the use of the Temple Sidney Tedesche, while at Providence,
Vestry rooms; invited them to a Supper. organized and conducted a study circle.
New Haven, Conn.-Yale University. Rabbi During the course of the year he visited
Louis Mann organized and conducted a the institution ten times. Students were
study circle. Students invited to attend entertained at a reception. Came regu-
all services. Annual reception given to larly to Alumni meetings and to services.

SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN METROPOLITAN CENTERS.
New Haven, Conn.-Department of Synagog terhoods, assisted in the maintenance of
and School Extension in cooperation with a free Religious School.
the National Federation of Temple Sis-


DISTRICT No. 3.
Northern New York. Supervisor, Rabbi Horace J. Wolf, Rochester, N. Y.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Rome, N. Y.-Vlsited by Rabbi Horace Wolf, Utica, N. Y.-Rabbi Horace Wolf, Rochester,
Rochester, N. Y., who organized Reli- N. Y., visited and organized school.
gious School. School in charge of Dr. M. Placed a competent teacher at its head.
Levitan.
JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Rochester, N. Y.-University of Rochester. Syracuse, N. Y.-Syracuse University. Col-
Students have been organized into a cir- legiate Society very active under Dr.
cle to unite them more closely. Are Adolph Guttman's supervision. Dr. Gutt-
studying various Jewish problems. A mann kept in personal touch with all the
number joined the Temple Bible Class students.
and attended services.
JEWISH SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.
Plattsburg. N. Y.-Rev. J. Lubin, of Platts- ment of Synagog and School Extension
burg, N. Y., conducted religious services sent Hymnals and reprints of the Sabbath
in the Military Training Camp. Depart- and Holiday Union Prayerbooks.

DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Dannemora, N. Y.-State Prison. All Welfare quest 'the Department of Synagog and
work in charge of Rabbi S. Yudelson, School Extension sent leaflet reprints of
Chaplain, who visited once a week and the Union Prayerbook.
held services twice a month. At his re-








8296 FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [OCTOBER

DETECTIVES IN INSTITUTIONS.
Dannemora, N. Y.-Dannemora State Hos- Rome, N. Y.-Rome State Custodial Asylum.
pital. Rabbi Jacob Lubin, of Platts- Rabbi A. Blum, New York, conducted
burg, N. Y., cooperated with the Jewish monthly services. The Department of
Protectory and Aid Society and other Synagog and School Extension sent re-
societies in providing for the Jewish prints of the Union Prayerbook.
patients. Rabbi Lubin conducted serv- Syracuse, N. Y.-Syracuse State Institution
ices on Holidays. for Feeble-Minded Children. Rabbi
Ray Brook, N. Y.-New York State Hospital Adolph Guttman arranged for Passover
for Incipient Tuberculosis. Rabbi J. needs of the inmates. Women of the
Lubin visited the Hospital monthly. Congregation prepared a special Seder
Under his supervision the inmates held service.
a Seder service. Through his efforts Utica, N. Y.-Utica State Hospital. Rabbi A.
various delicacies were furnished. Blum of New York cared for Spiritual
Welfare of the inmates.

SUMMER SERVICES.
Sehroon Lake Camp, Sehroon Lake, N. Y.- Woodmere Camp, Sehroon Lake, N. Y.-1
3 Services. Conducted by Rabbi Dr. Service. Conducted by Dr. Abram Simon,
Simon, Washington, D. C. Washington, D. C.
Lake Placid, N. Y.-6 Services. Conducted
Mondawanin Camp, Schroon Lake, N. Y.-1 by Dr. Stephen S. Wise, New York City.
Service. Conducted by Dr. Abram Simon, Wingdale, N. Y.-9 Services. Conducted by
Washington, D. C. Mr. Irving Reichert, Hebrew Union Col-
lege Student.

DISTRICT No. 4.
Northwestern New York. Supervisor, Rabbi Louis J. Kopald, Buffalo, N. Y.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Olenn-The Religious School reports a very has been in correspondence with them
successful year under the leadership of during the three years the school has
Mr. B. M. Marcus of Clean. The Depart- been in existence.
ment of Synagog and School Extension

JEWISII COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Ithaca, N. Y.-Cornell University. Rabbi Alfred, N. Y.-New York State School of
Louis J. Kopald, Buffalo, N. Y., visited Agriculture. Rabbi Louis Kopald, Buf-
the university and addressed the stu- falo, N. Y., invited 'the students to the
dents' congregation. He has arranged congregational Seder.
next year's program of speakers for the
student Congregation.
DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Auburn, N. Y.-State Prison. Mr. Max Thal- Seder at the prison. Rabbi Horace Wolf
heimer, Chief Probation Officer of Syra- was instrumental in collecting money for
cause has been very active assisting a Pesach Fund. A number of Jewish
Rabbi Adolph Guttman in providing for students from Syracuse University co-
the Welfare of the Jewish inmates of operated with Rabbi Guttman in con-
this prison. Rabbi Guttman held serv- ducting bi-monthly services.
ices on all the holidays and conducted a

DETECTIVES IN INSTITUTIONS.
Newark, N. .Y.-State Custodial Asylum for Willard. N. Y.-Willard State Hospital. Rabbi
Feeble-Minded Women. Rabbi J. Wolf, A. Blum sent matzoth to patients on Pass-
visited monthly. Arranged to have mat- over. Department of Synagog and School
zoth sent for Passover. Extension provided reprints of the Union
Prayerbook.

SUMMER SERVICES.
Ronah-on-Lake George, Glen Eyrie. N. Y.- Klein; S. Spectorsky, and Miss S. Sel-
10 Services. Conducted by Drs. S. Peyser; minski.
E. A. Lowe; A. Rosenberg; Messrs. M.

DISTRICT No. 5.
New Jersey. Supervisor, Dr. Henry Berkowitz, Philadelphia, Pa.
JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Princeton, N. J.-Princeton University. Rabbi Rabbi Jacobs visited the university oc-
Harry K. Jacobs organized a study circle casionally, keeping in close touch with
and personally conducted it. Many of the the students.
students attend services at his Temple.

DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Trenton, N. J.-State Home for Girls. Rabbi congregation gave a supper to the Jewish
Harry K. Jacobs held occasional services. inmates of the prison and provided mat-
Trenton, N. J.-State Prison. Rabbi Harry zoth.
K. Jacobs, held services on High-Holidays Rahway. N. J.-State Reformatory. Rabbi
and made bi-monthly visits to the prison. S. Foster, Newark, N. J., arranged for
At the suggestion of Rabbi Jacobs, the services during the Holidays.









DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION


8297


DETECTIVES IN INSTITUTIONS.
Skillman, N. J.-New York State Village for Trenton, N. J.-New Jersey School for the
Epileptics. Rabbi Harry K. Jacobs of Deaf. Rabbi Harry K. Jacobs instructed
Trenton, N. J., visited frequently during children in Biblical History and in the
the year and conducted services. Jewish Religion.



DISTRICT No. 6.
Eastern Pennsylvania. Supervisor, Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.


Carbondale-Rabbi Meyer Lovitch, Scranton,
Pa., visited. Plans to organize school
and conduct fortnightly services.
Forest City-Rabbi Meyer Lovitch, Scranton,
Pa., organized a Sunday School.
Hazelton-For .ten years, Rabbi M. Salzman,
Wilkesbarre, Pa., has held services and
supervised the Religious School. Hazel-
ton has just erected a Synagog and has
elected Rabbi Montague N. A. Cohen as
its spiritual leader.
Honesdale-Visited monthly by Rabbi M. Salz-
man, Wilkesbarre, Pa. For three years,
Rabbi Salzman has held services and had
the Religious School under his supervi-
sion.
Lehighton-Rabbi Jacob Tarshish; Allentown,
Pa., one visit. Addressed meeting on
project to organize Congregation.


Pittston-Rabbi Marcus Salzman, Wilkes-
barre, Pa., formed study circle, and con-
ducted services occasionally. School of
25 children supervised by Rabbi Salz-
man for nine years.
Sunbury-Rabbi Charles J. Freund, while
rabbi at Harrisburg, Pa., visited. Com-
munity now has rabbi.
Pottsville-Rabbi Julius Frank, Reading, Pa.,
kept in touch with adult study circle
organized last year. Also assisted in
Religious School work.
Northampton and Siegfried, Pa.-Visited by
Rabbi J. Tarshish, Allentown, Pa., who
conducts Religious School and study
circle.
Nanticoke-Rabbi Salzman organized a
school, and visited once a month.


SUMMER SERVICES.
Poconos, Pa-7 Services. Conducted by Rabbi
Marcus Salzman, Wilkesbarre, Pa.



DISTRICT No. 7.
Western Pennsylvania. Supervisor, Dr. J. Leonard Levy, Pittsburgh, Pa.*
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Cresson-Rabbi Moses J. S. Abels of Altoona, Sharon-The Religious School, organized last
Pa., in touch with the five Jewish fam- year by Rabbi I. E. Philo, Youngstown,
ilies of Cresson. Teacher and class of Ohio, has had another successful year
twelve children visited .school at Altoona under his guidance.
periodically.
Johnstown-Rabbi Moses J. S. Abels, Altoona, Huntingdon-Rabbi Moses Abels, Altoona,
Pa., visited the Religious School main- Pa., who organized Religious School for
trained by community; confirmed its first 15 children last year, has kept in touch
class on Shebuoth. with the school throughout the year.

JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
State College, Pa.-Pennsylvania State Col- visited the college 3 times during the
lege. Rabbi M. J. Ables, of Altoona, Pa., year and-conducted a Study Circle.

DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Huntingdon, Pa.-Pennsylvania State Re- baton to Rabbi Abels. Mr. Edward
formatory. Rabbi Moses J. S. Abels, Al- Hemple, Pittsburg, Pa., conducted serv-
toona, Pa., visited Huntingdon period- ices on Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur.
ically. Prayerbooks provided by Depart- Mr. Hemple reports progress in a few
ment of Synagog and School Extension. formerly incorrigible youths.
At the instance of Rabbi Abels, the local
Council of Jewish Women provided books Allegheny, Pa.-Western Penitentiary. The
and magazines for the inmates and Mrs. inmates observed the festivals and from
Isaac Blank. of Huntingdon, sent them time to time were addressed by Rabbis of
matzos. Two boys released under pro- Pittsburgh.

DETECTIVES IN INSTITUTIONS.
Cresson, Pa.-Cresson Sanitorium. Rabbi fruit and magazines. At the suggestion
Moses J. S. Abels of Altoona, Pa., has of Rabbi Abels, a number of Big Sisters
been active in providing for the needs have become interested in the girls at
and comfort of the Jewish patients of the institution. The Council of Jewish
this institution. On Thanksgiving day Women of Altoona provided matzoth dur-
members of his congregation sent them ing Passover.

* Deceased.


1917]








8298 FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [OCTOBER

DISTRICT No. 8.
Delaware. Supervisor, Rabbi Charles A. Rubenstein, Baltimore, Md.
JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Newark, Delaware-Delaware Cllege. Rabbi ices. Plans to make these services a per-
Charles A. Rubenstein conducted serv- manent institution at the college.


DISTRICT No. 9.
Maryland.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN METROPOLITAN CENTERS.
Baltimore. Md.-Department of Synagog and hoods, assisted in the maintenance of a
School Extension in cooperation with the free Religious School.
National Federation of Temple Sister-

JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Baltimore, Md.-University of Maryland. Goucher College, Maryland School of Law
Rabbi Morris Lazaron reports that on and John Hopkins University. Four of
the roll of his Junior Bible Class are 30 the young men conducted services at a
students of the University of Maryland, local home for Jewish Working Girls.

DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Jessups, Mwd.-Maryland House of Correction. Department of Synagog and School Ex-
Social Service Committee of Council of tension furnished leaflet reprints of
Jewish Women, of Baltimore, arranged Union Prayerbook.
services for Jewish girls in reformatory.


DISTRICT No. 10.
West Virginia, Western Maryland. Supervisor, Dr. William Rosenau, Baltimore, Md.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Martinsbure, W. Va.-Rabbi Morris Baron of Frostburg, Md.-Rabbi Morris Barron, of
Cumberland, Md., supervised, through Cumberland, Md., reports very satisfac-
correspondence, the Religious School or- tory work being done in Religiout School
ganized last year. which he organized two years ago.

DISTRICT No. 11.
North Carolina, Southern Virginia. Supervisor, Dr. Edward N. Calisch, Richmond, Va.
JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Chapel Hill, N. C.-University of North Caro- Greensboro, N. C.-Greensboro College for
lina. Rabbi Simon Cohen while at Women. The only Jewish student was
Greensboro, N. C., visited and interested invited by Rabbi S. Cohen to Passover
himself in the students. He invited them Services and Seder.
to Greensboro for Passover Services and
Seder and arranged weekly services to Greensboro, N. C.-State Normal School.
be conducted by the students. Jewish girls attended services on Fridays
Durham. N. C.-Trinity College. Visited by and during High Holy Days. All were
Rabbi S. Cohen in order to meet students invited to Passover Services and Seder
and invite them to services, by Rabbi S. Cohen. Two taught in Re-
Hickory, N. C.-Lenoir College. Rabbi Simon ligious School.
Cohen in touch with Jewish students.

JEWISH SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.
Charlotte, N. C.-Rabbi Solomon Philo ar- leaflet reprints of the Union Prayer
ranged for weekly religious services at Book in accordance with an arrangement
Military Training Camp. Department of with the Central Conference of Ameri-
Synagog and School Extension provided can Rabbis.
SUMMER SERVICES.
Ocean View. Va.-6 Services. Conducted by
Rabbi Harry Merfeld, Greenville, Miss.


DISTRICT No. 12.
South Carolina, Northern Georgia. Supervisor, Rabbi David Marx, Atlanta, Ga.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
South Carolina.
neanfort-Visited by Rabbi Jacob Raisin, in the United States Marine Corps, while
Charleston, S. C., who aroused sentiment stationed at Paris Island, S. C., visited.
for services and Sabbath School. Fred Organized Religious School of 33 chil-
Rypins, a H. U. C. student who enlisted dren, and conducted weekly services.








DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION


Greenville-Congregation had weekly Sab-
bath services conducted by a layman.
Rabbi Jacob S. Raisin, Charleston, W.
Va., in touch with congregation.
Manning-Rabbi David Klein, Sumter, S. C.,
visited monthly to conduct services and
Religious School.,
Orangeburg-Rabbi Jacob S. Raisin of
Oharleston, S. C., visited once a month
to conduct services and supervise Relig-
ious School.


Spartanbnrg-Congregation organized last
year by Rabbi Jacob Raisin. Held week-
ly services. Had Hebrew Union College
student to officiate for the holidays.
Florence-Rabbi Jacob S. Raisin conducted
Religious School and held services
periodically.
Camden-Rabbi David Klein, Sumter, S. C.,
held services periodically.
Columbia-Visited by Rabbi Jacob Raisin of
Charleston, S. C.


Georgia.
West Point-Rabbi David Marx, Atlanta, Ga., Waynesboro-Rabbi Leo Reich, while at Au-
made occasional visits. Regular Friday gusta, Ga., organized study class for
evening services held 'by the Congrega- Post-Biblical History.
tion. Gainesville, Fla.-Rabbi Israel L. Kaplan,
Jacksonville, Fla., visited and organized
Religious School of 12 children.

JEWISH SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.
Charleston, S. C.-Rabbi Jacob S. Raisin in-
vited Jewish soldiers to Seder.

JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Columbia, S. C.-University of South Caro- Charleston, S. C.-The Citadel. Rabbi J. S.
lina. Rabbi Jacob S. Raisin of Charles- Raisin visited the College, and invited
ton, S. C., conducted services during year the Jewish boys to Seder.
and kept in touch with the Jewish stu-
dents. Charleston, S. C.-Porter Military Academy.
Charleston, S. C.-College of Charleston. Rabbi J. S. Raisin visited the Military
Rabbi J. S. Raisin, visited College. In- Academy and invited students to Seder.
vited men for services and Seder.


DELINQUENTS IN
Atlanta, Ga.-Federal Penitentiary. Serv-
ices held on High-Holidays by Mr. Fred
Heilbron who officiated at request of
Rabbi David Marx, Atlanta, Ga. Seder


INSTITUTIONS.
services, held under supervision of Rabbi
Marx were also conducted by Mr. Hell-
bron. Rabbi Marx visited Penitentiary
periodically.


DISTRICT No. 13.
Southern Georgia and Florida, except Western Florida. Supervisor, Rabbi George Solomon,
Savannah, Ga.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Georgia.
Bainbridge-Rabbi Edmund A. Landau, Al- Brunswick-Rabbi George Solomon, Savan-
bany, Ga., officiated fortnightly and su- nah, Ga., organized -and supervised Re-
pervised Religious School. Congregation ligious School for 29 children.
has erected a synagog at cost of $8,000.



DISTRICT No. 14.
Alabama, Western Florida. Supervisor, Morris Newfield, Birmingham, Ala.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Alabama.
Anniston-Rabbi M. Newfield, Birmingham, Troy-Visited monthly by Rabbi Bernard
Ala., conducted services periodically. Ehrenreich, Birmingham, Ala., who re-
Hebrew Union College student officiated organized and supervised Religious
on the Holidays. School.
Demopolis-Rabbi Isidore Isaacson, Selma, Marion-Rabbi Isidore Isaacson, Selma, Ala.,
Ala., visited once a month, visited once a month.
Tuscaloosa-Visited by Rabbi M. Newfield, Uniontown-Rabbi Isidore, Isaacson, Selma,
Birmingham, Ala. Ala., visited.

TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION.
Birmingham, Ala.-Second Annual Conven- of the staff of the Department of Syn-
tion of the Jewish Religious Education gog and School Extension, participated
Association of Alabama held December in the program. Department sent Re-
27-30. Mr. Barnett Brickner, a member ligious School Text Book Exhibit.


1917]


8299









8300 FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [OCTOBER

DISTRICT No. 15.
Southern Mississippi and Southeastern Louisiana. Supervisor, Dr. Max Heller.
DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Baton Rouge, La.-State Penitentiary. Local Baton Rouge, La.-Baton Rouge Parish Jail.
Sisterhood furnished Prayer Books, and The local Sisterhood furnished prayer-
baskets of delicacies. Arranged services books and baskets of delicacies to pris-
on holidays, owners. Arranged Holiday services.


DISTRICT No. 16.
Louisiana. Supervisor, Rabbi Emil W. Leipziger, New Orleans, La.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Crowley-Congregation and Religious School Lafayette-Visited monthly by Rabbi Joshua
now supervised by Rabbi Joshua Block, Block, Lake Charles, La. Organized
Lake Charles, La. school.

Southern and Western Louisiana. Supervisor, Rabbi W. Leipziger, New Orleans, La.
JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
New Orleans-Tulane University of Louisi- his Temple., Rabbi Heller lectured be-
ana. Rabbi Leipziger invited students fore Menorah and interested himself in
to services, providing them with seats in the students.


DISTRICT No. 17.
Texas and Northern Louisiana. Supervisor, Dr. Moses P. Jacobson, Shreveport, La.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Amarillo, Tex.-Rabbi George Fox, Fort Gainesville, Tex.-Rabbi C. George Fox, Fort
Worth, Texas, visited and organized Con- Worth, Tex., visited Gainesville and ad-
gregation. dressed Jewish residents.
Wichita Falls, Tex.-Rabbi George Fox, Ft.
Worth, Texas, visited monthly. Congre-
gation met weekly.

JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Ft. Worth, Tex.-Texas Christian University.
Rabbi Fox attended to the comfort of
the Jewish students for the Holidays.

DETECTIVES IN INSTITUTIONS.
Pineville, La.-Louisiana Hospital for the In- visited occasionally to provide for the
sane. Various rabbis of this district wants of the Jewish patients.


DISTRICT No. 18.
Southeastern Texas. Supervisor, Rabbi Henry Cohen, Galveston, Tex.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Brenham-Rabbi Wolf Willner, Houston, Orange-Visited monthly by Rabbi Samuel
Tex., visited and organized Religious Rosinger, Beaumont, Texas, who held
School of 4 classes, services and supervised Religious School.
Marlin-Rabbi I. Warsaw, tWaco, Texas, Rabbi Joshua Block, Lake Charles, La.,
visited Marlin fortnightly to conduct was Instrumental In organizing congre-
services and superintend Religious gation.
School. Permanent congregation organ-
ized. Citizens of Waco pledged them- Mart-Rabbi Isidore Warsaw, Waco, Texas,
selves to contribute money for purchas- visited community once a month. Chil-
ing lot in Marlin. dren went to Waco for Religious School
Navasota-Rabbi Rosinger, Beaumont, Tex., instruction.
organized Religious School. Porth Arthur-Rabbi Samuel Rosinger, Beau-
Bryan-Rabbi Barnstein visited Bryan and mont, Texas, established a Religious
addressed congregation. School, with enrollment of 30.

JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Austin, Texas-University of Texas. Rabbi Houston, Tex-Wm. M. Rice Institute. Rabbi
Harry Cohen, Galveston, Texas, arranged Henry Barnstein visited the Institute,
for Passover holidays for students. invited students to Alumni reception.
Bryan, Texas-Agriculture and Mechanical On Seder night all students were invited
College. Rabbi Henry Barnstein, Hous- to the home of Rabbi Barnstein.
ton, Tex., visited college and addressed Waco, Tex.-Baylor University. Rabbi Isidore
the students under the auspices of the Warsaw reports that students attend
Menorah Society. services and are active in Congrega-
tional life.










1917] DEPARTMENT OF SYNAGOO AND SCHOOL EXTENSION 8301

JEWISH SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.
El Paso, Tex.-At the suggestion of Rabbi Galveston, Texas.-Jewish soldiers invited to
Martin Zielonka, 60 Jewish soldiers were Passover services and to Seder.
invited to Seder in the homes of the Jews
of this city.
DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Gatesville, Texas.-State Institution for veston, Texas, arranged Passover observ-
Traning Juveniles. Rabbi David Gold- ance for inmates and provided matzoth.
berg, Corsicana, Tex., visited institution Weldon, Tex.-Convict Camp. (Eastham State
periodically. Farm) Services held during past holi-
days by one of the inmates. Prayer
Huntsville, Tex.-State Penitentiary. Divine books provided by Department of Syna-
services held during Holidays, services gog and School Extension. Rabbi Henry
being read by one of the inmates. Vis- Cohen, Galveston, Tex., arranged that
ited by Rabbi David Rosenbaum of Passover observances be held and mat-
Austin, Texas. Rabbi Henry Cohen, Gal- zoth be sent to the inmates.


DISTRICT No. 19.

Arkansas. Supervisor, Rabbi Wm. H. Fineshriber, Memphis, Tenn.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Lexington-Rabbi Sol Kory, Vicksburg, Miss., cornerstone of which has been laid.
visited Lexington monthly. Rabbi Merfeld visited Greenwood every
Greenwood-Through the efforts of Rabbi H. two weeks to conduct services and su-
A. Merfeld, Greenville, Miss., sufficient pervise Religious School of 75 children.
funds were raised to build a temple, the 7 children confirmed on Shevuoth.


DISTRICT No. 20.
Eastern and Central Tennessee. Supervisor, Dr. Isidore Lewinthal, Nashville, Tenn.
JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Nashville, Tenn.-Vanderbilt University. Stu- Nashville, Tenn.-Ward Belmont College.
dents invited to participate in activities Students invited to participate in relig-
of the Temple by Dr. Isidore Lewinthal. ious and social life of the Congregation
by Dr. Isidore Lewinthal.

JEWISH SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.
Chattanooga, Tenn.-Rabbi Julian H. Miller. mauga Park and had each Jewish soldier
instituted weekly services at Chicka- invited to a meal on Sundays.


DISTRICT No. 21.
Kentucky. Supervisor, Rabbi J. Rauch, Louisville, Ky.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Covington-Students of Hebrew Union Col- Religious School in correspondence with
lege conduct Friday Evening services. Department of Synagog and School Ex-
Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan, Cincinnati, Ohio, tension.
addressed Y. M. H. A. and Zionist organ- Newport-Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan, Cincinnati,
ization. 0., addressed Y. M. H. A. and Congrega-
Henderson-Services every Friday evening tion. Students of Hebrew Union College
conducted by a layman of the community, conduct services.

JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Lexington, Ky.-University of Kentucky. Louisville, Ky.-University of Louisville, Ky.
Rabbi M. G. Solomon while in Lexington Through the efforts of Rabbi Rauch, the
with assistance of Dr. French and Blu- Sisterhood arranged for all students to
mental, teachers at University, kept in celebrate Passover in the homes of mem-
touch with students and invited them to bers of that organization. The students
meetings of his Young People's Society. also received special invitations to at-
The students were also invited to the tend services at the Temple.
public Seder.
DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Greendale, Ky.-Kentucky House of Reform. Louisville, Ky.-Industrial' School of Reform.
Rabbi Jacob Krohngold, Lexington, Ky., Channukka observed at Reformatory.
visited institution and had Matzoth sent Delicacies sent to inmates by Rabbi
for Pesach. Joseph Rauch.

TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION.
Henderson, Ky.-Kentucky Association for School Extension sent a Religious
Jewish Religious Education held its School Text Book Exhibit. Mr., Barnett
Fifth Annual Convention from December R. Brickner, a member of the staff of the
26-28. Department of Synagog and Department, participated in the program.









8302 FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT [OCTOBER


DISTRICT No. 22.
Southern Ohio. Supervisor, Dr. David Philipson, Cincinnati, Ohio.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Ironton-Hebrew Union College student con- Springfield-Hebrew Union College student,
ducted bi-monthly services, visited bi-monthly.
Middletown-Sunday School maintained un- Zanesville-Visited bi-monthly by Hebrew
der supervision of a Hebrew Union Col- Union College student.
lege student. Hamilton-Visited bi-monthly by Hebrew
Norwood-Sunday School maintained under Union College student.
supervision of a Hebrew Union College Xenia-Visited by Hebrew Union College stu-
student. dent.

SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN METROPOLITAN CENTERS.
Cincinnati, O-Department of Synagog and terhoods, assisted in the maintenance of
School Extension in cooperation with a free Religious School.-
the National Federation of Temple Sis-

JEWISH SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.
Chillicothe, O.-Camp Sherman. Mr. H. J. services. Department of Synagog co-
Rosenbaum, social worker of the Nation- operated in furnishing Prayerbooks and
al Jewish Board for Welfare Work in U. Hymnals.
S. Army and Navy. Arranged for weekly

DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Lancaster, O.-Boys' Industrial School. In- Rabbi Joseph S. Kornfeld. Services held
mates received religious instruction on High Holidays. Prayer books pro-
once a month from Mr. Putterman of vided by Department of Synagog and
Columbus, Ohio, under the supervision of School Extension.

DETECTIVES IN INSTITUTIONS.
Columbus, O.-State School for the Deaf. Kornfeld, one of the older inmates led
Under the supervision of Rabbi J. S. a class in Biblical History.


DISTRICT No. 23.
Northeastern Ohio. Supervisor, Rabbi M. J. Gries,* Cleveland, Ohio.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Alliance-Rabbi David Gross, while at Can- tended school and conducted services.
ton, Ohio, reorganized Religious School. Hebrew Union College student officiated
East Liverpool-Rabbi Isidore Philo, Youngs- on Holidays.
town, O., made monthly visits. Superin-


DISTRICT No. 24.
Northwestern Ohio. Supervisor, Rabbi Louis Wolsey, Cleveland, Ohio.
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION IN SMALL CITIES.
Mansfield-Rabbi Louis Gross, while at Sandusky-Visited by Rabbi Alexander of
Akron, visited bi-monthly to conduct Toledo. who held services and delivered
services and supervise Religious School. an address.

DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Mansfield, O.-State Reformatory. Services Gross, while at Akron, Ohio, made fre-
held on Holidays under auspices of Mans- quent visits to conduct services and in-
field Hebrew Congregation. Religious terview inmates. Department of Syna-
instruction given monthly by Rabbi I. gog and School Extension supplied Hym-
Philo, Youngstown, O. Rabbi Louis D. nals.


DISTRICT No. 25.
Southern Indiana. Supervisor, Dr. Louis Grossmann, Cincinnati, Ohio.
JEWISH COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Bloomington, Ind.-Indiana University. Rab- month for social and literary functions.
bi M. Feuerlicht, of Indianapolis, organ- At a meeting, at which Rabbi Feuerlicht
ized a "University Jewish Club" for 25 spoke on the conditions of the Jews
Jewish students together with 4 or 5 abroad, $250 was raised for the war suf-
Jewish residents, which meets once a ferers.

DELINQUENTS IN INSTITUTIONS.
Jefferaonville, Ind.-Indiana Reformatory. stitution. Held Passover services, and
Rabbi Joseph Rauch, Louisville, Ky., arranged for services on Rosh Hashana
conducted bi-weekly services at the in- and Yom Kippur.
* Retired.




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