• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Executive board
 Board of Govenors
 Board of Delegates
 Committees of the Executive...
 Memorial Tablets
 Proceedings of the Executive...
 Annual Report of the Board...
 Annual Report of President
 Catalog of the Hebrew Union...
 Alumni
 Roster of Students 1908 - 1909
 Rules for Government of Colleg...
 Course of Studies
 Report of the Board of Delegat...
 Report of the Board of Manager...
 Report of Director of Synagog and...
 Mexico
 Collections by the Isaac M Wise...
 Report of the Director General...
 Statement of Receipts and...
 Treasurer's Report
 Proceedings of the Twenty-first...
 Proceedings of the Executive...
 Classified List of Members
 Abstract of Annual Reports from...
 Israel's Work in America
 Unveiling and Consecration of the...
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: Annual report of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072064/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations
Alternate Title: Annual report, <197475>
Physical Description: v. : ; 21-26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Union of American Hebrew Congregations
Publisher: May & Kreidler
Place of Publication: Cincinnati Ohio
Publication Date: 1892-
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Reform Judaism -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 19th (1892)-
General Note: Vols. for 1891/92-<, 1921/22> include Proceedings of the 7th-<28th> biennial council.
General Note: Imprint varies.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072064
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: The Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica
Holding Location: The Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 04750396
lccn - 06007872
issn - 8755-0652
 Related Items
Preceded by: Proceedings of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Executive board
        Section
    Board of Govenors
        Section 1
        Section 2
    Board of Delegates
        Section 1
        Section 2
    Committees of the Executive Board
        Section
    Memorial Tablets
        Page VII
        Page VIII
        Page IX
        Page X
        Page XI
        Page XII
        Page XIII
        Page XIV
        Page XV
        Page XVI
        Page XVII
        Page XVIII
    Proceedings of the Executive Board
        Page 6005
        Page 6006
        Page 6007
        Page 6008
        Page 6009
        Page 6010
        Page 6011
    Annual Report of the Board of Governors
        Page 6012
        Page 6013
        Page 6014
        Page 6015
        Page 6016
        Page 6017
        Page 6018
    Annual Report of President
        Page 6019
        Page 6020
        Page 6021
        Page 6022
        Page 6023
        Page 6024
        Page 6025
        Page 6026
        Page 6027
        Page 6028
        Page 6029
        Page 6030
        Page 6031
        Page 6032
        Page 6033
        Page 6034
        Page 6035
        Page 6036
        Page 6037
        Page 6038
        Page 6039
        Page 6040
        Page 6041
        Page 6042
    Catalog of the Hebrew Union College
        Page 6043
    Alumni
        Page 6044
        Page 6045
        Page 6046
        Page 6047
        Page 6048
        Page 6049
        Page 6050
        Page 6051
        Page 6052
    Roster of Students 1908 - 1909
        Page 6053
        Page 6054
    Rules for Government of College
        Page 6055
        Page 6056
        Page 6057
        Page 6058
        Page 6059
        Page 6060
    Course of Studies
        Page 6061
        Page 6062
        Page 6063
        Page 6064
        Page 6065
        Page 6066
        Page 6067
        Page 6068
    Report of the Board of Delegates
        Page 6069
        Page 6070
        Page 6071
        Page 6072
        Page 6073
    Report of the Board of Managers
        Page 6074
        Page 6075
        Page 6076
        Page 6077
    Report of Director of Synagog and School Extension
        Page 6078
        Page 6079
        Page 6080
        Page 6081
        Page 6082
    Mexico
        Page 6083
        Page 6084
        Page 6085
        Page 6086
        Page 6087
        Page 6088
        Page 6089
        Page 6090
        Page 6091
        Page 6092
        Page 6093
        Page 6094
    Collections by the Isaac M Wise Memorial Fund
        Page 6095
        Page 6096
        Page 6097
        Page 6098
        Page 6099
        Page 6100
        Page 6101
        Page 6102
        Page 6103
        Page 6104
        Page 6105
        Page 6106
        Page 6107
        Page 6108
        Page 6109
    Report of the Director General of the the Isaac M Wise Memorial Fund
        Page 6110
        Page 6111
        Page 6112
        Page 6113
    Statement of Receipts and Disbursements
        Page 6114
        Page 6115
        Page 6116
        Page 6117
        Page 6118
        Page 6119
        Page 6120
        Page 6121
        Page 6122
        Page 6123
        Page 6124
        Page 6125
        Page 6126
        Page 6127
        Page 6128
        Page 6129
        Page 6130
        Page 6131
    Treasurer's Report
        Page 6132
        Page 6133
        Page 6134
        Page 6135
        Page 6136
        Page 6137
    Proceedings of the Twenty-first Council
        Page 6138
        Page 6139
        Page 6140
        Page 6141
        Page 6142
        Page 6143
        Page 6144
        Page 6145
        Page 6146
        Page 6147
        Page 6148
        Page 6149
        Page 6150
        Page 6151
        Page 6152
        Page 6153
        Page 6154
        Page 6155
        Page 6156
        Page 6157
        Page 6158
        Page 6159
        Page 6160
        Page 6161
        Page 6162
        Page 6163
        Page 6164
        Page 6165
        Page 6166
        Page 6167
        Page 6168
        Page 6169
        Page 6170
        Page 6171
        Page 6172
        Page 6173
        Page 6174
        Page 6175
        Page 6176
        Page 6177
        Page 6178
        Page 6179
        Page 6180
        Page 6181
        Page 6182
        Page 6183
        Page 6184
        Page 6185
        Page 6186
        Page 6187
        Page 6188
        Page 6189
        Page 6190
        Page 6191
        Page 6192
        Page 6193
        Page 6194
        Page 6195
        Page 6196
        Page 6197
        Page 6198
        Page 6199
        Page 6200
        Page 6201
        Page 6202
        Page 6203
        Page 6204
    Proceedings of the Executive Board
        Page 6205
        Page 6206
        Page 6207
        Page 6208
    Classified List of Members
        Page 6209
        Page 6210
        Page 6211
        Page 6212
        Page 6213
        Page 6214
        Page 6215
    Abstract of Annual Reports from Congregations
        Page 6216
        Page 6217
        Page 6218
        Page 6219
        Page 6220
        Page 6221
        Page 6222
    Israel's Work in America
        Page 6223
        Page 6224
        Page 6225
        Page 6226
        Page 6227
        Page 6228
        Page 6229
        Page 6230
        Page 6231
        Page 6232
        Page 6233
        Page 6234
        Page 6235
        Page 6236
        Page 6237
        Page 6238
        Page 6239
        Page 6240
        Page 6241
        Page 6242
        Page 6243
        Page 6244
        Page 6245
        Page 6246
        Page 6247
        Page 6248
        Page 6249
        Page 6250
        Page 6251
        Page 6252
        Page 6253
        Page 6254
        Page 6255
        Page 6256
        Page 6257
        Page 6258
        Page 6259
        Page 6260
        Page 6261
        Page 6262
    Unveiling and Consecration of the Isaac M. Wise Memorial Window
        Page 6263
        Page 6264
        Page 6265
        Page 6266
        Page 6267
        Page 6268
        Page 6269
        Page 6270
        Page 6271
        Page 6272
        Page 6273
        Page 6274
        Page 6275
        Page 6276
        Page 6277
        Page 6278
        Page 6279
        Page 6280
        Page 6281
        Page 6282
        Page 6283
        Page 6284
        Page 6285
        Page 6286
        Page 6287
        Page 6288
        Page 6289
    Back Cover
        Page 6290
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



















































RESV
BM
21
.U4
35th


















1 l d ?r

Yl2;2




-g ..,


Thirty-Fifth Annual Report

OF THE


Union of American



hebrew Congregations

*&*


MARCH


1909


S. C.. I-


7F


I


P^-67


---.












FORM OF APPLICATION FOR MEMBERS IP


(D a t e ) ... ...... ............... .......... .......... .... ........ .. ....... .......

To the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations

C o n g reg a tio n .................. .. .... .. ........ .. ...... ..

of ... ... ... .. ............ .. ...... hereby m ake
application to be admitted "to membership -in tie Uriii.i C
AnAmerican Hebrew Congregations.

S................ ..: ............ .... ........... .................... .... P resid en
ATTEST:

............. ....... ....... ...... ... ....S ecreta ry ..


The above application, under seal of the Congregation, can be sent t
LIPMAN LEvy, Secretary, Cincinnati, O. No membership fee is required.




FORM OF BEQUEST.


Give and bequeath to the Union'of American Hebrew Congregi
tions, for the benefit of the Hebrew Union College, at C: ." i. 0.

S the -sum of ................ .... ... ..... .... ...................... ...................... D dollar


*For the words in italTsothers words may be substituted if the testata
wishes to make a bequest for any other specific purpose.















TABLE OF CONTENTS-INDEXED


ABSTRACT OF ANNUAL REPORTS
ADDRESSES OF
Bernhard Bettmann
Dr. Lee K. Frankel
Rev. Dr. William S. Friedman
President Louis J. Goldman
Rev. Dr. Louis Grossmann
William B. Hackenburg -
President Alfred M. Klein
Rev. Dr. Kaufmann Kohler
Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf -
Louis Marshall -
Rev. Dr. David Philipson
Leonard G. Robinson
Mrs. nHugo Rosenberg
Jacob H. Schiff -
Hon. Oscar S. Strauss
Simon Wolf -
AMENDMENT TO CONSTITUTION
APPENDIX
APPROPRIATIONS FOR BOARD OF MANAGE
BOARD OF DELEGATES -
Election of
Report of -


BOARD OF GOVERNORS


BOkD OF .MANAGERS
"t "t "


Election of
Report of

Report of


PAGE
6216

6265
6230
6247
(6140
6283
6138
- 6160
6271
6279
.- 6254
6226
6243
6233
6239, 6264
6277
6224
6010, 6201
6223
6006
IV, 6206
6206
6069
II
6006
6012
III
074


ERS


BUILDING, COLLEGE -
CATALOG, ETC., OF HIEREW UNION COLLEGE
CLASSIFIED LIST OF IEMIERS -
COLLECTIONS BY ISAAC M5. WISE MEMORIAL FUND NATIONAL COMMITTEE
COLLEGE BUILDING
COMMITTEES OF TWENTY-FIRST COUNCIL -
CONSTITUTION, AMENDMENT TO -
COUNCIL, MEIETIN OF
DISBURSEMrI NTS -
DONATIONS FOR COLLEGE BUILDING -
TO LIBRARY -
EXAMINING ACCOUNTANT, REPORT OF -
EXECUTIVE BOARD FOR 1909-10 I
EXERCISES AT KENESETIT ISRAEL TEMPLE
RODEPII SHALOM SYNAGOG 6199


6181
6043
6209
6095
6181
6166
6201
6138
6129
6126
6029
6133
, 6196
6263
, 6223






u5


TABLE OF CONTENTS-INDEXED PAGE
FINANCIAL STATEMENT - 6134
HEBREW UNION COLLEGE 6043
ISAAC M. WISE MiEMORIAL FUND NATIONAL COMMITTEE I, 6095, 6110
LIBRARY, DONATIONS TO 6029
MEETINGS OF EXECUTIVE BOARD 6005, 6205
MEETING OF TWENTY-FIRST COUNCIL 6138
MhEIBERS, CLASSIFIED LIST OF 6209
EMBFERSIP 6005, 6009
MiEMiORIAL FUND, ISAAC WISE 6095
MEMORIAL TABLETS VII
MEXICO, REPORTS ON 6083
Norm AL CLASS FOR TEACHEI:S 6187
PROCEEDINGS OF TWENTY-FIRST COUNCIL --, 6138
RECEIPTS 6114
REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON
Affiliating Congregations Outside of United States 6191
Amending the Constitution 6193
Civil Rights 6173
College Buildings 6181
Congregations in Small Communities 6188
Credentials 6145
Discrimination by Foreign Governments 6173
Finances 6182
Isaac M. Wise Memorial Fund 6195
Jewish Students in Universities 6172
Next Meeting of Council 6195
Nominations for Members of Executive Board 6196
Normal Class for Teachers 6187
Permanent Organization 6160
Sabbath-School Leaflets 6178
School Journal "Young Israel" 6176
Sectarian Teaching in Public Schools 6185
Students at College, Increasing Number of 6179
Sunday Laws 6183
REPORTS OF OFFICERS AND BOARDS
Board of Delegates 6069
S Governors 6012
Managers -- 6074
Director of Synagog and School Extension 6078
Isaac AL Wise Memorial Fund 6095, 6110
President 6140
Secretary -6009, 6114
Treasurer 6132
SABBATH-SCHOOL LEAFLETS 6077
STANDING COMMITTEES O1 BOARD OF GOVERNORS -VI
EXECUTIVE BOARD -
SUNDAY LAWS 6183
SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION 6074
"YOUNG ISRAEL"- 6075, 6176















EXECUTIVE BOARD.


FOR 1909-10


ISAAC W. BERNIIEIM, 646 W. Main Street, Louistille, Ky.
BERNHARD BETTMANN, Government Bldg., Cintinnati, O.
JUDGE JOSIAI COHEN, Court House, I .. Pa.
SOLOMON Fox, 31 E. Fourth Street, Cincinnati, O.
J. WALTER FREIBERG, 216 E. Front Street, Cincinnati, O.
BERNARD GINSBURG, 84 Adelaide Street, Detroit, Mich.
Louis J. GOLDMAN, S.W. Cor. Fourth & Elm Sts., Cincinnati, 0., PRESIDENT.
HARRY HART, 226 Van Buren Street, Ill., VICE-PRES'T.
CHARLES HUTZLER, 315 E. Broad Street, Ricihond, Va.
SAMUEL KATZ, 427 Ramge i ..iil ?. Onaha, Neb.
ADOLF KRAUS, Tribune Building, Chicago, Ill.
VICTOR H. KRIEGSHrABlR, 8 N. Forsyth Street, Atlanta, Ga.
Louis KROIN, 530 Walnut Street, Cincinnati, 0., TREASURER.
MOnITz LOTH, P. O. Box 157, Cincinnati, 0.
BARUCI M\AIILER, 612 Electric Bldg., Clereland, O.
MARTIN A. MARKS, 5932 Broadway, Cleveland, 0.
MAX B. MAY, 518 Walnut Street, Cincinnati, O.
E LIAS MICHAEL, 1000 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo.
ADoLPH' S. Ocns, The Times," New York City.
ABRAM OPPENIIEIMER, 133 Swan Street, Buffalo, N. Y.
MARCUS RAUH, 951 Penn Avenue, :. Pa..
SIGMUND RHEINSTROM, 1318 1st Nat. B'k Bldg., Cincinnati, O.
JULIUs ROSENWALD, cllo Sears, Roebuck & Co.,. ...... IIl.
JAcoB H. SCHIFF, William & Pine Streets, New YorlkCity.
EMIL SELIG, 2026 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa.
CHARLES SHOHIL, Pugh Bldg., Cincinnati, O.
ISAAC STROUSE, N. E. cor. Lombard & Paca Sts., Baltimore, 3Md.
SoLOMON SULZBERGER, 1200 Madison Avenue, New York City.
JULIUS WEIS, 817 Gravier Street, NeI Orleans, La.
SAMUEL WOOLNER, 317 N. Perry Ave., Peoria, Ill.

Lipman Levy, Secretarj, Fourth National Bank Building, Cincinnati, O.

The Twenty-second Council will meet in New York City, January 17, 1911.














BOARD OF -GOVERNORS

OF THE


HEBREW UNION COLLEGE


FOR 1909-1911

TERN EXPIRES
JANUARY 1.
1911 REv. DR. ISRAEL AARON, 748 Auburn Ave., T.,..,. N. Y.
1912 REv. DR. HENRY BERKOWITZ, 1823 N. 33 St., Philadelphia, Pa.
1912 BERNHARD BETTMANN, Government Bldg., Cincinnati, 0., PRESIDENT.
1911 ALFRED 61. COHEN, S. W. cor. 3rd & Walnut St., Cincinnati, O.
1910 NATHAN' DRUCKER, Eighth and Broadway, Cincinnati, O.
1910 MAURICE J. FREIBERG, 216 E. Front Street, Cincinnati, O.
1910 EDWARD L. HEINSHEIMER, 326 Walnut St., Cincinnati, 0., VICE-PrEs'T.
1911 REV. DR. EMIL G. HIRSCH, 3612 Grand Boulevard, Chicago, Ill.
1911 JUD GE HARRY M. HOFFHEIMER, Court House, Cincinnati, O.
1911 ALFRED M. KLEIN, 927 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pa.
1912 REV. DR. JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF,
4715 Pulaski Avenue, Germanlown, Philadelphia, Pa.
1910 IRWIN M. KRnoN, Pendleton & Dandridge Sts., Cincinnati, O.
1910 JACOB KRONACHER, Pugh Building, Cincinnati, O.
1911 REV. DR. MAX LANDSBERG, 420 Main Street, Rochester, N. Y.
1912 REV. CHARLES S. LEVI, Peoria, Ill.
1912 REv. DR. J. LEONARD LEVY, P. O. Box 995, Pittsburg, Pa.
1911 MYER OETTINGER, 421 Race Street, Cincinnati, O.
1910 JACOB OTTENHEIMER, 533 Walnut Street, Cincinnati, O.
1912 REV. DR. DAVID PHILIPSON, Beechwood Ave., Cincinnati, O.
1911 EMIL POLLAK, Box 678, Cincinnati, O.
1910 REV. DR. M. SAMFIELD, 218 Adams Street, Memphis, Tenn.
1912 Rev. DR. JOSEPH SILVERMAN, 50 E. 76th St., New York City.
1912 'REV. DR. JOSEPH STOLZ, 4827 Langley Ave., Chicago, Ill.
1910 HENRY WANGENHEIM, 303 Union Trust Bldg., San Francisco, Cal.


All communications for the Board of Governors should be addressed to
Isaac Bloom, Secretary, Box 266, Cincinnati, 0.













ISAAC M. WISE MEMORIAL FUND NATIONAL
COMMITTEE.
REV. DR. JOSEPH IRAUSKOPF, 4517 Pulaski-ave.,
Germantown, I" ... ... a., Pa.,-DIRECTOR-GENERAL


ASSISTANT DIRECTORS.
REV. DR. E. N. CALISr, 406 N. Lombardy Street,
REV. SOLOMON FOSTER, 264 Clinton Avenue,
REV. LEO. M. FRANKLIN, 71 Brainard Street,
REV. DR. MAX HELLER, 1828 Marengo Street,
REV. CHARLES S. LEVI, National Hotel,
REV. JONAH B. WISE, The Hill,"


Richmond, Va.
Newark, N. J.
Detroit, Mich.
New Orleans, La.
Peoria, Ill.
Portland, Oregon.


Louis I. AARON, Second National Bank Bldg., Pittsburg, Pa.
*Louis BARKHOUSE, Kenyon Bldg., Louisville, Ky.
*SOLOMON Fox, 31 East Fourth st., Cincinnati, 0., VICE-CHAIRMAN
*Louis J. GOLDnMAN, s. w. cor. Fourth & Elm sts., Cincinnati, 0., CHAIRMAN
REV. MOSES J. GRIES, 45 Oakdale st., Cleveland, O.
DANIEL GUGGENHEIM, 30 Broad st., New York .
PHILIP HAMBURGER, 531 Wood st., Pittsburg, Pa.
REV. DR. EMIL G. HIRSCH, 3612 Grand Boulevard, .... Ill.
LEOPOLD KEISER, 40 Pearl st., Buffalo, N. Y.
BARUCH MAHLER, 612 Electric Bldg., Cleveland, O.
*Louis MARSHALL, 30 Broad st., New York City
ELIAS MICHAEL, 1000 Washington ave., St. Louis, Mo.
*MYER OETTINGER, 421 Race st., Cincinnati, O.
A. W. RICH, s. e. cor. Water & Reed sts., Milwaukee, Wis.
RELIGMAN SCHLOSS, 65 Winder st., Detroit, Mtich.
*SAMUEL STRAUS 504 Traction Bldg., Cincinnati, O.
ISAAC STROUSE, n. e. cor. Lombard & Paca sts., Baltimore, Md.
*JULIUS WEIS, 817 Gravier st., New Orleans, La.
*SAMUEL WOOLNER, 317 N. Perry ave., Peoria, Ill.
Lipman Levy, Secretary, Fourth National Bank Building, Cincinnati, O.

BOARD OF MANAGERS OF SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL
EXTENSION.


ISRAEL COWEN, 707 Tacoma Bldg.,
SOL. Fox, 31 E. Fourth st.,
*J. WALTER FREIBERG, 216 E. Front st.,
*Lours J. GOLDMAN, S. w. cor. Fourth & Elm sts.,
*LouIs KROHN, 530 Walnut st.,
MORITZ LOTH, P. O. box 157,
MARTIN A. MARKS, 5932 Broadway,
SIGMNUND RHEINSTROM, 1318 1st Nat. B'k Bldg.,
JULIUS ROSENWALD, % Sears, Roebuck & Co.,
*CHARLES SHOHL, Pugh Bldg.,
*SAMUEL STRAUs, 504 Traction Bldg.,
SAMUEL WOOLNER, 317 N. Perry ave,


( .'. .. I ll.
Cincinnati, O.
Cincinnati, 0.
Cincinnati, O.
Cincinnati, 0., CHAIRMAN
Cincinnati, 0.
Cleveland, 0.
Cincinnati, O.
', .... .. I ll.
Cincinnati, O.
Cincinnati, 0.
Peoria, Ill.


REv. ALFRED T. GODSHAW, 724 W. Sixth st., Cincinnati, 0., DIRECTOR
LIPMAN LEVY, Fourth National Bank Bldg., Cincinnati, 0., SECRETARY
Those marked Constitute the Executive Committee.














BOARD OF DELEGATES

ON

CIVIL RIGHTS.

FOR 1909-10


MILTON L. ANFENGER, 322 Symes Building,
RALPH BAMSBERGER, 707 State Life I ,ii -...
ISAAC BEAlR, 112 N. Front Street,
BERNHARD BETTMANN, Government Bldg.,
LEON BLOCK, 728 N. Y. Life i.,,-. I...-,
REV. DR. E. N. CALISCIT, 406 N. Lombardy Street,
JUDGE JOSIAH COHEN, Court House,
*MYEr COHEN, 700 Fourteenth Street,
MORRIS M. CorIN, 8 Kahn Building,
NATHAN COIIN, 54 Vanderbilt Buildin'g,
ISRAEL COWEN, 707 Tacoma Building,
HARRY CUTLER, 7 Eddy Street,
*LEVI H. DAVII, 344 1) Street,
FELIX J. DRE.ious, Cor. Carondelet & Common St
*HENRY FRANC, 401 Seventh Street,
REV. LEO M. FRANKLIN, 71 Brainard Street,
NATHAN FRANK, 1027 Century Building,
JACOB FURTH, 3951a 3 cPherson Avenue,
HION. HENEY M. GOLDFOGLE, 271 Broadway,
Louis J. GoLDMaAN, S. W. Cor. Fourth & Elm Sts.,
JOSEPH B. GREENHUT, 215 Woolner Bldg.,
REV. MOSES J. GRIES, 2045 E. 93d Street,
*WMr. B. HACKENnURGE, 535 Arch Street,
HENRY HIANAW,
HARRY HART, 226 Van Buren Street,
JOSEPH HIRSH,
MORRIS HIORCKRIEIMER, Sixteenth and Main Sts.,
HoN. JULIUS KAHrN,
ADOLP KRAUS, Tribune Building,
EMIL LESSER, 1700 Second Avenue,
REV. B. L. LEVINTIAL, 710 Pine Street,
REV. DR. J. LEONARD LEVY, 1526 Denniiston Ave.,


Denver, Colo.
Indianapolis, Ind.
Wihlington, N. C.
Cincinnati, O.
Kansas City, Mo.
Richmond, Va.
Pillsburg, Pa.
W ashington, D. C.
Little Rock, Ark.
Nashville', Tenn.
,.... Ill., VICE-CHAIR[AN
Providence, R. I.
Washington, D. C.
s. New Orleans, La.
TVashiington, D. C.
Detroit, Mlich.
St. Louis, Mo.
St. Louis, Mfo.
New York (
Cincinnati, 0., Ex Orsrcio
Peoria, Ill.
Cleveland, O.
Philadelphia, Pa.
Mobile, Ala.
.., ... Ill., Ex OiCPrIO
VIicksburg, Miss.
1Wheeling, TV. Va.
San FIraicisco, Cal.
Chicago, Ill.
Birmingham, Ala.
Phiiladelphia, Pa.
.. .- P a.













Board of Delegates on Civil Rights-Continued.


MoRITz LOTH, P. O. Box 157,
JUDGE JULIAN W. MACK, Court House,
JUDGE LEWIS W. MARCUS,
REV. DAVID MARX, 270 Whitehall Street,
T. M. MORDECAI, 43 Broad Street,
ISIDORE NEWMAN, 212 Carondelet Street,
REV. JACOB NIETO, 3933 Clay Street,
*JULIUS PEYSER, 705 G Street,


Cincinnati, 0.
Chicago, Ill.
J ., -, N .
Atlanta, Ga.
Charleston, S. C.
New Orleans, La.
San Francisco, Cal.
Washington. D. C.


JUDGE M. WARLEY PLATZEK, Supreme Court Bldg., New York ( .
REV. DR. WM. ROSENAU, 1515 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md.
*SIMON W. ROSENDALE, 57 State Street, Albany, N. Y.
*REV. CHARLES A. RUBENSTEIN, 2313 Callow Ave., Baltimore, Md.
DAVID ROTHSCHILD, Davenport, Ia.
LEWIS SEASOaGOOD, Union Trust Building, Cincinnati, O.
ALFRED SELLIGMAN, Kenyon Building, Louisville, Ky.
*REv. DR. ABRAM SIMON, 2606 University Place, Washington, D. C., SECRETARY
Lucius L. SOLOMONs, Metropolis Bank Building, San Francisco, Cal.
*RIE. Louis STERN, 1315 Columbia Road, il., .' D. C.
SAMUEL ULLMAN, 715 North Eighth Street, Birmingham, Ala.
HINRY WALLENSTEIN, 233 South Main Street, Wichita, Kans.
JONAS WEIL, New York kife Building, Minneapolis, Minn.
SOL. WEIL, Goldsboro, N. C.
EUGENE F. WESTHEIMER, 205 South Third Street, St. Joseph, Mo.
*LEo WISE, 56 Perin Building, Cincinnati, 0.
EDWIN WOLF, 608 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa.
*SISTON WOLF, 700 Fourteenth Street, :I. .. ..'. i). C., CHAIRMAN
ADOLPHE WOLFE, Third, Fourth & Washington Sts., Portland, Ore.
SAMUEL WOOLNER, 317 N. Perry Avenue, Peoria, Ill.

Those marked constitute the executive committee.

All communications in reference to the violation of the civil rights of
Jews should be addressed to the Chairman of the Board of Delegates, MR.
SIMON WOLF, 700 Fourteenth Street, Washington, D. C.
All communications referring to the admission of students to the College
should be addressed to the Secretary of the Board of Governors, MR. ISAAC
BLOOM, Box 266, Cincinnati, O.
Communications relating to any other business of the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations should be addressed to the Secretary of the
Executive Board, MR. LIPMAN LEVY, Fourth National Bank Building,
Cincinnati, O.














COMMITTEES OF EXECUTIVE BOARD.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
BERNHIARD BETTIMANN, Chairmi(n, J. VALT.ER FREIiERG,
MAX B. !MAY, SIGMUNI) RIIEINSTROM,
CIIARLES S'HOHiL.

AUDITING COMMITTEE
BERNHARD BETT3MANN, C'ltihimH1, SOL. Fox,
Louis KROIIN.
BUILDING COMMITTEE
SI-MUND RIlEINSTROM, C.'hirnant, ISAAC VW. BERNHIEIM,
SOL. Fox, J. WVALTER FREIDERG,
Louis J. GOLD.MAN.

FINANCE COMMITTEE
CHARLES SIlOIIL, Chairman, MAX B. MAY,
J. W\ALTER FREIBERG, SaIMUNn RIIIEINSTROM.



COMMITTEES OF BOARD OF GOVERNORS.
ON BUILDING AND SUPPLIES
NATHAN TRUCKER, Ch1airmnan, REV. CHARLES S. LEVI,
JUDGE' HARRY M. HOFFHEIMER, MYER OETTINGER,
HENRY WANGENIPEIM.

ON COURSE OF STUDIES
RE1V. D. DAnvr PHILIrsoN, Chairman, REV. DR. EmIrL G. HInsci,
REV. DR. ISRAEL AARoN, REV. DR. JOSEPHi KRAUSKOPF,
REV. DR. HENRY BEmRKOWI'Z, REV. DR. MAX LANDSBERG,
REV. DR. JOSEPHI SIL1ERMAN.
ON LIBRARY
JACOB KRONACIIER, Chai, an, m JACOBn OTTENfrEIMER,
MAURICE J. FREIBERG, REV. DR. M. SAMFIELD,
REV. R. J. LEONARD LEVY, REV. DR. JOSIEiII STOZ.

ON SALARIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS
EDWARI) L. HIINSHIIIMER,, Chairman, AI'REID KLEIN,
ALFED -M. COIIEX, I R\\IN M. KROIIN,
EMIL POLLAK,






















.. MEMORIAL TABLETS..



The following pages represent the memorial tab-

lets in the Hebrew Union College. The names of

the legators and the amounts bequeathed by them or

donated in their memory are engraved on these tablets.

A special record is kept, and on each recurring anni-
versary of death (Yahrzeit,) Kaddish is recited in

their memory by the students of the Hebrew Union

College.


~IL II 'IB '1 -- Issll


16eP -a --16~--CL--~-~- II.

















... 11n 0D1emor)...

OF -


HENRY ADLER,

FIRST DONOR OF


ten thousand dollarss

"io the funb
Co Establitb tbis College.













I ---- --aDY_


JOSEPH HALFF, Galveston, Tex.
GABRIEL AND FRADEL KOPPERL, Galveston, Tex.
ROSANNAII OSTERMAN, Galveston, Tex.
ISAAC AND FREDRICA RANGER, Galveston, Tex.
ISAAC BLUM, Galveston, Tex.
WHINNIE BERNSTEIN, Galveston, Tex.
LEOPOLD AND HENRIETTA BLOCK, Galveston, Tex.
DAVID AND MAGDALENAHEIDENHEIMER, Galveston, Tex.
NATHAN D. HIRSCH, Port Gibson, Miss.
ISRAEL F. HARPMAN, Memphis, Tenn.
NATHAN HAAS, Philadelphia, Pa.
RIKA HESS, San Francisco, Cal.
MICHAEL REESE, San Francisco, Cal.
EMIL JOSEPH, Boston Mass.
ESTHER KAHN, Cincinnati, O.
ABRAIIHAM AUB, Cincinnati, 0.
FANNIE DRUCKER, Cincinnati, O.
REV. SAMUEL EPSTEIN, Cincinnati, O.
Jos. L. SWARTS, Cincinnati, O.
REGINA STADLER, Cincinnati, O.
FANNIE OBERMAYER, Cincinnati, O.
MARCUS FECIIHEIMER, Cincinnati, O.
HARRY A. FRIEDLANDER, Cincinnati, O.
SOLOMON LEVI, Cincinnati, O.
REV. DR. MAX LILIENTHAL, Cincinnati, O.
SAMUEL AND MARIA KBEISMAN, Peoria, Ills.
DAVID AND HENRIETTA LEVY, Quincy, Ills.
NANNIE GOSLIN, Springfield, Ills.
GERTRUDE MARX, New Orleans, La.
REV. ABRAHAM ALIMA, New Orleans, La.
FANNIE ADLER, Milwaukee, Wlis.
HENRY COHEN, Falmouth, Eng.
HANSCHE Fox, Hartford, Conn.
SOPHIA HEROLD, Shreveport, La.


In Memory of the Departed Benefactors
of the Hebrew Union College.


$ 100
150
250
1,000
500
150
100
250
100
100
100
100
2,000
100
500
500
100
200
1,000
1,000
150
500
250
500
500
100
200
100
100
100
100
250
500
100


















Herman E. Sterne,
Leopold Goodman,
Rev. Mayer Eppstein,
Abraham Sloss,
Amelia Sloss,
Nathan Gundersheimer,
Rabbi Moses Sonneschein,
Moses Schwab,
Louis Morgenstern,
Emanuel Newman,
Samuel Rosenblatt,
Joseph I. Moch,
Raphael I ,' ,. I I. '
Aaron .-.I r 1;-: .gsbaker,
Simon Obermayer,
Louis Aufrecht,
Henry C. Nathan,
Martha E. Levi,
Abraham Senior,
Josephine Lowenthal,
Deborah Stix,
Daniel D. Raphael,
Jacob Seasongood,
Levi J. Workum,
Michael Ash,
Rebecca Rosenblatt,
Wm. Friedman,
Haehule and Yetta Kuh.
Wolf Winkler,
Moritz Frohman,
Isaac Goldstein,
Moses Oppenheimer,
Marx Leon,
Jennie Leon,
J. M. Brunswick,
B. Simon,
James M. Northman,
Samuel Kahn,
Henry Rosenberg,
Emanuel Barbe,
Juda and Bess Adler,
Jacob Lemanu,
Solomon Friedman,
Martin Mack,
Aaron Stix,
Jacob Netter,
Max Thurnaner,
Solomon Bloom,
Isaac Monheimer,
Max Hoffheimer,
Isaac Strauss.
Arnold Wertheimer,
Julius Fischel,
Philip Heidelbach,
Emannel and Clara Bamberger,
Ida Newberger,
Lambert M. Kahn,
Mordecai and Mehlile Kurzinger,
Levi Rosenfeld,
Jacob M. Gusky,
Joseph Berry,
Caroline Stern,
Julius Kahn,
Charles F. Sterne,
Dr. Joseph Aub,
Aaron Newhoff,
Moritz Loeb,


Pert, Inld.
Terre Haute, Ind.
pF- IV-, -', Ind.
1 y.
Columbus, O.
Hungary,
Santa Cruz, Cal.
Pittsb urg, Pa.
Buffalo, N. Y.
Rochester, N. Y.
Cincinnati, O.
r a

Cincinnati, 0.







Palestine, Tex.
j- i. '. .


', '.




Gauleston, Tex.
Indianapolis, Ind.
Rochester, N. Y.
Chicago, Ill.
Stadt Langfeld, Ger.
Donaldson, La.
Cincinnati, 0.









New York, N. Y.

St. Joseph, io.
San Francisco, Cal.
,f ii'in pii, f er.


MePherson, Kan.
Carthage, 3Mo.
Peru, Ind.
Cincinnati, O.
Paris, Ky.
Doylestown, Pa.


C __ C __













XI


Theresa Lowman,
Sophie Ottenheimer,
Rebecca Bloch,
Tillie Moch Mayer,
Jacob Winkler,
Meyer and Johanna Kaplan,
Seligman Loebstein,
Gottlieb Cohn.
HenrIetta Frankenstein,
Jacob L. Miller,
Louis E. Warner,
Sigmund Winkler,
Julius Ochs,
Morton M. Newburger,
Adelheid Kaufman,
Abraham Patz,
Amalia Mack,
Isidore Schradski,
Benedict Sachs,
Jonas Octtinger,
Regina Rothschild,
Samuel Kuhn,
Joseph Strauss,
Emma Strassburger,
Joseph Vogel,
Louis Klein,
Julius Houseman,
Hanna M. Hirsheimer.
Louis and Henrietta Berkowitz,
F. Hechinger.
Jeanette Benjamin,
Julius Freiberger,
Daniel -i :i I_.
Benjaman. "!i r ,
Babette Anspacher,
Alexander Rosenberg,
Caroline Assur,
Julius Mosler,
Henry C. Oettinger,
Dr. Solomon Eppingcr,
Jeanette Elsas,
Jacob L. Workum,
Sarah Workum,
David Lehman,
Joseph Gottlieb,
Yetta Levi,
Isaac Herman,
Julius Hannach,
Frederica Frank,
Wolf Weinstein,
Hannah Cohen,
Rev. Dr. Samuel Adler,
Raphael Vogel,
Rosa Miller,
Samuel Newman,
Samson Ieidenheimer,
Leopold Levi,
Jeanette Raphael,
Daniel Raphael,
Henry D. Raphael,
Solomon Hoffheimer,
Fannie B. Weil,
Jeanette Reefer,
Abraham Sands,
Henry Adler,
Isaac Faller,
Lipman Hess,
Feist and Yetta Seeman,


Cincinnati, 0.




Beecher, Ill.
Adelsdorf, Ger.

-1 I .* I.

Chattanooga, Tenn.
Philadclphia, Pa.
Portland, Ore.
La Crosse, Wis.
Cincinnati, 0.






Colambsii. O.
St. Loiis, Mo.
Grand .hapid.i, Mich.

' 1 i .

ene Orklans. La.

Din ier, Col.
Sn Francisco, Cal.
Cincinnati, O.









S' Pa.
. 0 .
.. Pa.

Niew York, N. Y.
Colnmbeus, 0.

N1.11 York, AN. Y.
Cinlcinnati, 0.



LouisvilleKy.
Mecadville. Pa.
Denver, Col.
Cincinnati, O.

Chicago, Ill.
Rueckerslhaisen, Ger.


-

















Moses Friedlich,
David and Yetta Wolf,
Leopold Oppenheimer,
Bernhard Lippman,
Ezekiel Shott,
Leopold Loeb.
Julius Strehlitz,
Asher Rosenblatt,
Nathan K. Baum,
Joseph Wile,
Lucy R. Ettenheimer,
Meyer Kaufman,
Simon Freiberg,
Nina Freiberg,
Arthur L. Northman,
Geo. W. Rayner,
Moses Freiberg,
Gertrude Kahn,
Morris Heilbrun,
Helen Schwarz,
Rebecca Dreyfoos,
Matilda Dryfoos Loeb.
Bertha Hirsch Wellhouse,
Asher Guckeuheimer,
Simon Stein,
Mrs. Carrie Krohn,
Marcus Feder,
Leon S. Bernheim,
Emanuel Berman,
Abraham Levison,
Julia Lemle,
Abraham Wendel,
Henry Newman.
Mrs. Bertha Newman,
Bertha Schiffman.
Rebecca Ufienheimer,
Elias Block,
Bernard Schroder,
S. J. Grauman,
Harris Kempner,
Simon Freiberger,
Fannie Loebstein,
Julius D. Bernd,
Laura Seasongood,
Harmon Nack,
Mattie Friedman August,
Fredericka Sterne,
Herman Heidenheimer,
Mordecai Moses Marks,
Deborah Marks,
Leonard Hyman,
Fannie Hyman,
Solomon Rauh,
Charles Mi. Rauh,
Henry Hess,
Gustav Moritz,
Bena Seinsheimer,
Leo August,
Adolph Rosenthal,
Samuel Silverman,
Moses Heidelbach,
Samuel Ullman,
Fanny Frohman,
Isaac Hart,
Leopold Monat,
Clara Rosenblatt,
Bernard Seinsheimer,
Leopold Rosenfeld,


Piqua, 0.

Cincinnati, O.

Marion, 0.
New York, N. Y.
Brooklyn. N. Y.
Rochester, N. Y.

Pcoria, Ill.
Ne tlciningcn, Gdcr.

Galvcston, Tex.
Baltimore, 1Md.
Ne uleiningen, Ger.
Cincinnati, O.



Atlanta, Ga.
P .
,0.

Schnielicim, Baden.
New York City.
Tyler, Tex.
Montomecry, Ala.
Piqua, 0.
Richmond. Va.

lHnnltiille, A la.
Cincinnati, 0.

Louisville, Ky.
Galtveton, Tex.
Ft. Wayne, Ind.
Beecher, Ill.
Pittsburg, Pa.
Cincinnati, 0.

New York, N. Y.
Selma, Ala.
Austin, Tex.
Jurnik, Prussia. )
Newi York, N. Y.
Wabash, Ind.j

S *.. Pa.

Cincinnati, 0.

Galveston, Tex.
Ft. Worth, Tex.
-, .. .

New York, N. Y.
Louisville, Ky.
Cincinnati, 0.

Sandusky, O.
St. Louis, Mo.
Cincinnati, 0.
11 "


$ 250
386
100
100
100
100
100
200
100
200
300
100
100
100
100
100
125
125
150
250
100
100
100
1,000
100
100
100
100
100
500
200
100
150
150
100
200
750
200
500
250
200
100
20,000
8,000
250
100
100
100
200

500

500
500
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
200
1.000
100
100


_ __ I C __


__ __ ~ _













XIII


Mina Rosenfeld,
Sarah Reiter,
Fannie Friedman,
Rosa Oettinger,
Philip Friedlander,
Aaron Marks,
Louis Moore,
Henry Levy
Henriette Rosenfeld,
Ezekiel Simon,
Rettel Simon,
Edward Kierstein,
Abraham Nussbaum,
Joseph Klaus,
Judah Judah,
Albert Kuhn,
Maier Rothschild,
Emil Benjamin,
Enianuel N. Moers,
Emanuel Bamberger,
Benj. J. Miller,
Hannah Rosenberg,
Juda George Joseph,
Clara Blum,
Nathan W. Nelson,
Jette L. Kaiser,
Hannah A Myers,
Henry Mack,
Joseph E. Marks,
Alexander Assur,
Louis Frohman,
James Brown,
Moses Schloss,
Amalie Schloss,
Isaiah Frankel,
Harriet F. Lehman,
Judah L. Friedheim,
Hindlah Friedheim,
Bernard Berman,
Morris Friedman,
Louis Kirby Lippman,
Clara Monheimer,
Jacob King,
M. Millhiser,
Isaac D. Blumenthal,
A. J. Friedlander,
Ezekiel L. Workum,
Jeptha L. Workum,
Isaac Lockey,
Lena Stromberg,
Hannah Schloss,
Robert Meyer Raab,
Isadole Berman,
Miriam Nathan,
Emanuel Beitman,
Lewis Mayer,
Bernard Hysinger,
Henrietta Hysinger,
Moses Kaufman,
James Bettmann,
Bernard Rosenthal,
Michael Friedman,
Minnie S. Goldsmith,
Lena Mundt Fink,
Bertha Rauh Cohen,
Regina Stolz,
Ruth Florence Lippman,


Cincinnati, 0.


M enph is, Tenn.
Cleveland, O.
Rochester, N. Y.

0.
New York, N. Y.
Rochrstler, N. Y.
1 :
I0
Cincinnali, 0.




I r y.

Jackson, Tenn.


S. ,Cal.
Cincinnati: O.



New York, .. Y.

Oskaloosa, Ia.
New Orleans, La.

Bastrop, La.
Ilarrisbr'g, Pa.
St. Louis, Mo.
Clereland, O.
C.nciinati, 0.

Richmond. Va.
ji Igs, Miss.
S0.

t, .
i Ala.
Detroit, Mich.
1j Ia.
0.

Wabash, Ild.
Cincinnati, 0.
St. Louis, MIo. 1
.Va.

Lancaster, Pa.
Cincinnati, O.
Rochester. N. Y.
Jackson, Miss.
Pittsburg, Pa.
Syracuse, N. Y.
Cleveland, O.


$ 100
100
200
100
100
100
200
100
1,000
2,500
250
700
100
200
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
250
100
250
100
100
100
250
100
150
150
1,000
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
250
1,000
500
1,000
500
100
100
150
500
100
100
100
250
200
250
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100


- --












XIV


Jacob Ettenheimer,
Eva Ettenheimer,
Regina Kuhn,
Jacob Ezekiel,
Laz. Dinkelspiel,
William Solomon Rayner,
Iina Kingsbaker,
Isaac Lesem,

Babette May
Simon Lazarus,
Amelia Lazarus,
Bernard Lemanun,
Clara Cohn,
Joseph P. Frisch,
!.opona Vrppstein,

Henrietta Geisenberger,
Ernest H. Kahn,
Caroline I ii'...
Fannie ..Ii-. i.. i,
Fannie Lowenstein,
Max Baldauf,
Emanuel Schwab,
Newman D. Lcvinson,
ponrr-o Bloom,
-, ... Bloom,
Henry Weil,
Frank Block,
Solomon Cohn,
Ferdinand Strauss,
Isidor Bush,
Hannah Harsh,
Simon Kaufmnan,
Julius Speier,
Rosa K. Weiler,
Rosina Ehrman,
Fanny Rice,
Zachariah Harsh,
Victor S. Cohen,
Samuel Lasker,
Anna Kahn,
Isaac Cohen,
August Pollak,
Rose T. Oppenheimer,
Henry W. May,
Louis Gutman,
Hanna Hvman,
Mayer Goldsmith,
Mcier Bettmann,
Lena Bettmann,
Sol. Kahn,
Henry Wineman,
Louis Meyer,
Minnie Levinson,
Louis Anfenger,
Solomon Woolner,
Sallie Woolner,
Johanna Woolner,
Isaac Wolfner,
Mary Sternbach.
Benedict Greenhut, Parents of Jos.
Minna Greenhut, B. Greenhut.
Regina Wineman,
Laura Feldman,
Isadore Frankel,
Rosalie Frankel,


Rocheslter, N. Y. }

Cincinnati, 0.

San Francisco, Cal.
Baltimore, Md.
Quincy, Ill.

Knoxville, Tenn.
Cincinnati, 0.
Columtus, 0.

New Orleans, La.
Adelsdorf, Bavaria.
Milwaukee. Wis.
Denison, Tex.
WIabash, Ind.
Lancaster, Pa.
Dallas, Tex.
I "
. ," I .

Baltimore, Md.
Oskaloosa, Ia.
Padhcah, Ky.
Ploblerille, Ind.
Cincinnati, O.

Paducah, Ky.
St. Louis, Mo.
Knowlille, Tenn.
Cincinnati, O.
St. Louis, Mo.
Wostler, O.

Indianapolis, Ind.
Helena, Ark.
New York, N. Y.
Wooster, 0.
Little Rock,Ark.

Lambsheim, Ger.
Ft. Smith, Ark.
" .. I'l.
0.


New York, N. Y.
Cincinnati, 0.


New York, N. Y.
Noblesville, Ind.
Denver, Col.
Peoria, Ill.


New York, N. Y.
Peoria, Ill.
Cincinnati, 0.

Detroit, Mich.


viii


$ 800
300
100
100
300
100
100
100
100
500
1,000
100
200
200
100
100
100
1,000
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
250
100
100
100
100
500
100
100
100
250
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
500
500
200
500
100
1,000
100
100
100
100

















Joseph Rothschild,
Leopold Feiss,
Emanuel Marks,
Henry Morgenthau,
David Berman,
Henrietta Feder Levy,
Abraham Hoffheimer,
Adolph L. Brown,
Rachel Kahn,
IdaE. Ginsburg,
Mathias A. Cohn,
Nathan Stein,
Joseph Wolfort,
Gustavus Basch,
Emanuel Newhoff,
Adolph Loner,
Wolf Joseph,
Samuel Aub,
Raphael Straus,
Louis Hart,
Nathan Greenebaum,
Sarah Greenebaum,
Joseph A. Friedlander,
Charlotte Friedlander,
Hirsch Baer,
Gothon Kahn,
Felix W. Strauss,
A.Trounstine,
Babette Trounstine,
Helen Trounstine,
Louis Speyer,
Henry Lauer,
Reuben Loeb,
Pauline Marks,
Mayer Friedman,
Meyer Eppinger,
Moses Frankenberger,
Joseph Shelt,
Jacob Silverman,
William Kraus,
Emanuel Lauer,
Marianne Bauman,
Emanuel Anfenger,
Nathan Kahn,
Jacob A aron,
Karolina Hirsch,
Samuel Harris,
Martin Hollstein,
Jacob S. Leiser,
Philip Sanger,
Jacob R. Cohen,
Marie Feibelman,
Pauline Solomon,
Rev. L. Naumburg,
Jennie Myers,
Frederika Griesheim,
Gussie Stern.
Leopold Friday,
Henry Frei,
Henrietta Schwabacher,
Lillie Northman,
Mary Sommer,
Rebecca Alpern,
Herman Gans,
M. M. Mayerstein,
Solomon Bennett,
Henry Winkler,


Summitville, Ind.
Cincinnati, 0.






Detroit, Mich.
Little Rock, Ark.
Meadville, Pa.
St. Louis, 11o.
Columbus, 0.
Chillicothe, O.

Cincinnati, 0.





Peru, TDd.
Indianapolis, Ind.
Cincinnati, O.


7T" I W. Va.
0.
Paducah, Ky.
Riverside, Miss.
It.
i .V. D.
Chalrleston, ,. Va.
Cincinnati, 0.

New York, N. Y.

St. Louis, Mo.
Denver, Col.
Indianapolis, ITd.
New York, NV. Y.
:ls, N Y.

Missoula, Mont.
Dallas, Tex.
Tallahassee, Fla.
Selma, Ala.
Helena, Ark.
New York, N. Y.
Rochester, N. Y.

Athens, O.
St. Louis, Mo.
* "I.
ii ... Ger.

Elk Rapids, Mich.
Helena, Mont.
1 i ,.

New York, N. Y.


~~~__ L__


_I ~ __ ___














xv'


Emma Moch,
Blanche Klein,
Dora Kahn,
Isaac Fruhauf,
Leopold Gruenwald,
David Wise,
Hannah Wise,
Emma Reiter Fruhauf,
Henry Loewenstein,
Babette Miller.
William Goodheart,
Sarah Waldheim,
Jacob Stern,
Moses Marks,
Sig. Adelsdorfer,
JacobVictor,
Daniel Wolf,
Jacob H. Hecht,
Hanna Blach,
Rebecca Steincr,
Hannah Felsenthal Strauss,
Simon Switzer,
Flora Kirschbaum,
Frank Clarence Haas,
Abraham Ermann,
Henry Jacobs,
Henry Halff,
Henrietta Halff,
Emina Oppenheimer,
Michael Hart,
Jennie Hart,
Leopold Mayer,
Abram D. Davis,
Jennie F i,- I. ..I .4,. -
M adeli ..' ,-i '1 ,
Julia Mannheimer,
Joseph Joseph,
Tillie Raphael Marks,
I.] I I i I ..
Nancy Kahn,
Sophie S. Wyler,
Sophie Adler,
Abraham Bloom,
Meyer Salzenstein,
Xavier Dreifus,
Hannah Lazarus,
Fanny Leiser,
Elizabeth Strauss,
Nathan Falk,
Abraham Scheuerman,
Delia Riugelhaupt Abeles,
Charlotte Ringelhaupt,
Pauline Friedman Cauman,
Joseph Goldstein,
Moses Krohn,
Regina Senior,
Moses Freiberg,
W. B. Kahn,
Duffie Brown,
Moses Rosenthal,
Abraham Mann,
Adolph Solomon,
Antoinette Forchheimer;
Moses Levy,
Leonard Brilleman,
Rev. Dr. Lippman Mayer,
David Adler,


Cincinnati, O.














Boston, .Mass.
Nashville, Tenn.
Chicago, lit.
1 1
















Vicksburg, Miss.
Iadianapolis, Ind.

New Orleans, La.
Wheeling, IV. Va.
Lauterbonrg, Alsace
Fort lWanyne, 1lrd.
Kaansas .
tfi.
"
-.a.
Ciaciannati, 0.








Athois, I1l.
Loniseillc, r,-,
Colaonhdia, i
Missoitla, Mont.
amsi liln, 0.

Des 11oies, la.
Little Rock, Ark.
Chicago, Ill.
,* "r .0.
( .




.Pcra, Ind.
llendenr5o0, Kq,
El Paso, Tex:.
Molbilc, Ala,
Louisville, KYI.
Alhan l, N. Y.
I Pi
S.... TI W is.


$ 250
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
1500
100
100
100
100
250
500
100
100
100
100
500
100
100
200
600
100
100
100
500
100
100
6,000
8,245
1,000
300
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
500
150
100
100
100
100
100
150
100
100
100
100
100
250
100
100
100
100
500


------- ----~- -I-- ~~-"-














XVII


Samuel Wertheimer,
Henriette Wertheimer,
Solomon Kingsbaker,
Sophia Levy,
Jacob Kuttner,
Nannie Lauer,
Max Joseph,
Hermal i ..,i. ...r
Aaron I. .- ,
Joseph Louchheim,
Julius Freiberg,
Isaac Bing,
Julins H. Goodhart,
Edward Bloch,
Aaron Burtanger,
Babetta Mook,
Ida Henly,
Theodore Mayer,
Caroline Swartz,
Raphael Stern,
Solomon Rose,
Mayer Hallf,
Solomon Halff,
Samuel Plant,
Dora Simons,
Therese Ichenhauscr,
Iguatz Frankenstein,
Henry Lessner,
Joseph M. Benson,
Moses Geisenberger,
Jacob Mandlebaum,
Jetta Mandlebaum,
Simon Heavenrich,
Abram Abrams,
Sarah Abrams,
Abe D. Whitlock,
Walter M. Whitlock,
Adolph Waldner,
Sophie Kaufman,
Martin Simon,
Esther Straus,
Mannis Hilb,
Jacob Rheinstrom,
I .'. i,- !,,_,, ,,,

Joseph Levy,
Wolf Cohen,
Sarah Cohen,
Louis Wyler,
Eliza Faller,
Herman Faller,
Joseph H. 'aller,
Julius Blach,
Caroline Rose,
Rosalie Millhiser,
Lizzie Sands,
Louis Sternbach,
Herman Gronauer,
Miriam Blumenthal,
Abram Anspacher,
Fannie Silberman,
William Solomon Rayner,
Dr. Samuel Leon Frank,
Max Oppenheimer,
Esther Oppenheimer,
Israel Stern,
Isaac Mann,


Philadelphia, Pa. }

Sedalia, Mo.
Gallatli, Tenn.
Rome, Ga.
Ncew York, N. Y.
Tcrre Haule, Ind.
Indiatnapolis, Ind.

* Pa.









La Grange, Ind.
,Sal Anto.io, Tcx.

[ II
Evansville, nLd.
ii .' ,,, .1 1.

Madi.soi, Idl.
Philadelphia, Pa.
Nyew York, IV. Y.1

Detroit, Mich.
Riclhioind, lia.


St. Louis Mo.
New York,N. Y;
Cincinnati, O.







"
Lexiiolos, AK//.}

Birm, inyhamn Ala.

Richmosnl, Va.
Helena, Mont.
New York, N. Y.


S '
,



Rochester, N. Y.
Henderson, Ky.


$ 250
100
185
100
100
100
100
100
1,000
2,500
500
1,000
200
100-
100
100
100
250
100
100
500
250
100
250
100
200
400
100
300
200
200

400

400
100
100
100
100,
1,000
100
100
200
200
200
200

300

100
300
100
100
100
100

250
100
7,500
7,500
100
100
200
100


- 'I--














XVIII


Eva Wise,
Sarah Schradski,
Louis H. Mossier,
Kate II. Mossier,
Osher Glaser,
Bottie Glaser,
Carrie May,
-. i (Glaser tMay,
S. Newhoff,

1, I T i .. ,,
Joseph Bilim.
Sinon (oodm lall,
Sigmund Klein
Bertha oIvy Ochs,
Eva H. Balim.
Henrietta Sachs,
Solomon W. Levi,
Leopold Hilb,
Solomon Wise,
eorman Brolh,
Leahl ~~s'or t I n nrn q irtT
Israel -, ..1!. ,,
HI annual. I1 ... I ..
Sidney Bernheimer,
Louis Weber,
Simoln Groenobaum,
Bertha Krohn Livingston,
Fannie Reiter Fruhauf,
Fannic Bloon,
Simon Katz,
Moses Vil _-l- -. l :r
M oses i i .. .,
Abraham Goldsmith,
Hannah Strauss,


Cincinnati, 0

Cotujcil j ,r. la.

Cincinnuai, 0.




Rochesler, iN. Y.
Loui,urille, IY. (

Cincinnati, 0.
Tr'ln.

Cincinuali, 0.





ill, l.
*' A la.
II.






0.
Ligomter, 0nd.
Cincinnati, O.


-- --














THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF

THE UNION OF

American Hebrew Congregations


PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD.
PHOENIX CLUB,
CINCINNATI, June 21 1908.
Pursuant to the call of the President, the Executive Board
met in semi-annual session at 10 o'clock A.M. Present: Messrs.
Isaac W. Bernheim, Bernhard Bettmann, Sol Fox, J. Walter
Freiberg, Louis J. Goldman, Louis Krohn, M. Loth, Max B. May,
and Sigmund Rheinstrom. President Louis J. Goldman in the
Chair; Lipman Levy, Secretary.

Excuses for Non-Attendance.
Excuses for not attending this meeting were presented from
Messrs. Josiah Cohen, B. Ginsburg, Harry Hart, Charles Hutzler,
Samuel Katz, Adolph Kraus, Victor H. Kriegshaber, B. Mahler,
Martin A. Marks, Elias Michael, Adolph S. Ochs, A. Oppenheimer,
Marcus Rauh, Julius Rosenwald, Emil Selig, Charles Shohl,
Isaac Strouse, Sol. Sulzberger, Julius Weis, Samuel Woolner.

Membership.
The Secretary reported that the following Congregations had
become members of The Union of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions since the last meeting of this Board:









THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Beth Israel ..................... Hartford, Conn.
Beth-ha-Tephila. ................. Asheville, N. C.
Temple Israel ................... Boston, Mass.
Beth Israel ................... .. Greenwood, Miss.
Congregation Temple Israel, of Uniontown, Pa., was on motion
suspended for non-payment of dues.

Appropriation for Board of Managers.
The sum of $7,500.00 was appropriated for expenses of the
Board of Managers of Synagog and School Extension.

Vacancies in Board of Governors.
The President stated that since the last meeting of this Board
we have been deprived by death of Simon Greenebaum, of Cin-
cinnati, 0., and Rev. Dr. Jacob Voorsanger, of San Francisco, Cal.,
who for many years rendered valuable services as members of the
Board of Governors of the Hebrew Union College. The resigna-
tions of Messrs. Louis Stern, of New York City, and Arnold Kohn,
of Philadelphia, Pa., as members of the Board of Governors of
the Hebrew Union College, were presented and accepted.

Election of Members of the Board of Governors.
Messrs. Max B. May, J. Walter Freiberg and Sigmund Rhein-
strom, were appointed a committee to report nominations for
members of the Board of Governors of the Hebrew Union Col-
lege.
The committee retired and on their return presented the fol-
lowing report:

To the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations :
GENTLEMEN: Your Committee presents the following names
for members of the Board of Governors of the Hebrew Union
College: Mr. Philip J. Goodheart, of New York City, to fill the


[JUNE


6006









PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD


unexpired term of Mr. Louis Stern, resigned. Mr. Alfred Klein,
of Philadelphia, Pa., to fill the unexpired term of Mr. Arnold
Kohn, resigned. Mr. Irwin M. Krohn, of Cincinnati, O., to fill
the unexpired term of the late Simon Greenebaum. Mr. Henry
Wangenheim, of San Francisco, Cal., to fill the unexpired term
of the late Dr. Jacob Voorsanger. Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz, of
Philadelphia, Pa. Mr. Bernhard Bettmann, of Cincinnati, O.
Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, of Philadelphia, Pa. Rev. Dr. Charles
S. Levi, of Peoria, Ill. Rev. Dr. J. Leonard Levy, of Pittsburg,
Pa. Rev. Dr. David Philipson, of Cincinnati, O. Rev. Dr. Joseph
Silverman, of New York City, and Rev. Dr. Joseph Stolz, of
Chicago, Ill., to succeed themselves for the term of three years,
beginning January 1, 1909.
Respectfully submitted,
MAX B. MAY,
J. WALTER FREIBERG,
SIGMUND RHEINSTROM.
Committee.
On motion the report was adopted, and the several candidates
therein named were duly elected.
Program for Twenty-First Council.
Messrs. Sigmund Rheinstrom (Chairman), B. Bettmann, J.
Walter Freiberg, Louis J. Goldman and Louis Krohn, were ap-
pointed a Committee to prepare a program for the Twenty-first
Council.
Mr. Emil Selig, of Philadelphia, Pa., was appointed a Com-
mittee to make preparations for the meeting of the Twenty-first
Council, and he was authorized to call to his assistance whoever
he might deem proper.
Committee on Falaslias.
The Committee on Falashes (see report of proceedings, page
5,991), reported progress, and upon their request were granted
further time,


6007


1908]









THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Committee on Publicity.
On motion, Messrs. Max B. May (Chairman), I. W. Bernheim,
Sol. Fox, J. Walter Freiberg and Charles Shohl, were appointed a
Committee on Publicity, to do whatever they might deem proper,
in order to secure a large attendance at the meeting of the
Twenty-first Council, and the Committee was authorized to expend
not to exceed $300 for that purpose.

Union of Jewish National Organizations.
A letter was read from Rev. Samuel Friedman, of Harrisburg,
Pa., with reference to a Union of Jewish National Organizations.
On motion, the communication was referred to a Committee com-
posed of Messrs. Louis J. Goldman (Chairman), Louis Krohn,
and M. Loth, and the Secretary was instructed to inform Rev.
Samuel Friedman of the action of the Board.

Appeal from Havana, Cuba.
A letter was read from the United Hebrew Congregation of
Cuba, of Havana, asking for financial assistance to improve its
Cemetery. The Executive Board resolved that it regretted that
it was not within its power to grant the request.

The foregoing minutes were read and approved.

Adjourned.



Louis J. GOLDMAN,
V I President.

i"I xa v LIPMAN LEVY,
Al/ % Secretary.


[JUNE


6008










PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD


MERCANTILE HALL,
PHILADELPHIA, January 18, 1909.
Pursuant to the order of the president the Executive Board
met at 2 o'clock P. M. Present: Messers. Bernhard Bettmann,
Solomon Fox, J. Walter Freiberg, Josiah Cohen, Bernard Gins-
burg, Samuel Katz, Adolf Kraus, Moritz Loth, Martin A. Marks,
Adolph S. Ochs, Abram Oppenheimer, Marcus Rauh, Emil Selig,
Solomon Sulzberger and Samuel Woolner. Mr. Adolf Kraus was
chosen to preside. Lipman Levy, Secretary

Excuses for Non-Attendance.
Excuses for not attending this meeting were presented from
Messrs. I. W. Bernheim, Louis J. Goldmau, Elias Michael and
Sigmund Rheinstrom.

Secretary's Report.
The secretary presented the following report, which was accepted:
PHILADELPHIA, January 18, 1909.
To the Executive Board of the Union of American Ifebrew Congre-
gations :
GENTLEMEN:-I beg leave to submit the following report:

MEMBERSHIP.
The following Congregation have become members of the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations since the last meeting of
this board:
Bene Israel. ............ ... Salt Lake City, Utah.
Beth El .................. Corsicana, Tex.
Bene Sholom ....... ...... Chicago Ill.
Mt. Sinai ................. Sioux City, Ia.
Emanuel .................. Statesville, N. C.
Beth El .................. Bessemer, Ala.
Gates of Prayer ............New Orleans, La.


6009










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Bene Israel ................ Baton Rouge, La.
Temple Israel of Harlem ... New York City.
Beth El ................... South Bend, Ind.
Har Sinai .............. .. Baltimore, Md.
Keneseth Israel .......... .Allentown, Pa.
American Hebrew Congregation, of Fremont, O., has resigned,
Very respectfully,
LIPMAN LEVY,
Secretary.
Amendment to Constitution.
Congregation Beth El, of Detroit, proposed the following
amendment to the Constitution:
Add to Section 6 the following: "It is provided, however, that
such representative or representatives shall be members in good
standing of a Congregation affiliated with the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations."

On motion the amendment was recommended to the Council for
adoption, with the following addition thereto: "Wives of mem-
bers and the rabbi of the congregation shall for the purpose of
such representation be considered members."

Correspondence was presented that had taken place with Con-
gregations Shaare Emeth, of St. Louis Mo.; Immanuel, Beaumont
Texas, and Moses Montefiore, of Marshall, Texas, with reference
to their financial relations towards the Union. On motion the
correspondence was referred to the incoming Executive Board.

Declination of Mr. Philip J. Goodheart.
Letters were read from Mr. Philip J. Goodheart declining the
position of member of the Board of Governors of the Hebrew
Union College. The declination was accepted, and the filling of
the vacancy thus created was referred to the incoming Executive
Board.


6010


[JANUARY










1909] PROCEEDINGS OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD 6011

President Goldman's address to the Twenty-first Council was
read and approved.

The foregoing minutes were read and approved.



: ADOLPH KRAUS,
President Pro-tenn.

SI LIPMAN LEVY,

( d on Secretary.



(Coutinued on page 6205)










6012 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER




ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE

Board of Governors Hebrew Union College.


CINCINNATI, O., November 1, 1908.
To the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew Congre-
gations :
GENTLEMEN :- The year just closed marked the advent of Dr.
David Neumark as a member of the Faculty of the College. He
took charge of his classes on December 1, 1907, filling the Chair of
Jewish Philosophy. During the year he wrote an essay on "The
Philosophy of Jehuda Hallevi," which was published by the Board
as the literary portion of the catalog of 1908. On January 29th Dr.
Neumnark was formally introduced to the public in the Auditorium
of the Reading Road Sabbath-school.

The death of Simon Greenebaum, which occurred on the evening
of Friday, February 21st in the Temple of Congregation Bene Israel
and that of Dr. Jacob Voorsanger, of San Francisco, on April 28th,
robbed the Board of two energetic and valuable members.

A rule governing the tenure ofoffice of the members of the Faculty
was adopted, whereby after continuous and satisfactory service of
five years the appointment becomes practically a permanent one.

The Library was the recipient of a very valuable donation by the
family of the late Julius Rosenthal, of Chicago. The gift in detail
is quoted in the report of the Librarian, which shows the progress
and improvement in this important and constantly growing Depart-
ment of the College.










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


The Graduation Exercises took place on Saturday, June 27th, at
the Plum Street Temple. The Rabbinical degree was conferred on
three candidates, namely: Joel Blau, G. George Fox and Herman
Rosenwasser. Dr. William Rosenau delivered the baccalaureate
oration. On the following day, June 28th, the Silver Anniversary of
the First Graduation was celebrated by services at the Rockdale
Avenue Temple. The speakers were the graduates of the Class of
'83, viz.: Israel Aaron, Henry Berkowitz, Joseph Krauskopf and
David Philipson. The Alumni of the College, of whom more than,
fifty attended this celebration, were entertained at the Cincinnati
Club in the evening. A souvenir booklet is now in press containing
the addresses delivered on these occasions.

At the meeting of the Alumni Association held on the same day
a fund was created for the purpose of assisting young men during
their first year at College.

M\rs. Bertha Lewi, of New York City, widow of the late Dr. Lewi,
of Albany, N. Y., through her son Mr. Isidor Lewi, enriched the
Isaac M. Wise Memorial Room with a unique gift of historical value.
It consists of a small Dressing Table, to which is attached the follow-
ing autograph letter of Dr. Wise:


1908]


6013










6014 THTRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

gaTABLSHKD 184.
The American Israelite. LEO WISE & o00., PusuaOER. Die Deborah.
CINCINNATI, L74a- v/r4.
y~r <^/t- s^--i^ cetz--










4<~4
^ 'w L-e ,- /-



/ 4r ,- ,"' ,.A^f~
cj^r9L--Okwi- Ln, ^----^^i~e~


^^^-<^-----~7C- .^A-,C _I--A--- <
/ ^ .4<^$L- L^ _r^-----^^-L^-^.



-^^i ^i~ ^-^<^% -LaC t^-^--L--

^s-*~ if^C- -ew^^'^^^---L-f ~ ~ W/^^"^e- *

^c^^L^^~L-c~--:h~r-P--^^^J^^^^L










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


The College was formally opened for the scholastic year 1908-09
on Monday, October 12th. Many members of the Board and several
guests occupied seats in the Chapel. Dr. Kohler welcomed the
students to the Halls of Learning. Mr. Bettmann offered words of
encouragement on behalf of the Board. Addresses were also made
by Dr. Philipson, Dr. Grossmann, and Mr. Moritz Loth. In addition
to the twenty-nine students remaining over from last year,
eleven applicants registered. After examination these were assigned
to the following classes:

COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT.
Seniors 9 Grade "A" 10
Juniors none "B" none
III Collegiate none "C" 4
II Collegiate 8 "D" 5
I Collegiate 4

Total 21 Total 19

Of these thirteen are post graduates of Universities; two are
Seniors, six Juniors, six Sophomores and four Freshmen in the
University of Cincinnati; six are taking special courses and three
are students in our High Schools.

The Board extends thanks for the following contributions re-
ported to us by your Secretary during the year:

DONATIONS.
Bertha Mann, Henderson, Ky., in memory of her hus-
band, Isaac Mann $100 00
Charles & M. Schradski, Shelbyville, Ky., in memory of
their mother, Sarah Schradski 100 00
Kate H. Mossler, Council Bluff, Ia., in memory of her
husband, Louis I. Mossler 100 00


6015










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Estate of Sophia Glaser May, Cincinnati, Ohio, in mem-
ory of Osher Glaser, Bettie (laser, Carrie May and
Sophia Glaser May -
A. Hyman, Kansas City, Mo., in memory of his father,
Charles Hyman -
S. Blum, Louisville, Ky., in memory of Jacob Joseph
Blum, Joseph Blum and Simon Goodman -
Adolph S. Ochs, New York City, in memory of his
mother, Bertha Levy Ochs -
Michael Broh, Huntington, West Va., in memory of his
son, Herman Broh -
Executor of the Estate of Mrs. Leah Bernheimer of
Mobile, Ala., in memory of her son Sydney Bern-
heimer -
J. Lowengart, Portland, Ore., in memory of Leah Gearst
Lowengart -
Esther Cohen, Nashville, Tenn., in memory of her hus-
band, Israel Benjamin Cohen -
Lazarus Silverman, Chicago, Ill., in memory of his wife,
Hannah Silverman -
Sol. L. and Theodore L. Mossier, Council Bluffs, la., in
memory of their mother Kate H. Mossler -
Bertha Greenebaum, Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of her
husband Simon Greenebaum -
H. S. Livingston, Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of his
wife, Bertha Krohn Livingston -
LaFayette Bloom and sisters, Cincinnati, Ohio, in
memory of their sister Fannie Bloom -
Clara Kingsbaker, Los Angeles, Cal., in memory of her
husband, Moses Kingsbaker -
Mrs. Maurice Israel, Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of her
father, Simon Katz -


$400 00

100 00

300 00

100 00

100 00


300 00

100 00

100 00

100 00

100 00

500 00

200 00

100 00

200 00


100 00


6016


[NOVEMBER











REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


BEQUESTS.
Solomon Wise, Abbeville, La. -
Leopold Hilb, Cincinnati, Ohio -
Solomon W. Levi, Cincinnati, Ohio -
Henrietta Sachs, Cincinnati, Ohio -
Eva H. Baum, Camden, S. C.
Sigmund Klein, Cincinnaii, Ohio -
Bertha Newhoff, Cincinnati, Ohio -
Louis Weber, Chicago, Ill. -
Fannie Reiter Fruhauf, Cincinnati, Ohio
Moses M. Kaufman, Springfield, Ohio -
Abraham Goldsmith, Ligonier, Ind.,
Hannah Strauss, Cincinnati, Ohio -
SCHOLARSHIPS.
Congregation Rodeph Shalom -
Emanu-El Theological Seminary Association


DISBURSEMENTS.
FACULTY.
Dr. Kaufmann Kohler, President, Salary
Prof..Dr. Gotthard Deutsch, -
Prof. Ephraim Feldman, "
Advance -
Prof. Dr. David Neumark, Salary (14 mos.) -
Advance -
Associate Prof. Dr. M. Buttenwieser, Salary -
Instructor Siegmund Mannheimer, -
Instructor Julian Morgenstern,
tc Li i Ac,


Ai vance
Jennie Mannheimer, (Elocution) -


- $100 00
S 100 00
S 500 00
100 00
100 00
S 200 00
200 00
S 500 00
S 100 00
S 100 00
500 00
100 00


$237 35
600 00


$6,000 00
3,625 00
3,000 00
250 00
3,150 00
225 00
2,700 00
2,700 00
2,150 00
150 00
250 00
-- $24,200 00


Isaac Bloom, Salary


SECRETARY.


CUSTODIAN.
Jos. Mayer, Salary -- -


500 00

970 00


1908]


6017


-











THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


STIPENDARY ITEMS.
Scholarships and Loans -
Tuition Fees at University -
Transportation -


LIBRARY.
Purchases -
Fixtures and Maintenance
Adolph S. Oko, Librarian, Salary
Advance
M. Freund, Asst. Librarian, Salary
Advance

SUNDRIES.
Dr. David Neumark, Expenses
Advertising -
Printing, Postage and Stationery
Lectures -
Graduation Exercises -
Memorial Tablets -
Items not tabulated -


All of which is respectfully submitted.


-$5,872 50
772 00
38 53


- $1,342 03
895 17
1,550 00
150 00
480 00
40 00


$6,683 03


4,457 20


- $1,247 15
173 05
724 77
439 90
169 80
163 10
956 05
3,873 82

$40,684 05


BERNHARD BETTMANN,
President.


ISAAC BLOOM,

Secretary.


[NOVEMBER


6018










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Annual Report of President Dr. Kaufmann Kohler.

CINCINNATI, O., November 24, 1908.
To the Hon. President and Members of the Board of Governors of the
Hebrew Union College:.
GENTLEMEN: "Inml il "h 3l m "Great peace have they
that love Thy Law"-This beautiful Scriptural word which the im-
mortal founder of the Hebrew Union College, Isaac M. Wise, loved
to see written over all his official letters, seem to convey a special
meaning to me; as I am about to write my annual report this year.
Looking back over the five years I worked under your wise ad-
ministration and with your hearty co-operation, I am particularly
happy to realize that, with the aid of the Most High, the Source of
all blessing and inspiration, the College has attained a gratifying
state of prosperity, of perfect harmony and healthy progress all
that the Hebrew word ~1L "peace" implies. When with untried
powers as head of an educational institute and unfamiliar with the
inner work of the institution I accepted your call to the presidency,
I could not but reasonably expect years of trial and misgivings,
whether in regard to the handling of the students, or in my dealings
with or the choice of, the members of the Faculty, or in my rela-
tions to the alumni of the College to most of whom I was in a certain
sense a stranger. Thanks to God and to your kindly aid and en-
couragement, all the difficulties I encountered, while conscientously
endeavoring to continue the work of my illustrious predecessor up-
on the principles of American Reform Judaism, have been success-
fully overcome. Your implicit faith in my loyalty to the cause and
the wise and valued counsel of your high-minded and venerated
President, Mr. B. Bettmann, the benefit of whose rich experience I "
had on every important question in which I consulted him, made
my task easier, and when at last the crisis came which was to test
the very strength and character of our institution, it proved to be
in very deed the source of its reinvigoration, a great opportunity of


6019












reasserting its fundamental principles. Boldly and without fear of
contradiction I venture to assert that the Hebrew Union College
stands to-day firmer than ever before as THE Rabbinical School for
Progressive American Judaism and as an institution of Jewish
learning recognized for earnest, thorough and systematic study and re-
search, encouraging and stimulating free historical investigation
and independence of mind, while fostering above all loyalty to our
American land as the home and the hope of the progressive
American Jew.
Inasmuch as it is the chief aim and purpose of the College to
train young men for the high and sacred task of spiritual leaders
of American Israel and render them efficient and zealous workers in
the pulpit, the Religious School and the community at large, we do
not lay all the stress upon socalled Jewish Science ("JuedischeWis-
senschaft") which does not, as facts amply show, make its represen-
tatives immune from skepticism, agnosticism and religious indiffer-
ence. As was the case under the genial and inspiring influence of the
sainted Dr. Wise, so does the College training at present aim espe-
cially at inculcating and arousingin its students a truly religious
spirit, that holy fervor and religious enthusiasm which can not fail
to exert a wholesome influence upon the Congregations they are to
lead and to mould in a manner which mere booklore never can. In
taking full cognizance of the demands of our age and of our Western
civilization, we look to sincerity and consistency which alone creates
wholesouled and vigorous men of courage and conviction, not mere
opportunists who are led, instead of being leaders. Yet at the
same time the Hebrew Union College with its steadily growing
library has grown to be a powerful source and stimulus of research
also to its alumni and all those who apply for intellectual, or scien-
tific help and advice as devotees of the Torah.
To mention the Library first which, thanks to generous-hearted
donors, such as Julius Rosenwald, the family of the late Julius
Rosenthal and the rabbi emeritus Dr. A. J. Messing, all of Chicago,
and thanks also to the annual contribution of $1000 most judicious-
ly granted by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, has


[NOVEMBER


6020


THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


of recent years assumed the proportions of a first class Jewish
library, it is not merely a monument appealing to our pride; it is
a most helpful instrument for the promotion of learning and scien-
tific research. It provides the students and graduates as well as the
professors and accomplished scholars with the most recent and the
oldest literature pertaining to various subjects. It is in one word,
a working library in the most comprehensive sense which keeps pace
with the progress of the time, aside from the possession of rare
editions which lend it especial value.
Our staff of teachers counts in its midst men who occupy the
highest rank in their department of learning, but, what I deem to
be of the utmost importance, they all are fihe teachers who take
personal and warm interest in the progress of their pupils, and they
work harmoniously together for the promotion of the welfare of the
institution and its disciples. In my selection of Prof. Dr. David
Neumark, as Professor of Jewish Philosophy, and of Dr. Julian
Morgenstern, an alumnus of the Hebrew Union College as Instructor
in Hebrew and kindred languages, I was particularly fortunate. The
former, an excellent master in his domain of learning, did not mere-
ly reflect new lustre upon the College but gave, after but a few
months' stay with us, ample evidence of his versatility and his
familiarity with the language and customs of our land and of his
thorough sympathy with our aims and'ideals, and he has won the
esteem, the confidence and good will of his pupils as well as of his
colleagues. Dr. Morgenstern also proved to be the right man in the
right place. With his scholarly attainments and his experience as
American rabbi he knows how to exert a wholesome and stimulating
influence upon the whole student body, to some of whom as the
youngest in the Faculty he stands in closer relation than the rest.
Owing to the resignation of Dr. Philipson as Professor of Homi-
letics which was accepted by your honored body and myself with
the greatest regret, I had to take charge of this department besides
that of Theology and Hellenistic Literature, but I think that with the
practical experience of thirty-four years in the Jewish Ministry at
my command, I succeeded in maintaining this department on the


1908]


6021










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


high plane on which my honored predecessor had held it for so
many years. It affords me especial pleasure in this connection to
state that Dr. Philipson still gives weekly lectures on Historical and
Practical Theology to the Graduating Class in addition to my own,
thus showing that his interest in the College has not abated.
In the department of Ethics and Paedagogy in charge of Dr.
Grossmann, of Jewish History and Literature in charge of Prof. Dr.
Deutsch, of Talmud in charge of Prof. Feldman, and of Biblical
Exegesis in charge bf Dr. Buttenwieser as Professor, and of Mr.
Mannheimer as Instructor, no essential change has been made.
In view of the fact that the minister of a Jewish Congregation is
in these days expected to take an active part in the charitable and
philanthropic work of the Community and accordingly to be
familiar with the various sociological problem with which the
American Jewry is confronted, we also introduced a course of lectures
on Jewish Philanthropy given by Dr. Boris Bogen the Superinten-
dent of United Jewish Charities to the Senior and Junior classes
which are attended also by outsiders. Besides, public lectures on
such and similar subjects were given by eminent scholars during
the winter at the new Avondale Temple under the auspices of the
Hebrew Union College, which elicited the interest of many in our
institution.
The number of our registered students has been increased to forty.
Of these eight from the Graduating Class and one belonging to the
Seniors will graduate a year later; eight are in the Second Collegiate
and four in the First Collegiate Class. In Grade A we have ten, in
C four and in D five students. Having come hither from all parts
of the country, these students are for the most part born and bred
in America, and all of them are imbued with the right spirit and
order, full of the noble ambition of being some day the banner-
bearers of Israel's great truth. No one can listen to the sermons
the Seniors preach alternately at the Chapel on Sabbath afternoon
but realizes that the flower and the promise of young American
Israel is found there, voicing in accents of true inspiration the
message of Judaism.


6022


[NOVEMBER









REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Of course the ancient Rabbinical dictum: "Take care of the sons
of the poor, for they are destined to be the teachers of the Torah"
still holds good with us, since the wealthier classes fail to take suf-
ficient pride in having their children occupy the honored position
of rabbi. Still the authorities of the Hebrew Union College have
acted wisely in changing the former stipends into Scholarships which
are awarded to those,.who do good, meritorious work. Owing to
the munificence-of Mr. Sigmund Rheinstrom, of this city, of Mr.
Nusbaum, of Chicago, of Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank, of Baltimore
who endowed a William Solomon Rayner and a Dr. Samuel Leon
Frank Scholarship, of Mr. Jacob H. Schiff, who endowed a
Kaufmann Kohler Scholarship, and of Mrs. Julius Beer, of New
York, also of Rabbi Gries' Congregation of Cleveland and of mem-
bers of Dr. Berkowitz's Congregation in Philadelphia the College has
been put in a better position than heretofore to encourage able and
promising young students to consecrate their lives to the Jewish
ministry. In addition the H. U. C. Alumni Association has recently
started a Scholarship fund for students during the first year of their
entrance into the College. But a great deal more is yet to be done
both by individuals blessed with wealth and by large and wealthy
Congregations to increase the scholarship fund, and thereby to en-
large the scope and influence of the College for the promotion of the
cause of Jewish learning and of the Jewish faith in the spirit of our
institution. It seems to me that an agitation in favor of having the
Hebrew Union College remembered by well-to-do Jews in their last
will, carried on, especially in the East, would result in a substantial
increase of the income of the College and enhance the interest of the
people in our cause. In voting recently for a Jacob Voorsanger
Scholarship to be given to the Hebrew Union College in memory of
their much lamented illustrious Rabbi Dr. Jacob Voorsanger the
San Francisco Congregation set a noble example to many.
In consequence of the financial depression during the last year
the work of the new building of our College has made little head-
way, but I have no doubt that it will be resumed with new energy
and zeal at the biennial Convention of the Union of American


1908]


6023









THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Hebrew Congregations; I feel especially prompted to urge its need,
as I find that in our present locality we are being more and more
hampered both as to time and space, because we lack many facilities
that a more commodious structure in the vicinity of the University
would afford us. The great distance from the University and our
residences up town almost compel us to have our regular lessons
only in the afternoon hours, when the students' mind is no longer
as fresh and alert as in the morning, and our private lessons in the
teacher's home. Still greater inconvenience is afforded us by the
limited number of rooms at our disposal in view of the larger space
required for our ever expanding library, which does not even allow
us to have special class rooms assigned to the various members of
the Faculty. I need not make especial mention of the fact that the
unfriendly and uninviting locality of the College and its surround-
ings are anything but in keeping with the great national institution
such as the Hebrew Union College is.
Only when we have a large auditorium at our disposel, can we
compete with other institutions in affording instruction to people
of all classes desirous to study Jewish literature, history, philosophy
and religion and offering them courses of lectures on all matters per-
taining to Judaism and its daughter-religions, and thus carry out
the plan conceived by the framers of the constitution of the College.
Still the very gratifying fact that a new turning-point has come
to our beloved institution; that since the celebration of the twenty-
fifth anniversary of Graduation from the College a new spirit has
taken hold of the Alumni and that in many respects the new schol-
astic year's work has begun under the most favorable auspices, and
with prospects of further extension aad expansion of our activities
-all this seems to me to dictate the words'of the prophet: "Enlarge
the place of thy tent and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine
habitation ; spare not, lengthen thy cords and'strengthen thy stakes.
For thou shalt spread abroad on the righthand and the left, and
thy seed shall possess the nations." So may God's'blessing rest
upon our institution and strengthen the work of our hand for the
sake of Israel's heritage and for the glory of God.
Respectfully submitted,
DR. K. KOHLER.


6024


[NOVEMBER










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Annual Report of the Librarian.
The Board of Governors, Hebrew Union College:
GENTLEMEN-In submitting my first annual report as librarian, I
wish to call your attention to the exact nature of the work and the
manner in which it has been pursued during the past year, and also
to certain needs of the library that have suggested themselves from
time to time as the work has progressed.
There was a great increase of work during the past year an in-
crease caused both by larger accessions and by reorganizing the
work in accordance with the science of library-economy-to make
the resources of the library as readily accessible as possible, and of
keeping every part of the library up to date. To accomplish this
work properly has required the absolute concentration of all my
efforts. I shall dwell on the different departments of my work, not
simply as to reading and searching, but as to the mechanical ar-
rangement, the acquisition of books, classification, cataloguing, book-
binding and circulation-in a word, organization. Much of this
work has been pioneer work in our library; sometimes slow, tedious,
but always leading to excellent results with the vast wealth of un-
exploited resources hidden on the shelves of the library.
MECHANICAL ARRANGEMENT.
The mere mechanical arrangement is the first change that strikes
the eye. Many corners of the library have already been transformed
into things of dignity and beauty, by substituting neatness and
uniformity for the chaos into which books are apt to fall if neglected
for ever so short a period. The library in spite of difficulties is as-
suming a more inviting and fitting external appearance. Our rare
and precious books, of which a considerable number has been found
this year, are being separated from the mass, to be kept as they
should, under lock and key, to be used only under proper super-
vision and protected from unnecessary handling. Likewise our
text-books have been withdrawn from the groups with which their
subject-matter connects them, and then brought together by them-
selves in the Student's Room," partly on account of the over-


6025










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


crowded condition of the library shelves. The introduction of "New
Book Shelves" has proved a very successful innovation. The more
interesting of the new books acquired are placed on these shelves for
a month before being put in their permanent places, so that the
members of the College can easily keep track of the latest acquis-
itions; and the increased use of such books is most gratifying. The
separation of reference books from others insures the student that
they will always be available and facilitates his work considerably.
ACQUISITION OF BooI(s.
The acquisition of books during the past year was rather heavy
from each of the regular sources, viz: purchases and gifts. A third
source has been added, the exchange of duplicates. The details are
shown in the appended table. From this it will appear that there
were more volumes purchased than during the preceding year with-
out including the purchases (about 1,000 volumes) from the Rashi
Memorial Fund, as these books have not been accessioned as yet.
The most notew'.rthy single gift of the year was the 240 volumes
donated by the heirs of the late Julius Rosenthal, of Chicago. All
the purchasing has been done with the most painstaking and
sytematic care and searching to avoid the'unintentional purchase of
duplicates.
CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGUING.
Every book, pamplet or sheet is done with full bibliographical in-
vestigations; and analyticals, when necessary, are made. Whatever
is thus done is of permanent value, unlike a "temporary" or
"preliminary" cataloguing, which would be only of temporary and
questionable usefulness, except as a finding-list with no biblio-
graphical significance: I consider the method of the so-called
"incomplete" working unfortunate, a waste of time and money.
The classification has been extended in many departments. Along
these lines we have been forced to do the most of our pioneer work.
Hebrew books require many cross-references to make a uniform
author-entry possible. A full title-entry with the necessary re-
ferences is also made for each Hebrew book.


6026


[NOVEMBER










1908] REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 6027
BOOXBINDING.
Bookbinding, especially of a collection with so many old works
as our own, is a source of constant care. To preserve the most
rigid uniformity in sets, to be sure that there are no missing or mis-
placed pages -for which purpose every book must be collated before
it is checked off-to select that which is best suited for each book
under the circumstances, and to keep an accurate bindery-record of
orders and prices, have perhaps occupied an undue portion of our
time, but a great part of the improvement in the appearance of the
library already mentioned is attributable to the attention paid to
this rather technical side of the work.
CIRCULATION.
The circulation has received our attention, and a most rigid
charging-system of books accompanied by a most liberal system
of distributing them has been instituted. The whereabouts of every
book or pamphlet in circulation can be ascertained at any time, and,
the danger of losing books through oversight or forgetfulness is
avoided. All this naturally requires diligence in order to catch up
with the arrears of work in cataloguing, classifying and in the care
of pamphlet files, to forward promptly bookorders, dispose of
duplicates, handling gifts and preparing for the bookbinder. Parallel
with this.work, and more intricate in some respects, is the handling
of old periodicals. We have already been fortunate enough to com-
plete a number of valuable sets, while others, are collated or being
collected preparatory to completing them. This work, however, in-
volving much labor and search, considerable expense, and good
fortune in finally finding the missing single numbers, title pages and
indexes in dealers' advertisements, can not, of course, be finished
all at once. At the same time we are re-classifying and catalogu-
ing our entire collection of periodicals.
Now all that is needed to perfect the library seems to be more
room and more time, presupposing, of course, that the same gener-
ous and intelligent support on the part of all those connected with
the institution that has been accorded the librarian during the past










6028 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

year will be continued. For all the co-operation, I take this op-
portunity to express my sincere thanks. For the present, in our
cramped quarters, with large folios crowding alongside of octavos,
with books that properly belong together in major groups, neces-
sarily scattered because of the unlibrary-like arrangement of the
shelves, we must simply continue to do the best we can. I recom-
mend, however, that a bookcase be purchased at once for the
rare and precious books that I mentioned above, so that they may
be properly kept.
In conclusion, I wish to acknowledge my indebtedness to my
assistant, Mr. P. Freund, who has been laboring faithfully to mas-
ter such details of cataloguing, etc., as have been entrusted to his
care, and for his loyal support jn the general conduct of the library.
Respectfully submitted,
ADOLPH S. OKO, Librarian.
June 1, 1908.


STATISTICS.
The statistics are shown in the following table:
Accessions (including periodical publications):
By purchase ......................................... 652
By gift ........................... ........ .. ......... 310
By exchange ......................... ............... .. 62

Total................. ... ...... ............. 1,024
Books catalogued and classified. ......................... 2,015
(This number includes 124 "Bound-withs")
Pamphlets catalogued and classified. ........ ...... 788
Cards made and filed. ..................... .......... 4,660
Books bound, rebound, repaired, etc .................. 818
Amount of duplicates sold. ................... .. ..... $187 80
Amount of duplicates exchanged ................... .. $ 77 55
Books loaned and renewed........................... ; 858










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS '


DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE
FROM JUNE 1, 1907, TO MAY 31, 1908.

Alliance Israelite Universelle: Ibn Kaspi, Joseph. Sharsherot
Kesef." 1907. Meshullam b. Moses, of Beziers. "Sefer Ha-
Haschlamah." V. 1-2. Paris-Warsaw, 1885-1907. Saadia b.
Joseph Fayumi, Gaon. "Pirush." Jerusalem, 1907. p.

Association for International Conciliation. Its pub.: The Results
of the Second Hague Conference. p.

Berkowitz, Dr. H. His Work: The Primacy of the Congregation.
1907. p.

Bernstein, Ignaz, Warsaw : Bernstein, I., and Segel, B. W. Juedische
SSpruechwoerter und Redensarten. Warschau, 1908.

C. C. A. R. Its Year Book. -No. 17. Chicago, 1907.

Congregation Beth Ahaba, Richmond, Va. Its Year Book. No. 1.
1907-08. p.

De Sola, M. His Work: Jewish Ministers. 1905. p.

Deutsch, Prof. Dr. G.: "Bezalel," 2. Bericht. Berlin, 1907. p.
Bloch, M. L'AlsaceJuive. 1907. p. Brisbane Hebrew Congre-
gation. Report. 1906-07. p. Congregation Beth Ahaba,
Richmond, Va. Year Book. No. 1. 1907-08. p. Congre-
gation B'nai B'rith, Los Angeles, Cal. Year Book. No. 8. 1907.
p. Deutelabaum, L., Chicago. The Home For Jewish Orphans,
Chicago, Ill. 1908. p. Felsenthal, B. Leopold Zunz. p.
Immigration Bills of Senator Latimer and Congressmen Bur-
nett and Gardner. N. Y. (1907) p. Jewish Chautauqua
Society. Proceedings of the Second Annual Assembly. p.
Koplowitz, J. Mosheeach or Messiah. Athens, Ga., 1907.
Landsberger, J. Worte der Erinnerung an A. Bonnheim. p.
Leavitt, E. Songs of Grief and Gladness. Chicago, 1907.


1908]


6029










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Levy, J. M. A Funeral Service. Maton, 1907. p. Liberal.
Verein f. d. Angelegeiheiten der jud. Gemeinde z. Berlin.
Drei Vortrage. Berlin, 1907. p. Lippe, K. Zwei Vortrage.
Jassy, 1907. p. Litt. Paliistina-Almanach, von A. M. Luncz.
1907. p. Michael, H., and Znnz, L. Briefwechsel. Frank-
furt a. M., 1907. p. Powell, H. H. The Supposed Hebraisms
in the Grammar of the Bible. Aramaic. (San Francisco), 1907.
p. Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel. Year Book. No.
29.- p. Sanatorium (The). V. 1, No. 4. p. Schiff, J. H.
Address Before the Chautauqua Summer Assembly. 1907.
Philadelphia, 1907. p. Schreiber, E. The Bible in the
Light of Modern Theology. Pittsburg, 1907. Spanier, M. G.
G. Falke als Lyriker. Hamburg, 1907. p. Weiss, H. Harvest
Time. 1907. p. Weiss, H. Poems. 1907. p.

Dickhart Cincinnati: C. G. Kayser's Bucher-Lexicon. Sach und
SSchlagwortregister z. 29. und 30. Bande. 1895-1902. 2 v.
Epstein, Mrs. A. Herzog, The Protestant Theological and Ecclesi-
astical Encyclopedia. V. 1-2. 1858-1860. 2 V.
Feldman, D., Cincinnati: Herzog-Hauck's Realencyclopadie. Bd.
19. 1907.
Fine, J., Baltimore, Md. His Work: "Neginash ben Jehudah."
N. Y., 1907.
Freidus, A. S., N. Y.: Schomer, A. S. How We Can Help Our-
selves. 1907. p.
Friedberg, A. M. His work : The Jew in German Literature. 1907. p.

Frisch, E. His work: Is the U. S. a Christian Nation? 1906. p.

Ges. z. Ford d. Wiss. d. Judt.: Kaufmann, D. Gesammelte
Schriften. Bd. 1. Frankfurt a. M. 1908.
Gratz College. Its Pub.: Greenstone, Dr. J. H. Statistical Data
of the Jewish Religious Schools in Philadelphia. 1907. p.


[NOVEMBER


6030










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


I. O B. B. Cincinnati Lodge No. 4. Its Pub.: Leo N. Levy
Memorial Vol. (1907).

Kohler, Prof. Dr. K. His Work: The'Origin and Function of
Ceremonies, (repr.) 1908. (2 copies.) p. Biedenkapp, G.
Babylonien u. Indogermanien. Berlin, 1903. p. Budde, K.
Was soll die Gemeinde aus dem Streit um Babel und Bibel
lernen ? Tubingen, 1903. Fuchs, B. Kaiser Wilhelm, Prof.
Delitzsch. u. d. babyl. Verwirrung. Wien, 1903. p. Glas-
ser, E. Altjemenische Nachrichten. Munchen, 1906. p.
Grimme, H. D. Gesetz Hammurabis u. Moses. 1903. p.
Heyn, J. Zum Streit um Babel u. Bibel. Greifswald. 1903.
p. Leimdorfer, D. Der JHWH Fund von Babel in der Bibel.
1903. p. Kley, E. Predigt-Skizzen. Lpz., 1856. Koenig, E.
Bibel und Babel. Berlin, 1902. p. Koenig, E. Babyloniens
Kultur und die Weltgeschichte. Berlin, 1908. p. Mann-
heimer, Predigten. Porges. Bibelkunde und Babelfunde. Lpz.
1903. p. Rosenthal, L. A. Bibel trotz Babel: Lpz. 1903. p.
Kranken-Unterstiitzungs-Institut. Dresden. Its Pub.: Z. 110. Jahr-
Feier, 1907.
Landes-Rabbiner-Seminar. Budapest. Its Pub.: Jhrsbr. 1907.
Lehranstalt f. d. Wiss. d. Judt. Its Pub.: Elbogen, J. Studien z.
Geschicte d. jud. Gottesdienstes. Berlin, 1907. Festschrift, von
J.Elbogen and J. Honiger.
Meyer, A., N. Y. His Work: History of the City of Gaza. N. Y.,
1907.

Morgenstern, Dr. J.: Anti-Semitismus und die ethische Bewegung.
Berlin, 1893. Cassel, P. S. Das TausendjThrige Reich. Berlin,
1890. Delitzsch, F. Ernste Fragen. Lpz., 1888. Harnack, A.
and Delbruck. Evangelisch-Sozial. Berlin, 1907. Lemann, J.
Eintritt d. Israel. i. d. buergerliche Gesellschaft. Rixheim, 1888.
Waldenberg, A. Die isocephale blonde Rassen element unter
jud. Taubstummen. 1902.


1908]


6031










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Neumark, Prof. Dr. D. His Work: Gesch. d. jud. Philosophie d.
Mittelalters. Berlin, 1907.

Philipson, Rev. Dr. D. His Work: The Reform Movement in
Judaism. 1907. (7 copies.) Deutsch, J., and Deutsch, D.
Riicksprache. Breslau, 1.. I :. Ohio State University Bulletin.
Commencement number. V. 11, No. 15. June, 1907. p.

Putkammer & Muhlbrecht, Publishers: Rappaport, M. W.: C. W.
Dohn u. s. Thesen. 190S.

Rabbiner-Seminar ("Hochschule"), Berlin. Its Pub.: Jhrsbr. 1907.
(2 copies.)

Schloessinger, Dr. M. Kuldell, A. R. Reform Judaism and Primi-
tive Christianity. 1907. p. Kuldell, A. R. The Jewish View.
1907. p.
Stolz, Rev. Dr., Chicago: Beckendorf, H. Neueste Denkwuerdig-
keiten. Lpz., 1864. Hajonah. Ztschr. Hft. 1. Berlin, 1851.
Ha-Techijjah, Ztschr. Hft. 1. 1850. Holdheim, S. Rode am
Sabath Parschath Schekalim. 1837. p. Jewish Directory of
Detroit. Pub. by Knoppow & Son, 1907. Rappaport, D. Ner
Mizwah (and appendix) Or Torah. 1797.

Schulman, Rev. S. His Sermon: Shall Am. Judaism Surrender
Its Ideals ? 1907. p.

Stevens, G. W., Director Toledo Museum of Art: Spiegelberg, W.
Papyrus Libbey. Toledo, O., 1907.

Stiefel, Bros., Slovina, Kansas: Thaten d. Grossen. (Manuscript.)

Temple Emanu-El. Its Pub.: The Temple Emanu El Pulpit.
No. 1-2.
U. A. H. C.: Adler, F. The Moral Instruction of Children. N.Y.,
1907. Am.-Jewish Year Book. 1907-08. Crooker, J. H. Re-
ligious Freedom in Am. Education. Boston, 1903. Griggs,


[NOVEMBER









1908] REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 6033

E. H. Moral Education. N. Y., 1906. 4. ed. Straus, O. S.
Religious Liberty in the U. S. N. Y., 1896. Strauss, O. S.
Roger Williams. N. Y. 1899.

University of Pa.: Greenstone, Dr. J. H. The Turkoman Defeat
at Cairo by Solomon b. Joseph Ha-Kohen. 1906.

Verband d. Vereine f. jud. Gesch. u. Lit. i. Deutschland. Their
Pub.: Jahrbuch f. jud. Gesch. u. Lit. No. 11. Berlin, 1908.

Wechsler, Dr. H., Cleveland, O. 93 volumes, 163 pamphlets (not yet
accessioned).


FROM THE HEIRS OF THE LATE JULIUS ROSENTHAL,
OF CHICAGO.
Abot. Sayings of the Jewish Fathers. With Notes. By C. Taylor.
Cambridge, 1897. 2. ed. Die Sprueche der Vaeter. Hrsg von
H. L. Strack. Berlin, 1888. 2. ed.
Allier R. Voltaire et Calas. Paris, 1898.
Allihn, F. H. T. Die Grundlagen der Allg. Ethik. Lpz. 1861.
Apocrypha. The Apocrypha of the O. T. With Notes. By E. C.
Bissel. New York, 1880.
Aristotle. Politik. Lpz., 1880.
Augustine, Church Father. Die Bekenntnisse. Lpz., 1888.
Bahya b. Joseph Ibn Pakuda. Die Herzenspflichten. Uebers. von
R. F. Fuerstenthal. Breslau, 1836.
Baugey. G. De la condition legal du culte Israelite en France et
en Algerie. Paris 1899.
Bauer, B. Philo, Strauss und Renan. Berlin, 1874. (Together with
2 more p.)
Bamberger, L. Zur Naturgeschichte des franz. Krieges. Lpz. 1871.









6034 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

Beneke, F. E. System d. Logik. Thl. 1-2. Berlin, 1842.
Bernhardy, G. Grundriss d. griech. Literatur. Thl. 1. Halle
1876. 4 ed.
Bernstein, A. Naturkraft als Geisteswalten. Berlin, 1874.
Bible: Polyglotten-Bibel. Bd. 1. Bielefeld, 1863. 3 ed.
Bible: Genesis. Uebrs. von H. Gunkel. Goettingen, 1901.
Bible: The Ten Commandments in ancient and modern languages.
Chicago, 1893. p.
Bible: Liber Ezechiels. (Ed. by J. S. Baer.) Lipsiae, 1884.
Bible: Die Sprueche, erkl. von G. Wildeboer. Freiburg, 1897.
Bible: Worte des Sammlers (Koheleth). In Deutsche Reime ge-
bracht, von H. Rosenthal. N. Y., 1885. p.
Bible: The Book of Job. (Ed. by C. Siegfried.) Lpz., 1893. p.
Biedermann, K. Deutschland im 18ten Jahrhundert. Bd. II, 1.
Lpz., 1858. Binder, W. Briefe von Dunkelmaennern. Stutt-
gart, 1876.
Bisohoff, E. Thalmud Katechismus. Lpz., 1904.
Bloch, M. Die Civil Process-Ordnung i. Mosaisch-Rabbinischem
Rechte. Budapest, 1882. p.
Bluntschli, J. K. Denkwuerdiges aus meinem Leben. Thl. 1-3.
Noerdlingen, 1884.
Blutprozess (Der) von Tisza-Eszlar. New York, 1883.
Boehmer, H. Geschichte der Naturwiss. Weltanschauung. Gotha.
1872.
Brandes, G. Die Hauptstroemmungen der Literatur.... Bd. 1-4,
Berlin, 1872-1876.
Brasch, M. Die Philosophie der Gegenwart. Lpz., 1888.
Braun, A. Die Ergebnisse der Sprachwiss. Cassel, 1872.










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Braun, J. W. Lessing. Bd. 1-2. Berlin, 1884-1893.
Brunner, S. Lessingiasis und Nathanologie. Paderborn, 1890.
Bruno, G. Reformation des Himmels. Lpz., 1889.
Bruno, G. Festschrift. Lpz., 1889. p.
Canonas et deoreta Concilii Tridentini. Ratisbonae, 1866.
Cassel, D. Geschichte der Juedischen Litteratur. Abtl. 1-2. Ber-
lin, 1872-1873.
Chalybaeus, H. M. FnI. ... ,il.!.....>phie. Kiel, 1861. (Bound
together with 2 more p.)
Colurm.na, Petrus (Galatinus. De arcanis' catolice ueritatis. (Or-
thonae Maris : Gershan Sancino, 1518.) Very rare!
Cornill, K. H. Einleitung i. d. A. T. Fl. ;I. ii i. B., 1891.
Dahn, F. Die Vernanft im Recht. Berlin, 1879.
Darmsteter, M. J. La vie de Ernest Renan. Paris, 1898. 2 ed.
Delitzsch, F. Ein Tag in Capernaum. Lpz., 1873. 2. ed.
Diez, F. Grammatik der Romanischen Sprachen. Bonn, 1882.
Dilthey, W. Einleitung in der Geisteswiss. Bd. 1. Lpz., 1883.
Dohm, C. W. von. Ueber die Buergerliche Verbesserung der Juden.
Thl. 1-2. Berlin, 1781-1783.
Driver, S.'R. Isaiah. His Life and Times. New York, (188-).
Drumont, E. A. Das Verjudete Frankreich. T1. 1-2. Berlin, 1889-
1890.
Druskowitz, H. Moderne Versuche eines Religionsersatzes. Heidel-
berg, 1886.
Duncker, M Geschichte des Alterthums. Bd. 1. Lpz., 1878. 5 ed.
Eisenmenger, J. A. Entdecktes Judenthum. In 2 Theilen. Frank-
fort on the Main, 1700.
Eucken, R. Der Wahrheitsgehalt der Religion. Lpz., 1901.


6085


1908]










6036 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

Ewald H. Geschichte des Volkes Israel. Bd. 1. Goettingen,
1864. 3 ed.
Feuerbach, L. Erlaeuterungen und Ergaenzungen. Lpz., 1846.
Fridrich, F. Anleitung zur Erlernung des Lesens in 15 Sprachen.
Prag, 1885.
Fries, J. F. System der Logik. Heidelberg, 1837. 3. ed.
Fripp, F. I. The Composition of the Book of Genesis. London,
1892.
Garetti, M. Catholicisme et Judaisme. Paris, 188-.
Geffken, J. Aus der Werdezeit des Christenthums. Lpz., 1904.
Geiger, A. D. Judenthum und seine Geschicbte. Abthl. 1-2.
Breslau, 1865. 2 ed.
Geiger, A. Nachgelassene Schriften. Bd. 1-3. Berlin, 1875-1376.
Geiger, A. D. Urschrift und Uebersetzung der Bibel. Breslau, 1857.
Geiger, L. Vortraege und Versuche. Dresden, 1890.
Gesenius, H. F. W. Hebraeische Grammatik. Lpz., 1896.
Gasenius, H. F. W. Hebr. u. Chald. Handwoerterbuch. Lpz. 1883.
9 ed.
Gesenius, H. F. W. Hebr. Elementarbuch. Thl. 2. Koeln, 1858.
9 ed.
Gesaenge fuer den Oeffentlichen Juedischen Gottesdienst. Phila-
delphia, 1862.
Goethe, J. W., von, and Eckermann, J. P. Gespraeche. Bd. 1-3.
Lpz., (1884?).
Graetz, H. Geschichte der Juden. Bd. 1-11. Lpz., 1853-1876.
Green, W. H. A Grammar of the Hebrew Language. New York,
1864. 3 ed.
Guedemann, M. Geschichte des Erziehungswesens und der Kul-
tur der Juden. V. 1-3. Wien, 1880-1888.










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Hury, J. P. Compendium Theologiae Moralis. Ratisbonaie,
1874. 5 ed.
Haeckel, E. Die Weltraethsel. Bonn, 1899.
Hagenbach, K. R. Encyklop. und Methodol. der Theol. Wiss.
Lpz. 1884.
Haggadah. Hagadah for Passover, with English tr. Jerusalem,
1896.
Hahn, A. The Rabbinical Dialectics. Cincinnati (cop. 1879.)
Hamburger, J. Real-Encyclopaedie. Abthl. 1-3. Neustrelitz,
1870-1895.
Hebrew Union College Annual. 1904.
Hertzka, T. Freiland, Dresden, (189-.)
Herzfeld, L. Handelsgeschichte der Juden des Alterthums.
Braunschweig, 1879.
Historie des variations de l'etat-major. I. Dreyfus. Paris, 1899.
Hoppe. A. Englisch-Deutsches Supplement-Lexikon.
Hume, D. Eine Untersuchung in Betreff des menschlichen Ver-
standes. Berlin, 1869.
Index librorum prohibitorum Leonis XIII. Iussu editus. Ro-
mae, 1881.
I. 0. B. B. Appeal XXLVI. New York, 1880.
Israelitische Tempelgesaenge. Chicago, 1876.
Jaeger, O. Geschichte der Neuesten Zeit. Bd. 1-3. Oberhausen,
1874-1875.
Jahn, M. Psychologie als Grundwiss. der Paedagogik. Lpz., 1883.

Jordan, W. D. Erfuellung des Christenthums. Frankfurt a. M.
1879.


1908]


6037










6088 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

Josephus, Flavins. Juedische Alterthuemer. Koeln a. R., (1883?)
2 ed.
Kant, I. Die Religion innerhalb der Grenzen der blossen Ver-
nunft. Leipzig, 1869. Die Religion. Leipzig, (1879?).
Kayser, A. Die Theologie d. A. T. Strassburg, 1886.
Kiepert, H. Lehrbuch der alten Geographie. Berlin, 1878.
Kirchmann, J. J. von. Kathechismus der Philosophie. Lpz.,
1881. 2 ed.
Kirchner, F. Ethik. Lpz., 1881. Kathechismus der Psychologie.
Lpz., 1883.
Kleinpaul, R. Das Stromgebiet der Sprache. Lpz. 1892.
Krehl, L. Das Laben und die Lehre der Muhammed. Theil 1.
Lpz., 1884.
Lange, F. A. Gesch. d. Materialismus. Iserlohn, 1876-1877.
Langlois, C. V. and Seignobos, C. Introduction aux etudes his-
toriques. Paris, 1898.
Larousse, P. Dictionaire. Paris, 1899. 102 ed.
Lazare, B. Une erreur judiciarre. Paris, 1897. 2 ed.
Leroy-Bealieu, H. B. A. La liberate religieuse en Russie. Paris,
1889.
Lehrs, K. Populaere Aufsaetze. Leipzig, 1875. 2 ed.
Lombroso, C. and Laschi, R. Il delitto politico. Torino, 1890.
Loew, L. Beitraege zur Juedischen Alterthumskunde. Bd. 1,
1-2. Leipzig, 1870-1871.
Lotz, W. Quaestiones de historic Sabbati, Lipsiae, 1888.
Lotze, H. Dictate a. d. Vorlesungen. (No. 1-8.)
Luetgen, F. Natuerliche und Soziale Religion. Stuttgart, 1894.
Luther, M. Der Grosse und Kleine Kathechismus. N. Y., 1854.










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS


Luther, M. Grosser Kathechismus. Zwikau i. S., 188-.
Maisch, R. Griechische Alterthumskunde. Stuttgart, 1891.
March, F. A. Latin Hymns. New York, 1874.
Marin, P. Dreyfus. Paris, (1899?).
Meyer, E. Die Entstehung des Judenthums. Halle a. S., 1896.
Meyer, E. Geschichte des Alterthums. Bd. 2. Stuttgart, 1893.
Molescott, J. Von der Selbsteuerung. Giessen, 1871.
Montaigne, M. de. Essays. Breslau, 1896.
Montesquieu, C. de Secondat. Esprit des lois. Paris, 1858.
Mueller, A. Briefe und die Christl. Religion. Stuttgart, 1870.
New Testament: Novun Testamentum triglottum. Ed. A. F. C.
Tischendorff. Lipsae, 1865.
New Testament: New Testament in the Original Greek. Vol. 2.
New York, 1882.
New Testament: Protestanten Bibel. Lpz., 1872.
New Testament: The Twentieth Century N. T. Pt. 2-3. New
York, 1900-1901.
New Testament: New Testament in Hebrew. London, 1885.
New Testament: New Testament in Lingua Italiana. N.Y., 1875.
New Testament: Vergleichende Uebersicht der vier Evangelien.
Lpz. 1897.
Oswald, F. The Bible of Nature. New York, (cop. 1888).
Pape, W. Woerterbuch der Griechischen Eigennahmen. Haelfte
1. Braunschweig, 1875. 8 ed.
Paulsen, F. Einleitung in der Philosophie. Berlin, 1893. 2 ed.
Perthes, J. Staatsbuerger Atlas. Gotha, 1896. 2 ed.
Pertz, G. H. Aus Stein's Leben. Haelfte 1-2. Berlin, 1856.


1908]


6039










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Peschel, O. Voelkerkunde. Lpz., 1874.
Petzhold, J. Katechismus d. Bibliothkenlehre. Lpz., 1871. 2 ed.
Raisus, C. E. Rechte und Pflichten der Kritik. Lpz., 1898.
Renan, J. E. Conferences d'Angleterre. Paris, 1880. 3 ed.
Renan, J. E. Etudes d'Histoire Religieuse. Paris, 1864. 7 ed.
Renan, J. E. Histoire des Origines du Christianisme. Livre 7.
Paris, 1882.
Renan, J. E. Histoire du Peuple d'Israel. Tom. 1-5. Paris,
1887-1893.
Revel, A. Letteratura Ebraica. (v.) 1-2. Milano, 1888.
Ribot, T. Die experimentelle Psychologie der Gegenwart. Braun-
schweig, 1881.
Ritter, E. H. Geschichte der Juedischen Reformation. Thl. 1-3.
Berlin, 1858-1865.
Roeth, E. Geschichte unserer Abendl. Philosophie. Bd. 1-2.
Mannheim, 1846-1858.

Ronge, J. Religionsbuch fuer den Unterricht. Thl. 1-3. Darm-
stadt, 1876.
Rost, V. C. F. Griech. Deutsches Woerterbuch. Bd. 1-2. Braun-
schweig, 1852. 4 ed.
Rosenkranz, K. Hegel als Deutscher Nationalphilosoph. Lpz.,
1870.
Rousseau, J. J. Contrat Social. Paris, (189-).
Rohling, A. Der Talmudjude. Muenster, 1873. p.
Sachs M. and Veit, M. Briefwechsel. Frankfurt a. M., 1897.
Samuel, S. M. Jewish Life in the East. London, 1881.
Scheler, A. Dictionaire. Bruxelles, 1888. 3 ed.


[NOVEMBER


6040










1908] REPORT OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 6041

(Schleiermacher, F.) Ueber die Religion. Berlin, 1821. 3 ed.
Scholz, F. Die Dialektik des Geistes. Lpz., 1887.
Schulte, J. F. von. K. F. Eichhorn. Stuttgart, 1884.
Schultze, F. Stammbaum der Philosophie. Lpz., 1892.
Schuppe, W. Grundzuege der Ethik und Rechtsphilosophie.
Breslau, 1881.
Spindler, 0. Der Jude. ThL. 1-3. Lpz., (18-).
Spinoza, B. Opera. V. 1-2. Hagae comitum, 1883.
Spinoza, B. Ethik. Heidelberg, 1886. 4 ed.
Spinoza, B. Der Theologisch-Politische Traktat. Lpz., (1886?).
Spinoza, B. Briefe an Spinoza und dessen Antworten. Ber-
lin, 1871.

Springer, A. Grundzuege der Kunstgeschichte. (v.) 1. Lpz.,
1888. 3 ed.

Tephilath Israel m. Uebersetzung. (By B. Wessely) Prague, 1860.
Todt, R. D. radikale deutsche Socialismus und die christliche
Gesellschaft. Wittenberg, 1878. 2 ed.
Toennies, F. Hobbes Leben und Lehre. Stuttgart, 1896.
Tsakni, N. La Russie Sectaire. Paris, (cop. 1888).
Ueberweg, F. System der Logik und Geschichte der logischen
Lehren. Bonn, 1868. 3 ed.
Wechsler, T. Lehrbuch der Rumaenischen Sprache. Wien,
(189-). 3 ed.
Weber, F. Juedische Theologie. Leipzig, 1897. 2 ed.
Weise, D. Schrift und Buchw)esen in alter und neuer Zeit. Leip-
zig, 1899.
Wendrinksky, J. Kaiser Josef II. Wien, 1880.










6042 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

Winer, G. B. Biblisches Realwoerterbuch. Bd. 1-2. Leipzig,
1847-48. 3 ed.
Winter, J. and Wuensche, A. Die juedische Litteratur. Bd. 1-3.
Trier, 1894-1896.
Wislicenus, G. A. Die Bibel. Bd. 1-2. Leipzig, 1863-1864. (to-
gether with 8 more p.)
Wislicenus, G. A. Gegenwart und Zukunft der Religion. Leip-
zig, 1873.
Zeller, E. D. F. Straus. Bonn, 1874.
Zeller, E. Geschichte der deutschen Philosophie. Muenchen,
1873.
Zeller, E. Grundriss der Geschichte der Griech. Philosophie.
Leipzig, 1883.
Zeitschrift fuer die Geschichte der Juden in Deutschland. Her-
ausg. von L. Geiger. Bd. 1-4. Braunschweig, 1887-1890.
(Bd. in 2.)
Zeitschrift fuer Volkerpsychologie und Sprachwiss. Herausg.
von M. Lazarus und H. Steinthal. Band 1-19.
Zimmermann, M. Josef Suess Oppenheimer. Stuttgart, 1874.











CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE


Catalog of the Hebrew Union College
1908-1909


THE FACULTY.
(Arranged in groups in the order of seniority of appointment to present rank.)
KAUFMANN KOILER, Ph. (Erlangen). Professor of Homiletics, The-
ology and Hellenistic Literature.-President.
3016 Stanton Avenue, Walnut Hills.
GOTTHARD DEUTSCH, Ph.D. (Wien). Professor of Jewish History
and Literature. 3600 Wilson Avenue, Avondale.
LOUIS GROSSMANN, D. D. (IT. U. C.) Professor of Ethics and Pedagogy.
2212 Park Avenue, Walnut Hills.
EPHRAIM FELDMAN, B.T. (H.U.C.), Professor of Talmud.
3520 Michigan Avenue, Hyde Park.
DAVID NEUMARK, Ph.D., (Berlin), Professor of Jewish Philosophy.
The Columbia, Winslow Avenue, Walnut Hills.
MOSES BUTTENWIESER, Ph.D. (Heidelberg), Associate Professor of Bib-
lical Exegesis. Secretary. 2106 Grand Street, Walnut Hills.
SIEGMUND MANNHEIMER, D. D. (H. U. C.), Professor of Biblical
Literature. 639 June Street, Walnut Hills.
JULIAN MORGENSTERN, Ph. D. (Heidelberg), Instructor in Bible and
Semitic Languages. 3450 Highland Place, Avondale.
SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS.
BORIS D. BOGEN, Pd.D. (New York University). Sociology with reference
to Jewish philanthropy. 965 Elberon Avenue, Price.Hill.
JENNIE MANNHEIMER, B.L. (University of Cincinnati). Elocution.
639 June Street, Walnut Hills.
DAVID PHILIPSON, D. D. (IH. U. C.), Lecturer on History of the Reform
Movement and the Activities of the Rabbi.
Beechwood Avenue, Rose Hill Park.

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY.
Aaron Hahn (1887) David Davidson (1892)
David Wolf Marks (1891) Emil G. Hirsch (1901)


6043










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


THE ALUMNI.

A. Alphabetical Arrangement and Present Residence.

Rabbi Israel Aaron, D.D., Buffalo, N. Y.
Rabbi David Alexander, B. A:, Toledo, 0.
Rabbi Abraham S. Anspacher, B. A., Scranton, Pa.
Rabbi Moise Bergman, B. A., New Orleans, La.
Rabbi Henry Berkowitz, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa.
Rabbi Louis Bernstein, B. A., St. Joseph, Mo.
Rabbi Joseph Blatt, B. A., Columbus, Ga.
Rabbi Seymour G. Bottigheimer, B.A., Natchez, Miss.
Rabbi Frederick E. Braun, B.A., Lincoln, Neb.
Rabbi Abram Brill, B.A., Greenville, Miss.
Rabbi Joel Blan, B. A., Cincinnati, O.
Rabbi Morris Cahan, B. A., New York City.
Rabbi Edward N. Calisch, M. A., Richmond, Va.
Rabbi Frederick Cohn, Ph.D., Omaha, Neb.
Rabbi Simon Cohen, B.A.
Rabbi Abraham Cronbach, B. A., South Bend, Ind.
Rabbi Max Cohen Currick, B. A., Erie, Pa.
Rabbi Hyman J. Elkin, B.A., Alexandria, La.
Rabbi Hyman G. Enelow, D. D., Louisville, Ky.
Rabbi Henry Englander, B. A., Providence, R. I.
Rabbi Harry W. Ettelson, B. A., Ft. Wayne, Ind.
Rabbi Morris M. Feuerlicht, B. A., Indianapolis, Ind.
Rabbi Wm. H. Fineshriber, B. A., Davenport, Ia.
Rabbi Henry M. Fisher, B. A., Atlantic City, N. J.
Rabbi Charles Fleischer, B. A., Boston, Mass.
Rabbi Solomon Foster, B. A., Newark, N. J.
Rabbi Leo M. Franklin, B. L., Detroit, Mich.
Rabbi Charles J. Freund, B. L., Salt Lake City, Utah.
Rabbi Wm. S. Friedman, LL.D., Denver, Col.
Rabbi Aaron Friedman, B. L.


[JANUARY


6044










1909] CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE


Rabbi Harry G. Friedman, B. A., New York City.*
Rabbi Ephraim Frisch, B. A., Pine Bluff, Ark.
Rabbi G. George Fox, Ph. B., Bloomington, Ill.
Rabbi Alexander Geismar, B. L., New York City.
Rabbi Abraham Gideon, B. A.
Rabbi Alfred T. Godshaw, B. A., Cincinnati. t
Rabbi Samuel H..Goldenson, B. A., Albany, N. Y.
Rabbi Sidney E. Goldstein, B.A., New York City.||
Rabbi Nathan Gordon, B. A., Montreal, Can.
Rabbi Bennett Grad, B. L., Amsterdam, N. Y.
Rabbi Samuel Greenfield, B. A., New York City.*
Rabbi Moses J. Gries, B. L., Cleveland, O.
Rabbi Louis Grossmann, D. D., Cincinnati, O.
Rabbi Rudolph Grossmann, D. D., New York City.
Rabbi Adolph Guttmacher, Ph.D., Baltimore, Md.
Rabbi Max Heller, M. L., New Orleans, La.
Rabbi Abraham Hirschberg, B. A., Chicago, Ill.
Rabbi Samuel Hirschberg, A. M., Milwaukee, Wis.
Rabbi Pizer Jacobs, B. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Rabbi Joseph Jasin, B. A., Ft. Worth, Tex. '
Rabbi Moses Perez Jacobson, B. L., Shreveport, La.
Rabbi Israel Joseph.
Rabbi Theodore F. Joseph, B. A., Marshall, Tex.
Rabbi Emanuel Kahn, B.A., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan, Ph. D., Selma, Ala. s
Rabbi Israel Klein, B. A., Chicago, Ill.
Rabbi Samuel Koch, M. A., Seattle, Wash.


Those marked with a reside in places stated, but are not officiat-
ing rabbis.
t Director of Synagog and School Extension for the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
II Director of Social Service of the Free Temple, New York City.
Died October, 1896.


6045










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Rabbi Joseph A. Kornfeld, B. A., Columbus, O.
Rabbi Solomon L. Kory, B. A., Vicksburg, Miss.
Rabbi Nathan Krass, B. L., Rochester, N. Y.
Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa.
Rabbi Louis Kuppin, B. A., Quincy, Ill.
Rabbi Isaac Landman, B. A., Philadelphia, Pa.
Rabbi Maurice Lefkovits, Ph. D., Duluth, Minn.
Rabbi David Lefko.witz, B.A., Dayton, O.
Rabbi Emil W. Leipziger, B. A., Terre Haute, Ind.
Rabbi Charles S. Levi, B. L., Peoria, Ill.
Rabbi Harry Levi, B. A., Wheeling, W. Va.
Rabbi Clifton H. Levy, B. L., New York City.*
Rabbi Felix A. Levy, A. B., Chicago, Ill.
Rabbi Gustav H. Lowenstein, B. A., Brunswick, Ga.
Rabbi Meyer Lovitch, B.A., Paducah, Ky.
Rabbi Solomon C. Loewenstein, B. A., New York City.t
Rabbi Alexander Lyons, B. L., Brooklyn, N. Y.
Rabbi J. Leon Magnes, Ph. D., New York City.
Rabbi Leo Mannheimer, Ph. D., Paterson, N. J.
Rabbi Eugene Mannheimer, B. A., Des Moines, Ia.
Rabbi Isaac E. Marcuson, B. L., Sandusky, O.
Rabbi Elias Margolis, B. A., New York City.
Rabbi David Marx, B.L., Atlanta, Ga.
Rabbi Harry H. Mayer, B. A., Kansas City, Mo.
Rabbi E* Mayer, B. A., Philadelphia, Pa.
Rabbi Louis D. Mendoza, B. A., Norfolk, Va.
Rabbi Max J. Merritt, B. A., Evansville, Ind.
Rabbi Abraham J. Messing, B. A., Peoria, Ill.*
Rabbi Martin A. Meyer, Ph. D., Brooklyn, N. Y.


Those marked with a are located in places stated, but are not
officiating rabbis.
SSuperintendent of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the city of
New York.


[JANUARY'


6046










1909] CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE


Rabbi Julius H. Meyer, B.L., Milwaukee, Wis.*
Rabbi Jacob Mielziner, M. A., Cincinnati, O.
Rabbi Julian H. Miller, B. A., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Rabbi Julian Morgenstern, Ph.D., Cincinnati, O.4
Rabbi Alfred G. Moses, B.A., Mobile, Ala.
Rabbi Leon M. Nelson, B.A., Charlotteville, Va.*
Rabbi Morris Newfield, B. A., Birmingham, Ala.
Rabbi Simon Peiser, B.A., Cleveland, O.|1
Rabbi David Philipson, D.D., Cincinnati, O.
Rabbi Jacob S. Raisin, B.A., Butte, Mont.
Rabbi Max Raisin, B.A., Meridian, Miss.
Rabbi Joseph Rauch, B.A., Sioux City, Ia.
Rabbi Max Reichler, B. A., Schenectady, N. Y.
Rabbi Abraham B. Rhine, B.A., Hot Springs, Ark.
Rabbi William Rosenau, Ph.D., Baltimore, Md.
Rabbi Isidor E. Rosenthal, B. A.
Rabbi Leonard J. Rothstein, B. A., Alexandria, La.
Rabbi Charles A. Rubenstein, A.M., Baltimore, Md.
Rabbi Isaac Rubenstein.
Rabbi Isaac L. Rypins, B.L., St. Paul, Minn.
Rabbi Herman Rosenwasser, A. M., Lake Charles, La.
Rabbi Marcus Salzman, B.A., Wilkesbarre, Pa.
Rabbi Tobias Schanfarber, B.A., Chicago, Ill.
Rabbi Jacob D. Schwarz, B. A., Pensacola, Fla.
Rabbi Mendel Silber, B.A., St. Louis, Mo.
Rabbi Joseph Silverman, D.D., New York City.
Rabbi Abram Simon. Ph.D., Washington, D. C.


Those marked with a reside in places stated, but are not officiat-
ing rabbis.
Instructor in Bible and Semitic Languages in the Hebrew
Union College.
II Assistant Superintendent Jewish Orphan Asylum, Cleveland, O.
Died in 1898.


6047










6048 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [JANUARY

Rabbi George J. Solomon, B.A., Savannah, Ga.
Rabbi M. G. Solomon, B. L., Los Angeles, Cal.
Rabbi Nathan Stern, Ph. D., Trenton, N. J.
Rabbi Joseph Stolz, D.D., Chicago, Ill.
Rabbi Joseph H. Stolz, Ph. B., Helena, Ark.
Rabbi Leon Volmer, B.A. Charleston, W. Va.
Rabbi Isidor Warsaw, B.A., New York City.
Rabbi Harry Weiss, B. A., Macon, Ga.
Rabbi Jonah B. Wise, B.A., Portland, Ore.
Rabbi Louis Witt, B.A., Little Rock, Ark.
Rabbi Philip Wolf, B.A.
Rabbi Louis Wolsey, B.A., Cleveland, O.
Rabbi George Zepin, B. A., Ft. Worth, Tex.
Rabbi Martin Zielonka, B.A., El Paso, Tex.










CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE 6049


THE ALUMNI
B. Chronological Arr'alnlgencnt.

Class of 1883.
Israel Aaron Joseph Krauskopf
Henry Berkowitz David Philipson

Class of 1884.
Louis Grossmann Joseph Silverman
Max Heller Joseph Stolz


Class of 1885.
Isaac Rubenstein


Class of 1886.
Moses Perez Jacobson Tobias Schanfarber


Class of 1887.
Edward N. Calisch

Class of :.- -
None

Class of 3 I-.


Hyman J. Elkin
Wm. S. Friedman
Moses J. Gries
Rudolph Grossmann


Adolph Guttmacher
C('!,, 1 S. Levi
Win. Rosenau
Isaac L. Rypins


Class of 1890.
Alexander Geismar Clifton H. Levy


1909]










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


('1., of 1891.
Samuel Greenfield Israel Joseph
Samuel Hirschberg Alexander Lyons
Charles A. Rubenstein

Class of 1892.
Leo M. Franklin

Class of 1893.
Charles Fleischer Marcus Salzman
Aaron Friedman M. G. Solomon

Class of 1894.
Abraham Gideon David Marx
Bennctt Grad Isidore E. Rosenthal
Isaac E. Marcuson Abram Simon

Class of 1895.
Seymour G. Bottigheimer Morris Newfield
George J. Solomon

Class of 1896.


Frederick Cohn
Gustav H. Lowenstein


Harry H. Mayer
Abraham J. Messing


Class of 1897.
Harry Levi Harry Weiss
Julius Henry Meyer Philip Wolf

Class of 1898.
Max Cohen Currick Joseph A. Kornfeld
Hyman G. Enelow Leon M. Nelson
Abraham Hirschberg Simon Peiser


[JANUARY


6050










1909] CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE

Class of 1899.
Simon Cohen Leo Mannheimer
Theodore ;. Joseph Louis Wolsey
Israel Klein Martin Zielonka

Class of 1900.
Abraham S. Anspacher David Lefkowitz
Abram Brill Emil W. Leipziger
Wm. I. Fineshriber J. Leon Magnes
Charles J. Freund Jacob Mielziner
Pizer Jacobs Jacob S. Raisin
George Zepin


Class of 1901.
David Alexander Solomon C. Loewenstein
Moise Bergman Elias Margolis
Joseph Blatt Martin A. Meyer
Henry Englander Alfred G. Moses
Morris M. Feuerlicht Leon Volmer


Class of 1902.


Solomon Foster
Emanuel Kahn
Jacob H. Kaplan
Samuel Koch
Maurice Lefkovits


Eugene Mannheimer
Eli Mayer
Julian Morgenstern
Abraham B. Rhine
Isidor Warsaw


Class of 1903.


Morris Cahan
Henry.M. Fisher
Solomon L. Kory
Nathan Krass


Louis Kuppin
Max J. Merritt
Max Raisin
Jonah B. Wise


Louis Witt


6051










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Class of 1904.
Harry W. Ettelson Joseph Jasin
Harry G. Friedman Leonard J. Rothstein
Ephraim Frisch Mendel Silber
Alfred T. Godshaw Nathan Stern
Samuel H. Goldenson Joseph H. Stolz

Class of 1905.
Frederick E. Brown Meyer Lovitch
Sidney E. Goldstein Joseph Rauch


Class of 1906.


Louis Bernstein
Abraham Cronbach
Nathan Gordon
Isaac Landman


Joel Blau


Louis D. Mendoza
Julian H. Miller
Max Reichler
Jacob D. Schwarz


Class of 1907.
Felix A. Levy

Class of 1908.
G. George Fox
Herman Rosenwasser


6052


[JANUARY











1909J CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE


ROSTER OF STUDENTS--1908-09

COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT
SENIORS
Louis D. Gross, M. A.1 David Rosenbaum, Ph. B.3
Israel I. Mattuck, A. M.2 Samuel Schwartz
Louis J. Kopald, M. A.1 Jacob Singer, M.A.1
William Reisz Aaron L. Weinstein, M.A.1
Horace J. Wolf, M. A.1


JUNIORS
None.


THIRD COLLEGIATE CLASS
None.

SECOND COLLEGIATE CLASS
Moses Ariel Maurice M. Mazure
Hyman Buchofski Jacob Pollak
HymanL. Grabosky, A.M.4 Joseph M. Rubin, B. A.6
Benno Leon, A. B.5 Arthur Zinkin


FIRST COLLEGIATE CLASS
Israel Bettan Isadore Isaacson
Samuel S. Cohon Benjamin Laas
Aldolf Rosenberg


1 University of Cincinnati.
2 Harvard University.
3 University of Chicago.
4 University of Pennsylvania.
5 Morris Harvey College, W. Va.
6 University of Wisconsin.


6053










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT


Arthur B. Bonnheim
Leo S. Hexter
Emanuel Jacubowitz, B.
Israel L. Kaplan
Charles B. Latz


GRADE A
Morris S. Lazaron
Edgar F. Magnin
A.7 Marius Rasinsky
Sidney Tedesche
Elkan C. Voorsanger


GRADE B
None.


Irvin M. Bloom, B. A.8
Abe Kaplan


GRADE C
Theodore J. Levy
Jacob Wallach


GRADE D
Jacob B. Krohngold Samuel S. Mayerberg
Louis L. Mann Harold F. Reinhart
Max H. Wilensky, B. A.9


7 University of Cincinnati.
8 Columbia University.
9 University of Pennsylvania.


[JANUARY


6054










1909] CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE


RULES FOR GOVERNMENT OF COLLEGE.
CALENDAR OF SESSIONS.
The sessions of the Preparatory department begin on the
second Monday of September; the sessions of the Collegi-
ate department on the first Monday after Yom Kippur.
The first semester closes January 31, the second about
June 15.
Recitations and lectures are held as prescribed in the
curriculum. Divine services take place in the college chapel
every afternoon at 3 o'clock, Sabbath services on Friday
evening at 5 and Sabbath afternoon at 3 o'clock. These
services, which the faculty and students are required to
attend, are conducted by students of the Collegiate de-
partment. A member of the Senior or Junior class
preaches a sermon, approved by the professor of Homi-
letics, on Sabbath afternoon. Students are also requiIed
to attend the morning services on Sabbaths and on holi-
days in one of the local Temples. No sessions are held
on the Jewish holidays, Thanksgiving day, Washington's
birthday and New Year's day.

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE.
* Applicants for the Preparatory department must be at
least fifteen years of age, possess the knowledge required
for the third (B) grade of the Cincinnati high-schools,
and present a certificate of good character. The applicant
is further required to have a general knowledge of biblical
history, must show sufficient ability to translate easy
passages of Genesis, and conjugate the regular verb.
Applicants for the Collegiate department must possess
the knowledge required for admission to the University
of Cincinnati, present a certificate of good character,
and pass an examination on the subjects taught in the
Preparatory department.


6055









THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


The condition of admission to a higher grade is deter-
mined by the standard of the class to which the student
desires admission.
Tuition at the College is now and always has been
absolutely free.
Applications for admission shall be submitted on the
form furnished by the Board of Governors and shall be
in the hands of the Secretary not later than the first of
September preceding registration.

SCHOLARSHIPS.
Scholarships are granted by the Board of Governors to
students of the college who have been registered students
for at least one year and have distinguished themselves
in their studies.
EXAMINATIONS.
Examinations are held at the end of each semester. The
first examination covers the work of the first semester,
while the second embraces the work of the entire year.
Conditions are incurred:
1. By failure to satisfy the requirements of any course.
The requirements of a course include both the term work
and the examination.
2. By exclusion from an examination. A student who
has three unexcused absences in any course, shall be ex-
cluded by the instructor from the examination in that
course. Unexcused absence from Chapel services shall
be treated in the same manner as unexcused absence
from the class room. Cases of repeated tardiness shall
be regarded as unexcused absence, if such tardiness is re-
ported by the majority of the instructors of the class.
3. By unexcused absence from an examination.
Conditions are removed:
By re-examination at the beginning of the new scholas-
tic year. Re-examinations can be taken only with the per-
mission of the individual instructors.


6056


[JANUARY










1909] CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE


A condition in more than one subject debars the student
from the privilege of re-examination.

GRADUATION
No student shall graduate unless he has been in attend-
ance for three years or more in the Collegiate Department
subject to this exception: that credit will be given in each
individual case to graduates and students of other Jewish
theological institutions of required standing for work done
there, said credit not to exceed one year.
A candidate for the degree of rabbi must prepare a
thesis. The subject must be submitted for the approval
of the faculty not later than November 1, and the thesis
itself must be presented not later than April 1. The
thesis must give evidence of a knowledge of the subject
satisfactory to the Faculty. The candidate must preach
a sermon before one of the local congregations, such
sermon having been passed upon by the professor of
homiletics. The rabbinical degree will not be conferred
upon the candidate until he has passed an examination
in the studies pursued during the Senior year, and unless
he is in possession of a degree equal to that of B. A. of
the University of Cincinnati.
The examination shall take place not later than May
15th; after the examination the candidate shall be ex-
cused from further attendance at the college.

DOCTOR OF DIVINITY
A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Divinity must
have graduated as rabbi at least two years before the
examination. A course of study must be selected by the
applicant from groups of courses hereinafter named and
approved by the faculty, embracing one major and two
minor subjects extending over a period of at least two
years. A thesis, which shall give evidence of the candi-
date's ability to pursue original investigations shall be sub-


6057










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


mitted to the faculty, which thesis must be approved before
the candidate will be admitted to the final examination
for the degree. This examination must be passed in the
presence of the faculty, and the members of the Board
shall be invited to be present at the same. The examina-
tion shall last two hours, whereof one hour shall be de-
voted to the major subject and one hour to the two minors.
The work for the degree of Doctor of Divinity is grouped
under the following headings:
Theology, Biblical Exegesis, Philosophy;
Biblical Exegesis, Midrash, Exegetical Literature;
Talmud, Midrash, History;
Philosophy, Biblical Exegesis, Midrash;
History, Talmud, Philosophy;
Semitic Philology, Biblical Exegesis, Talmud.
This list is but suggested as a guide. The candidate is
at liberty to select any combination of subjects indicated
in this list, subject however to the approval of the faculty.

HONORARY DEGREE
The honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity may be
conferred by the faculty with the consent of the Board
of Governors upon Jewish scholars and theologians of
distinction.

FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF STUDENTS DESIRING TO
OFFICIATE IN A RABBINICAL CAPACITY
1. No student of the college shall officiate in any rab-
binical capacity except with the permission of the presi-
dent of the college and the president of the Board of
Governors.
2. No student shall accept an engagement of his own
accord. All assignments are to be made by the president
of the college.


[JANUARY


6058










1909] CATALOG 'OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE 6059

3. Only students who have had instruction in homiletics
in the college shall be permitted to preach on the holi-
days or any other occasion.
4. Other students in the collegiate department may
conduct the services on the holidays, but shall not preach
unless with the consent of the president of the college
they read the published sermons of Jewish preachers.
5. No student of the graduating class shall apply for a
permanent position in any congregation that is not a
member of the Union of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions. In case a congregation not a member of the Union
desires the services of one of our students, we recom-
mend that such congregation be informed of this reso-
lution.
6. The Board of Governors earnestly requests all grad-
uates of the college who are officiating in congregations
not members of the Union, to use their every effort to have
their congregations become affilliated with the Union,
the foster-mother of the college.
7. All congregations or communities desiring the ser-
vices of our students for the fall holidays are requested
to make application for such students to the president of
the college before the close of the scholastic year, i. e.,
by the 1st of June preceding these holidays. Among
such applicants the congregations belonging to the Union
shall be supplied first, no matter what be the order of
the application.

LIBRARY.
1. The library shall be open from 1 P. M. to 5 P. M.
daily.
2. Students may be admitted to the book stacks only
after obtaining permission from the librarian.












3. General reference books and books in the reserved
list may be consulted only in, the reading room.
4. Current periodicals shall be filed in the periodical
case and shall not be removed from the library under any
condition.
5. Books not in the reserved list or general reference
books may be borrowed for home use by students of the
College upon signing the receipts provided for that pur-
pose. Books thus drawn may be kept two weeks and may
be renewed for two weeks. No student shall be permitted
to draw more than six books at one time.
6. The Alumni of the College and others whose applica-
tion for books is endorsed by the President of the Board
of Governors in a written order to the librarian, may have
the use of such books as are not in the reserved list. Non-
residents must pay express charges both ways. Books thus
borrowed may be kept for two weeks, with the privilege
of renewal for two weeks. Not more than three books
shall be drawn at one time from the library by a non-
resident.
7. Borrowers of books shall be responsible for injury
to the same by marking, tearing or defacement of any
kind.
8. Requests by members of the faculty for books to be
purchased shall be filed upon cards furnished for that
purpose. These cards shall be submitted by the librarian
to the purchasing committee of the Board and the Presi-
dent of the College, and with their approval the purchase
shall be made.
9. Copies of books unfit for re-binding shall be with-
drawn. Duplicates may be entered on duplicate sale cards
to be sold or exchanged.
10. Inter-library loans shall be made only through the
librarian.


[JANUARY


6060


THIRZTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT










1909] CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE 6061

COURSE OF STUDIES.


D GRADE (14 hours).
1. Hebrew Grammar. ........... ....... .. .2 hours.
2. Bible: (a) Genesis and Exodus............ .5 "
(b) Joshua and Judges. ............. .2 "
(c) Psalms ............ .... .....1 "
3. Pirke Abot...... ..... ... .......... 2 "
4. Prayerbook .............. ... ............ 1
5. Catechism ....... ........... .. ....... 1 "

C GRADE (14 hours).
1. Hebrew Grammar ........................ 2 hours.
2. Bible: (a) Deuteronomy and Numbers......4 "
(b) Samuel and Kings ... ........ .3 "
3. Mishna: Berakot and Bikkurim ........... .2 "
4. Prayerbook............ ......... ......... "
5. Biblical History......................... 1 "
6. Catechism .......... .................... 1

B GRADE (14 hours).
1. Hebrew Grammar........................... 1 hours.
2. Bible: (a) Leviticus with Commentaries .... "
(b) Ruth, Esther, Chronicles, Ezra and
Nehemiah.......... ........2 "
(c) Psalms and Proverbs ............2 "
3. Mishna: Some Tractate in Seder Moed......2 "
4. Aramaic Grammar.................... ... 1 "
5. Biblical History........... ...........1 "
6. Prayerbook .............................. 1 "
7. Catechism ............................. 1 "










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


A GRADE (14 hours).
1. Aramaic Grammar and the Book of Daniel.. .2 hours.
2. Bible: (a) Poetic portions of the Pentateuch
with Targum and Commentaries.8 "
(b) Psalms and Proverbs .............1 "
3. Midrash Abot di Rabbi Nathan ............ .2
4. Mishna: Sanhedrin and Makkot ........... .2 "
5. Introduction to Jewish Philosophy ..........1 "
6. Jewish History ............... ............2 "
7. Catechism ............................... 1 "


FIRST COLLEGIATE CLASS (15 hours).
1. Bible: (a) Genesis with Targum and Com-
m entries ................... 2 hours.
(b) Amos, Jonah and selections from
Hosea, Isaiah and Jeremiah... 8 "
2. Midrash, Rabba to Genesis and Canticles ... .2 "
3. Mishna Baba Kamma.................... 2 "
4. Jewish Philosophy. .................... 2 "
5. Jewish H istory........................ ... 2 "
6. History of Judaism .....................2 "

SECOND COLLEGIATE CLASS (15 hours).
1. Bible: (a) Hosea, Micah and Isaiah. ....... 3 hours.
(b) Exodus with Commentaries .... 2 "
2. Introduction to the Talmud, Halakici and
Agadic readings from Berakot and Sanhedrin.3 "
3. Midrash Kohelet and Shir ha-shirim. ......2 "
4. Jewish Philosophy .................. 2 "
5. Jewish History ............................2 "
6. Apocrypha .......... .................. ...1 "


6062


[JANUARY










1909] CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE


THIRD COLLEGIATE CLASS (15 hours).
1. Bible: (a) Jeremiah, Deutoronomy, Isaiah,
Lamentations .......... ..... 3 hours.
(b) Numbers with Commentaries .2
2. Talmud: Pesahim, Taanit and Shabbat ......3 "
3. Midrash: Ekah and Leviticus Rabbah ...... "
4. Apocalyptic Literature .................. .1 "
5. Jewish Philosophy ................... ...2
6. Homiletics .................. .......... .
7. Jewish H history ............................ 2

JUNIOR CLASS (15 hours).
1. Bible: (a) Ezekiel and Pentateuch. ........ .2 hours.
(b) Selections from Ebn Ezra, Rash-
bam and Ralbag to Exodus.... 1 "
2. Talmud Hullin and Codes ..................2
3. Midrash and Homiletics. .. ................2 "
4. Systematic Theology ....................... 1 "
5. Jewish Philosophy. ................. ...2 "
6. Jewish History .. ...................... 2 "
7. Ethics and Pedagogics.................. ...2
8. Elocution ................. .............1 "

SENIOR CLASS (14 hours).
1. Bible Exegesis, Job and Kohelet ...........2 hours.
2. Homiletics and Midrash ... .............. 2 "
3. Talmud: Kiddushin,Gittin,Yebamot and Code
Eben ha-Ezer ......... ........2 "
4. Jewish Philosophy ................... ..... 2 "
5. Practical Theology and Liturgy ............ 2 "
6. Jewish History. ............... ......... 2 "
7. Ethics and Pedagogics. ................... .1 "
8. Elocution .......... ................. ... 1


6063











THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF EVENTS IN HISTORY OF THE
HEBREW UNION COLLEGE

1872 Oct. 20. MIr. Loth's appeal for the formation of a union of con-
gregations.
1873 July 8. A convention of congregations, held in Cincinnati, re-
solves upon the formation of a union.
1874 July 14. The first council of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations held at Cleveland.
1875 Oct. 3. Hebrew Union College opened ; MI. Wise and Sol.
Eppinger as teachers; 17 students.
1876 Mlax Lilienthal enters the faculty of the College.
1877-8 Emanuel Loewenthal and Abraham Harris are added to the
teaching staff.
1878 Louis Aufrecht appointed preceptor of Hebrew Literature.
1879 Sept. M1oses Mielziner appointed professor of Talmud,
1881 April 24. College building dedicated.
1882 April 5, Max Lilientlal dies.
July 25, Louis Aufrecht dies.
Henry Berkowitz and Ignatz IMeller appointed assistant
teachers.
Dec. 17. Chapel service on Sabbath afternoon introduced.
Morris Goldstein appointed teacher of liturgical music.
1883 Jan. Solomon Eppinger receives degree of D.D., honors causa.
July 11. First graduation of rabbis.
Sept. David Philipson appointed preceptor.
IS84 Jan. 15. Siegmund Mannheimer appointed preceptor, later
also assistant librarian.
Rev. Dr. S. H. Sonneschein lectures on Homiletics.
Sept. Dr. Henry Zirndorf professor of History and Literature.
188( Feb. 1 Dr. Eppinger retires, and David Davidson succeeds
him as preceptor.
Ephraimi Feldman assistant teacher.
Honorary degree of D.D. conferredLon Aaron Hahn.


[JANUARY


6064











1909] CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE


6065


1887 All eight classes of the college in session for the first time.
Rabbi Aaron Hahn, of Cleveland, lectures on the literature of
Response.
Isaac L. Rypins assistant teacher.
1888 Rev. Maurice Fluegel, of Paducah, Ky., lectures on the Juris-
prudence of Moses.
1889 Moritz Loth retires from the presidency of Union of American
I lebrew Congregations.
Rudolph Grossmann appointed assistant teacher.
David Philipson lectures on Assyriology, and is appointed
preceptor of Semitics.
Charles S. Levi appointed preceptor in Biblical History.
April 6. Isaac M. Wise's seventieth birthday.
1890 Feb. 11. Solomon Eppinger dies.
Zirndorf retires, anh is given the honorary title of D.D.
1891 Israel Joseph and Samuel Greenfield assistant teachers.
Prof. David W. Marks, of London, given the honorary title of
D. D.
Aug. 24. Gotthard Deutsch elected professor of History and
Literature.
David Philipson appointed professor of Homiletics and in-
structor in Assyriology.
Charles Fleischer, Leo M. Franklin and Abraham Gideon
elected as assistant teachers.
1892 Feb. 10. Henry Adler dies.
Sept. David Davidson retires from the faculty and is given
the honorary title of D.D.
Max L. Margolis appointed preceptor of Talmud and instruc-
tor in Hebrew.
1893 Dec. 17. Henry Zirndorf dies.
1894 Louis Grossmann lectures on comparative religion.
Adolph Moses, of Louisville, lectures on Mosaism.
Ephraim Feldman is given the honorary title of B. T. (Bache-
lor of Theology).
Rev. Jacob Mendel and Morris Newfield appointed assistant
teachers.












6066


THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


[JANUARY


1894 Prof. Moritz Lazarus is given the honorary title of D.D.
1895 Casper Levias elected instructor in Biblical Literature.
Rev. Jacob Voorsanger given the honorary title of B. T.
1896 Jacob Ezekiel resigns as secretary of the Board of Governors.
Isaac Bloom appointed his successor.
Moritz Steinschneider given the honorary title of D. D.
Hebrew Union College Journal founded.
1897 Max L. Margolis resigns from the faculty and Moses Butten-
wieser is appointed.
1898 E. Feldman appointed professor.
Moses Mielziner given the honorary title of D.D.
Charles S. Levi resigns from the faculty.
Louis Grossmann appointed professor of Theology.
1898-9 The registration of students rises to 77, the highest number
on record.
1899 March 14. Isaac M. Wise's eightieth birthday is celebrated.
June. Isaac M. Wise Memorial Chair of Systematic Theology
established by the Alumni of the College and filled by
Isaac M. Wise and Louis Grossmann.
1900 Henry Mialter appointed as instructor.
March 26. Isaac M. Wise dies, and Moses Mielziner is ap-
pointed acting president.
1901 Emil G. Hirsch, of Chicago, lectures on the fundamental con-.
cepts of Jewish theology, and is given the honorary title of
D. D.
1902 Bernhard Felsenthal is given the honorary title of D.D.
1903 Feb. 18. Moses Mielziner dies, and Gotthard Deutsch succeeds
him as acting president.
Feb. 25. Kaufmann Kohler elected president of the college.
J. Leon Magnes appointed instructor.
March 5. Committee appointed to secure a site for a new col-
lege building.
Joseph Krauskopf made director-general of the Isaac M. Wise
Memorial fund.
1904 March 25. Anatole Leroy Beaulieu visits the college.
Sept. J. L. Magnes resigns, and Max Schloessinger is ap-
pointed to succeed him.











1909] CATALOG OF THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE 6067

1904 August 2. The college celebrates the 70th birthday of B. Bett-
mann.
1904-5 A Third Collegiate class is added.
1905 Sept. C. Levias resigns, and Max Margolis is appointed as
professor.
Nov. 18. A tract of 18 acres of land is bought for new college
buildings.
Nov. 25. The 250th anniversary of the settlement of Jews in
America is celebrated. President Dabney, of the Cincin-
nati University, addresses the college.
1906 April 9. Morris Goldstein dies.
1907 Jan. Henry Malter resigns.
March. Max L. Margolis resigns.
Max Schloessinger resigns.
June 25. Julian Morgenstern appointed Instructor.
Sept. 24. David Neunmark appointed Professor.
1908 Jan. 14. Bernhard Felsenthal dies.
Feb. 21. Simon Greenebaum dies.
April 28. Jacob Voorsanger dies.
October 24. Solomon H. Sonneschein dies.

HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE COLLEGE
D. D.
1883 Solomon Eppinger, preceptor H.U.C., died at Cincinnati, Feb-
ruary 11, 1890.
1886 Aaron Hahn, rabbi at Cleveland, O.
1887 Benjamin Szold, rabbi at Baltimore, died at Berkeley Springs,
W. Va., July 31, 1902.
1890 Henry Zirndorf, professor H. U. C., died at Cincinnati, Decem-
ber 17, 1893.
1891 David W. Marks, rabbi at London, England.
1892 David Davidson, preceptor H. U. C.
1894 Moritz Lazarus, professor University of Berlin, died at Meran,
Austria, April 13, 1903.












THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


1896 Moritz Steinschneider, professor, Berlin.
1898 Moses Mielziner, professor H.U.C., died at Cincinnati, Febru-
ary 18, 1903.
1901 Emil G. Tirsch, rabbi of Sinai Congregation, and professor in
the University of Chicago.
1902 Bernhard Felsenthal, rabbi emeritus, Chicago.
1903 Jacob Voorsanger, rabbi, San Francisco.
1909 Siegmund Mannheimer, Professor H. U. C.
B. T.
1894 Ephraim Feldman, professor H. U. C.
1895 Jacob Voorsanger, rabbi, San Francisco.
RABBI.
1885 Ignatz Mueller, rabbi, Kalamazoo, Mich.

DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE COLLEGE
D. D.
1886 David Philipson.
1887 Israel Aaron.
Henry Berkowitz.
Joseph Krauskopf.
Joseph Silverman.
1888 Louis Grossmann.
1894 Rudolph Grossmann.
1898 Joseph Stolz.
1902 Hyman G. Enelow.
B. *H.
1888 Miss Emily Bloch, Chicago.
1890 Miss Jennie Mannheimer, Cincinnati.


6068


[JANUARY










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DELEGATES


kIeport of the Board of Delegates on Civil Rights.

To the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew Congre-
gations :
GENTLEMEN:-The Board of Delegates on Civil Rights has the
honor to present its annual report.
As in all the preceding years, the Board has been active in as-
sisting and aiding worthy persons from being deported. Some of
these requests have come through the medium of the Executive
Committee of the Order of B'nai B'rith (with which organization
we are acting in concert), and it is gratifying to state that wherever
it was possible, the authorities exercised a wise and judicious dis-
cretion, and permitted the landing of immigrants. Many of them
had to give bond, in case they should become a public charge, or if
the disease with which they seemed to be temporarily afflicted,
should prove incurable. The Secretary of Commere and Labor, as
well as the authorities of the Immigration Bureau have at all times
shown a deep interest in these matters, and have given the benefit
of the doubt to the applicant whenever possible. The Board is in
possession of a large number of letters of grateful appreciation, ac-
knowledging the great service rendered to these people. It is of
course well known that immigration has materially fallen off within
the last fiscal year; that a large number returned to Europe and
naturally the number of pleas to prevent deportation, have not been
as numerous as in past years. Every indication however, points to
a large immigration in the coming year; conditions seem to warrant
this belief.
The Board of Delegates through its Chairman was asked to assist
a political organization labled specifically Jewish, and he promptly
declined, deprecating the action of sectarian bodies on political
lines, claiming that any political organization that claimed to speak
for any class of men from a sectarian or any other standpoint, other


1909]


6069










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


than American, was contrary to the fundamental principles of our
government and inimical to the best interests of the Republic. This
action which was taken in the shape of a letter, was highly approved
and the letter copied in all parts of the United States.
Numerous requests have come from different parts of the United
States, asking the Board to assist persons who were indicted for
alleged crimes or sentenced to a term in prison. Each and every
one of these claimants stated that they had been wrongfully dealt
with and that prejudice was the cause of their conviction. As far
as practicable, these cases were promptly investigated. In one case
recently, where a United States District Attorney in Virginia was
charged with gross prejudice during the trial of a Jew, the matter
was given immediate attention. The trial Judge, as well as the
District Attorney were corresponded with, and from the latter, a
voluminous answer was received, giving every detail of the case, and
showing, that as in a number of other cases, the accusation as to
prejudice on the part of Government officials, was inaccurate and
unfounded.
Quite a number of cases have come to our attention in the matter
of securing pensions for widows and orphans of Jewish soldiers, not
only in the Civil but the -Spanish War, all of which have been
promptly and satisfactorily attended to, and the grateful acknow-
ledgements of the claimants received.
The case of the Russian fugitive, Poureen, was brought to the no-
tice of the Board, and inasmuch as this case had been thoroughly
gone over by numerous other bodies, sectarian and non-sectarian,
and by individuals, we did not deem it wise or prudent to take too
prominent a part therein, although the Board is absolutely certain
that the principles underlying extradition as embodied in this case
-the right of asylum for those who have been unfortunately perse-
outed on account of religion or politics will no doubt be on the
lines that have been laid down from time immemorial by our Gov-
ernment.
We are also happy to state, as has been already published, both
in private as well as in official correspondence, that the treaty rela-


6070


[NOVEMBER









REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DELEGATES


tions between Russia and the United States are under advisement,
and a revision of the existing treaty will undoubtedly be made in
the very near future, and in this connection the all important
American passport question will be one of the main factors for re-
vision. The Board does not arrogate to itself, any exclusive credit
in securing attention in this matter, but has in connection with the
universal demand, contributed its quota, and been in constant touch
with the Executive Departments of our Government in relation
thereto.
In common with other numerous Jewish organizations and in-
fluential private citizens, the Board took an active part in securing
the planks in the platforms of the two great political organizations,
in regard to the American passport. Mr. Myer Cohen,.of Washington,
D. C., a member of the Board, went to Chicago, armed with letters
from prominent Republicans, asking those in authority to do all
they possibly could, to have such plank incorporated in the plat-
form of the Republican party; and to friends of the Board, the
Union of American Congregations, and of the Order of B'nai B'rith
resident in Denver, letters were written of the same character, and
the Chairman of the Board also wrote letters to delegates to that
convention, asking them to use every effort to secure a proper plank
in the platform to be adopted at Denver by the Convention of the
Democratic party.
Numerous requests have been received from different sections of
the country, asking for copies of the report made to the Public
Schools of the District of Columbia, and which at the time, appeared
in the official records of the Board of Delegates. All these requests
have been complied with and letters of thanks received, stating that
the information conveyed had been of great service and secured for
the respective communities, immunity from the introduction of
sectarian teachings in the Public Schools. Thus the work by the
Board of Delegates in this direction alone, has been of vast service,
as not only this year but as has been noted in former years, when
our record was used successfully in Montreal, Canada.


6071










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


The Board has also received, as in many years past, a number
of requests from young men and young women, who have
graduated either from the Universities or Public Schools, asking
the assistance of the Board to secure them positions in the dif-
ferent Departments of the Government. The universal answer
has been that the Board was not constituted for any such purpose,
but in each and every case, the Chairman as an individual, has
done what was possible, and in a number of instances, has been
successful.
The postal money order matters, that were partially attended
to last year, came up again for action this year, and were satis-
factorily adjusted, as the Board has been informed by the postal
authorities that similar complaints have not been received.
The question of importing books for the Hebrew Union College
free of duty, was referred to the Board for action. The Collector
at the port of New York, having raised the question as to whether
they could be legally imported free. The matter was argued be-
fore the Customs Service of the Treasury Department, with the
result favorable to their admission free.
A very important matter was brought to the attention of the
Board on the question of naturalization, which was satisfactorily
adjusted, leading to such conclusions that may lead to a revision
in some of the regulations that will materially modify some of
the present hardships of securing naturalization papers.
The Board was requested to secure circular letters for Rabbi
Zielonka, who wished to go to Mexico under the auspices of the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations to establish Congre-
gations. The request was promptly complied with, with satis-
factory results.
The case of Jewish immigrants who had secured land warrants
in some of the Western states, and had become bona fide residents,
was brought to the attention of the Board, in consequence of at-
tempts made by land grabbers, to oust these immigrants from
their homes; and we are happy to state that after an exhaustive


FFXOVEMBtR


6072










REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DELEGATES


examination, and arguments in the Land Office, these people
were permitted to retain their holdings.
The case of a Jewish minor, who enlisted in the Navy and who
became insane during one of the voyages, was brought to our
attention by the family of this sailor living in New York, who
were anxious to have him brought East, he being then confined
in an institution on the Pacific Coast. The Board interposed and
the patient has been brought to Washington and placed in the
Government Hospital, thus making all parties concerned, happy.
A Russian Jewish immigrant, resident in Rockville, Mont-
gomery Co., Md., pursuing peaceably his vocation as a merchant,
was foully murdered by a young man, who fled-from justice, but
has been brought back to Rockville. The Board is taking active'
steps to co-operate with the authorities to see that justice shall
be done and the criminal punished.
It is the painful duty of the Board to chronicle the death of
one of the government's best servants. The Honorable Frank P.
Sargent, Commissioner General of Immigration died suddenly in
the midst of his duties; universally esteemed and honored. Mr.
Sargent had during his incumbency as Commissioner of Immigra-
tion, endeared himself to one and all by his courteous and gentle-
manly treatment, by his wise counsel, his just decisions, and his
unselfish devotion, not only to the service, but to the immigrants
who came under his supervision. His memory should be treasured
by one and all, and his example transmitted to future generations,
as a splendid type of what an American official should be.-
Respectfully submitted,
SIMON WOLF,
Washington, D. C., Nov. 2, 1908. Chairman.









THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Report of the Board of Managers of Synagog and
School Extension.

To the Executive Board of the Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregation.
GENTLEMEN :-We herewith submit our annual report for the
year ending October 31, 1908.

SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION.
The organization of religious schools and congregations and
bringing the latter into membership relations with the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations has been during the past
year in charge of Director Rabbi Alfred T. Godshaw. His report
(page 6065) shows but partially the work he has accomplished.
From sources other than his own modest communications, we
have learned that his work has been of such a character, especially
in small communities where prior to his appearance among them,
no Jewish religious organizations existed, that it is a source of re-
gret that our financial condition renders it impossible for us to put
more laborers in the field. The work of bringing into life schools
and congregations is second in importance only to the work of
the Hebrew Union College.

MEXICO.
The reports of Rabbi Martin Zielonka (page 6083) and pro-
fessor Gotthard Deutsch (page 6087) of their visits to Mexico
speak for themselves and we invite your earnest consideration of
them. The efforts thus far made to bring our co-religionists in
that country to recognize themselves should be continued, believing
as we do that good must result if the work is persisted in.


6074


[DECEMBER










1908]


6075


REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS


JEWISH STUDENTS IN UNIVERSITIES.
Under the auspices of the Board of Managers, lectures on
Jewish topics were delivered before the Menorah Society of Harv-
ard University by Rev. Drs. Henry Berkowitz, of Philadelphia;
J. Leonard Levy, of Pittsburg; and David Philipson, of Cincinnati.
These lectures were very largely attended not only by the Jewish
students, but by many others. The result of this work aside from
the instruction thereby imparted to Jewish students, cannot but
help to remove prejudice which unfortunately still exists among
some of the people of our country who may be numbered as be-
longing to the highly educated class. Arrangements for lectures
of like character have been made for the coming year for Harvard
and Yale Universities.

"YouNG ISRAEL."
The publication of this weekly journal began on November
29, 1907, under a contract made with Mr. S. M. Goldsmith, of
Detroit, Mich., whereby he became managing publisher of
"Young Israel" assuming all financial responsibility in the pub-
lication, the ownership however remaining with the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations. That considerable labor and
expense was incurred by him in getting the publication started
and obtaining subscriptions therefore will be readily understood.
Mr. Goldsmith brought to his work not only all his ability as an
energetic business man, but an enthusiasm worthy of the highest
commendation. When success was almost in sight, he was taken
away to his eternal reward. He died at his home in Detroit,
Mich., on October 4, 1908, after a very brief illness. We cannot
pay a higher tribute to his character than by saying he was a good
man worthy to be ranked among the best of those who have always
striven by both word and deed to make the name of Jew honored
among men. Peace to his memory I










6076 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [DECEMBER

The death of Mr. Goldsmith placed the Board of Managers
in a very embarrassing position with reference to the continuance
of the publication of "Young Israel." The successors to Mr.
Goldsmith's business were not in a position to carry on the
publication and had it not been for the kindly intervention and
assistance of Rabbi Leo M. Franklin, to whom we owe a great
debt of gratitude, the publication of "Young Israel" would have
ceased. We succeeded in making a contract substantially on the
same basis as the one with Mr. Goldsmith-whereby Mr. Simon
Bacharach of Cincinnati, Ohio, has become the managing publi-
sher. He has enlarged and greatly improved the paper especially
in its appearance and we have reason to believe will, with proper
co-operation of the spiritual and business heads of the Congrega-
ions make "Young Israel" an ideal paper for the Jewish school
and home. It is now published in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Board
of Editors is now composed of
Rev. Dr. David Philipson ....... Cincinnati, O., Chai,)iran
Miss Corinne B. Arnold ......... Philadelphia, Pa.
Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz ....... Philadelphia, Pa.
Rev. Dr. H. G. Enelow .......... Louisville, Ky.
Rabbi Harry Ettelson .......... Fort Wayne, Ind.
Rabbi Solomon Foster ......... Newark, N. J.
Rabbi Leo M. Franklin.... ..... Detroit, Mich.
Miss Miriam D. Goldman ........ Detroit, Mich.
Rev. Dr. Louis Grossmann ..... Cincinnati, O.
Rabbi Isaac Landman .......... Philadelphia Pa.
Mr. Moritz Loth. ................ Cincinnati O.
Rabbi David Marx ............. Atlanta, Ga.
Rabbi Max J. Merritt. ........... Evansville, Ind.
Rev. Dr. William Rosenau ....... Baltimore, Md.
Rev. Dr. Samuel Schulman ..... .New York City
Rabbi Jonah B. Wise............ Portland, Ore.











1908] REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 6077

RELIGIOUS SCHOOL LITERATURE.
During the past year we have distributed the following leaflets:
On History ............. 154,631
On Religion ............. 15,825
M idrashic............... 16,455

186,911
EXPENSES
The following is a detailed statement of the moneys expended during the
past fiscal year by the Board of Managers:
Rabbi Alfred T. Godshaw, salary as Director .................... $ 2,500 00
traveling expenses ..................... 1,526 82
Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz traveling expenses to Cambridge, Mass., 20 75
Rev. Dr. J. Leonard Levy to lecture before the Menorah Society 61 00
Rev. Dr. David Philipson of Harvard University .............. 63 30
Rabbi Martin Zielonka traveling expenses to Mexico (see reports, 176 70
Rev. Dr. G. Deutsch S pp. 6009 and 6013...................... 195 50
May & Kreidler, printing "Religious School Leaflets" ............. 471 25
$5,015 32
Respectfully submitted,
Louis KIOHN, Chairwan,
LIPMAN LEVY, .'.. ., /.,
CINCINNATI, December 9, 1908.










THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT


Report of 'Director of Synagog and School Extension.


CINCINNATI, November 1, 1908.
To the Board of Managers of Synagog and School Extension, Mr.
Louis Krohn, Chairman :
GEINTLEMEN:-The following is respectfully submitted as supple-
mental to the detailed weekly reports of my visits to the various
communities for the year ending October 31, 1908. During this
year I was in sixty-one communities, some of them having been
visited several times in the course of the year. I found that most
communities were organized after a fashion. Even the small
communities in the East, populated for the most part by recent im-
migrants are organized, but these communities need some guidance
and help, I frequently visited such communities and addressed
the congregations on the importance of establishing religious in-
struction to supplement the teaching of the Oheder. This is an
important field and I feel from the reception accorded me even in
the most conservative congregations, that a beginning has been
made. In the course of my work I delivered forty-eight addresses
in various congregations. Nine schools were established and three
congregations were formed. The initial work of organization has
been effected in most communities and I have been re-visiting com-
munities to stimulate further interest. I delivered various ad-
dresses before young people's societies such as the Y. M. H. A. in
Boston and Paterson, N. J., and gatherings of Jewish students at
various universities. The society formed at Austin (Tex.) University
was recently re-visited. Twenty-nine schools were visited and ad-
dresses given to the children. I addressed quite a few congregations
which were temporarily without a Minister. There are many con-
gregations that are unable to support a Minister but which have
regular services with a lay-reader. I visited a number of such com-


[NOVEMBER










1908] REPORT OF DIRECTOR SYNAGOG AND SCHOOL EXTENSION i, H7

munities and conducted services and addressed the children of the
religious schools.
My aim has been to supply the lack of a Minister in the small
towns and to stimulate interest in communal and national activities
for the advancement of Judaism. I visited communities where the
message of Judaism was seldom, if ever heard. There are various
things which have to be looked after in the small towns. One im-
portant consideration is the tendency of individuals to form
"Hebrew Political Clubs." I have on various occasions not only
spoken against such clubs in my addresses, as un-American and
un-Jewish but have helped in making an end of them. I have fre-
quently had to emphasize the necessity of looking after the religious
instruction of girls. In many communities there is a sort of make-
shift instruction for boys exclusively. but no attempt to make any
provision for the religious guidance of the other sex. This work
goes slowly and requires much patience in handling. I am trying
to bring home to some communities, the necessity of I..-.1'i .:
religious instruction according to modern methods. I visited a
community in which there was not one religious school and where
there were eight-hundred Jewish children whose 1.-!;;.n.- training
was being neglected. I succeeded with great difficulty in establishing
two schools there.
I feel that a beginning is being made; the s9ed must be planted
and results can be obtained by patient and sympathetic li,,.1 _;
of the difficult problems that arise on every side. I feel that some
progress has been made but it is impossible to incorporate in a report
the best results of this attempt to arouse interest in Judaism in
dormant communities. Such work cannot be expressed in statistics.
Sometime I have effected organization which lapsed after I left a
town and it was necessary to re-visit the community. On the other
hand, a little gathering in a small town without seemingly tangible
results has often ended in welding a community together for the
maintenance of a school and congregation as the visible n :1 i- of
Jewish consciousness. A Rabbi in charge of a congregation may
labor a lifetime in his community and still feel that there is much










6080 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT [NOVEMBER

that he would fain have accomplished. One cannot hope in the
course of a few days to revolutionize things in a small dis-organized '
community. I generally remain in a town several days, although in
one case it was necessary to remain two weeks before I could secure
a gathering. There were some communities in which I could well
have remained several months in order to accomplish something in
the way of more effectual organization.
As a result of this work, schools and congregations have been
established in communities which before this time had had merely
an annual Minyan on the Holidays, attended by 'a few of the older
men and avoided by the young people and the women of the com-
munity. Children have been confirmed by Rabbis of neighboring
cities, in communities where such a ceremony was a novel and in-
structive occasion. Circuit arrangements have been made by which
Rabbis of adjacent cities paid occasional visits to surrounding
towns. The town of Ardmore Okla., illustrates the possibilities of
this work. Four years ago I organized a congregation in what was
then, a new community in a sparsely settled section of Indian
territory. On a recent visit there I addressed the congregation at a
Hall which had been fitted up as a place of worship, and learned
that the school and congregation had been kept up, that they had
had services during the year with a lay-reader and had observed the
Holidays assisted by a Jewish choir and organist. They felt a keen
pride in the progress they had made.
The permanence of this work is the resultant of so many different
factors that no exact statements can be made with reference to it.
The population of the small town is a constantly shifting one.
Circuit arrangements are disturbed, too, by frequent changes in
pulpits and by differences which arise between some congregations
and ministers because the latter do not always bring to this work
the devoted and sympathetic handling it needs. A great deal of
harm nas been done by such men and I have had great difficulty in
endeavoring to revive interest in communities where congregational
affairs were demoralized by errors on the part of adjacent ministers.
The permanence of organization is conditioned by the leader-ship




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