• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Agricultural resources and farm...
 Marketing
 Economic development, land and...
 Land tenure, retirement farming...
 Publications dealing with topics...
 Miscellaneous statistical...
 Miscellaneous
 Theses and dissertations
 Author index






Group Title: Mimeo report - Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Florida - EC 66-12
Title: 15, fifteen years of publications, July 1, 1950-June 30, 1965
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00071982/00001
 Material Information
Title: 15, fifteen years of publications, July 1, 1950-June 30, 1965
Series Title: Agricultural economics mimeo report EC 66-12
Physical Description: 103 l. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Economics Dept
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1966
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Economic aspects -- Bibliography   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
Funding: Agricultural economics mimeo report ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00071982
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 00022378
lccn - 68066705

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Dedication
        Dedication
    Preface
        Preface
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Agricultural resources and farm management
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        General
            Page 1
        Studies of farm organization, labor and materials, costs of production and returns
            Page 6
            Citrus
                Page 6
                Page 7
                Page 8
            Livestock and livestock products
                Page 9
                Beef
                    Page 9
                    Page 10
                Dairy
                    Page 11
                    Page 12
                    Page 13
                    Page 14
                    Page 15
                Poultry
                    Page 16
                    Page 17
                    Page 18
            Truck crops
                Page 19
                Page 20
            Other
                Page 21
                Page 22
    Marketing
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        General
            Page 23
            Citrus
                Page 23
            Cooperative associations
                Page 27
            Horticultural specialty
                Page 28
                Page 29
                Page 30
            Livestock and livestock products
                Page 31
                Page 32
                Page 33
                Page 34
                Page 35
            Potatoes
                Page 36
                Page 37
                Page 38
            Truck crops
                Page 39
                Page 40
                Page 41
            Other
                Page 42
                Page 43
                Page 44
        Harvesting, handling, packing and processing
            Page 45
            Citrus
                Page 45
                Page 46
                Page 47
                Page 48
                Page 49
            Potatoes
                Page 50
                Page 51
                Page 52
                Page 53
            Other
                Page 54
    Economic development, land and water economics and public policy
        Page 55
        Economic development
            Page 55
            Page 56
        Land and water economics
            Page 57
            Page 58
        Public policy
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
    Land tenure, retirement farming and low-income areas and problems of older people
        Page 62
        Land tenure and rental contracts
            Page 62
        Retirement farming
            Page 63
            Page 64
        Low income areas and problems of older people
            Page 65
            Page 66
        Other
            Page 67
            Page 68
    Publications dealing with topics in countries outside the United States
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Miscellaneous statistical summaries
        Page 72
        Publications dealing with crop and livestock forecasting
            Page 72
            Page 73
        Statistics on trends in production, shipments, prices, income, etc.
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
        Florida truck crop competition summaries
            Page 78
        Florida vegetable crop annual summaries
            Page 79
            Page 80
        Movement of citrus trees
            Page 81
    Miscellaneous
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Theses and dissertations
        Page 86
        MSA theses
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
        Ph. D. dissertations
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
    Author index
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida




la! o

,q~f(0h. 66-/I


"s
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
MIMEO REPORT EC 66-12














DEDICATION


The publication is dedicated to Dr. Henry Glenn Hamilton,

Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics from July 1, 1950

to June 30, 1965. The Department experienced substantial growth

during this period and made many contributions to Florida's

agriculture.

Dr. Hamilton was a distinguished leader in agricultural

economics and researcher in the marketing of citrus fruits and

vegetables over a period of 42 years. His former students have

distinguished themselves in positions of responsibility such as

farm operators, teachers, research workers, and members of Congress.

During Dr. Hamilton's tenure as Head of the Department, he was

responsible for, among other'duties, directing the development of

research methods in experimental design to measure the demand for

individual agricultural commodities at the retail level. Also, he

was largely responsible for the reorganization of the departmental

curriculum to better meet the needs of students in a changing

economy and for the establishment of a Ph.D. program in agricultural

economics at the University of Florida in 1951.














PREFACE


During the 15 year period July 1, 1950 to June 30, 1965,

numerous publications were released in the Department of

Agricultural Economics. These reports contained data and the

results of research to provide guidance to farmers, managers of

marketing firms, consumers, policy making bodies and others in

making decisions with respect to the economic development of the

agriculture of Florida in a manner consistent with the economic

growth of the state and the economy as a whole.

The purpose of this publication is to provide a list of

titles and a brief abstract of the content of each publication

prepared in the Department for the period covered. It is intended

that this summary will provide interested parties with: (1) in-

formation concerning the nature and scope of the activities in the

Department of Agricultural Economics at Florida and (2) information

concerning publications that may be useful in analyzing problems

confronting them.








TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES AND FARM MANAGEMENT. .


General ..... .
Studies of Farm Organization, Lator and
Costs of Production and Returns
Citrus. . .. . .
Livestock and Livestock Products. .
Beef. . . .. .
Dairy . . . .
Poultry . . . .
Truck Crops . . . .
Other . . . .


page

. . S 6 4


i .
Materials,
4 . .



. 6 *
S. 6 6


. .
............ ... .. .


A * *


II. M rK.il lNr . . . . .. .* * .
General . . . . . . i
Citrus . . . . .. . . ..
Cooperative Associations. . . . . .....
Horticultural Specialty . .. . . . .
Livestock and Livestock Products. .. . . . .
Potatoes. . . . . ....... . ..
Truck Crops . . . . ...... .
Other . . . . . . . .
Harvesting, Handling, Packing and Processing. . . . .
Citrus. . . . . . . . .
Potatoes. . . . . . . ........
Other. . . . . . . . .
III. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, LAND AND WATER ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC POLICY .
Economic Development. . . . . . ..
Land and Water Economics. . . . . ...
Public Policy . . . . . . .
IV. LAND TENURE, RETIREMENT FARMING AND LOW-INCOME AREAS AND PROBLEMS
OF OLDER PEOPLE . . . . . .
Land Tenure and Rental Contracts . . . . .
Retirement Farming . . . . . ..
Low Income Areas and Problems of Older People . . . .
Other . . . .. . . . ..

V. PUBLICATIONS DEALING WITH TOPICS IN COUNTRIES OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES .
VI. MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICAL SUMMARIES . . . . .
Publications Dealing with Crop and Livestock Forecasting . .
Statistics on Trends in Production, Shipments,
Prices, Income, etc.. ............... .
Florida Truck Crop Competition Summaries. . . . .
Florida Vegetable Crop Annual Summaries . . . .
Movement of Citrus Trees . . . . . .

VII. MISCELLANEOUS . . . . . . . .
VIII. THESES AND DISSERTATIONS. . . . . ... . ..
MSA Theses. . . . . . . . .
Ph.D. Dissertations . . . . . .
AUTHOR INDEX. . . . . . . .


74
78
79
81
82
86
86
94
100


6
6
9
9
11
16
19
21
23
23
23
27
28
31
36
39
42
45
45
50
54
55








PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


JULY 1, 1950 JUNE 30, 1965

I. AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES AND FARM MANAGEMENT

General

1. LAND GRAZED BY FLORIDA LIVESTOCK EXCEEDS 15 MILLION ACRES, by
D. E. Alleger, Florida Cattleman, November 1950, 3 pages.

Data for this storywere obtained by questionnaire from County Agents
as to total acreages of pastures under fence in the respective
counties as well as data re: planted pastures. These data were
compiled and released as a popular article.

2. THE OUTLOOK FOR FLORIDA FARMERS IN 1951, by F. W. Parvin, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 50-10, December 1950, 5 pages.

Discusses the demand for Florida farm products, the outlook for
supplies of civilian goods, the outlook for farm costs and the
outlook for Florida farm products in 1951.

3. AN APPRAISAL OF THE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION CAPACITY OF FLORIDA FOR
1952, Prepared by a committee, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-15,
Aug. 1951, 8 pages.

This report is part of a comprehensive study of the agricultural
capacity of the United States. It contains selected data showing
estimates of use of farm land, crop and pasture yields per acre,
number of livestock and production of livestock and livestock
products, 1952 attainable, with comparisons.

4. AGRICULTURE OUTLOOK FOR FLORIDA FARMERS, by Clyde E. Murphree,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Mimeo Report 51-18, Nov. 1951, 3 pages.

An annual release of the outlook for the coming year.

5. AN APPRAISAL OF ATTAINABLE PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA AGRICULTURE, 1955,
Prepared by a committee, Agr. Expt. Sta. & Ext. Ser. Mimeo Report,
Nov. 1951, 25 pages.

This study attempted to appraise the Agricultural Productive Capacity
of Florida for 1955 assuming that the general level of prices re-
ceived for Florida products would reflect a parity ratio of 105 to
110 and that production materials and equipment would be available
in quantities needed. The basis for making the estimates were first
to determine what yields of crops and livestock could be obtained if
the best known production practices were adopted and. second to
determine to what extent producers would accept and put to use these
practices.










6. A METHOD OF DETERMINING THE AMOUNT OF MONEY A FARMER CAN INVEST IN
IMPROVED PASTURES, by W. K. McPherson and L. A. Reuss, Fla. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Journal Series No. 135, 10 pages. (Printed in The Soil Science
Society of Florida Proceedings, Vol. XII, 1952).

The principle factors determining the amount of money a farmer can
invest per acre in improving pasture land are (1) the quantity of
marketable beef produced (2) the variable cost of producing forage
and (3) the level of beef prices.

7. ECONOMIC STUDY OF FARMING IN THE PLANT CITY AREA, HILLSBOROUGH
COUNTY, FLORIDA, by R. E. L. Greene, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin
533, Dec. 1953, 53 pages.

Farm management studies were made for farms in the Plant City area
for the five crop years 1917-1922. Additional studies were made for
the 1927, 1932 and 1945 crop years. This bulletin presents a
summary of the data for these years and also an analysis of factors
affecting farm returns. Data are also presented for two representa-
tive farms showing returns for the period July 1, 1950 to June 30,
1951 and estimated returns if the farmers followed a recommended
level of practices.

8. FLORIDA'S LAND RESOURCES AND LAND USE, by L. A. Reuss, Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Bulletin 555, Nov. 1954, 52 pages.

This report brings together and analyzes information from many
scattered sources concerning the land resource base of Florida's
agriculture, its use and existing trends. Physical resources are
described in terms of soils, climate, cover, drainage and irrigation.
Resources, throughout the state, are related to land use differences,
types of farming and returns per acre as disclosed by census, forest
resources survey and related data. Land use trends are shown to 1950.

9. USE OF TOBACCO HARVESTERS IN COLUMBIA AND SUWANNEE COUNTIES, FLORIDA,
1954, by Theo H. Ellis, R. E. L. Greene and Marvin A. Brooker, Agr.
Econ. Mimeo Report 55-6, Mar. 1955, 23 pages.

Data are presented on estimated number of tobacco harvesters in
Florida in 1954, amount of use, costs and problems involved in oper-
ating tobacco harvesters, advantages and disadvantages of harvesting
tobacco with a machine as compared to the usual method and a com-
parison of costs of harvesting tobacco with a machine and hand methods.

10. A SIMPLE METHOD OF ESTIMATING ECONOMIC OPTIMUM ALLOCATION OF
FERTILIZER, by W. K. McPherson and Roy L. Lassiter, Jr., Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Journal Series 502, 13 pages. (Printed in The Soil Science
Society of Florida Proceedings, Vol. XV, 1955).

The optimum application of fertilizer can be estimated on the basis
of (1) the cost of the fertilizer (2) the physical relationship
between the amount of fertilizer applied and the increase in crop
yield and (3) an estimate of what the product can be sold for.









11. a. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL OUTLOOK, by C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser.
Econ. Series 56-2, February 1955, 7 pages.

b. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL OUTLOOK, by Susan R. Christian and
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 57-1, January 1957,
10 pages.

c. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL OUTLOOK, by C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser.
Econ. Series 58-1, January 1958,. 3 pages.

d. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION General Agricultural Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 59-1, January 1959,
17 pages.

e. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Florida Agricultural Outlook, 1960,
by C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 60-1, January 1960,
16 pages.

f. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION General Agricultural Outlook, 1961,
by C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-2, January 1961,
20 pages,

g. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION General Agricultural Outlook for
1962, by C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-2, January
1962, 18 pages.

h. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION General Economic Conditions and
Outlook, by C. C. Moxley and R. P. Hill, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 62-5, May 1962, 1 page.

i. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION General Economic Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley and R. P. Hill, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-13,
August 1962, 2 pages.

j. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION 1963 General Economic Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 63-1, January 1963,
17 pages.

k. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION 1964 General Economic and Agricul-
tural Outlook, by C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ, Series 64-1,
January 1964, 8 pages.

1. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION 1965 General Economic and Agricul-
tural Outlook, By C. C. Moxley and R. P. Hill, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 65-2, January 1965, 8 pages.

An analysis of the economic data and situations pertinent to
prospects for Florida agricultural producers, handlers and con-
sumers. The general economic statements relate to the overall
economy and to prospects for agriculture in general. The
commodity sections pertain to outlook for specific crops and
livestock. The family living sections are concerned with prospects
for supplies and prices of consumer goods and services.











12. PANGOLA PASTURES FOR BEEF PRODUCTION IN CENTRAL FLORIDA A METHOD
OF DETERMINING THE ECONOMICS OF ESTABLISHING AND FERTILIZING TPEM, by
L. A. Reuss, N. K. Roberts and R. E. L. Greene, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Bulletin 585, May 1957, 36 pages.

This bulletin was prepared: (1) to illustrate, by use of ranch
budgets, the types of information and the analyses that will help
ranchers answer some of these questions as they apply to their own
ranches; and (2) for situations represented by the budgets, to
illustrate the economic relationship involved and the effects of
selected combinations of conditions on net returns. Brief attention
is given to some aspects of the proposal that ranchers concentrate
fertilizer on a part of the improved pasture acreage; and the effects
of alternative fertilization and improvement plans on capital required
in the ranch business.

13. COST OF OPERATING FARM TRACTORS IN COLUMBIA AND SUWANNEE COUNTIES, by
R. E. L. Greene, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 58-2, Sept. 1957, 15 pages.

Data are presented on the amount of use and costs of operation of
small, immediate and medium size tractors in Columbia and Suwannee
Counties during 1952. Based on the Nebraska tractor tests, tractors
rated 6.0 to 12.0 drawbar horsepower were classified as small, 12.1
to 16.0 immediate and 16.1 to 22.0 medium.

14. COST OF CLEARING LAND AND ESTABLISHING IMPROVED PASTURES IN CENTRAL
FLORIDA, by L. A. Reuss, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 600, Aug. 1958,
40 pages.

The results of a survey of ranches and custom land developers are
presented concerning the extent, methods, land characteristics, and
costs of clearing land and establishing improved pastures in two
areas of Florida. Inputs in physical and monetary terms reflect
conditions prevailing in the general period 1949-1952.

15. ECONOMIC FACTORS INFLUENCING PASTURE DEVELOPMENT IN FLORIDA DURING
THE PAST 20 YEARS, by W. K. McPherson, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal
Article 1030, 1959, 9 pages. tPrinted in The Soil Science Society
of Florida Proceedings,.Vol. XIX).

The factors that influenced the rates at which the production of
forages was increasing in North and South Florida are identified and
used to predict future trends.

16. AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES IN FIVE RIVER BASINS
OF NORTH AND WEST FLORIDA, a report to the United States Study
Commission, Southeast River Basins, by C. D. Covey, Dept. of Agr.
Econ., Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta., August 1960, Vol. 1, 122 pages; Vol. 2,
392 pages.

This special report was prepared at the request of the U. S. Study
Commission, Southeast River Basins and was included as resource










material in the final report submitted to the President on June 19,
1963. The study was conducted in three parts, (1) an inventory of
the agricultural, forest, and water resources in each of the five
river basins, (2) an evaluation of the agricultural, forest and
water problems and the growth potential of each of the five river
basins, and (3) projections of the agricultural, forest, and water
resource use for 1975 and 2000.

17. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL OUTLOOK FOR PEANUT FED HOGS, by C. C. Moxley,
Agr. Ext. Econ. Series 61-4, March 1961, 2 pages.

A report on the swine situation with particular emphasis on the
outlook for peanut fed hogs.

18. ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES A TOOL FOR FARM MANAGEMENT DECISIONS, by
C. Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 63-9, December 1963, 19 pages.

This publication was designed for educational work with county agents
and producers. Principles of diminishing return, maximum profit
point, substitution, equal-marginal, and enterprise combination are
covered.

19. PRINCIPLES OF FARM MANAGEMENT AND APPRAISAL, by Ralph A. Eastwood,
Fla. Agr. Home Econ. & Rural Youth Extension Training Course No. 19,
June 1-2, 1964.

This material was assembled from secondary sources. Topics treated
include: agriculture in an increasingly urban society; beliefs and
values as a factor in the farm problem; characteristics of modern
farming; risk and uncertainty in farming; kinds of farm organization;
how to study a farm business; factors affecting profits in farming;
contracts, business management and insurance; acquisition of capital;
negotiable instruments; farm acquisition; and farm appraisal.

20. ECONOMIC INFORMATION ON WHICH TO MAKE BETTER BUSINESS DECISIONS, by
Ralph A. Eastwood, National Broiler Council, July 1964, 15 pages.

Edited the two presentations and prepared the necessary foreword for
inclusion of this section in the proceedings number as chairman of
the section of the'symposium dealingwith this topic.

21. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF OUTDOOR RECREATION ON RESIDENT INCOME IN THE
RURAL COUNTIES OF NORTH FLORIDA, by Clyde E. Murphree, Economic
Leaflet, Vol. XXIII, No. 10, October 1964, 4 pages.

Summarizes the material presented in Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 690.

22. DISCUSSION: ANALYTICS OF DECISION MAKING, by Max R. Langham,
Journal of Farm Economics, Vol. 45, No. 5, December 1964,
pp. 1362-1364.

This article reviews John R. Tedford's paper in which decision theory
was used in an attempt to determine a replacement policy for a laying
flock.








PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


JULY 1, 1950 JUNE 30, 1965

I. AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES AND FARM MANAGEMENT

General

1. LAND GRAZED BY FLORIDA LIVESTOCK EXCEEDS 15 MILLION ACRES, by
D. E. Alleger, Florida Cattleman, November 1950, 3 pages.

Data for this storywere obtained by questionnaire from County Agents
as to total acreages of pastures under fence in the respective
counties as well as data re: planted pastures. These data were
compiled and released as a popular article.

2. THE OUTLOOK FOR FLORIDA FARMERS IN 1951, by F. W. Parvin, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 50-10, December 1950, 5 pages.

Discusses the demand for Florida farm products, the outlook for
supplies of civilian goods, the outlook for farm costs and the
outlook for Florida farm products in 1951.

3. AN APPRAISAL OF THE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION CAPACITY OF FLORIDA FOR
1952, Prepared by a committee, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-15,
Aug. 1951, 8 pages.

This report is part of a comprehensive study of the agricultural
capacity of the United States. It contains selected data showing
estimates of use of farm land, crop and pasture yields per acre,
number of livestock and production of livestock and livestock
products, 1952 attainable, with comparisons.

4. AGRICULTURE OUTLOOK FOR FLORIDA FARMERS, by Clyde E. Murphree,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Mimeo Report 51-18, Nov. 1951, 3 pages.

An annual release of the outlook for the coming year.

5. AN APPRAISAL OF ATTAINABLE PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA AGRICULTURE, 1955,
Prepared by a committee, Agr. Expt. Sta. & Ext. Ser. Mimeo Report,
Nov. 1951, 25 pages.

This study attempted to appraise the Agricultural Productive Capacity
of Florida for 1955 assuming that the general level of prices re-
ceived for Florida products would reflect a parity ratio of 105 to
110 and that production materials and equipment would be available
in quantities needed. The basis for making the estimates were first
to determine what yields of crops and livestock could be obtained if
the best known production practices were adopted and. second to
determine to what extent producers would accept and put to use these
practices.











23. RESOURCE USE AND INCOME IMPLICATIONS OF OUTDOOR RECREATION, by
Clyde E. Murphree, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 690, Mar. 1965, 55 pages.

Analyzes the potential contribution of outdoor recreation to resident
income in Suwannee County, Florida. Although the county may never
equal peninsular Florida as an outdoor recreation area for tourists,
it could be developed as a preferred area for Floridians.

Studies of Farm Organization. Labor and Materials,
Costs of Production and Returns

Citrus

1. a. CITRUS COSTS AND RETURNS IN FLORIDA, by Zach Savage.
(1) Eighteen years, 1931-1949, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 50-8,
Sept. 1950, 19 pages.
(2) Nineteen years, 1931-1950, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 52-3,
Mar. 1952, 21 pages.
(3) Twenty years, 1931-1951, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 53-4,
Feb. 1953, 26 pages.
(4) Twenty-one years, 1931-1952, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
54-7, Oct. 1953, 27 pages.
(5) Twenty-two years,.1931-1953, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
55-1, Feb. 1955, 26 pages.
(6) Twenty-three years, 1931-1954, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
56-1, April 1956, 27 pages.
(7) Twenty-four years, 1931-1955, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
57-2, April 1957, 29 pages.
(8) Twenty-five years, 1931-1956, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
58-6, Dec. 1958, 32 pages.
(9) Twenty-six years, 1931-1957, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
59-5, Aug. 1959, 32 pages.
(10) Twenty-seven years, 1931-1958, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
61-1, Jan. 1961, 31 pages.
(11) Twenty-eight years, 1931-1959, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
61-10, Aug. 1961, 27 pages.
(12) Twenty-nine years, 1931-1960, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
62-16, Sept. 1962, 27 pages.
(13) Thirty-one years, 1931-1962, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
64-2, April 1964, 28 pages.

2. b. CITRUS COSTS AND RETURNS IN ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, by
Zach Savage.
(1) Eighteen years, 1931-1949, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
51-6, Feb. 1951,12 pages.
(2) Twenty-one years, 1931-1952, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
54-1, July 1953, 13 pages.

3. c. TWENTY YEARS OF CITRUS COSTS AND RETURNS IN LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
1931-1951, by Zach Savage, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 53-5,
Zirch 1953, 14 pages.











23. RESOURCE USE AND INCOME IMPLICATIONS OF OUTDOOR RECREATION, by
Clyde E. Murphree, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 690, Mar. 1965, 55 pages.

Analyzes the potential contribution of outdoor recreation to resident
income in Suwannee County, Florida. Although the county may never
equal peninsular Florida as an outdoor recreation area for tourists,
it could be developed as a preferred area for Floridians.

Studies of Farm Organization. Labor and Materials,
Costs of Production and Returns

Citrus

1. a. CITRUS COSTS AND RETURNS IN FLORIDA, by Zach Savage.
(1) Eighteen years, 1931-1949, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 50-8,
Sept. 1950, 19 pages.
(2) Nineteen years, 1931-1950, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 52-3,
Mar. 1952, 21 pages.
(3) Twenty years, 1931-1951, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 53-4,
Feb. 1953, 26 pages.
(4) Twenty-one years, 1931-1952, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
54-7, Oct. 1953, 27 pages.
(5) Twenty-two years,.1931-1953, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
55-1, Feb. 1955, 26 pages.
(6) Twenty-three years, 1931-1954, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
56-1, April 1956, 27 pages.
(7) Twenty-four years, 1931-1955, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
57-2, April 1957, 29 pages.
(8) Twenty-five years, 1931-1956, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
58-6, Dec. 1958, 32 pages.
(9) Twenty-six years, 1931-1957, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
59-5, Aug. 1959, 32 pages.
(10) Twenty-seven years, 1931-1958, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
61-1, Jan. 1961, 31 pages.
(11) Twenty-eight years, 1931-1959, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
61-10, Aug. 1961, 27 pages.
(12) Twenty-nine years, 1931-1960, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
62-16, Sept. 1962, 27 pages.
(13) Thirty-one years, 1931-1962, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
64-2, April 1964, 28 pages.

2. b. CITRUS COSTS AND RETURNS IN ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, by
Zach Savage.
(1) Eighteen years, 1931-1949, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
51-6, Feb. 1951,12 pages.
(2) Twenty-one years, 1931-1952, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
54-1, July 1953, 13 pages.

3. c. TWENTY YEARS OF CITRUS COSTS AND RETURNS IN LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
1931-1951, by Zach Savage, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 53-5,
Zirch 1953, 14 pages.









4. d. ORANGE COSTS AND RETURNS IN FLORIDA, by Zach Savage.
(1) Twenty-seven years, 1931-1958, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
60-2, Mar. 1960, 30 pages.
(2) Thirty years, 1931-1961, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 63-3,
April 1963, 25 pages.
(3) Thirty-two years, 1931-1963, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
65-3, Mar. 1965, 24 pages.

A summary of costs and returns per acre'for a sample of citrus
groves in Florida. Some of the reasons for the increases in the
number of boxes of fruit harvested per acre were increases in average
age of trees, better fertilizer practices, larger proportion of fruit
harvested due to good prices and the development of fruit processing.
One or more groves failed to return cash costs in each of the seasons
of these records.

5. INDIVIDUAL GROVE REPORTS, by Zach Savage, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
50-7, September 1950, 4 pages.


6. CITRUS GROVE RECORDS, by
a. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
b. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
c. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.


Zach Savage.
Series 55-3, Oct. 1955, 12 pages.
Series 58-5, April 1958, 12 pages.
Series 62-9, July 1962, 13 pages.


Adequate grove records over a period of several seasons tend to
increase efficiency in fruit production and grove management in
general. The needs of a particular grove and its response to prac-
tices do not necessarily conform to that of any other grove. The
individuality of groves necessitates individual treatment. Grove
records facilitate the individual treatment and management of each
grove.


7. SHOULD I
a. Agr.
b. Agr.


BUY A CITRUS GROVE?, by Zach Savage.
Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 51-2, January 1951, 7 pages.
Ext. Ser. Cir. 119, Oct. T953, 12 pages.


In purchasing a grove see that it has a large number of factors
favorable for high fruit yields produced efficiently. Selling fruit
at a price advantageous to the grower is very important. Sufficient
acreage should be had to supply ample income to carry the debt load,
if any, and to furnish the required additional income needed. Citrus
fruit production is highly competitive and should be so recognized.

8. COST OF PLANTING AND DEVELOPING FLORIDA CITRUS GROVES THROUGH 10 YEARS
OF AGE, by Zach Savage.
a. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 54-3, July 1953, 2 pages.
b. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 56-3, August 1956, 2 pages.
c. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 59-6, September 1959, 2 pages.
d. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 65-1, January 1965, 2 pages.

Variations in costs at different levels and for individual plantings
are so wide that it is not possible to arrive at figures that apply










at all times and .under all circumstances. -:Changes in the general
price level cause fluctuations in costs and returns, and such
fluctuations should be taken into account when applying figures at a
given time or to a particular situation.

9. DOES IRRIGATION PAY ON YOUR GROVE? by Zach Savage.
a. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 54-8, October 1953, 3 pars.
b. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-1, January 1962, 3 pages.

Each grove should be checked to determine whether irrigation is
profitable on that particular grove.

10. HOW MANY CITRUS TREES PER ACRE? by Zach Savage.
a. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 55-2, April 1955, 4 pages.
b. Agr. Ext. Ser..Econ. Series 57-4, Feb. 1957, 4 pages.
c. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 59-3, Feb. 1959, 4 pages.
d. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-11, Aug. 1961, 4 pages.
e. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 65-4, April 1965, 4 pages.

There are a number of factors and conditions entering into the
determination of spacings of trees for maximum yields and net returns.
Double-set groves while developing through the younger ages uses the
land space more efficiently and tend to increase yields per acre. As
trees begin to crowd each other, alternate trees should be pruned
back as needed to make room for the alternate trees that are to be
left permanently.

11. CITRUS YEILD PER TREE BY AGE, by Zach Savage.
a. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 60-8, November 1960, 10 pages.
b. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 63-7, October 1963, 10 pages.

Average or usual yields of fruit per tree are sometimes used in
indicating what may be expected in yields over a period of time.
However, such data do not indicate what may be expected in variations
from the average of a particular grove or between yields of different
groves.

12. SO YOU WOULD LIKE TO SET A CITRUS GROVE, by Zach Savage.
a. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-3, Mar. 1961, 2 pages.
b. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-7, July 1962, 2 pages.

Good citrus land is worth several times as much as land unsuitable
for citrus fruit production. If suitable land cannot be obtained,
it would be best to purchase a good grove already set on good citrus
land.

13. A SUMMARY AND DIRECTORY OF RECENT RESEARCH FINDINGS ON THE ECONOMICS
OF THE FLORIDA CITRUS INDUSTRY, by Zach Savage, A. H. Spurlock,
Eric Thor, and Marshall R. Godwin.
a. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 57-3, February 1957, 14 pages.
b. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 58-2, March 1958, 13 pages.








14. FAGTOil7 AFFECTING FLORIDA ORANGE YIELDS, by Zach Savage, Sunshine
State Agr. Research Report, Vol. 3, No. 4, October 1958, 1 page.

15. IT COSTS A LOT NOW TO SPRAY AND DUST FLORIDA CITRUS, by Zach Savage,
Sunshine State Agr. Research Report, Vol. 5, No. 4, October 1960,
2 pages.

16. ESTIMATING THE VALUE OF CITRUS FRUITS AS IT DEVELOPS, by Zach Savage,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 64-6, September 1964, 9 pages.

Citrus groves usually increase in value as they increase in age and
productiveness. Citrus fruit also increases in value as it develops.
Approximation of fruit values were developed by months from the
bloom to mature fruit. Such information is often very valuable in
appraisals for the settlement of estates, setting fruit values upon
sale of grove and for other purposes.

17. PER-ACRE YIELD AND ON-TREE PRICE OF FLORIDA CITRUS 1929 TO DATE, by
Zach Savage, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 65-5, April 1965, 5 pages.

Livestock and Livestock Products

I. Beef

1. A COW-AND-CALF PLAN FOR FLORIDA, by F. W. Parvin, Fla. Agr. Ext.
Cir. 95R, April 1952, 6 pages.

Describes a plan designed to sell heavy calves from poor-to-fair
cows of dairy breeding and high quality beef bull. The cows
would be bred to calve in the early spring and the calves would
be sold at weaning time in the fall. At that time, from good
pasture and plenty of milk, these calves should weigh from 400
to 500 pounds. (Adopted from a plan being used in Kentucky).

2. a. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 59-4, July 1959,
1 page.

b. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 60-6, Sept. 1960.

c. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL OUTLOOK Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-6, June 1961,
8 pages.

d. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, T. J. Cunha, K. L. Durrance, H. C. Giles,
W. K. McPherson, J. E. Pace, Clifford Rhodes and Gene Rowe,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-16, September 1961, 7 pages.

e. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, R. P. Hill, T. J. Cunha, K. L. Durrance,
H. C. Giles, W. K. McPherson, J. E. Pace, Clifford Rhodes
and Gene Rowe, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-3, March 1962,
8 pages.








14. FAGTOil7 AFFECTING FLORIDA ORANGE YIELDS, by Zach Savage, Sunshine
State Agr. Research Report, Vol. 3, No. 4, October 1958, 1 page.

15. IT COSTS A LOT NOW TO SPRAY AND DUST FLORIDA CITRUS, by Zach Savage,
Sunshine State Agr. Research Report, Vol. 5, No. 4, October 1960,
2 pages.

16. ESTIMATING THE VALUE OF CITRUS FRUITS AS IT DEVELOPS, by Zach Savage,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 64-6, September 1964, 9 pages.

Citrus groves usually increase in value as they increase in age and
productiveness. Citrus fruit also increases in value as it develops.
Approximation of fruit values were developed by months from the
bloom to mature fruit. Such information is often very valuable in
appraisals for the settlement of estates, setting fruit values upon
sale of grove and for other purposes.

17. PER-ACRE YIELD AND ON-TREE PRICE OF FLORIDA CITRUS 1929 TO DATE, by
Zach Savage, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 65-5, April 1965, 5 pages.

Livestock and Livestock Products

I. Beef

1. A COW-AND-CALF PLAN FOR FLORIDA, by F. W. Parvin, Fla. Agr. Ext.
Cir. 95R, April 1952, 6 pages.

Describes a plan designed to sell heavy calves from poor-to-fair
cows of dairy breeding and high quality beef bull. The cows
would be bred to calve in the early spring and the calves would
be sold at weaning time in the fall. At that time, from good
pasture and plenty of milk, these calves should weigh from 400
to 500 pounds. (Adopted from a plan being used in Kentucky).

2. a. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 59-4, July 1959,
1 page.

b. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 60-6, Sept. 1960.

c. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL OUTLOOK Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-6, June 1961,
8 pages.

d. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, T. J. Cunha, K. L. Durrance, H. C. Giles,
W. K. McPherson, J. E. Pace, Clifford Rhodes and Gene Rowe,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-16, September 1961, 7 pages.

e. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Livestock Outlook, by
C. C. Moxley, R. P. Hill, T. J. Cunha, K. L. Durrance,
H. C. Giles, W. K. McPherson, J. E. Pace, Clifford Rhodes
and Gene Rowe, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-3, March 1962,
8 pages.









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f. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Livestock Outlook, by H. C. Giles,
T. J. Cunha, K. L. Durrance, R. P. Hill, W. K. McPherson,
J. E. Pace, Clifford Rhodes and Gene Rowe, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 62-14, August 1962, 9 pages.

A summary of the economic situation as it relates to the
livestock industry. A brief report on the livestock situation
and outlook for livestock.

3. a. BUSINESS ANALYSIS, 1959--FIFTEEN SOUTH FLORIDA RANCHES, by
Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 60-12, Nov. 1960,
25 pages.

b. 1960 RANCH BUSINESS ANALYSIS--SIXTEEN FLORIDA RANCHES, by
Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-18, Nov. 1961,
25 pages.

c. SOUND FARM MANAGEMENT BUSINESS ANALYSIS, 1961--FIFTEEN FLORIDA
RANCHES, by Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-19,
Oct. 1962, 22 pages.

d. FACTS FOR RANCH FARM MANAGEMENT DECISIONS, 1962 RANCH
BUSINESS ANALYSIS, by Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 63-4, Sept. 1963, 21 pages.

e. FACTS FOR RANCH FARM MANAGEMENT DECISIONS, 1963 RANCH
BUSINESS ANALYSIS, by Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 64-4, Oct. 1964, 20 pages.

Data are prese~ttd for cooperatibg ranches. Analyses are
set up on some major factors affecting profit such as size,
production rates, land use and efficiency in the use of some
major inputs. Records are secured by county agents.
Tabulation and analysis is by'the author.

4. BEEF PRODUCTION,SOIL AND FORAGE ANALYSIS AND ECONOMIC RETURNS
FROM EIGHT PASTURE PROGRAMS IN NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA, by M. Koger,
W. G. Blue, G. B. Killinger, R. E. L. Greene, H. C. Harris,
J. M. Myers, A. C. Warnick, N. Gammon, Jr., Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Tech. Bulletin 631, May 1961, 76 pages.

This experiment is designed to show variations in beef production,
using a cow calf program on a year-round basis for different
pasture programs and breeding season. It is a cooperative








-11-


project between Animal Science, Agronomy, Soils, Agricultural
Engineering and Agricultural Economics. This publication reports
the first phase of the experiments when there were eight pasture
programs. Using input and output data from the study and data
from other studies, estimates were made of costs and returns for
each program, adjusted as to what one could reasonably expect
under commercial conditions.

5. EFFECTS OF FEEDING LIMITED AMOUNTS OF CONCENTRATE TO STOCKER
STEERS ON PASTURE, by C. E. Haines, H. L. Chapman, Jr.,
R. W. Kidder and R. E. L. Greene, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin
693, July 1965, 17 pages.

In three consecutive years, groups of 80 yearling steers were
used to study the effects of supplementing pasture grazing
during certain quarters of the pre-feedlot year. Each test
period was approximately a years duration prior to finishing
the steers in the feedlot. This publication summarizes type of
supplementation, weight changes, market grades and relative
economic returns from supplementation prior to the pre-feedlot
treatments.

II. Dairy

1. SUMMARY OF COSTS AND RETURNS FOR TWENTY WHOLESALE DAIRIES,
JACKSONVILLE AREA, FLORIDA, by R. E. L. Greene, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 50-c, Nov. 1950, 14 pages.

A study of 20 wholesale dairies in the Jacksonville area for
the calendar year, 1949. Data are presented on costs and
returns, distribution of operator capital, percent turnover of
cows in the dairy herd and seasonal distribution of milk for
small, medium and large farms and an average for all farms.

2. SUMMARY OF COSTS AND RETURNS FOR TWENTY-FOUR WHOLESALE DAIRIES,
MIAMI AREA, FLORIDA, by A. H. Spurlock and Donald L. Brooke,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 50-5d, Nov. 1950, 12 pages.

One of a series of area production costs for 24 dairies for one
year. Monetary costs only for feed, labor and other principal
items are shown with income from sales, and net income.







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3. COST OF PRODUCING MILK IN SELECTED AREAS OF FLORIDA, by
A. H. Spurlock, D. L. Brooke and R. E. L. Greene, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 51-4, Jan. 1951, 20 pages.

A summary of costs and returns on dairy farms in six areas of
Florida 24 dairies in the Miami area, 17 in the Palm Beach
area, 20 in the Jacksonville area, 11 in the St. Petersburg
area, 21 in the Tampa area and 19 in the Orlando area. The data
covered the 1949 calendar year, except Miami, which covered
approximately the 12 month period ending August 31, 1950.

4. TURNOVER OF COWS IN FLORIDA DAIRY HERDS, by A. H. Spurlock,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 52-9, Oct. 1952, 3 pages.

A preliminary report giving accumulated average lifespans of
dairy cows with life expectancy at different ages. Reasons for
disposal of living cows, causes of deaths and rate of turnover
are, shown.

5. PRODUCTIVE LIFE SPAN OF DAIRY CATTLE, by R. B. Becker,
P. T. Dix Arnold and A. H. Spurlock, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin
540, Mar. 1954, 18 pages.

Cooperative with Dairy Science Department. Economic phase:
From observation of 1742 cows average lifespans were determined,
and life expectancy at different ages. Rate of turnover, reasons
for disposal and cause of deaths are shown.

6. MILK PRODUCTION COST TRENDS IN THE FLORIDA PENINSULA. A SPECIAL
PRELIMINARY REPORT, by Eldon D. Smith, N. K. Roberts and
William G. O'Reagan, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 55-9, May 1955,
41 pages.

A study of dairy farming in the peninsula of Florida was con-
ducted by the Department of Agricultural Economics during 1954
covering the 1953 calendar year. Records were obtained for 105
farms in four areas for four size groups of dairies. This
report presents descriptive data concerning characteristics of
the dairy farms studied. An analysis is made of cash costs and
dairy cow depreciation costs incurred by dairy farmers in 1953.
Comparisons are made among the various areas and size classes.
By application of suitable price index numbers, an analysis is
made of the estimated costs of the items presented for 1953 if
purchased under 1950, 1951, 1952 and 1954 price condition,





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7. DAIRY CATTLE AND THEIR CARE, by P. T. Dix Arnold, R. B. Becker
and A. H. Spurlock, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 599, Aug. 1958,
55 pages.

Cooperative with Dairy Science Department. Economic aspects:
Some principles of successful dairying; culling; raised vs
purchased replacements. Average lifespans of 2961 cows, with
life expectancy at different ages are shown together with
depreciation rates, and reasons for disposal. Effects of useful
lifespan and initial cost of cow on depreciation cost per gallon
-are given for three levels of productions.

8. SUMMARY OF COSTS AND RETURNS FOR WHOLESALE DAIRY FARMS, CENTRAL
FLORIDA, 1958, by R. E. L. Greene, John Warrington and D. L. Brooke,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-2, Oct. 1959, 33 pages.

A study of the cost of producing milk on wholesale dairy farms
in Central Florida for the 1958 calendar year. Records were ob-
tained for 34 farms for which average daily deliveries varied
from 82 to 1,427 gallons per day. In summarizing and presenting
the data, the farms were grouped into three size groups small,
medium and large. Small dairies were those with a daily base of
less than 225 gallons, medium size dairies, 225 to 449 gallons
and large dairies,those with a daily base of 450 gallons or more
per day. Data are presented on farm organization and costs and
returns in producing milk by size of farm and an average for all
farms.

9. SUMMARY OF COSTS AND RETURNS FOR WHOLESALE DAIRY FARMS, NORTHEAST
FLORIDA, 1958, by R. E. L. Greene, John Warrington and D. L. Brooke,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-5, Oct. 1959, 33 pages.

A study similar to the one for Central Florida. Records were
obtained for 31 farms for which average daily deliveries varied
from 70 to 1,414 gallons per day.

10. a. BUSINESS ANALYSIS 1959, by Clifford Alston.
(1) 15 Dairy Farms,-. Manatee-Sarasota Counties, Agr. Ext.
Ser. Econ. Series 60-5, Sept. 1960, 29 pages.
(2) Nine Polk County Dairy Farms, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 60-7, Sept. 1960, 25 pages.
(3) 18 Dairy Farms, Lower East Coast, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 60-9, Oct. 1960, 24 pages.
(4) Nine Dairy Farms. Washington-Holmes Counties, Agr. Ext.
Econ. Series 60-10, Nov. 1960, 22 pages.
(5) Ten Dairy Farms, Lake, Marion and Sumter Counties, Agr.
Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 60-11, Nov. 1960, 22 pages.

b. 1960 DAIRY BUSINESS ANALYSIS, by Clifford Alston.
(1) Eleven Orange County Dairy Farms, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 61-7, June 1961, 22 pages.
(2) Fifteen Dairy Farms, Manatee-Sarasota Counties, Agr. Ext.
Ser. Econ. Series 61-8, June 1961, 22 pages.
(3) Nine Polk County Dairy Farms, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
61-12, July 1961, 22 pages.





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(4) Twelve Dairy Farms, Lake, Marion, Sumter and Osceola
Counties, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-14, Sept.
1961, 22 pages.
(5) Nine Dairy Farms, Washington. Holmes. Okaloosa and
Jackson Counties, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 61-15,
Sept. 1961, 22 pages.
(6) Eighteen Dairy Farms, Lower East Coast, Agr. Ext. Ser.
Econ. Series 61-17, Nov. 1961, 22 pages.

c. SOUND FARM MANAGEMENT BUSINESS ANALYSIS, 1961, by
Clifford Alston.
(1) Fifteen Orange County Dairy Farms, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 62-6, June 1962, 19 pages.
(2) Sixteen Dairy Farms, Manatee--Sarasota Counties, Agr. Ext.
Ser. Econ. Series.62-8, July 1962, 19 pages.
(3) Eleven Dairy Farms, Lake--Marion--Sumter--Osceola Counties,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-11, July 1962, 19 pages.
(4) Nine Dairy Farms. Pblk--Hillsborough Counties, Agr. Ext.
Ser. Econ. Series 62-12, August 1962, 19 pages.
(5) Ten Dairy Farms, Lower East Coast, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 62-17, Sept. 1962, 19 pages.

d. FACTS FOR DAIRY FARM MANAGEMENT DECISIONS, 1962 DAIRY BUSINESS
ANALYSIS, by Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
63-5, Oct. 1968, 20 pages.

e. FACTS FOR DAIRY FARM MANAGEMENT DECISIONS, 1963 DAIRY BUSINESS
ANALYSIS, by Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
64-3, Sept. 1964, 20 pages.

Data are presented for cooperating dairy farms. Analyses are
set up on some major factors affecting profit such as size,
production rates, land use, and efficiency in the use of some
major inputs. Records are secured by county agents.
Tabulation and analysis is by the author.

11. SUMMARY OF COSTS AND RETURNS FOR WHOLESALE DAIRY FARMS, TAMPA BAY
MILK MARKETING AREA, FLORIDA, 1959, By. R. E. L. Greene,
R. H. Walker and D. L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 61-5,
Nov. 1960, 41 pages.

A study similar to the studies of wholesale dairy farms in Central
and Northeast Florida, except the data covering the 1959 calendar
year. Records were obtained for 50 farms on which the average
amount of milk sold per day varied from 63 to 1,098 gallons. This
publication also includes comparative data for dairies in North-
east Florida, Central Florida and the Tampa Bay area.

12. COSTS AND RETURNS IN RAISING DAIRY HEIFERS, SIX FARMS ORANGE
COUNTY FLORIDA,1961 by A. F. Cribbett and R. E. L. Greene,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 61-11, May 1961, 22 pages.

A detailed cost study was made of the heifer replacement enter-
prise on six farms in Orange County covering the 1960 calendar





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year to obtain information on the costs of raising heifers and
the relative importance of the various items of costs. The st,!'
was designed so the data could be summarized by age groups -
0 to 6 months, 6 to 15 months, and 15 to 27 months and 0 to 27
months. Total returns, net returns and net costs were calculated
for heifers to 27 months of age.

13. FLORIDA DAIRY OUTLOOK, by Ralph A. Eastwood, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 61-9, July 1961, 2 pages.

Describes economic situation as of the publication date, and
projects these for the following year.

14. COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED COSTS AND RETURNS ON WHOLESALE DAIRY
FARMS IN CENTRAL FLORIDA IN 1958 and 1960, by R. E. L. Greene,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-5, Oct. 1961, 10 pages.

This study was made to show changes in costs and returns on dairy
farms in Central Florida between 1958 and 1960. Records were
obtained covering the 1960 calendar year for 18 of the 34 farms
included in the 1958 study. The method of analysis was the same
for 1958 and 1960. The data were summarized to show an average
for all farms. Summaries were not made for farms in different
size groups.

15. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Florida Dairy Outlook, July 1, 1962,
by C. C. Moxley, and R. P. Hill, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series
62-10, July 1962, 2 pages.

An analysis of the economic situation and its relevance to the
Florida Dairy Industry. A brief report on the outlook for the
Florida dairy industry.

16. ECONOMISTS SEE CHANGE IN DAIRYING, by Ralph A. Eastwood,
The Florida Dairy Farmer, Vol. 1, No. 3, Winter 1962, p. 12B.

This reports a summary of .the opinions of Donald E. Hirsch,
Assistant Direttor, Commodity Division, American Farm Bureau
Federation concerning dairy farming. Farm production, farm prices,
farm costs and incomes, farming practices, markets for dairy foods,
market prices, developments in marketing, and international trade
are topics mentioned.

17. FLORIDA DAIRY PICTURE, by Ralph A. Eastwood, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 62-20, November 1962, 13 pages.

Assumptions are outlined for ten years concerning Florida popula-
tion, income, dairy prices, milk supplies and per capital consump-
tion. The retailing situation is treated for food stores, insti-
tutions, and retail routes. Milk handling is discussed with
respect to manufacturing, processing, cooperatives, producer-
distributors and capacities. Dairy farming is described generally,
as to business form, herd sizes, cow numbers, production per cow,
replacements, and farm numbers.







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18. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING COSTS AND RETURNS IN PRODUCING
MILK BY SIZE OF FARM IN THREE AREAS OF FLORIDA, by R. E. L. Greene
and Bobby Ray Bennett, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-6,
Nov. 1963, 58 pages.

In the studies of dairies in Northeast and Central Florida for
1958 and the Tampa Bay area for 1959, they were classified as
small, medium and large. Records for each of the size groups
were combined and averages calculated for small, medium and large
dairies in the three areas. Within each of the size groups, the
data were analyzed by cross tabulations to show factors affecting
costs and returns. Because of the wide variation in size of
dairy farms in Florida, it was felt that a more accurate study
of relationship would be possible if part of the effects of
variation in size were eliminated.

19. A SUMMARY OF COSTS AND RETURNS AND AN ECONOMIC DESCRIPTION OF
WHOLESALE DAIRY FARMS IN THE PENSACOLA, FLORIDA MILK MARKETING
AREA, by Blair J. Smith, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 65-1,
July 1964, 65 pages.

The major objectives of this study were to develop an economic
description of area dairying and to get representative costs and
returns data. The dairyman's over-all financial position,
management practices followed, and biographical data were re-
ported. The report was prepared in a way such that each cooper-
ating farmer could compare his operation with other area farms
of similar size.

20. A SUMMARY OF 1962 COSTS AND RETURNS AND AN ECONOMIC DESCRIPTION
OF WHOLESALE DAIRY FARMS IN THE TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA MILK MARKET-
ING AREA, by Blair J. Smith, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 65-2,
Sept. 1964, 65 pages.

The major objectives of the study were to develop an economic
description of area dairying and to get representative costs and
returns data. The dairyman's over-all financial position, manage-
ment practices followed, and biographical data were reported.
The report was prepared in a way such that each cooperating farmer
could compare his operation with other area farms of similar size.

TII. Poultry-

1. CAGE LAYERS A GOOD VENTURE FOR FLORIDA, by R. E. L. Greene,
Sunshine State Agr. Res. Report, Vol. 2, No. 1, January 1957,
1 page.

A summary of the study of the cage-layer enterprise in West
Florida to give a description of the enterprises, practices of
producers, investment, costs, returns, and a summary of im-
portant factors affecting costs and returns.





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2. A STUDY OF THE CAGED-LAYER ENTERPRISE IN WEST FLORIDA, by
R. E. L. Greene, D. L. Brooke and R. K. Noles, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Series 57-7, April 1957, 43 pages.

A study of enterprise organization, management practices, degree
of profitableness and factors affecting costs and returns for the
cage-layer enterprise in Northwest Florida. Contains data for
53 farms showing size of operation, capital invested and produc-
tion and marketing practices. Records were obtained for 33
farms on all expenses and income for the cage-layer enterprise
for the fiscal year September 1, 1954 to August 31, 1955.

3. FLORIDA OUTLOOK.INFORMATION I 'OUTLOOK FOR POULTRY AND EGGS, by
C. C. Moxley.
a. Agr, Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 59-3, April 1959, 1 page.
b. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 59-7, December 1959, 2 pages.
c. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 60-3, July 1960, 1 page.
d. Agr. Ext. S'er. Econ. Series 61-5, May 1961, 2 pages.
e. Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-4, May 1962, 4 pages.

An analysis of the economic situation and its relevence to the
Florida Poultry Industry. A brief report on the outlook for
the Florida Poultry Industry.

4. a. BUSINESS ANALYSIS, 1959 14 POULTRY FARMS, by Clifford Alston,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 60-4, July 1960, 24 pages.

b. 1960 POULTRY BUSINESS ANALYSIS 23 FLORIDA POULTRY FARMS,
HILLSBOROUGH, PASCO, PINELLAS, POLK, MARION, ORANGE AND
MANATEE COUNTIES, by Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 61-13, Sept. 1961, 23 pages.

c. SOUND FARM MANAGEMENT BUSINESS ANALYSIS, 1961, SIXTEEN FLORIDA
POULTRY FARMS, by Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series 62-18, Sept. 1962, 17 pages.

d. FACTS FOR POULTRY MANAGEMENT DECISIONS, 1962 POULTRY FARM
BUSINESS ANALYSIS, by Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ.
Series, 63-6, Nov. 1963, 17 pages.

e. FACTS FOR POULTRY FARM MANAGEMENT DECISIONS, 1963 POULTRY
FARM BUSINESS ANALYSIS, by Clifford Alston, Agr. Ext. Ser.
Econ. Series 64-5, Oct. 1964, 16 pages.

Data are presented for cooperating poultry farms. Analyses
are set up on some major factors affecting profit such as
size, production rates, and efficiency in the use of some
major inputs. Records are secured by county agents.
Tabulation and analysis is by the author.








-18-


5. AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF MARKET EGG PRODUCTION CONTRACTS AS THEY
RELATE TO THE PRODUCER, by R. E. L. Greene and W. Bernard Lester,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 63-6, Feb. 1963, 46 pages.

Comparative data are given for market egg production contracts
offered producers by four feed companies in Florida in 1962.
Selected contract producers were surveyed to obtain their
opinions and attitudes regarding contracts and contracting and
also a record of their operations for the 1961 calendar year.
Estimates were made of returns to producers for different type
contracts assuming certain levels of efficiency of operation.

6. RISK, UNCERTAINTY AND PROFIT IN THE POULTRY BUSINESS, by
Ralph A. Eastwood, Southeastern Times, 1963, 4 pages.

This is a speech, printed almost in its entirety, delivered at
the twenty-second Annual Florida Poultry Institute. The econom-
ic situation was reviewed, and projections were made to 1966.
Substantial attention is devoted to supply management with
applications to poultry and eggs.

7. FLORIDA'S DARE POULTRY COMMITTEE SEES MAJOR EGG PRODUCTION BY
1975, by Ralph A. Eastwood, Poultry Times, June 3, 1963.

This reviews DARE (Poultry) Committee report. It evaluates the
existing situation. It projects committee thinking to 1975.
Production goals are indicated which will achieve the projected
industrial capacity.

8. AN ECONOMIC STUDY OF FLORIDA HATCHERIES, by R. E. L. Greene and
Victor Gladden Edman, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-1, Oct. 1963,
64 pages.

At the time of this study, there were 33 commercial hatcheries
in Florida that varied in size from 13,300 to 507,000 egg
capacity. Records were obtained for 31 of the 33 hatcheries on
management practices. Financial data including investment, costs
and returns were obtained for 20 hatcheries. In most cases, the
data were for the 1959 calendar year. For a few hatcheries on a
fiscal year basis, the most recent year was used. Data are
presented on general characteristics and practices of hatcheries,
cost per chick sold by types of chicks and a study of factors
affecting costs and returns.

9. THE GENERAL POULTRY OUTLOOK, by Ralph A. Eastwood, Twenty-Fourth
Annual Florida Poultry Institute, Aug. 24, 1965.

This speech reviews the economic and public affairs setting for
the poultry industry. It projects into 1966. Consumption is
considered in immediate, short-, and long-run contexts.





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Truck Crops

1. LABOR AND MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS,COSTS OF PRODUCTION AND RETURNS ON
FLORIDA IRISH POTATOES, by D. L. Brooke and A. H. Spurlock, Fla.
Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 472, September 1950, 29 pages.

Data are presented on the amount of labor by operations, approximate
dates of performance and amounts of materials used in production of
Irish potatoes in the major producing areas in the state. Costs and
returns data are shown also for the seasons 1946-47 through 1948-49.

2. LABOR AND MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS, COSTS OF PRODUCTION AND RETURNS ON
FLORIDA TOMATOES, by D. L. Brooke and A. H. Spurlock, Fla. Exp. Sta.
Bulletin 474, September 1950, 34 pages.

Data are presented on the amount of labor by operations, approximate
dates of performance and amounts of materials used in production of
tomatoes in the major producing areas in the state. Costs and
returns data are shown also for the seasons 1946-47 through 1948-49.

3. a. COSTS AND RETURNS FROM VEGETABLE CROPS IN FLORIDA, VOL. 5, SEASON
1949-50 WITH COMPARATIVE DATA, by D. L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 51-8, February 1951, 90 pages.

b. COSTS AND RETURNS FROM VEGETABLE CROPS IN FLORIDA, VOL. VI,
SEASON 1950-51 WITH COMPARATIVE DATA, by Tallmadge Bergen,
A. H. Spurlock and D. L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 52-2,
February 1952, 68 pages.

c. COSTS AND RETURNS FROM VEGETABLE CROPS IN FLORIDA, by
D. L. Brooke.
(1) Vol. VII, Season 1951-52, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 53-3,
February 1953, 72 pages.
(2) Vol. VIII, Season 1952-53, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 54-11,
Feb.1954, 69 pages.
(3) Vol. IX, Season 1953-54, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 55-7,
February 1955, 71 pages.
(4) Vol. X, Season 1954-55, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 56-7,
March 1956, 63 pages.
(5) Vol. XI, Season 1955-56, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 57-6,
February 1957, 57 pages.
(6) Vol. XII, Season 1956-57, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 58-8,
March 1958, 58 pages.
(7) Season 1960-61, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-9, February 1962,
21 pages.
(8) Season 1961-62, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 63-8, March 1963,
21 pages.
(9) Season 1962-63, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-11, April 1964,
21 pages.
(10) Season 1963-64, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 65-4, February 1965,
32 pages.

Presents annual and comparative data on average per acre and
per unit costs of producing, harvesting and selling major
vegetable crops in important producing areas of Florida to-
gether with average net returns to growers.





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4. A CONDENSED SUMMARY OF MAN HOURS AND MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS AND
SEASON OF OPERATION FOR SELECTED VEGETABLE CROPS BY AREAS, FLORIDA,
by A. H. Spurlock, D. L. Brooke and R. E. L. Greene, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 51-10, March 1951, 10 pages.

Presents condensed data on labor requirements by type of operation
and material requirements per acre to produce and harvest the major
vegetable crops together with the normal season of production in
important producing areas of the state.

5. PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF PER ACRE COSTS OF PRODUCING VEGETABLE
CROPS IN SELECTED AREAS IN FLORIDA, by D. L. Broke, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 51-12, April 1951, 6 pages.

Presents data on the relative importance of various items of expense
(land, labor, materials and power) in the production of major vege-
table crops in important producing areas for the period 1946 to 1950.

6. LABOR AND MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CROPS AND LIVESTOCK, II TRUCK
CROPS, by A. H. Spurlock, D. L. Brooke and R. E. L. Greene, Fla.
Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 489, January 1952, 80 pages.

Data are presented on the amount of labor required by operations,
approximate dates of performance and amounts of materials used in
the production of important vegetable crops in the major producing
areas in the state. The data were obtained for different crops and
areas over the period 1943 to 1950.

7. SOME ECONOMIC FACTORS IN FLORIDA VEGETABLE PRODUCTION, by D. L. Brooke,
Economic Leaflet, Vol. XII, No. 3, February 1953, 4 pages.

A description of the economic conditions of vegetable production in
Florida together with trends in costs and returns from major crops
from 1946 to 1951.

8. FLORIDA TOMATOES--PRODUCTION, HARVESTING AND MARKETING COSTS AND
F.O.B. AND GROWER GROSS PRICES BY AREAS, FIVE-SEASON AVERAGE,1949-50
TO 1953-54 WITH COMPARATIVE DATA FOR 1953-54, 1952-53 and 1951-52
SEASONS, by D. L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 55-8, February 1955,
16 pages.

A compilation of annual and five-year average data for the period
1949-50 to 1953-54 of the cost of producing, harvesting and marketing
tomatoes in important producing areas of Florida together with f.o.b.
and grower returns from tomato sales.

9. HASTINGS CABBAGE GROWERS LOSE MONEY, by Donald L. Brooke, Sunshine
State Agr. Research Report, Vol. 4, No. 2, April 1959, 1 page.

An article describing the financial experience from cabbage produc-
tion in the Hastings area during the period 1952-53 to 1956-57 by
size of grower.







-21-


10. LABOR AND MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS,COSTS AND RETURNS FOR I-IISH POTATOES
AND CABBAGE IN THE HASTINGS AREA, FLORIDA, by D. L. Bro)l-e, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 61-4, October 1960, 15 pages.

Data are presented on the amount of labor required by operations,
approximate dates of performance and amounts of materials used in
the production of Irish potatoes in the Hastings area. Costs and
returns data are shown also for the seasons 1953-57 and 1959-60.

11. LABOR AND MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR VEGETABLE CROPS, by D. L. Brooke,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 660, June 1963, 83 pages.

Data are presented on the amount of labor required by operations,
approximate dates of performance and amounts of materials used in
the production of important vegetable crops in the major producing
areas in the state. The data were obtained for different crops and
areas over the period 1959 to 1961.

Cther

1. a. COSTS AND RETURNS ON AVOCADOS IN DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA, SEASONS
1938-1949, by D. L. Brooke, C. H. Steffani and J. D. Campbell,
Mimeo Report, Jan. 1951, 17 pages.

b. COSTS AND RETURNS ON AVOCADOS IN DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA, SEASONS
1938-1950, by D. L. Brooke, C. H. Steffani and J. D. Campbell,
Mimeo Report, April 1952, 18 pages.

A comparison of costs of growing avocados in Dade County annually
from 1939 to 1950 together with average yields and on-tree re-
turns to growers on a per acre and bushel basis.

2. a. COSTS AND RETURNS ON PERSIAN LIMES IN DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SEASONS 1939-1949, by D. L. Brooke, C. H. Steffani and
J. D. Campbell, Mimeo Report, Jan. 1951, 16 pages.

b. COSTS AND RETURNS ON PERSIAN LIMES IN DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SEASONS 1939-1950, by D. L. Brooke, C. H. Steffani and
J. D. Campbell, Mimeo Report, April 1952, 17 pages.

A comparison of costs of growing limes in Dade County annually
from 1939 to 1950 by age of trees together with average yields
and on-tree returns to growers on a per acre and bushel basis.

3. LABOR AND MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS, COSTS AND RETURNS PER ACRE FOR
TOBACCO IN THREE FLORIDA COUNTIES, 1949, by Donald L. Brooke, Agr.
Econ. Mimeo Report 51-13, June 1951, 11 pages.

Presents data on the usual man hour, power and materials required
per acre in the production, harvesting and curing of flue-cured
tobacco on 37 farms in Alachua, Hamilton and Suwannee counties in
1949.








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4. GENERAL FARMING AND TRUCK CROPS, The Florida Handbock, by
Donald L. Brooke.
a. Third Edition,1952, pp. 61-62.
b. Fourth Edition, 1953, pp. 154-55.
c. Fifth Edition, 1955, pp. 307-308.
d. Sixth Edition, 1957, pp. 261-263.
e. 1959-60, pp. 257-259.
f. 1961-62, pp. 359-61.
g. 1963-64, pp. 412-14.

A general description of the nature, importance and location of
general farming and truck crop production in Florid3.






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II. MARKETING

General

Citrus

1. DISTRIBUTION OF CONSUMERS' DOLLARS BETWEEN CITRUS AND THREE COMPETING
PRODUCTS FROM MARCH TO JUNE, 1949 AND 1950 IN 10 STORES IN JACKSONVILLE,
FLORIDA, by Tallmadge Bergen, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 50-11, Dec. 1950,
7 pages.

Summarizes data on the distribution of the consumer dollar between
citrus products, fresh apples, pineapples and tomato juice in 10
stores in Jacksonville, Florida, for two 15-week periods from March
to June 1949 and 1950. Size of store varied from supermarket to
small. Three stores were located in a high income district; three
in a medium; and four in a low.

2. DISTRIBUTION OF CONSUMERS' DOLLARS BETWEEN CITRUS AND CERTAIN SELECTED
PRODUCTS BY INCOME AREAS IN A NUMBER OF STORES IN JACKSONVILLE,
FLORIDA FROM NOVEMBER 7 TO DECEMBER 10, 1949 AND FROM JANUARY 9 TO
JUNE 19, 1950, by Tallmadge Bergen, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-3,
Jan. 1951, 16 pages.

Summarizes data on weekly sales of citrus fruits and citrus products
and certain related products for a group of stores in Jacksonville,
Florida. The stores represented a large variety of merchandising
methods and store sizes, and were well distributed over the city to
represent low, medium and high income areas.

3. THE INFLUENCE OF ORANGEADE ON THE MARKET FOR FRESH AND PROCESSED
ORANGES, by D. C. Kimmel, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-7, Jan. 1951,
5 pages.

Reports the results of a study in Meridian, Mississippi, in 17 stores
in which weekly data were collected in August and October, 1950 on
volume of sales of citrus and possible competing products. In this
report the data are summarized to show (1) the proportion dollar
value of sales of orangeade were of total dollar volume of sales of
orange products, (2) the change in relative volume of orangeade sales
for the two months studied, and (3) a comparison of the percentage
change in dollar volume of orangeade sales for the two months with
the percentage change in the total volume of sales of orange products.

4. TRANSPORTATION OF FRESH CITRUS FROM FLORIDA, SEASONS 1949-50 AND
1950-51, STATISTICAL FINDINGS, by Marvin A. Brooker, Donald E. Church
and Kenneth M. Gilbraith, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 52-6, Aug. 1952,
125 pages.

This study was undertaken to develop a body of information which
should prove helpful as a basis for carriers to improve their services
and for both carriers and public agencies to develop their policies.
This report was issued to make the statistical findings immediately
available to interested persons, while the general interpretive
report was being prepared.





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5. ASSETS OF 33 CITRUS PACKINGHOUSES, 1951, by J. L. Tennant, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 52-10, Nov. 1952, 8 pages.

A summary of the original cost plus improvements for land, buildings,
equipment and other assets of citrus packinghouses in 1951. Also
a distribution of assets among firms by size of investment and by
volume of fruit handled.

6. CUSTOMER RESPONSE TO VARYING PRICES FOR FLORIDA ORANGES, by
M. R. Godwin, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 508, Dec. 1952, 24 pages.

This study determines the characteristics of the demand for fresh
oranges in a comparatively small segment of the society and investi-
gates the feasibility of using experimental techniques to establish
demand relationships for citrus products. It reports the responses of
customers to seven price levels of oranges in seven retail food stores
in Central Kentucky in 1952.

7. USE OF CITRUS PRODUCTS IN MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI HOUSEHOLDS, SPRING,
1951, by D. C. Kimmel, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 509, Dec. 1952,
56 pages.

Data were obtained from 660 Meridian, Mississippi homemakers in the
spring of 1961, on the extent and use of citrus products at a given
time, the preferred types of citrus products, the manner and occasion
of serving, the substitution of citrus products for each other and
other miscellaneous information. The data were analyzed to show the
relation of income, education, age of homemaker, color and other
characteristics on the factors above.

3. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE METHOD OF TRANSPORTATION USED IN MARKETING
FRESH FLORIDA CITRUS, by M. A. Brooker and K. M. Gilbraith, Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Bulletin 549, Sept. 1954, 80 pages.

The overall objective of this study was to obtain information and
develop analyses that would provide a basis for improving the
efficiency and reducing the cost in marketing and transportation of
fresh citrus fruit. The study covered two seasons 1949-50 and
1950-51. Records were obtained for approximately 19,000 individual
shipments from 45 packinghouses. These data were analyzed to study
factors other than cost affecting the mode of transportation and also
the effects of cost of transportation on method of shipment.

9. CITRUS AND COMPETING PRODUCT SALES IN 20 MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI GROCERY
STORES, FOUR MONTHLY PERIODS, 1950-51, by Cecil N. Smith, Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Bulletin 561, May 1955, 40 pages.

A report of the findings of a retail store study concerned with the
rate of inventory turnover, sales patterns and extent of competition
among various fresh and processed citrus products, conducted during
four monthly periods in 1950 and 1951 in Meridian, Mississippi.






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10. ECONOMIC RELATIONSHIPS INVOLVED IN RETAILING CITRUS PRODUCTS, by
L. A. Powell, Sr., and Marshall R. Godwin, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Tech.
Bulletin 567, Aug. 1955, 88 pages.

This study analyzes the consumer purchasing pattern for certain
citrus and non-citrus products as well as other demand relationships
by using aggregate retail sales data. Data were obtained from 18
retail food stores in Jacksonville, Florida and Memphis, Tennessee
from 1949 to 1951.

11. CONSUMER REACTION TO VARYING PRICES FOR FROZEN ORANGE CONCENTRATE, by
M. R. Godwin and L. A. Powell, Sr., Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 589,
Aug. 1957, 27 pages.

Using the controlled experiment approach, the study estimates the
characteristics of demand for frozen orange concentrate. The study
was conducted in 10 retail food stores in the Lower Delaware Valley
area of Pennsylvania and New Jersey in 1954.

12. EXPERIMENTAL PRICING AS AN APPROACH TO DEMAND ANALYSIS, by
L. A. Powell, Sr., W. G. O'Regan and M. R. Godwin, Fla. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Tech. Bulletin 592, Mar. 1958, 45 pages.

This study describes the data-generating technique and the procedure
followed in an analysis of the demand for frozen orange concentrate.
Data serving as a basis for the study were obtained from 10 retail
food stores in the vicinity of Trenton, New Jersey during the period
June 7 through August 7, 1954.

13. MAJOR CHANGES IN THE FLORIDA CITRUS INDUSTRY PART I, by
H. G. Hamilton, Economic Leaflet, Vol. XVIII, No. 9, Sept. 1959,
4 pages.

Indexes (1935-39=100) are shown of trends in acreage, yield per acre
and total production of oranges and grapefruit from the 1920-21 season
to the 1957-58 season. Data are presented on types of citrus planted
from the 1929-30 season to the 1957-58 season. Quality of citrus
produced is discussed. Comparisons are made of indexes of average
seasonal variation of Florida fresh orange and grapefruit prices
during the 1919-20 1927-28 seasons and the 1948-49 1956-57 seasons.

14. MAJOR CHANGES IN THE FLORIDA CITRUS INDUSTRY PART II, by
H. G. Hamilton, Economic Leaflet, Vol. XVIII, No. 10, Oct. 1959,
4 pages.

Data are presented on boxes of oranges and grapefruit used for
different market uses from the 1933-34 season to the 1956-57 season.
Factors affecting demand are enumerated. Changes in market organi-
zations and operation are discussed, especially the effects of such
changes on the form in which citrus is marketed.





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15. RETAIL DISTRIBUTION AND MERCHANDISING OF FRESH LIMES AND FROZEN
LIMEADE CONCENTRATE, by W. T. Manley and M. R. Godwin, Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Bulletin 626, Sept. 1960, 32 pages.

This study determines the extent to which fresh limes and frozen
concentrated limeade are handled by type and size of retailing
establishment and establishes merchandising methods for these prod-
ucts. Data were obtained from a sample survey of 258 retail food
stores in the Dayton and Cincinnati, Ohio market areas in Sept. 1958.

16. CHARACTERISTICS AND POTENTIALITIES OF THE CONSUMER MARKET FOR FLORIDA
LIMES, by William T. Manley and Marshall R. Godwin, Fla. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Bulletin 642, Feb. 1962, 38 pages.

This study describes the market status for fresh limes and frozen
limeade concentrate from the standpoint of the consumer and examines
the implications of the findings with respect to the development of
improved marketing procedures and the formulation of promotional
programs. The method of study was a consumer survey of 2,172
families in the Dayton, Ohio market area in 1958.

17. CITRUS EXPORTS AND THE EUROPEAN COMMON MARKET, by Cecil N. Smith,
Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 1563, 5 pages. (Printed in the
Proceedings of the Fla. State Hort. Society,,Vol. 75, Nov. 1962).

Discusses the development of the European Common Market, trends in
European food consumption, Common Market fruit and vegetable policies
and the outlook for Florida citrus exports to Europe.

18. SUBSTITUTION RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FRESH ORANGES AND RELATED CITRUS
AND NON-CITRUS PRODUCTS, by Marshall R. Godwin and Billie S. Lloyd,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-2, Sept. 1963, 5 pages.

This study examines the question of the existence of substitution
relationships between fresh oranges and other products found in
retail food stores. In 1962, detailed sales records were kept in
nine retail grocery stores on customer purchases of an assortment of
both citrus and non-citrus items which are usually regarded as
competitive with fresh citrus fruit.

19. FAMILY BUYING PRACTICES FOR CITRUS AND NON-CITRUS PRODUCTS IN THE
ATLANTA MARKET, by Marshall R. Godwin, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-3,
Sept. 1963, 45 pages.

This study provides an overview of the consumption patterns of families
in the Atlanta market area for citrus products and for a number of
other processed fruit, juice and beverage items. It provides an
examination of the dynamics of consumption over time and in response
to radical changes in the supply of Florida citrus fruit.






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II. MARKETING

General

Citrus

1. DISTRIBUTION OF CONSUMERS' DOLLARS BETWEEN CITRUS AND THREE COMPETING
PRODUCTS FROM MARCH TO JUNE, 1949 AND 1950 IN 10 STORES IN JACKSONVILLE,
FLORIDA, by Tallmadge Bergen, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 50-11, Dec. 1950,
7 pages.

Summarizes data on the distribution of the consumer dollar between
citrus products, fresh apples, pineapples and tomato juice in 10
stores in Jacksonville, Florida, for two 15-week periods from March
to June 1949 and 1950. Size of store varied from supermarket to
small. Three stores were located in a high income district; three
in a medium; and four in a low.

2. DISTRIBUTION OF CONSUMERS' DOLLARS BETWEEN CITRUS AND CERTAIN SELECTED
PRODUCTS BY INCOME AREAS IN A NUMBER OF STORES IN JACKSONVILLE,
FLORIDA FROM NOVEMBER 7 TO DECEMBER 10, 1949 AND FROM JANUARY 9 TO
JUNE 19, 1950, by Tallmadge Bergen, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-3,
Jan. 1951, 16 pages.

Summarizes data on weekly sales of citrus fruits and citrus products
and certain related products for a group of stores in Jacksonville,
Florida. The stores represented a large variety of merchandising
methods and store sizes, and were well distributed over the city to
represent low, medium and high income areas.

3. THE INFLUENCE OF ORANGEADE ON THE MARKET FOR FRESH AND PROCESSED
ORANGES, by D. C. Kimmel, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-7, Jan. 1951,
5 pages.

Reports the results of a study in Meridian, Mississippi, in 17 stores
in which weekly data were collected in August and October, 1950 on
volume of sales of citrus and possible competing products. In this
report the data are summarized to show (1) the proportion dollar
value of sales of orangeade were of total dollar volume of sales of
orange products, (2) the change in relative volume of orangeade sales
for the two months studied, and (3) a comparison of the percentage
change in dollar volume of orangeade sales for the two months with
the percentage change in the total volume of sales of orange products.

4. TRANSPORTATION OF FRESH CITRUS FROM FLORIDA, SEASONS 1949-50 AND
1950-51, STATISTICAL FINDINGS, by Marvin A. Brooker, Donald E. Church
and Kenneth M. Gilbraith, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 52-6, Aug. 1952,
125 pages.

This study was undertaken to develop a body of information which
should prove helpful as a basis for carriers to improve their services
and for both carriers and public agencies to develop their policies.
This report was issued to make the statistical findings immediately
available to interested persons, while the general interpretive
report was being prepared.






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II. MARKETING

General

Citrus

1. DISTRIBUTION OF CONSUMERS' DOLLARS BETWEEN CITRUS AND THREE COMPETING
PRODUCTS FROM MARCH TO JUNE, 1949 AND 1950 IN 10 STORES IN JACKSONVILLE,
FLORIDA, by Tallmadge Bergen, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 50-11, Dec. 1950,
7 pages.

Summarizes data on the distribution of the consumer dollar between
citrus products, fresh apples, pineapples and tomato juice in 10
stores in Jacksonville, Florida, for two 15-week periods from March
to June 1949 and 1950. Size of store varied from supermarket to
small. Three stores were located in a high income district; three
in a medium; and four in a low.

2. DISTRIBUTION OF CONSUMERS' DOLLARS BETWEEN CITRUS AND CERTAIN SELECTED
PRODUCTS BY INCOME AREAS IN A NUMBER OF STORES IN JACKSONVILLE,
FLORIDA FROM NOVEMBER 7 TO DECEMBER 10, 1949 AND FROM JANUARY 9 TO
JUNE 19, 1950, by Tallmadge Bergen, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-3,
Jan. 1951, 16 pages.

Summarizes data on weekly sales of citrus fruits and citrus products
and certain related products for a group of stores in Jacksonville,
Florida. The stores represented a large variety of merchandising
methods and store sizes, and were well distributed over the city to
represent low, medium and high income areas.

3. THE INFLUENCE OF ORANGEADE ON THE MARKET FOR FRESH AND PROCESSED
ORANGES, by D. C. Kimmel, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-7, Jan. 1951,
5 pages.

Reports the results of a study in Meridian, Mississippi, in 17 stores
in which weekly data were collected in August and October, 1950 on
volume of sales of citrus and possible competing products. In this
report the data are summarized to show (1) the proportion dollar
value of sales of orangeade were of total dollar volume of sales of
orange products, (2) the change in relative volume of orangeade sales
for the two months studied, and (3) a comparison of the percentage
change in dollar volume of orangeade sales for the two months with
the percentage change in the total volume of sales of orange products.

4. TRANSPORTATION OF FRESH CITRUS FROM FLORIDA, SEASONS 1949-50 AND
1950-51, STATISTICAL FINDINGS, by Marvin A. Brooker, Donald E. Church
and Kenneth M. Gilbraith, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 52-6, Aug. 1952,
125 pages.

This study was undertaken to develop a body of information which
should prove helpful as a basis for carriers to improve their services
and for both carriers and public agencies to develop their policies.
This report was issued to make the statistical findings immediately
available to interested persons, while the general interpretive
report was being prepared.







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20. THE CHANGING STRUCTURE OF THE FLORIDA CITRUS INDUSTRY, by 3. G. Hamilton,
Economic Leaflet, Vol. XXIII, No. 12, Dec. 1964, 4 pages.

Data are presented showing the trend in production of citrus in Florida
and the changing proportion that Florida production is of the total
United States production. Changes in cultural practices are discussed,
especially the increase in care-taker organizations and their influence
in improving production practices and speeding up the adoption of new
technology in production. Data are presented on trends in utilization
of citrus in fresh and processed form. Changes in method of marketing
and market structure are also discussed. A look is taken at the
future of the citrus industry pointing up favorable factors and prob-
lemnSwith which the industry will have to deal.

21. ON-TREE AND IN-STORE CITRUS PRICE RELATIONSHIPS, by Max R. Langham,
A paper given at the Seminar on Demand for Citrus Products, Orlando,
Florida, 1965 and published in the Proceedings of the Second Annual
Citrus Business Conference, Fla. Citrus Commission, Lakeland, Florida,
November 1965, 26 pages.

In this paper the large decrease in citrus supplies resulting from the
freezes encountered by the citrus industry in December of 1957 and
1962 were used to identify demand functions for oranges and orange
products in each of the two years. On-tree and retail demand were
estimated. Ihtferoperiod comparisons of the estimates were made to
determine recent shifts in demand. Lastly, on-tree and retail demand
functions were compared in order to arrive at a functional estimate of
the marketing margins.

Cooperative Associations

1. FLORIDA FARMER COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, by M. D. Love, Jr., Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 61-1, Aug. 1960, 74 pages.

The purpose of this report is to furnish basic information on the
current status of Florida cooperatives. The data give information
on volume of business, financial position, membership, type of
cooperatives, pooling arrangements, and services performed. No
analysis is made of the data in this report but will be presented in
a second publication.

2. CO-OPERATIVE AGRICULTURE IN FLORIDA, Revised by E. W. Cake, Sept. 1962,
State Dept. of Agr. Bulletin 92,148 pages.

In the bulletin information is presented on such things as the impor-
tance of cooperatives in the country, answers to many of the usual
questions asked about co-ops, how to organize, incorporate and finance
a co-op, model corporation papers for a co-op, special information
about credit co-ops, the Florida Statutes on co-operatives and a list
of Florida Co-operatives.







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3. FLORIDA COOPERATIVES, by H. G. Hamilton, Maxey Love and A. H. Spurlock,
Fla. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 672, May 1964, 53 pages.

A brief history and setting of the cooperative movement in Florida.
Cooperatives for marketing citrus, truck crops, dairy products, eggs,
tobacco, livestock and for providing farm supplies and services are
treated separately, giving, when available, membership, financial
status and sales. For citrus cooperatives pooling arrangements are
given and efficiency measures shown.

Horticultural Specialty

1. IMPROVED MARKETING OF FLORIDA GLADIOLUS, by Cecil N. Smith and
Donald L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 56-2, Oct. 1955, 20 pages.

Presents data on the marketing of Florida gladiolus in the 1952-53
season including the principal varieties sold, prices by grades and
varieties, volume of sales, extent of use of various selling
practices and scope of distribution of the product. Possibilities
for improving marketing practices are pointed out.

2. THE FLORIDA CHRYSANTHEMUM INDUSTRY, by Cecil N. Smith and Donald L.
Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 56-10, May 1956, 22 pages.

Presents data on the acreage, production and value of chrysanthemums
by areas in Florida as well as methods of sale, market outlets and
transportation practices of growers during the 1954-55 season.

3. THE FLORIDA FLOWER AND NURSERY INDUSTRY, by Cecil N. Smith, Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Journal Series 548, Nov. 1956, 6 pages. (Printed in the
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society, Vol. 69).

A paper reporting on the structure of the Florida flower and nursery
industry, number of firms, value of sales and the marketing of flowers
and ornamentals. Data are taken from the 1954 U. S. Census of
Agriculture.

4. BOOM IN BLOOMS, by Cecil N. Smith and D. L. Brooke, Sunshine State
Agricultural Research Report, Vol. 2, No. 2, April 1957, 1 page.

A short article describing the rapid development of the flower and
nursery industry in Florida, together with research projects underway
on market structure and expansion.

5. A PRELIMINARY REPORT ON MARKETING FLORIDA FERNS, by Cecil N. Smith,
Donald L. Brooke, Tze-I Chiang and Daniel D. Badger, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 58-3, Oct. 1957, 18 pages.

Presents results of a survey of acreage, production, value of sales,
and marketing practices of Florida fern producers in 1956.




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6. FLORIDA FERN INDUSTRY HAS COMPETITION COOPERATION IS NEEDED IF
GROWERS ARE TO MAINTAIN FAVORABLE ECONOMIC POSITION, by Cecil N. Smith,
Donald L. Brooke and Tze-I Chiang, Sunshine State Agricultural Research
Report, Vol. 3, No. 1, January 1958, pp. 4-5.

An article describing the size of the Florida fern industry and its
competition from other areas in the national market.

7. THE FLORIDA FOLIAGE PLANT INDUSTRY, by Charles A. Nicholls, Cecil N.
Smith and Donald L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 58-10, April 1958,
25 pages.

Reports on a survey conducted in 1957 to determine the size and
value of the foliage plant industry in the state, the type and extent
of use of various selling practices and the scope of market distribu-
tion of foliage plants.

8. FLORIDA FOLIAGE PLANT INDUSTRY EXPANDS, by Cecil N. Smith,
Charles A. Nicholls and Donald L. Brooke, Sunshine State Agricultural
Research Report Vol. 3, No. 2, April 1958, pp. 10-11.

An article reporting results of a study on the size of the foliage
plant industry in Florida in 1956, types of plants grown, number of
growers by size groups, employment data and market outlets.

9. MARKETING FLOWERS THROUGH MASS OUTLETS, by Cecil N. Smith, Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Journal Series 824, Oct. 1958, 4 pages. (Printed in the
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society, Vol. 71).

A discussion of the potentials for marketing cut flowers through
chain store retail outlets together with current research on the
problems of market development and flower buying habits of the
American public.

10. A SURVEY OF THE FLORIDA FOLIAGE PLANT INDUSTRY, by C. A. Nicholls,
Cecil N. Smith and D. L. Brooke, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 615,
Dec. 1959, 30 pages.

A report of the foliage plant industry in Florida with particular
reference to: (1) acreage and total production of plants by
geographic area and grower size; (2) type and extent of various
selling practices; and (3) the scope of market distribution.

11. THE STRANGE WAYS OF RESEARCH A FLOWER CART UNVEILED, by Cecil N. Smith,
Elwyn S. Holmes and T. J. Sheehan, Sunshine State Agricultural Research
Report, Vol. 6, No. 3, July 1961, pp. 4-5.

A report of the development and testing of a flower cart for display
and sale of cut flowers in supermarkets designed to aid in mass
market merchandising.






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12. MARKETING NURSERY PRODUCTS IN PINELLAS COUNTY, by Cecil N. Smith,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 1366, Nov. 1961, 4 pages. (Printed
in the Proceedings of the Fla. State Horticultural Society,Vol. 74).

Presents results of a study on market outlets, total sales, pricing
policies, and size of business of ornamental nursery operators in
Pinellas County as a pilot project for planning a state-wide study
of marketing practices in the nursery industry.

13. THE PINELLAS COUNTY NURSERY INDUSTRY, by Cecil N. Smith, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 62-8, Feb. 1962, 15 pages.

Presents data on market outlets, total sales, purchases of other
nursery stock, pricing policies and size of business of ornamental
nursery operators in Pinellas County as a pilot project for planning
a state-wide study of marketing practices in the nursery industry.

14. MARKETING FLORIDA FERNS, by Cecil N. Smith, Donald L. Brooke and
Tze-I Chiang, Florida Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 647, June 1962, 34 pages.

Presents results of a study of the acreage, quantity sold, value
of sales, marketing practices and other economic aspects of the
fern industry in Florida during the period 1952 to 1956.

15. CHANGES IN THE MARKETING OF FOLIAGE PLANTS, by John R. Brooker and
Cecil N. Smith, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 1569, Nov. 1962,
4 pages. (Printed in the Proceedings of the Fla. State Horticultural
Society, Vol. 75).

A paper relating preliminary findings of a research project on the
marketing practices of Florida foliage plant growers. Comparisons
are made of changes in practices from 1957 to 1962.

16. MARKETING CHALLENGE FLORIDA'S FOLIAGE PLANT INDUSTRY HAS EXPERIENCED
TREMENDOUS GROWTH. CURRENTLY FACED WITH MANY MARKETING PROBLEMS,
PRODUCERS ARE INITIATING STEPS TO PLAN TOGETHER FOR THE FUTURE, by
Cecil N. Smith and John R. Brooker, Sunshine State Agricultural
Research Report, Vol. 8, No. 2, April 1963, 3 pages.

An article describing the growth of the Florida foliage plant
industry, its many marketing problems and the need for coordinated
marketing by industry members.

17. MARKETING CHANNELS FOR ORNAMENTAL NURSERIES, by Cecil N. Smith, Fla.
Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 1787, Nov. 1963, 4 pages. (Printed
in the Proceedings of the Fla. State Horticultural Society, Vol. 76).

Reports results of a research effort to determine the marketing
channels and pricing policies of Florida ornamental nursery products,
including a determination of the value of plants and supplies
marketed through various channels, the general types of plants sold
and the extent to which containers were used by size of nursery
operators.






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18. CUT FLOWERS POTENTIAL PROFIT MAKERS FOR MASS MARKETING STORES, by
Cecil N. Smith, T. J. Sheehan and Elwyn S. Holmes, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 64-7, Sept. 1964, 6 pages.

A report on the scope and potential of mass market merchandising of
cut flowers produced in Florida together with a moveable display
device developed for use in merchandising cut flowers in retail
food stores.

19. OPINIONS AND PRACTICES OF LENDING AGENCIES AND REAL ESTATE OPERATORS
TOWARD NURSERY LANDSCAPING, by Cecil N. Smith, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Journal Series 1995, Nov. 1964, 4 pages. (Printed in the Proceedings
of the Fla. State Horticultural Society, Vol. 77).

A report of a study to determine the attitudes and practices of
savings and loan associations and real estate agencies toward nursery
landscaping. Part of a larger study concerned with expanding the
market for ornamental horticultural products.

20. MARKETING CHANNELS FOR FLORIDA COMMERCIAL TURF GRASSES, by
Cecil N. Smith and Robert H. Brewster, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal
Series 2008, Nov. 1964, 4 pages. (Printed in the Proceedings of
the Fla. State Horticultural Society, Vol. 77).

A report of a study which developed data on the scope and marketing
practices of the turfgrass or sod industry in Florida, using data
obtained by personal interview methods in 1963.

Livestock and Livestock Products

1. ANALYSIS OF THE PRICE-WEIGHT RELATIONSHIP OF FEEDER PIGS, by
Clyde E. Murphree, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 51-16, Sept. 1951,
5 pages.

Examines the income effect of paying more for feeder pigs than
finished hog prices. It is concluded that all feeders can be equally
profitable provided the importance of the price-weight relationship
is recognized.

2. INITIAL RESULTS OF LIVESTOCK MARKETING STUDY ARE REPORTED BY EXPERI-
MENT STATION RESEARCHERS PROBING SUBJECT, by W. K. McPherson,
The Florida Cattleman, Sept. 1952.

3. BEEF OUTLOOK CONCERNS MANY PRODUCERS; ECONOMIST REVIEWS BACKGROUND OF
NEW LIVESTOCK MARKETING SITUATION IN U.S., by W. K. McPherson,
The Florida Cattleman, Aug. 1953.

4. WHAT 75 PERCENT OF PARITY FOR BUTTER MEANS TO FLORIDA DAIRYMEN, by
E. D. Smith, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 54-12, Mar. 1954, 3 pages.






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On February 15, 1954 an order was issued by the Secretary of Agri-
culture, Ezra T. Benson, lowering the Federal price support level on
butter from 90 to 75 percent of parity effective April, 1954, or
a reduction in the support level of about 8 cents per pound. In this
publication, the proposed change in price is discussed as to its
effect on (1) income of dairymen, (2) cattle prices, (3) feed prices,
and (4) the market for fluid milk.

5. SOME TRENDS AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY IN FLORIDA, by
W. K. McPherson and Robert Floyd Luckey, Jr., Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Bulletin 539, March 1954, 32 pages.

A description of the Florida dairy industry and with special emphasis
on the production and marketing problems in Glades and Hendry Counties.

6. MARKET DATA VALUE AND USE REVIEWED, by W. K. McPherson, The Florida
Cattleman, Aug. 1954.

7. FREIGHT RATES VARY ON DRESSED vs LIVE BEEF, by W. K. McPherson,
The Florida Cattleman, Vol. 19, No. 11, Aug. 1955.

8. IMPROVEMENT OF LIVESTOCK AND GRAIN MARKET REPORTS, by W. K. McPherson,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 405 (Journal of Farm Econ. Vol. 38,
Feb. 1956).

Some comments on a paper entitled, "Livestock and Grain Market
Reports They can be Improved," that appeared in the August 1955
issue of Journal of Farm Economics. The note questions the effective-
ness of market news in the peripheries of the surplus livestock and
grain producing areas.

9. HOW WELL DO AUCTIONS DISCOVER THE PRICE OF CATTLE?, by W. K. McPherson,
Fla. agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 391, Feb. 1956, (Published in
Journal of Farm Economics, Vol. 38).

A large number of small auctions may be depressing the price of all
cattle below the price that could be obtained by larger and more
efficient auctions.

10. PRICE CYCLES FLUCTUATE BEEF INCOME, by W. K. McPherson, The Florida
Cattleman, Vol. 23, No. 11, Aug. 1959.

Farm income derived from the sale of cattle is more responsive to
changes in the price of cattle than the amount of beef cattle sold.

11. WHERE SHOULD YOU SELL AT AUCTION OR DIRECT? by W. K. McPherson,
The Florida Cattleman, Vol. 24, No. 2, p. 30, Nov. 1959.

12. COMPETITIVE MARKETING SYSTEM IS ADVANTAGE, by W. K. McPherson,
The Florida Cattleman, Vol. 24, No. 3, Dec. 1959.

A presentation of alternative methods of making the markets for
cattle more competitive.





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13. MILK MARKETING IN FLORIDA, by Ralph A. Eastwood, Florida Grower and
Rancher, March 1960, 3 pages.

Situations with respect to supply and demand are reviewed. Outlook
for need to sell milk north of present markets is outlined. Coopera-
tive and trade association status and services are described.
Similarities and differences between federal and state farm minimum
price control agencies and functions are developed. Market pooling
systems are discussed. Base rights and building periods are described.
Use of classification pricing and differentials are projected. A
bibliography is included.

14. FLORIDA EGG MARKETING, by Ralph A. Eastwood, Florida Grower and Rancher,
May 1960, 3 pages.

Marketing systems are described, and their use forecasted. Nearby
premiums are discussed. Cooperatives are listed. Quality control is
treated. Salesmanship is advocated. A bibliography is included.

15. MARKETING HOGS IN FLORIDA, by W. K. McPherson, Published in
Swine Production in Florida, Fla. State Dept. of Agr. Bulletin 21,
June 1960, 13 pages.

A summary of the long-and short-range marketing decisions made by
hog producers.

16. IS MARKET INFORMATION IMPORTANT?, by W. K. McPherson, The Florida
Cattleman, Aug. 1960.

The role of market information in a competitive economy.

17. THE ECONOMIST LOOKS AT POULTRY CONTRACTING, by Ralph A. Eastwood,
Florida Grower and Rancher, Sept. 1960, 2 pages.

An introduction outlines the genesis of integration in the poultry
industry. The importance of business management is stressed. Ad-
vantages and disadvantages of contracting with firms of several
business forms are presented. Provisions of contracts are listed
and discussed. A method of evaluating the shares determined by a
contract is shown by example.

18. THE COST OF EGG CONTRACTING, by Ralph A. Eastwood, Poultry Digest,
Oct. 1960.

Operating expenses of contracting parties are synthesized. The con-
clusion is reached that in 1959, the West Coast Florida poultry
producers surveyed would have fared as well under the usual egg con-
tracts as they did as independent producers.





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19. HOW ACCURATE CAN CATTLE BE GRADED, by W. K. McPherson, Sunshine State
Agr. Research Report, Vol. 6, No. 3, July 1961, 1 page.

An evaluation of the accuracy with which individuals can estimate
the grade of the carcass a live animal can produce.

20. CAN PRICE FLUCTUATIONS BE REDUCED?, by W. K. McPherson,
The Florida Cattleman, Aug. 1961.

21. AN ECONOMIC AND STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF GRADING CATTLE, by
W. K. McPherson, L. V. Dixon and H. L. Chapman, Jr., Fla. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Tech. Bulletin 632, Sept. 1961, 57 pages.

A statement of the role that grades play in the marketing of beef
and the presentation of a new technique for measuring the ability of
individuals to estimate the grade of cattle.

22. CATTLE MARKETING, by W. K. McPherson, Published in Beef Cattle in
Florida, Fla. State Dept. of Agr. Bulletin No. 28, October 1961,
14 pages.

A summary of the long- and short-run marketing decisions cattle
producers make.

23. MARKETWIDE EQUALIZATION OF MILK IS OUTLINED, by Ralph A. Eastwood,
The Florida Dairy Farmer, Vol. 1, No. 1, Summer 1962, 5 pages.

Pooling systems are described. Marketwide equalization is selected
for generalized treatment. The working is described. Points for
consideration are listed and discussed to include legality, adminis-
tration, producer assignment, producer payments, business regulation,
reserve milk, compensatory payments, interstate commerce, market
financing, and market building.

24. AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF FLUID MILK SUPPLY, MOVEMENT AND UTILIZATION
IN FLORIDA, by R. E. L. Greene and H. W. Warburton, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 63-1, Sept. 1962, 119 pages.

In this study, the state was divided into five milk marketing areas.
Data on milk supply, movement and utilization were collected for the
months of April and October 1959. These data show source of supplies
of milk by areas both for milk produced in the state and in-shipment
of milk from other states. Data are also presented showing the number
and location of processing plants, the area of distribution for plants
in each marketing area and the volume and forms in which the products
were delivered. Estimates were also made of potential demand for
fluid milk in each of the five market areas in 1970.

25. THERE ARE MANY REASONS FOR MILK PRICE FLUCTUATIONS, by
Ralph A. Eastwood, The Florida Dairy Farmer, Vol. 1, No. 2, Fall 1962,
2 pages.

Possible advantages of price research are alluded. Demand is defined,
as are cross elasticities. Laws of demand and of supply are reviewed.
Applications of these principles to dairy farming are cited.





-35-


26. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION Florida Dairy Picture, by Ralph A.
Eastwood, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 62-20, November 1962, 13 pages.

This is a mimeographed reprint of a speech made at the 1962 Annual
Dairy Field Day. It appraises short- and long-run outlook for all
stages of the Florida industry.

27. a. FEED AND SALE ANALYSIS, A Summary of Relationships Between Grade
and Price, Price and Weight and Price and Penlot Size 1963
Highlands County Feeder Sale, by Howard C. Giles and B. J. Harris,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 63-10, Nov. 1963, 10 pages.

A summary designed to aid producers and Extension personnel to
evaluate the sale and the animals. Tables are presented designed
to show grade price relationships, effects of size of penlots on
sale, weight price relationships, sex-price relationships, and
other data. The tables presented do not represent a statistical
sample of Florida cattle, and should not be interpreted as such.

b. FEEDER SALE ANALYSIS, A Summary of Relationships Between Grade
and Price, Price and Weight and Price and Penlot Size 1963
Jackson County Feeder Sale, by Howard C. Giles and W. W. Glenn,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 63-11, Nov. 1963, 10 pages.

Data in this report are similar to that presented for the 1963
Highlands County Feeder Sale.

c. FEEDER SALE ANALYSIS, A Summary of Relationships Between Grade
and Price, Price and Weight and Price and Penlot Size 1963
Leon County Feeder Sale, by Howard C. Giles and Lloyd J. Rhoden,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 63-12, Nov. 1963, 10 pages.

Data in this report are similar to that presented for the 1963
Highlands County Feeder Sale.

d. FEEDER SALE ANALYSIS, A Summary of Relationships Between Grade
and Price, Price and Weight and Price and Penlot Size 1964
Jackson County Spring Feeder Sale, by Howard C. Giles and
W. W. Glenn, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 64-2, March 1964,
10 pages.

Data in this report are similar to that presented for the 1963
Highlands County Feeder Sale.

28. TRENDS, SITUATIONS, AND PROJECTIONS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF MILK IN
FLORIDA AND IN RELATED RESOURCE USAGES AND REQUIREMENTS, by
Blair J. Smith, Presented at the DARE Conference on Dairying held
at the University of Florida, May 14-15, 1964.

A set of tables and graphs which were distributed at the Dairy DARE
Conference in connection with the presentation of a paper by the
same title. The title of the talk is a good summary of its contents.





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29. THE DAIRY INDUSTRY: ITS STRUCTURE AND PRICING SYSTEM, by
Ralph A. Eastwood, Economic Leaflet, Vol. XXIV, No. 3, March 1965,
4 pages.

The dairy industry is described at the aggregative and firm levels.
The structure of the industry is evaluated in terms of size, marketing
firms, consumer financing, price elasticities, income elasticities,
interregional competition and per capital consumption. The price
discovery system considers direct and indirect regulation, direct
price control, pooling, classified pricing, pricing factors, and
price differentials. Consequences of controls are cited.

30. ENTRIES OF CENTRAL AMERICAN BEEF THROUGH FLORIDA PORTS FOR MARKETING
IN THE UNITED STATES, by Daniel E. Alleger and Jose Antonio Costa, Jr.,
Sunshine State Research Report, Vol. 10, No. 2, April 1965, 3 pages.

This article. as based on thesis material accumulated in'Central
America in 1963. In 1962, Americans ate 971 million pounds of beef
over and above domestic production, and 50 million pounds of it came
from Central America. It was shipped into the United States largely
as frozen boneless beef for use principally in sausages, bolognas,
and other meat-product demands. Airplanes, steamships and motor
trailers were used to transport, and large proportions of the total
shipments entered Florida through Miami and Tampa.

31. AN ALGEBRAIC PROCEDURE FOR SEPARATING TOTAL REPORTED STATE MILK
SUPPLIES INTO GRADE A AND NON-GRADE A COMPONENTS, by Blair J. Smith,
Journal of Farm Economics, Vol. 47, No. 2, May 1965.

A simple algebraic procedure for separating total reported state milk
supplies into Grade A and Non-Grade A components, from data which are
regularly reported in the statistical literature, is presented.

32. CATTLE FEEDERS CAN NOW REDUCE MARKET RISKS, by W. K. McPherson,
Sunshine State Research Report, Vol. 10, No. 3, July 1965, 2 pages.

A description and evaluation of how cattle feeders can use the
futures market.

Potatoes

1. QUALITY OF POTATOES AND SOME OF THE FACTORS AFFECTING QUALITY, by
R. E. L. Greene, Nov. 1950, 5 pages. (Printed in the Proceedings of
the Florida State Horticultural Society, 1950).

A report on the study conducted in Pittsburg in 1950 to determine
grade qualities of potatoes displayed for sale to consumers in
retail stores. The method of conducting the study is explained.
Data are: presented on the number of samples of potatoes collected
from selected states. A comparison is made of percent grade defects
and a discussion given of the factors affecting defects.






-37-


2. THE EFFECTS OF THE USE OF PERFORATED PAPER BAGS AND COLORED WAX ON
THE SHIPPING OF IRISH POTATOES FROM DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA, by
L. J. Kushman, R. E. L. Greene and G. B. Ramsey, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 51-11, March 1951, 7 pages.

Reports results of special test shipments made during the 1950
season of railroad cars containing perforated and non-perforated
paper bags and a modified method of loading to determine the effect
of perforation on heat retention, loss in weight in transit and bag
breakage; also the effect of waxing of potatoes on spoilage and
weight loss in transit. The results indicated no significant
differences between the various test shipments.


3. CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE OF WAXED AND COLORED POTATOES, by R. E. L. Greene,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. So. Coop. Ser. 22, Feb. 1952, 27 pages.

Tests were conducted in 12 grocery stores in Baltimore in the Spring
of 1951 to determine: (1) whether consumer discriminated between
potatoes that were waxed and colored and those not waxed or colored
and (2) if waxing and coloring resulted in an increase in sales of
potatoes so treated. Where consumers had a choice of buying either
waxed and colored or non-treated potatoes, they bought about four
pounds of waxed and colored potatoes for each 1 pound of unwaxed
potatoes. The relative proportion that sales of Florida potatoes
was of sales of all potatoes in the stores was 11 percent more when
waxed and colored potatoes were displayed than it was when potatoes
not waxed or colored were displayed.

4. GRADE QUALITIES OF POTATOES IN SELECTED RETAIL STORES IN PITTSBURGH,
PENNSYLVANIA, 1950, by R. E. L. Greene, J. M. Johnson and R. C. Barnes,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. So. Coop. Ser. 24, June 1952, 79 pages.

During the period March 1 to July 15, 1950, 30 grocery stores in
17 different shopping centers throughout Pittsburg and surrounding
suburbs were visited twice each week and samples collected for each
type and method of potatoes displayed. During this period 2,801
usable samples of potatoes were collected. These were examined for
various types of defects. This publication presents data to show
amount and kind of defects in new and late crop potatoes summarized
by state of origin, size of store, method of display and by bi-weekly
periods during which the samples were collected.

5. TRANSPORTATION TESTS WITH EARLY IRISH POTATOES FROM THE SOUTHEASTERN
STATES, 1950 SEASON, by L. J. Kushman, R. E. L. Greene and Morris
White, Va. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. So. Coop. Ser. 31, April 1953, 32 pages.

During 1948 and 1949, investigations on factors that cause losses in
handling potatoes were made from principal potato areas in five south-
eastern states. These investigations gave a good picture of current
practices in handling potatoes and the effects of these practices on
condition and quality of potatoes as they reached markets in con-
suming cities. Indications were that additional data were needed at





-38-


certain points. Because of the heterogenous nature of the tests, those
from the different states were handled separately. This bulletin presents
the results of the following tests during the 1950 season:
a. Use of perforated paper bags and colored wax on potatoes from
Dade County,Florida.
b. Value of washing potatoes with a chlorine solution for decay
control in shipments from Baldwin County, Alabama.
c. Comparisons of various types of truck shipments from Baldwin
County, Alabama.
d. Comparison of various types of truck shipments and methods of
preparation of potatoes from Camden, N. C.
e. Shipping and chip-making qualities of Kennebec and Sebago varieties
from Charleston, S. C.

6. A COMPARISON OF SEBAGO, CHEROKEE AND KENNEBEC POTATOES IN RELATION TO
THEIR SUITABILITY FOR SHIPPING AND MANUFACTURE OF POTATO CHIPS, by
L. J. Kushman and R. E. L. Greene, H. T. & S. Office Report No. 304,
Aug. 1953, 16 pages.

About 95 percent of the potato acreage in the Hastings Area in 1959
was planted in the Sebago variety. The Cherokee and Kennebec were
two new varieties that looked good in test planting but experiences
of area growers who had grown the varieties indicated they possessed
poor shipping qualities. This report gives the results of tests
designed to compare the new varieties with Sebago potatoes when they
were grown according to recommendations for commercial producers and
handled through commercial packing houses and shipping facilities.

7. SOME ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF THE POTATO INDUSTRY IN FLORIDA, by
R. E. L. Greene, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-16, June 1962, 29 pages.

The material in this report is substantially the same as that pre-
sented at a hearing in Atlanta, Georgia on April 18, 1962 on a pro-
posed National Potato Marketing Agreement Order. The presentation
was an attempt to briefly summarize: (1) background information
relative to the production of potatoes and the organization of potato
farms in Florida; (2) trends in the production of potatoes and in
marketing practices; and (3) some aspects of cost, price and income
problems in the state which are integrally associated with a relative-
ly inelastic market demand and the variability from year-to-year in
the amount and quality of potatoes produced both within the state
and in the late crop areas during the preceding season.

8. MARKET ORGANIZATION AND PRACTICES FOR POTATOES IN THE HASTINGS AREA
OF FLORIDA, by R. E. L. Greene and Paul T. Blair, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Bulletin 668, Mar. 1964, 99 pages.

This publication describes important changes in the Hastings potato
industry during the five-year period 1953-54 to 1957-58. These relate
particularly to change in market organization, grower and shipper
practices and the proportion of the potato crop going to processors.
Attention was given to obtaining opinions of growers and astppe&s
relative to the market situation during the period-:covered-in the study
and also to evaluating the possibilities and probable effects of some
alternative group actions on the-part of the industry.







-39-


Truck Crops

1. VEGETABLE TRADE IN THE CARIBBEAN AREA, by Cecil N. Smith, Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Journal Series 222, Nov. 1953, 9 pages. (Printed in the
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society.,,1953,
Vol. LXVI) 9 pages.

A discussion of trends in vegetable imports from the Caribbean area
and domestic production during the period 1943-44 to 1952-53, con-
flicting interests in national policy and Florida's competitive
advantages.

2. MARGINS AND COSTS IN MARKETING FLORIDA SWEET CORN, by W. Smith Greig
and A. H. Spurlock, USDA Misc. Pub. 719, April 1956, 11 pages.

Costs of harvesting, packing, refrigeration, transportation and retail
selling of Florida sweet corn, showing margins to each agency handling.
Margins are determined on corn from Belle Glade, Florida and retailed
in Baltimore, Maryland, 1955.

3. PREFERENCE FOR SIZES OF FLORIDA TOMATOES, by Marshall R. Godwin and
William T. Manley, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 58-5, Dec. 1957, 13 pages.

This study evaluates consumer preferences for five commercial sizes of
Florida tomatoes. The data were obtained from a series of retail
store testslin the New'York matropolitan.atealin 1957.

4. DISTRIBUTION OF FLORIDA TOMATOES, by Donald L. Brooke and Cecil N. Sith
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 58-11, June 1958, 36 pages.

A report of the distribution of Florida tomatoes by grade and size,
market area, type of transportation, method of sale, types of buyers
and containers for the three seasons 1951-52 through 1953-54.

5. AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF CULL TOMATO DISPOSAL
IN DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA, by Donald L. Brooke and George L. Capel,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 59-2, Sept. 1958, 12 pages.

Report of a study to determine the cost of alternative methods of
disposal of eliminations of tomatoes from packing operations in
Dade County and the economic feasibility of their dehydration for
use as a food for cattle.

6. COMPETITORS IN THE CELERY MARKET, by Marshall R. Godwin, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 59-6, Feb. 1959, 27 pages.

This study examines the competitive relationship between celery grown
in California and Florida. The study was conducted in nine retail
food stores in the Chicago metropolitan area during May and June of
1958.






-40-


7. DISTRIBUTION OF FLORIDA SNAP BEANS, SEASONS 1952-53 AND 1953-54 .by
Donald L. Brooke and Cecil N. Smith, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 59-13,
June 1959, 15 pages.

A report of the distribution of Florida snap beans by variety, type
of transportation, type of sale, market area and type of buyer for
the 1952-53 and 1953-54 seasons.

8. DISTRIBUTION OF FLORIDA PEPPERS, SEASONS 1952-53 AND 1953-54, by
Donald L. Brooke and Cecil N. Smith, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-1,
Sept. 1959, 14 pages.

A report of the distribution of Florida green peppers by type of
transportation, method of sale, type of buyer and market area for
the 1952-53 and 1953-54 seasons.

9. SOME ECONOMIC PROBLEMS IN THE FLORIDA SWEET CORN INDUSTRY, by
Donald L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-8, Feb. 1960, 23 pages.

Presents data on the production, harvesting and marketing of Florida
sweet corn during the period 1948 to 1959 and outlines the basic
problems facing the industry at the end of the period.

10. SOME ECONOMIC PROBLEMS IN THE FLORIDA CELERY INDUSTRY, by .
Donald L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-1, July 1961, 28 pages.

Presents data on the economics of the production, harvesting and
marketing of Florida celery during the period 1951 to 1961 and outlines
the basic problems facing the industry at the end of the period.

11. COMPETITION BETWEEN FLORIDA AND CALIFORNIA CELERY IN THE CHICAGO
MARKET, by M. R. Godwin and B. S. Lloyd, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin
636, Nov. 1961, 34 pages.

This study determines the nature of the competitive relationship
between Florida and California celery. The research procedure en-
tailed the creation of retailing situations in which the consumer was
afforded an opportunity to choose between two products under conditions
of varying relative prices. The study was conducted in nine super-
markets in Chicago in 1958.

12. LONG DISTANCE MARKETING OF FRESH SWEET CORN, by R. K. Showalter,
A. H. Spurlock, W. Smith Greig, C. S. Parsons and K. D. Demaree,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 638, Nov. 1961, 47 pages.

Cooperative with two divisions of the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
Shipping point practices, costs and market distribution of Florida
sweet corn were given for 1954. Retail prices, costs and margins were
shown for each stage in the marketing process for corn shipped from
Belle Glade, Florida to Baltimore, Maryland in 1955. Various handling
practices as related to quality were discussed.






-41-


13. CUSTOMER PREFERENCE ASPECTS OF COMPETITION BETWEEN FLORIDA AND
CALIFORNIA CELERY, by Marshall R. Godwin and William T. Manley,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Station Bulletin 648, June 1962, 16 pages.

This study examines certain nonprice aspects of competition between
Florida and California celery from the standpoint of the market
advantage enjoyed by California celery resulting from the general
reputation of the area in which it is grown and the relative merits
of Utah Pascal type and the Summer Pascal type celery produced in
Florida. The method of study involved a series of retail store
tests in a midwestern market area in 1959.

14. AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF GRADE AND SIZE STANDARDS FOR MATURE GREEN
TOMATOES, by Marshall R. Godwin and William T. Manley, Fla. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Bulletin 652, March 1963, 28 pages.

This study examines preference patterns within the complex of grades
and sizes currently employed in Florida marketing operations to the
end of determining the degree to which the standards reflect dis-
cernible differences to consumers. The method of study involved
a series of experimental tests in retail grocery stores.

15. THE EXPORT MARKET POTENTIAL FOR FLORIDA ICEBOX WATERMELONS, by
Billie S. Lloyd, Kenneth M. Gilbraith and Marshall R. Godwin, Agr.
Econ. Mimeo Report 63-5, April 1963, 8 pages.

This study examines the export market potential for Florida icebox type
watermelons. The principal factors considered are the physical
difficulties involved in overseas shipments, the costs of harvesting.
and'handling, and the extent of consumer acceptance of these melons in
a foreign market.

16. THE MARKET STATUS OF FLORIDA VINE-RIPENED TOMATOES, by William T. Manley
and Marshall R. Godwin, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 63-11, June 1963,
27 pages.

This study examines the impact of increased shipments of vine-ripened
tomatoes on the market structure for fresh tomatoes. Personal inter-
views were conducted with management personnel of a selected cross
section of terminal market handlers of vine-ripened tomatoes.

17. SOME ORGANIZATIONAL AND FUNCTIONAL ASPECTS OF THE FLORIDA WATERMELON
INDUSTRY, by D. L. Brooke, E. G. Close and W. B. Riggan, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 63-12, May 1963, 50 pages.

A report of a study in 1960 to determine the organization and
structure of the watermelon market in order to have a basis for
evaluating any program which might be suggested for improvement.
Growers, buyers and itinerant truckers were interviewed for their
marketing practices and opinions of programs for marketing improve-
ments.






-42-


18. MARKETING FLORIDA VINE-RIPENED TOMATOES, by William T. Manley and
Marshall R. Godwin, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-147, Nov. 1963, 23 pages.

This study examines the impact of increased shipments of vine-ripened
tomatoes on the market structure for the winter tomato crop, enumerates
the marketing problems that can be ascribed to these increased ship-
ments, and evaluates these problems in terms of alternative policies
and practices that may assist the industry in improving market outlets
and marketing efficiency.

19. PREDICTING THE PRICE OF FLORIDA CELERY, by W. B. Riggan and
D. L. Brooke, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 1730, Nov. 1963,
6 pages. (Printed in the Proceedings of the Florida State Horticul-
tural Society, Vol. 76).

Presents a method of predicting the price of Florida celery a week in
advance using the four independent variables of (1) the California
f.o.b. price of celery on Thursday, (2) the unsold Friday celery plus
the expected harvest in Florida Friday and Saturday, (3) the quantity
of Florida celery shipped from Sunday through Thursday, and (4) the
f.o.b. Belle Glade price on Friday morning.

Other

1. RESEARCH OF IMPROVED MERCHANDISING OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS, by
Marshall R. Godwin, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 518, Dec. 1956,
8 pages. (Printed in the Journal of Farm Economics, Vol. XXXVIII,
No. 5).

This article evaluates elements of approaches to merchandising research.
These elements are discussed as the identification of research problems,
the testing of likely merchandising alternatives and the evaluation of
test results from the standpoint of application.

2. AGRICULTURE IS AFFECTED BY CHANGES IN THE RETAIL FOOD BUSINESS, by
Cecil N. Smith, Sunshine State Agr. Research Report, Vol. 4, No. 4,
October 1959, 2 pages.

An article describing the effect on agriculture engendered by the
growth of supermarkets, integration, and technological improvements in
production and marketing of farm products.

3. SOUTHERN REGION EXTENSION PAPERS AND DISCUSSIONS AT SOUTHERN REGIONAL
CONFERENCE ON MARKETING PROGRAMS, by Ralph A. Eastwood, Farm Foundation,
So. Dir. of Ext. Fed. Ext. Service USDA, October 26-31, 1959, 3 pages.

The Dairy Committee report was prepared by Dr. Eastwood as chairman.
It outlines dairy program areas of probable interest to specialists in
the southern states. It also discusses recommendations for report
forms to be required of states by state and federal Extension
directors and administrators.

4. EXTERNAL QUALITY FACTORS OF FLORIDA AVOCADOS THEIR IMPORTANCE TO
THE CONSUMER, by D. L. Brooke, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 617, Dec. 1959,
16 pages.






-43-


Presents results of a retail store study of consumer reaction to the
external quality factors of size, shape, and appearance of Florida
avocados. Customers exhibited a significant preference for better
grades of fruit with little regard for size or shape.

5. THE CONSUMER MARKET FOR FLORIDA AVOCADOS, by William T. Manley and
Marshall R. Godwin, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 625, Aug. 1960, 54 pages.

This study examines the extent to which avocados are used and those
factors which appear related to consumer use patterns. It provides
information useful in implementing a program to expand the total
market for Florida avocados.

6. THE REVOLUTION IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY, by Cecil N. Smith, Economic
Leaflet, Vol. XX, No. 5, May 1961, 4 pages.

A discussion of the changes taking place in (1) food consumption habits,
(2) distribution of the food dollar, (3) the retail food industry, (4)
processing, wholesaling and distribution, (5) food production on farms,
and (6) integration of production and marketing functions.

7. PRODUCTION AND MARKETING PRACTICES OF FLORIDA PECAN PRODUCERS, by
D. L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report, 62-4, Sept. 1961, 19 pages.

Describes the production, harvesting, and marketing practices of
pecan growers in five selected counties of Florida in 1960-61. Pecan
buyers and truckers bought over 90 percent of the pecans sold by
growers. Cooperatives sold less than 10 percent of growers' pecans.

8. SOME OBSERVATIONS ON FOOD STORE PRODUCE OPERATIONS, by Cecil N. Smith,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 1342, Nov. 1961, 5 pages. (Printed
in the Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society, Vol. 74).

A discussion of the recent trends which have occurred in the retail
food industry.

9. REPORT OF LIVESTOCK SUB-COMMITTEE ON EFFICIENCY IN MARKETING, DISTRI-
BUTION AND UTILIZATION, by Ralph A. Eastwood, Livestock Marketing
Sec. Consumer Education in Food Marketing, 1961, 3 pages.

These reports were written at the conclusion of detailed and effective
committee action by the Livestock Sub-committee, whose members includ-
ed representatives from each department in the Florida Agricultural
Extension Service concerned with livestock and livestock products. The
reports were administratively requested as the basis for long-range
program planning within the Extension Service.

Substantial attention was devoted to Consumer Education because the
livestock industry of Florida implicitly or explicitly must be con-
sumer oriented, and consumer demand will be of determinative importance.
The portions devoted to livestock production treat current state
situation and project development based upon the informed opinion of
the sub-committee. Program implications are introduced wherever
pertinent.





-44-


10. FLORIDA FARM TO FLORIDA HOME FARM PRODUCTS AND GROCERY CHAINS, by
Cecil N. Smith, Sunshine State Agricultural Research Report, Vol. 7,
No. 2, April 1962, 3 pages.

An article describing operations of retail chains and cooperative
buying groups in the purchasing and merchandising of farm products
observed during a six-week period of study with a large chain
organization.

11. THE EFFECT OF PRICE VARIATION, SKIN BLEMISH AND FIRMNESS ON RETAIL
SALES OF FLORIDA AVOCADOS, by F. W. Williams, D. L. Broolke and
W. B. Riggan, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 645, March 1962, 38 pages.

Presents results of a retail store study of (a) consumer response
to price variation as reflected in the sales volume of Florida
avocados on retail display, (b) consumer preference for avocados
having varying amounts of skin blemish when fruit is available at a
range of prices, and (c) consumer preference for avocados having
varying degrees of firmness.

12. MARKETING FLORIDA HONEY, by Fred J. Hoffer and H. G. Hamilton, Agr.
Econ. Mimeo Report 62-10, March 1962, 51 pages.

This report gives information on the cost of packing honey, sales
policies and practices, and sales of 9 of 20 commercial honey packers
operating in Florida in 1956. A sample of 6,760 sale invoices was
obtained for two years, 1955 and 1956. They furnished sales data
for 15,687 different lots of honey by type of honey, kind of contain,
method of sale, price received and point of sale or destination. The
data were analyzed to show cost of packing honey, selling practices,
returns by type of sales, distribution of sales to buyers and markets,
seasonal distribution of sales, and method and costs of transporting
honey to important markets.

13. MARKETING PROBLEMS MAY NOT BE WHAT THEY SEEM, by Ralph A. Eastwood,
Vocational Agricultural Conference, July 9, 1963.

14. TEAM-WORK APPROACH TO SOLUTIONS OF PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED IN CHANGING
MARKETING PRACTICES, by W. W. McPherson, (Printed in the Proceedings
of the Florida State Horticultural Society, Vol. 76, 1963),
pp. 338-341.

Explanation of how researchers from different disciplines as a team
together with engineers and farm production personnel approached and
solved problems encountered when the practice of shipping bananas as
stems of fruit were changed to packaging the fruit in the areas of
production.

15. IMPACT OF FREIGHT RATE CHANGES ON SOUTHERN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AND
MARKETING, by W. K. McPherson, A paper read at the Annual Meeting of
the Association of So. Agr. Workers and published in the Proceedings,
Marketing Section, Assoc. of So. Agr. Workers, Feb. 1965, Mimeo,
19 pages.

A preliminary analysis of the relationships between the differences
in the least cost formulation of diets in Illinois and Florida and
the cost of shipping livestock products from Illinois to Florida.





-45-


Harvesting, Handling, Packing and Processing


COSTS OF PICKING AND HAULING FLORIDA CITRUS FRUITS, 1950-51
SEASON, by A. H. Spurlock and H. G. Hamilton, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 52-1, Jan. 1952, 7 pages.


b. COSTS OF PICKING AND HAULING FLORIDA


A. H. Spurlock.
(1) 1951-52 Season,
13 pages.
(2) 1952-53 Season,
15 pages.
(3) 1953-54 Season,
16 pages.
(4) 1954-55 Season,
18 pages.
(5) 1955-56 Season,
16 pages.
(6) 1956-57 Season,
17 pages.
(7) 1957-58 Season,
16 pages.
(8) 1958-59 Season,
16 pages.
(9) 1959-60 Season,
17 pages
(10) 1960-61 Season,
14 pages.
(11) 1961-62 Season,
10 pages.
(12) 1962-63 Season,
12 pages.
(13) 1963-64 Season,
11 pag6s.


Agr. Econ. Mimeo


Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.


Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.


Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo


CITRUS

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report


FRUITS, by

53-2, Jan. 1953,

54-13, Mar. 1954,

55-5, Jan. 1955,

56-6, Jan. 1956,

57-3, Jan. 1957,

58-7, Feb. 1958,

59-10, Feb. 1959,

60-9, Feb. 1960,

61-7, Feb. 1961,

62-11, Mar. 1962,

63-7, Mar. 1963,

EC 64-8, April 1964,

EC 65-6, Mar. 1965,


An annual series of 14 years, giving itemized average costs
with variations for hauling citrus and for picking oranges,
grapefruit and tangerines. Costs also are combined to show
the complete harvesting operation (picking and hauling) for
each type of fruit. Based on a sample in the 1963-64 season
of 30 firms.


Citrus

1. a.





-45-


Harvesting, Handling, Packing and Processing


COSTS OF PICKING AND HAULING FLORIDA CITRUS FRUITS, 1950-51
SEASON, by A. H. Spurlock and H. G. Hamilton, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 52-1, Jan. 1952, 7 pages.


b. COSTS OF PICKING AND HAULING FLORIDA


A. H. Spurlock.
(1) 1951-52 Season,
13 pages.
(2) 1952-53 Season,
15 pages.
(3) 1953-54 Season,
16 pages.
(4) 1954-55 Season,
18 pages.
(5) 1955-56 Season,
16 pages.
(6) 1956-57 Season,
17 pages.
(7) 1957-58 Season,
16 pages.
(8) 1958-59 Season,
16 pages.
(9) 1959-60 Season,
17 pages
(10) 1960-61 Season,
14 pages.
(11) 1961-62 Season,
10 pages.
(12) 1962-63 Season,
12 pages.
(13) 1963-64 Season,
11 pag6s.


Agr. Econ. Mimeo


Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.

Agr.


Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.

Econ.


Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo

Mimeo


CITRUS

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report

Report


FRUITS, by

53-2, Jan. 1953,

54-13, Mar. 1954,

55-5, Jan. 1955,

56-6, Jan. 1956,

57-3, Jan. 1957,

58-7, Feb. 1958,

59-10, Feb. 1959,

60-9, Feb. 1960,

61-7, Feb. 1961,

62-11, Mar. 1962,

63-7, Mar. 1963,

EC 64-8, April 1964,

EC 65-6, Mar. 1965,


An annual series of 14 years, giving itemized average costs
with variations for hauling citrus and for picking oranges,
grapefruit and tangerines. Costs also are combined to show
the complete harvesting operation (picking and hauling) for
each type of fruit. Based on a sample in the 1963-64 season
of 30 firms.


Citrus

1. a.







-46-


2. a. ESTIMATED COST OF HANDLING FLORIDA CITRUS FRUITS IN FRESH AND
PROCESSED FORM FROM TREE TO CHICAGO WHOLESALE MARKET, 1946-47
THROUGH 1950-51 SEASONS, Special Report by H. G. Hamilton,
J. K. Samuels and H. W. Little, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-5,
April 1951, 5 pages.

b. COST OF HANDLING FLORIDA AND TEXAS CITRUS FRUITS IN FRESH AND
PROCESSED FORM, 1949-50 SEASON, by D. L. Brooke, K. A. Fugett and
C. K. Baker, Special Report, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-14,
June 1951, 48 pages.

c. COST OF HANDLING FLORIDA AND TEXAS CITRUS FRUITS IN FRESH AND
PROCESSED FORM, 1950-51 SEASON, by J. L. Tennant, H. B. Sorenson,
and C. K. Baker, Special Report, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 52-5,
June 1952, 59 pages.

d. COST OF HANDLING FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT IN FRESH AND PROCESSED
FORM, 1951-52 SEASON, by Eric Thor, J. L. Tennant, H. G. Hamilton,
C. K. Baker and J. K. Samuels, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 54-5,
Sept. 1953, 45 pages.

e. COST OF HANDLING FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT IN FRESH AND PROCESSED
FORM, 1952-53 SEASON, by Eric Thor, A. H. Spurlock, H. G. Hamilton,
C. K. Baker and J. K. Samuels, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 54-14,
May 1954, 35 pages.

f. COST OF PACKING AND SELLING FLORIDA FRESH CITRUS FRUITS, 1953-54
SEASON, by Eric Thor and A. H. Spurlock, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report
55-4, Jan. 1955, 22 pages.


g. COST OF PACKING AND SELLING
SEASON, by Eric Thor and A.
56-5, Jan. 1956, 24 pages.


FLORIDA FRESH CITRUS FRUITS, 1954-55
H. Spurlock, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report


h. COST OF PACKING AND SELLING FLORIDA FRESH CITRUS FRUITS, by


A. H. Spurlock and I
(1) 1955-56 Season,
(2) 1956-57 Season,
27 pages.
(3) 1957-58 Season,
30 pages.
(4) 1958-59 Season,
27 pages.
(5) 1959-60 Season,
30 pages.
(6) 1960-61 Season,
29 pages.
(7) 1961-62 Season,
27 pages.
(8) 1962-63 Season,
29 pages.
(9) 1963-64 Season,
26 pages.


1. G.


Hamilton.


Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 57-4, Jan. 1957,26pages.
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 58-6, Feb. 1958,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 59-9, Feb. 1959,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-10, Feb. 1960,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 61-8, Feb. 1961,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-14, April 1962,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 63-9, April 1963,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-9, April 1964,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 65-7, April 1965,







-47-


An annual series of about 17 years, giving average packing and
selling costs by items of expense for each type of fruit handled
and each important container used. Gives range in packing and
selling costs and relates total cost to value of fruit handled.
Based on a sample in'the 1963-64 season of 38 packinghouses
handling 54 oercent-of Florida fresh citrus shipments.

3. A JOB COST ANALYSIS-PACKING HOUSE NO. 17, by Eric Thor, Agr. Econ.
Typed Report 53-2a, Jan. 1953,22 pages.

This report was prepared from data collected in a time and method
study to give the operator of Packinghouse # 17 a detailed summary
and analysis of the per box cost of packing and handling citrus in
his house.

4. COST OF HANDLING CITRUS FRUIT FROM THE TREE ONTO THE HIGHWAY TRUCK,
by Eric Thor and Luke D. Dohner, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 54-2,
July 1953, 7 pages.

The purpose of this study was to determine the most efficient method
of handling citrus fruit from the tree onto highway truck. The data
were collected by: (1) time studies of actual field operations;
(2) examination of records of handling and packing firms; and (3)
personal interviews with foremen, workers, managers and equipment
dealers. The handling methods studied were: (1) hand dumping field
box, (2) field box bulk field truck, (3) portable elevator bulk
field box, (4) tractor-bulk field trailerand (5) tractor basket.

5. COST ANALYSIS OF BULK HANDLING METHODS FOR FRESH CITRUS, (Preliminary
Report) by Eric Thor, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 55-1, Sept. 1954,
33 pages.

In this study the costs of the three bulk methods of handling fresh
citrus from the tree on to the dump belt were compared with standard
field box procedures in use by the industry. The average total cost
per box based on volume picked and received was determined for each
method by calculating average fixed costs and average direct costs
for various weekly and seasonal volume. A total of six methods were
studied and comparisons of costs were made for two distinct situations.

6. COST OF MOVING CITRUS FROM TREE ONTO HIGHWAY TRUCKS AS RELATED TO
METHODS OF HANDLING, by Eric Thor and Luke D. Dohner, Fla. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Bulletin 547, Sept. 1954, 44 pages.

Five distinct methods used by the Florida citrus industry for trans-
porting and handling citrus from the tree onto highway trucks were
studied 1. Hand dumping and field box; 2. Field box bulk "goat";
3. Portable grove elevator'--bulk,"goat"; 4. Tractor-bulk field
trailer:and, 5. Tract'r-basket to determiie:which of the methods
was most economical under specified conditions.





-48-


7. BULK HANDLING OF FRESH CITRUS FRUIT, by D. S. Prosser, Jr.,
W. F. Grierson, Eric Thor, W. F. Newhall and J. K. Samuels, Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Bulletin 564, June 1955, 35 pages.

The low price of citrus during the 1947-48 season generated increased
interest in finding cheaper methods of handling citrus to be sold as
fresh fruit. To supplement the effort of commercial concerns that had
experimented with various types of bulk handling, a cooperative
project was set up at Lake Alfred to determine if a feasible method
of bulk handling could be devised for fresh fruit. This bulletin
reports the results of this project, together with a discussion of
the merits of the system developed and the evaluation of the economic
savings attendant upon bulk handling of fresh fruit.


8. a. THE COST OF PROCESSING, WAREHOUSING AND SELLING
PRODUCTS, 1953-54 SEASON, by A. H. Spurlock, H.
C. K. Baker and J. K. Samuels, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
June 1955, 12 pages.


FLORIDA CITRUS
G. Hamilton,
Report 55-10,


b. COSTS OF PROCESSING, WAREHOUSING AND SELLING FLORIDA CITRUS
PRODUCTS, 1954-55 SEASON, by A. H. Spurlock, H. G. Hamilton,
J. W. Rust and J. K. Samuels, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 56-11,
June 1956, 13 pages.

c. COSTS OF PROCESSING, WAREHOUSING AND SELLING FLORIDA CITRUS
PRODUCTS, 1955-56 SEASON, by A. H. Spurlock, H. G. Hamilton,
J. W. Rust and J. K. Samuels, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 57-9,
June 1957, 15 pages.

d. COSTS OF PROCESSING, WAREHOUSING AND SELLING FLORIDA CITRUS
PRODUCTS, 1956-57 SEASON, by A. H. Spurlock, H. G. Hamilton,
F. E. Hulse and J. K. Samuels, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 59-1,
Aug. 1958, 18 pages.

e. COSTS OF PROCESSING, WAREHOUSING AND SELLING FLORIDA CITRUS
PRODUCTS, by A. H. Spurlock and H. G. Hamilton.
(1) 1957-58 Season, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 59-12, June 1959,


21 pages.
(2) 1958-59 Season,
18 pages.
(3) 1959-60 Season,
17 pages.
(4) 1960-61 Season,
18 pages.
(5) 1961-62 Season,
19 pages.
(6) 1962-63 Season,
19 pages.
(7) 1963-64 Season,
18 pages.


Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-12, June 1960,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 61-9, March 1961,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-12, March 1962,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 63-10, April 1963,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-10, April 1964,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 65-8, April 1965,







-49-


An annual series of about 17 years giving itemized annual
costs of processing, warehousing and selling single strength
juices, citrus sections, frozen orange concentrate, and for
a shorter period, by-products. Gives variation in total
costs. Based on a sample in the 1963-64 season-of 19 plants
with two-thirds or more of the state's.processed output.

9. COSTS OF PROCESSING, WAREHOUSING AND SELLING FLORIDA CITRUS
BY-PRODUCTS, 1960-61 SEASON, by A. H. Spurlock and H. G. Hamilton,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-15, June 1962, 5 pages.

Data on cost of processing, warehousing and selling citrus by-products.

10. THE USE OF PACKING LABOR IN FLORIDA CITRUS PACKINGHOUSES,by
George L. Capel, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 57-8, June 1957, 19 pages.

This study was undertaken to show the labor requirements for packing
various types of containers and sizes of fruit, differences in prac-
tices followed in managing the labor force, trends in the use of
containers, and computed rates giving equal earnings to packers for
each type of container. Studies of packing labor were made in 14
packinghouses using work-sampling methods which permitted studies to
be made of a number of workers simultaneously.

11. A METHOD OF ALLOCATING CITRUS PACKINGHOUSE COSTS, by Eric Thor,
James W. DeVault and A. H. Spurlock, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 58-1,
July 1957, 80 pages.

Description of a method of using cost-allocation ratios developed
from job analyses and timing studies in citrus packinghouses. Their
use facilitates distribution of each item of cost to each product-
pack. A model packinghouse distribution is illustrated.

12. COSTS FOR HANDLING FLORIDA ORANGES SHIPPED IN CONSUMER BAGS AND IN
BULK, by George L. Capel, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 58-12, June 1958,
23 pages.

This study was made to compare the costs for handling and packing
bulk shipments in the market with the cost for handling fruit bagged
at the shipping point, and to determine the problems and further
possibilities in bulk shipping.

13. ECONOMIES OF SCALE IN THE OPERATION OF FLORIDA CITRUS PACKINGHOUSES,
by Eric Thor, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 606, Jan. 1959, 39 pages.

This study was undertaken to determine (1) the estimated savings
avialable to the Florida citrus industry if packinghouses shifted
from the conventional field box automatic dump method to bulk handling
method without changing scale of operation; (2) the cost relationship
of a single unit and a two-unit packinghouse, and (3) economies which
might result from packinghouse consolidation and expansion. Com-
parisons were made of long-run cost curved for conventional and model
packinghouses.






-50-


14. COMPARATIVE COSTS OF ALTERNATIVE METHODS FOR PERFORMING CERTAIN
HANDLING OPERATIONS IN FLORIDA CITRUS PACKINGHOUSES, by
George L. Capel, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 609, June 1959, 69 pages.

The purposes of this study were (1) to measure the physical input-
output relationshipsin a number of specific packinghouse operations,
and (2) to use these relationships to show the relative :csts of
alternative work methods under a range of output rates. Various
packinghouse operations are described. For selected rates of output
per hour, the effects of volume handled per season on cost are shown.

Potatoes

1. REDUCTION OF PHYSICAL INJURIES IN PICKING UP IRISH POTATOES, by
B. J. Todd, N. E. Shuler and R. E. L. Greene, S. C. Exp. Sta. Mimeo
Report AE 105, Sept. 1951, 9 pages.

Reports the results of tests to determine the extent to which physical
damage to early Irish potatoes could be reduced by using rubberized
wire baskets for pick-up containers rather than the usual wire basket
or wooden hampers. Pounds of potatoes per 100 pounds with minor
injuries averaged 2.9 pounds when picked up in rubber covered baskets,
6.3 pounds in wooden hampers and 12.4 pounds in wire baskets.

2. POSSIBILITIES OF MECHANICAL HARVESTERS AND INDICATED ADJUSTMENTS IN
FLORIDA OPERATIONS, by R. E. L. Greene, Nov. 1952, 3 pages. (Pub-
lished in Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society
65:112-114, 1952).

A presentation of observations on the use of equipment for mechanical
harvesting and handling of potatoes in Florida and Alabama during
the 1952 season. Problems likely to be encountered in the use of
such equipment to dig early Irish potatoes were enumerated. A list
of factors affecting the successful operation of individual machines
was given.

3. REDUCING DAMAGE TO EARLY IRISH POTATOES DURING HARVESTING A PRE-
LIMINARY REPORT, by R. E. L. Greene and B. J. Todd, Released by the
Fla. Agr. Ext. Ser., Mar. 1953, 5 pages.

Reports the results of special tests in the Hastings, Florida area
to obtain data on the effects that certain protection on the digger
and the speed of digging had on the amount of physicalinjuries to
early Irish potatoes during digging; also the amount of injury to
potatoes when picked up in rubber covered baskets, wooden hampers and
wire baskets.







-51-


4. REDUCTION OF PHYSICAL INJURIES TO EARLY IRISH POTATOES DURING DIGGING
AND PICKING UP, by B. J. Todd and R. E. L. Greene, Si C. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Bul. So. Coop. Series 32, March 1953, 31 pages.

This report presents the findings of two seasons of research on
methods of reducing physical injuries to early Irish potatoes during
the harvesting process. The two specific operations studied were
digging and picking up the potatoes. Injuries during digging can be
kept to a minimum by the use of simple modifications to the digger
and reduction in the speed of digging. Cuts and bruises occurring
during the picking up operation can be substantially reduced through
the use of rubberized baskets or pick-up containers.

5. MECHANICAL HARVESTING AND BULK HANDLING OF POTATOES IN FLORIDA AND
ALABAMA PRELIMINARY REPORT BASED ON OBSERVATIONS DURING THE 1952
AND:1953 SEASONS, by R. E. L. Greene, L. J. Kushman, J. S. Norton and
H. C. Spurlock, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 54-10, Jan. 1954, 47 pages.

Research was conducted to obtain information on the operation of
mechanical potato harvesting and handling equipment in Florida and
Alabama during 1953. This report presents data on number of harvesters
amount of use, rate of harvesting, cost of harvesting, amount of
physical damage in potatoes harvested and handled mechanically, some
of the problems associated with this method of handling and suggestions
for evaluating prospective equipment and improving.the operation of
such equipment.

6. MECHANICAL HARVESTING AND BULK HANDLING OF POTATOES, by R. E. L. Greene
and J. S. Norton, Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 317, Oct. 1954,
6 pages. (Printed in the Proceedings of the Fla. State Horticultural
Soc. Vol. LXVII).

A report on work in Florida and Alabama in 1953 and 1954 to obtain
data on the operation of mechanical harvesting and handling equipment,
quality of potatoes harvested, cost of harvesting and handling potatoes
mechanically and a comparison of cost with conventional methods, and
a discussion of changes needed on the farm and at packinghouses to
increase the efficiency of operation of such equipment.

7. EQUIPMENT FOR MECHANICAL HARVESTING AND HANDLING OF IRISH POTATOES IN
THE SOUTEEAST, by J. S. Norton, R. E. L. Greene and L. J. Kushman,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 579, Nov. 1956, 32 pages.

This bulletin was prepared to describe the various systems and equip-
ment being used to harvest and handle potatoes mechanically in the
Southeast and to present data on amount of use, performance and cost.
Major emphasis is given to describing ~p:bleiiencci-teed.ands ss-
tions for improving the operation of mechanical equipment. No effort
is made to analyze cost and quality factors as these data will be
presented in a subsequent report.





-52-


8. A TRASH AND CLOD ELIMINATOR FOR PACKINGHOUSES HANDLING MECHANICALLY
HARVESTED POTATOES, by J. S. Norton, R. E. L. Greene and J. M. Myers,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-107, Apr. 1958, 14 pages.

Harvesting and handling potatoes with mechanical equipment often
results in an increased amount of vines, weeds, grass and dirt being
delivered with the potatoes to the packinghouse, especially under
adverse digging conditions. This material causes numerous problems
in operating the packinghouse equipment. Work was conducted to
develop mechanical means to aid in removing trash and clods at the
packinghouse. This report gives the results of tests conducted with
an experimental eliminator. Drawings and instructions are given for
designing and building a trash eliminator.

9. PACKING COSTS AND GRADING EFFICIENCY IN FLORIDA AND ALABAMA POTATO
PACKINGHOUSES, by George L. Capel, R. E. L. Greene and L. J. Kushman,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 59-7, Dec. 1958, 37 pages.

A study was made of the operation of 10 packinghia1M.s: in South Florida
and 10 in the Hastings area for the 1956 season and 5 in Alabama for
the 1957 season. The study was made to deal with problems in packing-
house management and was specifically aimed at determining (1) the
most efficient method of performing various packinghouse operations,
(2) the most efficient combination of labor and equipment, (3) the
efficiency of grading and (4) the levels of costs according to type
of container. This report presents data on average costs for the
season for each type of container packed and the efficiency of graders
in removing potatoes with defects as they passed over the grading
table. Subsequent reports deal with the specific packinghouse opera-
tions.

10. AN ANALYSIS OF QUALITY AND COST OF HARVESTING AND HANDLING POTATOES
WITH MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT, by R. E. L. Greene, L. J. Kushman and
H. C. Spurlock, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 612, Oct. 1959, 72 pages.

Equipment for mechanically harvesting and handling potatoes was first
used commercially in the Southeast to an appreciable extent in
Alabama in 1952. Studies were made during the 1953 and 1954 harvest-
ing season in areas of Florida and Alabama where mechanical equipment
was used. This report describes methods and types of equipment used,
how the equipment operated, problems encountered and amount of annual
use. Data are presented on the performance pf the equipment, the
amount of physical injuries in potatoes harvested and handled mechan-
ically and the cost of harvesting and handling potatoes both with the
conventional system and mechanical equipment. Data are also presented
on factors affecting rate of harvesting per hour and effects of rate
of harvesting and amount of annual use on cost per unit for harvest-
ing and handling potatoes.

11. ANALYSIS OF COSTS FOR PACKING POTATOES IN 10-POUND BAGS IN THE
SOUTHEAST, by George L. Capel and R. E. L. Greene, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 60-6, Dec. 1959, 32 pages.







-53-


An analysis of the costs for packing and handling 10-pound bags in
packinghouses in Florida and Alabama. Data are presented on costs
of alternative methods available and a comparison of these costs with
cost for packing 100 pound bags. Data are also presented showing
estimated costs for each method for selected outputs per hour and
volumes of 10-pound bags packed per season.

12. FLUME DESIGN FOR RECEIVING AND HANDLING POTATOES IN PACKINGHOUSES,
by J. S. Norton and R. E. L. Greene, Fla. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-119,
Jan. 1960, 8 pages.

Discusses the advantages of a flume over a belt conveyor for moving
mechanically harvested potatoes, lists factors to consider in de-
signing and building a flume and gives specifications and drawings
for the construction of a flume.

13. COST OF ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF BAGGING AND LOADING POTATOES IN THE
SOUTHEAST, by George L. Capel and R. E. L. Greene, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 61-10, March 1961, 28 pages.

This report presents a comparison of costs of alternative methods of
performing two potato packinghouse operations: (1) filling and weigh-
ing bags and (2) handling and loading bags. The comparisons are based
on data obtained on potato packinghouses in Florida.

14. RESEARCH ON NEW METHODS FOR HANDLING POTATOES, by E. K. Bowman,
E. S. Holmes, G. E. Yost and R. E. L. Greene, Sunshine State Agricul-
tural Research Report Vol. 6, No. 2, April 1961, 3 pages.

A description and presentation of preliminary results of research
aimed at obtaining information needed as a basis for development and
planning of efficient and economical facilities for receiving and
temporary holding of early crop Irish potatoes in bulk at packinghouses.

15. HANDLING POTATOES IN PALLET BOXES, by E. S. Holmes, G. E. Yost,
R. E. L. Greene, E. K. Bowman and W. G. Grizzell, Sunshine State
Agricultural Research Report Vol. 7, No. 4, October 1962, 3 pages.

Pallet boxes, holding about 2000 pounds, have been used in late crop
areas as a means of storing and holding potatoes. Since such boxes
are relatively inexpensive and lend themselves to easy storage in
multiple heights, they seemed to offer possibilities to the solution
of the problem of temporary storage and efficient handling of new
crop potatoes. This article presents results of experimental work
in the Hastings area during the 1960-61 season to determine (1) the
equipment needed to handle pallet boxes from the field to the packing
line, (2) the manpower requirements, (3) the amount of potato injury
incurred as compared to current methods, (4) the number of pallet
boxes necessary for a balanced flow between field operations and the
packing line, and (5) the economy of a pallet box operation as com-
pared to current methods.







-54-


Other

1. PACKING, LABOR AND RETURNS FOR TOMATOES BY TYPE OF CONTAINER, by
A. H. Spurlock, Article Printed in the Proceedings of the Florida
State Horticultural Society, Vol. LXIV, 1951, 3 pages.

Packing labor costs for lugs of tomatoes compared with open-top
bushel boxes and bushel nailed boxes or wirebound boxes were higher.
F.O.B. prices, less total packing costs, returned more to the grower
for bushel size containers than for lugs.

2. COST OF PACKING TOMATOES BY CONTAINERS, 1950-51 F.O.B. PRICES AND
NET RETURNS TO GROWERS, BY CONTAINERS, 1949-50, by A. H..SpurloEk;
Agr.; Econ. Mtteo Report'.52-11, Oct.ber 1952, 20 pages.

Tomato packing costs were itemized by type of shipping containers for
1950-51. Total sales by a large marketing cooperative were segrega-
ted by containers showing for each type by month, F.O.B. prices,
packing and handling charges and net returns to grower.

3. CONTAINERS FOR SHIPPING FLORIDA TOMATOES, by L. H. Halsey,
L. P. McColloch, A. H. Spurlock and R. K. Showalter, Fla. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Bulletin 560, April 1955, 32 pages.

Cooperative with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Several types
of containers for shipping tomatoes were evaluated for suitability
after actual shipping tests and simulated transit tests. Itemized
costs of packing were given for four containers for 1950-51 for
economic comparisons.




-55-


III. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, LAND AND WATER ECONOMICS
AND PUBLIC POLICY


Economic Development

1. SOME ASPECTS OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE TENNESSEE VALLEY, by
W. K. McPherson, Economic Leaflet, Vol. XI, No. 6, May 1552, 4 pages.

An over-all evaluation of TVA's contribution to economic g:-owth in the
pKstershed.

2. PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL RESOURCE ADJUSTMENT, by D. E. Allager, Mimeo
Release, STICA, San Jose, Costa Rica 1957.

This paper was prepared for and at the request of an official in the
Costa Rican Public Works Ministry. It set forth the urgency to keep
natural resources in balance with a rapidly expanding population,
compared productivity per worker by provinces, and exhibited a simple
level of living index to high-light differential economic opportunity
within the country. It urged cooperation in research effort and in
national economic development planning.

3. THE IMPACT OF AREA DEVELOPMENT ON LAND RESOURCES, by W. K. McPherson,
A paper read at the Association of Southern Agricultural Workers and
published in the Proceedings, Agricultural Economics and Rural Soci-
ology Section, Association of Southern Agricultural Workers, Vol. 2,
Feb. 1962, 12 pages.

Area development alters the use of land resources by (1) creating a
demand for land as a factor of production and as a consumer good and
(2) increasing the ad valorem tax burden.

4. CONTRIBUTIONS OF SOUTHERN SOCIAL POLITICAL AND RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS
TO ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, by D. E. Alleger, Read at Associ-
ation of Southern Agricultural Workers, Memphis, Tenn., Feb. 1963,
Mimeo Release.

Data were developed from secondary and historical sources to outline
some of the major social, political and religious contributions of
the South to national economic growth.

5. CHARACTERISTICS AND MEASUREMENTS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH, by W. W.
McPherson, A paper read at the Association of Southern Agricultural
Workers and published in the Proceedings of the Agricultural Eco-
nomics and Rural Sociology Section, Association of Southern Agri-
cultural Workers, 1963, pages 1-18, p. 7 of Abstracts of Proceedings.

A discussion of factors determining the rate of economic growth,
means of measuring growth and associated features.




-55-


III. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, LAND AND WATER ECONOMICS
AND PUBLIC POLICY


Economic Development

1. SOME ASPECTS OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE TENNESSEE VALLEY, by
W. K. McPherson, Economic Leaflet, Vol. XI, No. 6, May 1552, 4 pages.

An over-all evaluation of TVA's contribution to economic g:-owth in the
pKstershed.

2. PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL RESOURCE ADJUSTMENT, by D. E. Allager, Mimeo
Release, STICA, San Jose, Costa Rica 1957.

This paper was prepared for and at the request of an official in the
Costa Rican Public Works Ministry. It set forth the urgency to keep
natural resources in balance with a rapidly expanding population,
compared productivity per worker by provinces, and exhibited a simple
level of living index to high-light differential economic opportunity
within the country. It urged cooperation in research effort and in
national economic development planning.

3. THE IMPACT OF AREA DEVELOPMENT ON LAND RESOURCES, by W. K. McPherson,
A paper read at the Association of Southern Agricultural Workers and
published in the Proceedings, Agricultural Economics and Rural Soci-
ology Section, Association of Southern Agricultural Workers, Vol. 2,
Feb. 1962, 12 pages.

Area development alters the use of land resources by (1) creating a
demand for land as a factor of production and as a consumer good and
(2) increasing the ad valorem tax burden.

4. CONTRIBUTIONS OF SOUTHERN SOCIAL POLITICAL AND RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS
TO ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, by D. E. Alleger, Read at Associ-
ation of Southern Agricultural Workers, Memphis, Tenn., Feb. 1963,
Mimeo Release.

Data were developed from secondary and historical sources to outline
some of the major social, political and religious contributions of
the South to national economic growth.

5. CHARACTERISTICS AND MEASUREMENTS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH, by W. W.
McPherson, A paper read at the Association of Southern Agricultural
Workers and published in the Proceedings of the Agricultural Eco-
nomics and Rural Sociology Section, Association of Southern Agri-
cultural Workers, 1963, pages 1-18, p. 7 of Abstracts of Proceedings.

A discussion of factors determining the rate of economic growth,
means of measuring growth and associated features.





-56-


6. PEOPLE, LAND AND FOOD, by Cecil N. Smith, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal
Series 1825, 1963, 8 pages. (Printed in Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida, Vol. 23).

A discussion of major trends in world population and food production
as related to land and other resources used in the production of
food.

7. CONSIDERATIONS FOR PLANNING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF RURAL AREAS, by
U. 1. McPherson, Discussion: Journal of Farm Economics, Vol. 45,
No. 5, Dec. 1963, pp. 1090-1091.

Discussion of a paper by this title given at the Annual Meeting of
the American Farm Economics Association. Importance of flexibility
to meet differences among local areas is stressed.

8. INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, by U. W. McPherson,
A paper given at Annual Meetings of Association of Southern Agri-
cultural Workers, Feb. 1964, published in Abstracts of Proceedings,
p. 252 and to appear as a chapter in Frontiers in Southern Agri-
cultural Marketing, Iowa State Univ. Press (in process).

Important institutional factors related to economic growth are dis-
cussed with observations drawn from the U. S., the Southern States
and Latin America.

9. PROGRAMS TO ALLEVIATE RURAL POVERTY WHAT WILL WORK? by U. W.
McPherson in Rural America Looks to the Future, Agr. Policy
Institute, N. C. State University and Center for Agr. and Econ.
Development, Iowa State Univ., January 1964, pp. 37-58.

Means of increasing economic, social and geographic mobility, role
of local and regional planning, and importance of reconciling
interest conflicts in such a manner as to promote rather than
prohibit change are discussed.

10. OVERVIEW OF SOUTHERN ECONOMIC GROWTH, by W. U. McPherson, in
Optimizing Institutions for Economic Growth, Agr. Policy Institute,
N. C. State University and Southern Land Economic Research Committee,
4My 1964, pp. 20-46.

Economic growth of the South in relation to the U. S. is reviewed and
institutional factors related to the growth differences are dis-
cussed. Special importance of full-employment policy to the South
is stressed.

11. DESARROLLO ECONOMIC DE LA INDUSTRIAL ANICOLA DOMINICANA: by Juan A.
Aguirre and 1. U. McPherson, Turrialba Revista Interamericana de
Ciencias Agricolas, Vol. 15, No 2, Abril-Junio, 1965, pp. 88-93.

Analysis of farm costs and financial arrangements, and competitive
supply position in relation to imports.





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12. REVIEW OF: IIARION CLAWSON (ed.) NATURAL RESOURCES AND INTERNATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT, by W. U. McPherson, Printed in Journal of Farm Economics,
Vol. 47, No. 2, May 1965, pp. 477-479.

(Book review)

13. INPUT MARKETS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, by W. W. McPherson, A paper
given at the annual conference of the Center for A-ricultural and
Economic Development, Iowa State University, November 1964 and
published as chapter 6 in Economic Development of Agriculture, Iowa
State Univ. Press, 1965, pp. 99-117.

The conditions of factor markets in underdeveloped areas, their
relation to economic growth, and importance of the public sector and
the private marketing sector in economic growth are discussed.

14. OVERVIEW OF SOUTHERN ECONOMIC GROWTH AND INSTITUTIONS INFLUENCING
GROWTH, by U. 17. McPherson, Agricultural Policy Review, Vol. 4, No. 4,
1964, pp. 4-5.

Summary of institutional factors affecting economic growth in the
South.

Land and Water Economics

1. SOME ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF FORMULATING WATER POLICY, by W. K. McPherson,
Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series No. 577, 9 pages. (Printed in
The Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida Proceedings, Vol. 16,
1956)

To create a more favorable environment for private investments in
water control facility it will be necessary to (1) obtain more
quantitative data on the hydrologic cycle,(2) define water rights more
precisely and (3) determine the economic value of water in alterna-
tive uses.

2. CAN WATER BE ALLOCATED BY COMPETITIVE PRICE?, by U. K. McPherson, Fla.
Agr. Ex:p. Sta. Journal Series No. 514, 10 pages. (Printed in Journal
of Farm Economics, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 5, Dec. 1956).

The extent to which competition will be used in pricing water rights
in the future depends upon the ability of people to alter their
social institutions to accomMioateagrowing population and new
technological developments.

3. AN ANALYSIS OF THE TRENDS IN LAND PRICES AND VALUES, by Roy L.
Lassiter and U. K. McPherson, Mimeo Release, Published by the "Central
and Southern Florida Flood Control District," West Palm Beach,
Florida, June 1956, 68 pages.

An analysis of the impact of (a) the demand for land,(b) the supply
of land,(c) technology and (d) the availability and terms of credit
on the price of agricultural land in Palm Beach County, Florida.







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4. METHODS OF COMPENSATING LAND OWNERS FOR DAMAGES ATTRIBUTED TO PUBLIC
CONTROL OF WATER LEVELS: A CASE STUDY OF THE ISLANDS IN LAKE
OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA, by R. L. Lassiter, Jr. and W. K. McPherson, Fla.
Exp. Sta. Journal Series No. 627, Feb. 1953, 7 pages. (Printed in
Land Economics, Feb. 1958, Vol. XXXIV, No. 1).

Three methods are proposed for compensating land owners for damages
incurred from holding lakes at higher than normal water levels.

5. CLEARING LAND FOR DIFFERENT USES, by James R. Anderson, Adon Poli and
Lawrence A. Reuss, Chapter in book entitled Land (The Yearbook of
Agriculture 1958) pp. 409-415.

Information is presented concerning the location, extent, methods and
use characteristics of land clearing operations in Florida and in the
Southeast as a part of the total picture of land clearing in the
United States.

6. AGRICULTURAL LAND PRICES IN PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA, 1940-1955, by
Roy L. Lassiter, Jr. and W. K. McPherson, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Bul. 608, Feb. 1959, 76 pages.

The factors identified as influencing the price of land in Palm Beach
County were (1) changes in the demand for the products of land,
(2) changes in the quantity of land available (3) risk and uncertain-
ty, (4) the availability of credit and (5) technological innovations
and factor substitutions.

7. USE OF FLORIDA LAND: EXPECTED MAJOR CHANGES, by W. K. McPherson,
Economic Leaflet, Vol. XIX, No. 9, Sept. 1960, 4 pages.

A preliminary analysis of the changes taking place in the use of
land based on the data collected in Florida's Inventory of Soil and
Water Conservation Needs.

8. WATER CONSERVATION AND FLORIDA'S GREEN SWAMP, by W. K. McPherson,
Economic Leaflet, Vol XX, No. 11, Nov. 1961, 4 pages.

A broad statement of problems encountered in managing Florida's
water supply and the unique problems encountered in the Green Swamp
Area.

9. FUTURE WATER REQUIREMENTS OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST ENTERPRISES, by
U. K. McPherson, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series No. 1616.
(Published in The Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida, Vol. 22,
Nov. 1962).

In the aggregate the supply of fresh water is ample to supply the
needs of Floridians in the foreseeable future but temporal and lo-
cational differences in the rates of precipitation and evapo-
transpiration will cause temporary surpluses and deficits.




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10. A GUIDE TO RURAL ZONING IN FLORIDA, by R. P. Hill, Agr. Ext. Ser.
Econ. Series 63-2, October 1963, 13 pages.

General information and suggestions are presented to assist local
community leaders in establishing effective land use controls as a
means of guiding growth and development along paths consistent with
community goals. Information is provided on the process of goal
selection and planning, obtaining enabling legislation, the necessary
elements of a comprehensive plan, the adoption of zoning regulations,
and implementing and enforcing land use regulations.

11. RECENT LEGISLATION AFFECTING TAXATION OF AGRICULTURAL LAND, by R. P.
Hill, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 63-8, November 1963, 7 pages.

Into a situation characterized by confusion and controversy for the
past several years, this short paper attempts to clear the air by
setting forth the conditions leading to legislation affecting the
taxation of agricultural land, relating the relevant statutes, re-
viewing the attendant-court cases, and pointing out controversial
areas which have not been tested in the courts.

Public Policy

1. A CRITICAL APPRAISAL OF FAMILY FARMS AS AN OBJECTIVE OF PUBLIC
POLICY, by U. K. McPherson, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series
No. 64, 16 pages. (Printed in Journal of Farm Economics, Vol. XXXIV,
No. 3, August 1952).

An effort is made to identify some of the political, ethical and
economic attributes of the value people achieve by owning and
operating "family farms".

2. PRODUCERS' OPINIONS OF THE 'FLUJ CURED .TOBACCO ACREAGE CONTROL AND
PRICE SUPPORT PROGRAM, by Charles D. Covey, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report
59-11, June 1959, 34 pages.

Presumably tobacco farmers are keenly aware that the acreage control
and price support program directly affects their economic welfare.
This study provided some insight into farmers' evaluation of the
program as well as their understanding of program objectives. Under-
standing of basic economic concepts substantiates the continued en-
dorsement of the program by producers.

3. AN APPROACH TO APPRAISING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ACREAGE CONTROL AND
PRICE SUPPORT PROGRAMS, by Clyde E. Murphree, Proceedings ASAW, 58th
Annual Convention, Feb. 6-3, 1961, Jackson, Miss.

Summarizes methodology used in research project, the results from
which are reported in Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Technical Bulletin 643.





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4. THE INCOME IMPLICATIONS OF ACREAGE CONTROL FOR FLUE-CURED TOBACCO
PRODUCERS, by Levi A. Powell, Sr., Clyde E. Murphree and Charles D.
Covey, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Tech. Bul. 643, Feb 1962, 85 pages.

From a family of cost curves derived from grower cost data, income
transfers were used to demonstrate program achievements. It was
concluded that the real income of growers was more than preserved
during a period when yield increases forced a reduction in allotment
sizes.

5. A CASE FOR PRODUCTION CONTROL PROGRAMS, by Ralph A. Eastwood,
Marketing Workshop Coop. Directors and Managers, UF, June 21, 1962.

This mimeographed speech is the assigned affirmative in a debate
concerning production control programs. Controllership and private
controls are treated in a general way. Programs of local, state and
national governments are outlined. Specific federal programs are
evaluated with respect to direct impacts and to attractiveness to
them.

6. GAME THEORY APPLIED TO A POLICY PROBLEM OF RICE FARMERS, by Max R.
Langham, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 1631. (Printed in
Journal of Farm Economics, Vol. 45, No. 1, Feb. 1963, pp. 151-162.

This paper is an empirical application of the theory of games to an
agricultural policy problem of rice farmers. The paper poses farmers
in a game against the government. The objective of the study was to
determine the position a major farm organization should take in
response to a government offer to liberalize acreage controls on
rice.

7. THE TWO SIDES OF THE SUBSIDY COIN, by 1. K. McPherson, A paper
presented at the 12th Annual Beef Cattle Short Course, Gainesville,
Florida, April 18-20, 1963 and published in The Polled Hereford
World Magazine, July 1963, 3 pages.

Subsidies to agriculture in terms of alternative objectives with
special attention being given the feed grain program.

8. RURAL PLANNING AND ZONING, by C. Dean Covey, Sunshine State Agri-
cultural Research Report, Vol. 9, No. 2, April 1964, 2 pages.

This article is a brief review of the need for and the lack of
adequate land use control authority in rural Florida. The various
effects of unplanned growth on farmers are pointed out and remedial
measures suggested.

9. CONSIDERATIONS FOR NATIONAL LEGISLATION WITH RESPECT TO AGRICULTURE
IN THE UNITED STATES: STRATEGIC STORAGE; FEED GRAINS, WHEAT AND
PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTS; DAIRY, POULTRY AND EGGS, by Ralph A. Eastwood
(the latter three with B. J. Smith), Dept. of Agr. Economics,
January 6, 1965.

This publication was prepared in response to an invitation by Senator
Ellender (D., La.).






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Strategic storage of CCC stockpiles is urged. The complementarity of
feed grains, wheat and protein supplement programming with that for
dairy and poultry is indicated.

Federal procurement regulations and Class I bases in federal orders
are advocated, as are easier enactment of federal milk marketing
orders.

The easing of terms of international trade for poultry and eggs are
urged. Direct production controls for poultry and eggs are expected
to meet with substantial disapproval.

10. PROBLEMS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT INCIDENT TO REGIONAL PLANNING, by C. D.
Covey in: Local Government Problems in Urbanizing Rural Areas, (Ed.)
by F. L. Corty, Southern Land Economics Research Publication No. 4,
Louisiana State University, March 1965, 53 pages.

This paper reviews the general concept of the region in a develop-
mental frame-work and examines some of the major problems facing
local governments in regional planning, Three major problem areas
facing local governments are developed. These areas are (1) archaic
and unstable governmental institutions, (2) financing and (3) the
public concept of planning and the planner.

11. POLICY RESEARCH NEEDS IN THE SOUTH: INTERNATIONAL, by W. W.
McPherson, a paper given at the conference on Price and Income
Policies in U. S. Agriculture, Agriculture Policy Institute, N. C.
State University, April 1965. (Published in Price and Income
Policies, Raleigh, N. C., October 1965, pp. 25-32).

Need for research into the "real" competitive position of the South
vs. low income countries in international markets is emphasized.






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IV. LAND TENURE, RETIREMENT FARMING, LOW-INCOME
AREAS AND PROBLEMS OF OLDER PEOPLE


Land Tenure and Rental Contracts

1. A STUDY IN METHODS OF FARM LAND RENTAL, by D. E. Alleger,
Rural Sociolohy, March 1950, 2 pages.

Data from over 200 field interviews were subjected to Chi Square
tests in respect to farm management supervision. Results indicated
that management roles were more firmly established under cropping
agreements (the "old way") than under share-tenant arrangements
(the "new way"). This suggested that the sharing of contributions
and authority was in a transitional stage beyond the traditional
cropper level.

2. CURRENT FARM LEASING PRACTICES IN FLORIDA, by D. E. Alleger and
Max M. Thorp, Fla. AKgr. Exp. Sta. So. Coop. Series Bul. 13, June 1951,
28 pages.

This bulletin describes various ways that agricultural land is rented
in Florida. Leases were usually vague oral agreements, except in
special-crop areas where cash rent was paid according to written terms.
The most common types of leasing were (1) field leases, (2) cash rent
contracts, both oral and written, (3) share-tenant arrangements and
(4) cropper contracts.

3. RENTAL ARRANGEMENTS ON CROP-SHARE FARMS, (AN ANALYSIS OF CONTRIBUTIONS
AND RETURNS), by D. E. Alleger, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 498,
June 1952, 43 pages.

By means of interview data, variations in rental arrangements on
crop-share farms were examined, together with the sharing of contri-
butions and returns by landlords and tenants. Crop-share arrange-
ments were oral and on an annual 50-50 crop-share basis, and crop-share
tenants earned higher returns than croppers. Landlord returns were
higher with cropper arrangements on tobacco farms, and with tenants on
peanut farms. In general 50-50 crop-share leasing was fair to both
the cropper and the tenant, according to their views of fairness.

4. FLORIDA FIELD LEASE GUIDE, by Daniel E. Alleger, C. M. Hampson and
Harold H. Ellis, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-79, May 1955, 8 pages.

The guide points out the importance of having a written leasing
agreement which clearly names the parties to the lease, the descrip-
tion of property, the term of lease, rental terms, special provisions,
and wisdom of signing, acknowledging and recording. A sample of a
field lease is shown.






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IV. LAND TENURE, RETIREMENT FARMING, LOW-INCOME
AREAS AND PROBLEMS OF OLDER PEOPLE


Land Tenure and Rental Contracts

1. A STUDY IN METHODS OF FARM LAND RENTAL, by D. E. Alleger,
Rural Sociolohy, March 1950, 2 pages.

Data from over 200 field interviews were subjected to Chi Square
tests in respect to farm management supervision. Results indicated
that management roles were more firmly established under cropping
agreements (the "old way") than under share-tenant arrangements
(the "new way"). This suggested that the sharing of contributions
and authority was in a transitional stage beyond the traditional
cropper level.

2. CURRENT FARM LEASING PRACTICES IN FLORIDA, by D. E. Alleger and
Max M. Thorp, Fla. AKgr. Exp. Sta. So. Coop. Series Bul. 13, June 1951,
28 pages.

This bulletin describes various ways that agricultural land is rented
in Florida. Leases were usually vague oral agreements, except in
special-crop areas where cash rent was paid according to written terms.
The most common types of leasing were (1) field leases, (2) cash rent
contracts, both oral and written, (3) share-tenant arrangements and
(4) cropper contracts.

3. RENTAL ARRANGEMENTS ON CROP-SHARE FARMS, (AN ANALYSIS OF CONTRIBUTIONS
AND RETURNS), by D. E. Alleger, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 498,
June 1952, 43 pages.

By means of interview data, variations in rental arrangements on
crop-share farms were examined, together with the sharing of contri-
butions and returns by landlords and tenants. Crop-share arrange-
ments were oral and on an annual 50-50 crop-share basis, and crop-share
tenants earned higher returns than croppers. Landlord returns were
higher with cropper arrangements on tobacco farms, and with tenants on
peanut farms. In general 50-50 crop-share leasing was fair to both
the cropper and the tenant, according to their views of fairness.

4. FLORIDA FIELD LEASE GUIDE, by Daniel E. Alleger, C. M. Hampson and
Harold H. Ellis, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-79, May 1955, 8 pages.

The guide points out the importance of having a written leasing
agreement which clearly names the parties to the lease, the descrip-
tion of property, the term of lease, rental terms, special provisions,
and wisdom of signing, acknowledging and recording. A sample of a
field lease is shown.






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5. FLORIDA CASH RENT FARM LEASE GUIDE, by Daniel E. Alleger,
Charles M. Hampson and Harold H. Ellis, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-80,
May 1955, 10 pages.

The cash rent guide stresses the need for a clear understanding of
all terms, including soil conservation and capital improvements,
arbitration, and similar consideration. A sample of a completed
lease is included.

6. FLORIDA SHARE-TENANT LEASE GUIDE, by D. E. Alleger, C. M. Hampson
and Harold H. Ellis, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-81, May 1955, 19 pages.

The lease guide includes a check list of important points to consider
in drawing up a share-tenant agreement, and how to show the contribu-
tions of both landlord and tenant. A sample lease is included.

7. FLORIDA SHARECROPPING AGREEMENT GUIDE, by Daniel E. Alleger,
Charles M. Hampson and Harold H. Ellis, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Cir.
S-82, May 1955, 18 pages.

The lease guide includes a check list of important points to consider
in drawing up a sharecropper agreement, and how to show the contribu-
tions of both landlord and tenant. A sample lease is included.

8. THE LAWS OF FARM TENANCY AND SHARECROPPING IN FLORIDA, by
J. R. Greenman and James J. English, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 586,
June 1957, 48 pages.

The legal nature of different kinds of contractual arrangements
between landowners and those who cultivate the land are described.
This includes tenancy, sharecropping, mixed tenancy-sharecropping,
tenancy in common and partnership arrangements. A detailed descrip-
tion is given of the legal rights of landlords, tenants, employers
under a sharecropping arrangements, and sharecroppers.


Retirement Farming

1. RETIREMENT FARMING IN DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA, Living in the Later Years,
by D. E. Alleger, of Article Gerontology Proceedings, University
of Florida Press, 1952, pp. 87-89.
This is a panel contribution to finances for living in later years.
In the Jacksonville area 66 percent of the respondents voluntarily
resorted to rural living for one reason or another, and nearly half
the male family heads were permanently disabled. Most of the others,
as did the disabled, depended upon farming for self-sufficiency income.

2. AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES OF INDUSTRIAL WORKERS AND RETIREES (A SURVEY
OF SMALL AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF FLORIDA), by
D. E. Alleger, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 528, October 1953,
43 pages.

A survey of the Jacksonville area was conducted to determine if
part-time farming was of economic advantage to the participating
families. Among the economic rewards recorded was that part-time
farming reduced living costs of the participants and sometimes pro-




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vided moderate cash returns in addition. Because of the growth of
Jacksonville, rising equities in real estate were substantial rewards.
Non-economic values were the subjective satisfactions in country
living and the opportunities that small-scale agricultural enter-
prises offered for the non-regulated use of technological leisure.

3. THE ROLE OF AGRICULTURE IN RETIREMENT: A STUDY IN FIVE FLORIDA
COUNTIES, by D. E. Alleger, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series No. 373,
June 1955, 9 pages.

Conclusions presented were that small-scale farming or gardening are
means whereby retirees can better their financial situations and/or
by means of it engage in self-regulated physical activity. One half
to one acre of land in urban suburbs or small villages, where
personal adjustment of older people seems best achieved, offered
greater assurance than farms for adjustment.

4. RETIREMENT FARMERS, by D. E. Alleger, The All Florida Weekly Magazine,
Oct. 9, 1955.

This article, a Sunday supplement release, described several success-
ful retirement situations facilitated by agricultural income.

5. THE FARM'S CONTRIBUTION TO RETIREMENT, by D. E. Alleger, Published in
Aging, A Current Appraisal, Irving L. Webber (Ed.), University of
Florida Press, 1956, pp. 152-166.

The conclusion of the presentation was that the role of the villages
and urban suburbs for scale scale retirement farming should be
thoroughly explored. In villages or suburbs companionship, social
activities and public transportation eases the rigors of old age.
Here too, medical services are more readily and less expensively
obtained.

6. RURAL FARM RETIREMENT (STUDY OF RURAL RETIREMENT IN FIVE COUNTIES),
by D. E. Alleger, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bulletin 583, February 1957,
51 pages.

This report examined the possibilities of retirement (income subsidy)
farming for retirees with limited financial resources. It was noted
that the factors which affected net farm returns of retirement
farmers were closely interrelated. Retirement income and age were
inversely related to farm income, and gardening represented the
maximum efforts of most. A retiree's income from farming was just
enough to bridge the gap between retirement income and cash require-
ments. A positive conclusion reached was that the elderly should not
retire to isolated homesteads.

7. RETIRING ON A SMALL FARM, by D. E. Alleger, Sunshine State Agricul-
tural Research Report, Vol. 8, No. 3, July 1963, 1.5 pages.

Retirement farming provides the physical therapy demanded by work
oriented oldsters. The article points out some advantages of retire-
ment farming but cautions against over optimism and against rural
isolation.






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Low-Income Areas and Problems of Older People

1. SOCIAL SECURITY FOR FARM FAMILIES, by C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser.
Econ. Series 55-4, Nov. 1955, 24 pages.

A simplified description of new Social Security Regulations that are
applicable to farm families. An explanation of the farmers' respon-
sibilities and opportunities under social security and the procedures
involved. Questions and answers on social security that would con-
cern farmers and farm families.

2. FAMILY SURVEY FOR RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, by
C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 58-3, March 1958, 42 pages.

A report of a family survey in Washington County, Florida. A tabular
analysis of occupations, income levels, and attitudes of rural
families, etc. A survey conducted as the initial phase of the rural
development program in Washington County.

3. SUWANNEE COUNTY FAMILY SURVEY FOR RURAL DEVELOPMENT, by C. C. Moxley,
Agr. Ext. Ser. Econ. Series 58-4, April 1958, 38 pages.

Report of a comprehensive survey of Suwannee County, families'
incomes, occupations and attitudes, etc. A tabular analysis of the
data collected during this survey which was conducted as the initial
phase of the rural development program.

4. SOURCES AND LEVEL OF INCOME RURAL HOUSEHOLDS OF NORTH AND WEST
FLORIDA, 1956, K. M. Gilbraith and L. A. Reuss, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 59-4, October 1958, 175 pages.

Data are presented concerning income levels and source of income
of 730 rural families in 20 counties in North and West Florida in
1956. Family income is shown by type and size of farm, tenure, value
of farm assets, net worth, occupation, age, race and level of educa-
tion.

5. RESOURCE CHARACTERISTICS AND UTILIZATION AND LEVEL OF LIVING ITEMS,
RURAL HOUSEHOLDS, NORTH AND WEST FLORIDA, 1956, by L. A. Reuss and
K. M. Gilbraith, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report No. 60-11, March 1960,
130 pages.

Data are presented concerning the characteristics and utilization of
resources of 730 rural households in North and West Florida in 1956.
Human resources are described in terms of age, sex, race, education,
family type and employment status. Capital resources are described.
Resource levels are related to income levels.

6. CONTINUUM OF PURPOSE AMONG LOW-INCOME FARMERS, by D. E. Alleger,
Paper given at the annual meeting Southern Agricultural Workers,
February 1961.

The hypothesis presented was that among homogeneous groupings of
white populations, the low-income farm problem is routed in a







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low-level of group purpose, and that this concept of achievement is
transferred from one generation to another as are folkways and mores.
Data were drawn from low-income areas of West Florida to support the
hypothesis.

7. BASIC STEPS IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT, by C. C. Moxley, Agr. Ext. Ser.
Econ. Series 61-19, Nov. 1961, 9 pages.

A guide for use by county extension agents and other county agricul-
tural leaders involved in resource development programs. A descrip-
tion of methodology useful in motivating and activating local re-
source development groups. An outline on the methods useful in
inventorying local resources, delineating problems, and implementing
resource development programs through group action.

8. ANOMIA: A BASIS FOR INTERPRETING ATTITUDES IN LOW-INCOME FARM AREAS,
by D. E. Alleger, Paper given at annual meeting of Association of
Southern Agricultural Workers, Jacksonville, Florida, February 1962.

Data presented were developed in West Florida by personal interview.
They related to abject depression of individuals as measured by the
Srole Scale, an attitudinal response instrument developed by
Dr. Leo Srole, a medical psychiatrist. This paper presented the
first demonstrated evidence of anomie -- the sociological aspect of
anomia -- in the low-income areas of rural Florida, and created
considerable interest. Additional analyses have since been carried
out.

9. SOME RETIREMENT CONSIDERATIONS OF FLORIDA'S RURAL AGED, Retirement
Income of-the Aging, by D. E. Alleger, Hearings before the Sub-
committee on Retirement, U. S. Senate, 87th Congress, 1st. Session,
Sarasota, November 8, 1961, Washington, 1962, pp. 412-416.

Contains an outline of the income and adjustment problems confronting
rural retirees. Suggests that all Old Age Assistance recipients be
placed under Social Security (1) to reduce costs of operation and
administration, (2) to thaw the freeze on use and transfer of farm
land, and (3) to encourage migration of the rural elderly to suburban
areas or villages.

10. INCOME, RESOURCES, AND ADJUSTMENT POTENTIALS AMONG RURAL FAMILIES IN
NORTH AND WEST FLORIDA, by L. A. Reuss and K. M. Gilbraith, Fla.
Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 649, Dec. 1962, 54 pages.

Information obtained in a survey of 730 rural families in North and
West Florida is summarized, analyzed and inferences drawn concerning
the adjustment potentials of low-income rural families, based on
conditions in 1956.

11. OLDER PEOPLE AND THEIR PROBLEMS, A Place To Live, by D. E. Alleger,
Article, 1963 Yearbook of Agriculture U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture, pp. 45-46.






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Census and research data were used to outline the changing age profile
in the United States. In addition the article dealt with some of
the issues of income, housing, medical care and personal problems of
the elderly.

12. SOCIAL CHANGE AND AGING IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, D. E. Alleger,
(Ed.) Book, University of Florida Press, 1964.

The problems of aging are related to the unprecedented speed,
variety and magnitude of social and economic changes of the twentieth
century. Attention is focused upon broadened horizons for retirement,
planning for retirement and personal adjustment of older persons, and
volunteer services by and for the aged.

13. ANOMIA AMONG THE AGED, by D. E. Alleger in Social Change and Aging
in the Twentieth Century, D. E. Alleger, (Ed.) Univ. of Fla. Press,
1964, pp. 70-77.

The presentation is based upon scaled attitude data obtained in a
field survey in eight southern states during 1960-1961. These data
revealed the existence of a psychological condition that bears upon
personal adjustment. This condition is called anomia. The incidence
of anomia suggests that older rural people because of a changing
social milieu have lost a feeling of belonging which leaves them in
a distressed state of mind.

Other

1. IMPACT OF RURAL POPULATION CHANGES ON THE RURAL ECONOMY OF THE SOUTH,
by D. E. Alleger Paper read at the Association of Southern Agricul-
tural Workers, Biloxi, Miss., Feb. 1950.

In this paper two questions were asked, "Will the efficiency of in-
tensive mechanization and the efficiency of large-scale operation
uproot the traditional family farm? What is to be the role of
the individual in the years ahead?" The paper outlined population
and farm changes in the South, and indicated that industrial, dis-
tributive and service trades would have to be greatly expanded to
absorb farmers and farm workers who would likely be displaced by
approaching technological innovations.

2. DISTRIBUTION OF IMMIGRANTS IN FLORIDA, by D. E. Alleger, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 52-4, May 1952, 16 pages.

This paper is incorrectly titled. It deals with in-migrants to
Florida, e.g. people from other states who settled in Florida. Using
State and Federal Census data, tables depict the differential and
changing patterns of population growth in four Florida areas, namely
West, North, Central and South Florida, and by geographical region
of origin.






-68-

3. RURAL AREAS IN TRANSITION, by Daniel E. Alleger, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Bulletin 671, May 1964, 36 pages.

The report surveys the impact of off-farm employment on the use of
agricultural and human resources by comparing a rural farm county
with one in course of industrialization. Data presented indicated
that agricultural income per farm rose or fell with increases and
declines in industrial income, that rural young people were prone
to migrate from farm areas to places of nonfarm employment opportu-
nity, and that the residual rural populations were heavily composed
of the aging and the aged whose skills and educational levels were
noncompetitive on the labor market.







-69-


V. PUBLICATIONS DEALING WITH TOPICS IN COUNTRIES
OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES


1. ORGANIZATION Y OPERATION DE FINCAS DE CANA,,by D. E..Allcger:.
and J. Francisco Montoya, Bol. Tec. No. 20, 1957, 39 pages.

This bulletin is one segment of a farm management study in Costa Rica
in which the Florida/Costa Rica ICA contract participated. The 1954
annual operation of 68 small-scale sugar cane farms were analyzed.
Among the recommendations that evolved were that farmers should keep
farm accounts, devote more emphasis to complementary crops, particu-
larly those suitable to small farms, and to more effectively use
family labor to increase farm income, because many farms supported
excessive populations. The ideal conditions, it was viewed, was that
the systems of cultivations should be related to the appropriate
ecological use of the land.

2. SELLING CATTLE IN COSTA RICA BY DIRECT BARGAINING, by D. E. Alleger
and Paulino Gutierrez, STICA, San Jose, Costa Rica, 1958, 10 pages.

Data were compiled from sales operations on the Alajuela Livestock
Market. The paper presents the marketing procedures followed, to-
gether with average sales prices for cows, steers, bulls and oxen,
the animal classifications used on the market. Steers and oxen,
when used for beef, brought higher prices than cows or bulls.

3. THE CATTLE SITUATION IN COSTA RICA, by D. E. Alleger, STICA,
San Jose, Costa Rica, 1958, 16 pages...: (Spanish Text published
serially in San Jose, Costa Rica newspaper, El Diario).

This paper was developed from Costa Rican Census data. It tabulates
and describes the cattle and pasture situations by provinces.

4. AGRICULTURAL POLICY PLANNING FOR GUATEMALA, by D. E. Alleger, Report
to Sr. Enrique Garcia Salas, Guatemalan Minister of Agriculture, 1958,
5 pages.

This report was made in 1958 to the Minister of Agriculture of
Guatemala. It resulted from his request that I visit Guatemala
officially. The report suggests that Central America be viewed as
one geographical unit rather than a nation so that the theory of
comparative advantage might apply, that agricultural research could
be conducted without day to day political regulation, that studies
include input-output relationships, that grades and standards be
established and that some type of agricultural land-use map be de-
veloped for Guatemala.

5. PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL RESOURCE ADJUSTMENTS, by D. E. Alleger,
STICA, San Jose, Costa Rica, Mimeograph Report, 1958, 9 pages.

The basic economic problem facing Costa Rica is in bringing a
rapidly expanding population and limited land resources into balance.
Resource adjustment problems, to cite a few, center around net





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reproductive rates, population distribution, economic opportunities,
levels of living, expansion in agricultural productivity and in ways
to equate the elements of this matrix in such a manner that consis-
tent economic growth is probable.

6. AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS IN NATIONAL PLANNING, by D. E. Alleger,
After-dinner address to International Businessmen's Club, San Jose,
Costa Rica, 1959.

The paper explored the inherent difficulties of trying to develop
reliable agricultural statistics in underdeveloped nations. It
also stressed the need for reliable historical and current data to
effectively plan for economic development.

7. STUDIO ECONOMIC DE LA PRODUCTION Y DEL MERCADO DE PAPAS EN COSTA
RICO, by R. E. L. Greene,(Ministerio De Agricultura E Industrias)
En Cooperacion don Servicio Tecnico Interamericano de Cooperacion
Agricola (STICA). Boletin Tecnico No. 29, 1959, 32 pages.

This report gives the results of a general survey of the potato
industry in Costa Rica to identify some of the problems and adjust-
ments needed to improve the efficiency of production and the market-
ing system. Data are presented on production practices and cost of
producing.ipotatoes in the Cartago area. Marketing practices and
method of selling potatoes are described. Problems of production and
marketing are discussed. General recommendations are given for con-
sideration in developing a program of work to improve the potato
situation.

8. FLORIDA'S FRIENDSHIP AMBASSADORS TO COSTA RICA UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA EXTENDS 15 YEARS OF SERVICE TO CENTRAL AMERICAN COUNTRY, by
D. E. Alleger, Sunshine State Research Report, Vol. 5, No. 4,
October 1960.

The article is a brief resume of the nature of the Florida/Costa Rica
ICA Contract, 1954-1960, the personnel assignments, and the general
nature of their work assignments.

9. EJEMPLO DE VERACION ER LOS PRECIOUS DE LA PAPA,MERCADO DE, SAN JOSE.*'
NOVIEMBRE DE 1958 A OCTUBRE DE 1959, by R. E. L. Greene and
Gregorio Alfaro, Servicio Tecnico Interamericano de Cooperacion
Agricola, Ministerio de Agriltura E Industrias STICA, Informacion
Tecnica No. 11, Dec. de 1960, 37 pages.

Reports the results of a study in Costa Rica to collect data on
season variation in supplies and prices of potatoes at wholesale and
retail and volume of sales by cooperating wholesalers and retailers.
Weekly data were collected from November 3, 1958 to October 17, 1959.
Data are also presented on price spreads between wholesale and retail
prices.

10. THE DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC RESEARCH IN COSTA RICA, by
D. E. Alleger, Termination Report, Univ. of Fla. Costa Rica Contract,
STICA, San Jose, Costa Rica, 1960.






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This was a termination report under the 1954-1960 Florida/Costa Rica
Contract under ICA sponsorship. It reviewed accomplishments, obser-
vations of areas needing attention, and suggested research. It has
been translated into Spanish, a copy of which has been placed in the
national library in San Jose.

11. FERTILE LANDS OF FRIENDSHIP, D. E. Alleger, (Ed.) University of
Florida Press, 1962.
D. E. Alleger, Introduction pp. 1-6; Agricultural Economics, pp. 26-50;
The Cattle Situation, pp. 102-115.
W. K. McPherson, Land Use problems in the Sugar Industry, pp. 51-64.
R. E. L. Greene, Irish Potatoes: Production and Marketing Problems,
pp. 65-87.
L. A. Reuss, Land Tenure and Type and Size of Farm. pp. 88-101.

A symposium of 18 University of Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station personnel who served tours of duty in Costa Rica under a
University of Florida/ICA contract, 1954-1960. The subject matter
covered treats of observation on agricultural economics, cattle
production, pasture development, soils, virus disease and Mediter-
ranean Fruit Fly problems with which the writers were associated.

12. AGRARIAN REFORM IN LATIN AMERICA, by D. E. Alleger, Paper presented
at a meeting of the Rural Sociology Society, San Fernando Valley
State College, California, 1963, 13 pages.

The current ideological struggle over mind, man, and land is one of
the most dramatic international contests of all world history. In
setting goals for agrarian reform,U. S. Policy-makers premised their
concepts of it upon the private ownership patterns. To numerous
Latin Americans, whose cultural traditions support a fusion of ancient
Iberian and American Indian land tenure systems as well as private
ownership, other approaches also seemed warranted,

13. LA REFORMA AGRARIA EN LATINA, by D. E. Alleger, Published in Revista
Interamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Pan American Union, 1965,
Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 32-46.

The paper, Agrarian Reform in Latin America, deals with some of the
problems and conflicts of agrarian reform in Latin America. It cites
the risks involved in breaking up large holdings, simply because of
size. It infers that in Latin America a multi-proned approach to
agrarian reform is needed social, economic and political.






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VI. MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICAL SUMMARIES

Publications Dealing with Crop and Livestock Forecasting


1. CITRUS TREE LOSS SURVEY IN TWELVE NORTHERLY COUNTIES OF FLORIDA,
by B. W, Kelly, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-4, Nov. 1959, 6 pages.

A sample survey of citrus groves was conducted to estimate the
reduction in bearing surface and tree numbers resulting from the
1957-58 freeze in 12 counties of the northern edge of the citrus
belt. Seven of the 12 counties included in the survey were also
included in a route survey conducted by the Division of Plant
Industry to estimate tree losses. Comparisons of estimates de-
rived from the two survey methods are given.

2. SIZE OF FRUIT AND DROPPAGE RATES INFLUENCE TOTAL CITRUS PRODUC-
TION, by Roy G. Stout, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report No. 62-2, July
1961, 19 pages.

A sample of oranges, grapefruit and tangerines was enumerated
beginning on October 1 and extending to harvest in each of seven
years. Fruit were measured and counted each month, and growth
rates and droppage rates were computed. Fruit volume in cubic
inches was computed and related to the number of fruit required
to fill a 90 pound field box. The effect of both growth rates
and droppage rates on total volume of fruit produced was evalu-
ated.

3. SOME POSSIBLE ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF A SEVERE OUTBREAK OF
TRISTEZA TO THE FLORIDA ORANGE INDUSTRY, by Roy G. Stout, Cecil
N. Smith, Wilson B. Riggan and Chen Tuan Li, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Journal Series 1568, Nov. 1962, 5 pages.

A discussion of the possible economic losses in orange produc-
tion in Florida if a severe outbreak of tristeza was2 to occur.

4. REPORTING FLORIDA CUT FLOWER SHIPMENTS, by Elmo F. Scarborough
and Cecil N. Smith, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 1745, Nov.
1963, 8 pages. (Printed in the Proceedings of the Fla. State
HorticulturalSociety, Vol. 76).

A paper discussing reporting procedures for Florida cut flower
shipments from 1959 to 1963. Problems, weaknesses, areas of
origin and distribution for Florida flowers and other attributes
of shipment data are also discussed.

5. FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT AND TREE LOSSES FROM THE DECEMBER 1962 FREEZE,
by Roy G. Stout, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-7, Jan. 1964, 34
pages.

This report presents estimates of the amount of citrus fruit lost
and damaged and estimates of citrus tree losses and damage result-
ing from the 1962 Florida freeze. The effects of the freeze on
fruit growth patterns, droppage patterns, and juice yields are
evaluated. The study-was based on data obtained in special and
routine surveys of the Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting Service.






-72-


VI. MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICAL SUMMARIES

Publications Dealing with Crop and Livestock Forecasting


1. CITRUS TREE LOSS SURVEY IN TWELVE NORTHERLY COUNTIES OF FLORIDA,
by B. W, Kelly, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-4, Nov. 1959, 6 pages.

A sample survey of citrus groves was conducted to estimate the
reduction in bearing surface and tree numbers resulting from the
1957-58 freeze in 12 counties of the northern edge of the citrus
belt. Seven of the 12 counties included in the survey were also
included in a route survey conducted by the Division of Plant
Industry to estimate tree losses. Comparisons of estimates de-
rived from the two survey methods are given.

2. SIZE OF FRUIT AND DROPPAGE RATES INFLUENCE TOTAL CITRUS PRODUC-
TION, by Roy G. Stout, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report No. 62-2, July
1961, 19 pages.

A sample of oranges, grapefruit and tangerines was enumerated
beginning on October 1 and extending to harvest in each of seven
years. Fruit were measured and counted each month, and growth
rates and droppage rates were computed. Fruit volume in cubic
inches was computed and related to the number of fruit required
to fill a 90 pound field box. The effect of both growth rates
and droppage rates on total volume of fruit produced was evalu-
ated.

3. SOME POSSIBLE ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF A SEVERE OUTBREAK OF
TRISTEZA TO THE FLORIDA ORANGE INDUSTRY, by Roy G. Stout, Cecil
N. Smith, Wilson B. Riggan and Chen Tuan Li, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Journal Series 1568, Nov. 1962, 5 pages.

A discussion of the possible economic losses in orange produc-
tion in Florida if a severe outbreak of tristeza was2 to occur.

4. REPORTING FLORIDA CUT FLOWER SHIPMENTS, by Elmo F. Scarborough
and Cecil N. Smith, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Journal Series 1745, Nov.
1963, 8 pages. (Printed in the Proceedings of the Fla. State
HorticulturalSociety, Vol. 76).

A paper discussing reporting procedures for Florida cut flower
shipments from 1959 to 1963. Problems, weaknesses, areas of
origin and distribution for Florida flowers and other attributes
of shipment data are also discussed.

5. FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT AND TREE LOSSES FROM THE DECEMBER 1962 FREEZE,
by Roy G. Stout, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-7, Jan. 1964, 34
pages.

This report presents estimates of the amount of citrus fruit lost
and damaged and estimates of citrus tree losses and damage result-
ing from the 1962 Florida freeze. The effects of the freeze on
fruit growth patterns, droppage patterns, and juice yields are
evaluated. The study-was based on data obtained in special and
routine surveys of the Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting Service.






-73-


6. SPECIFIC GRAVITY AS A MEANS OF ESTIMATING JUICE YIELDS OF FREEZE
DAMAGED VALENCIA ORANGES, by Roy G. Stout, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Cir. S-150, Mar. 1964, 11 pages.

Specific gravity tests are described which allow determinations
of orange juice yields without extracting juice from the fruit.
Samples of fruit were evaluated at two-week intervals from
January 1 through March 15, 1963 to assess the reductions in
juice yield resulting from the December 1962 freeze. Regression
analysis was used to associate the specific gravity measurements
with the pounds of juice contained in a 90 pound box of Valencia
oranges.

7. SOME FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO YEAR-TO-YEAR VARIATIONS IN FLORIDA
ORANGE PRODUCTION, by Roy G. Stout and J. W. Todd, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report EC 64-12, June 1964, 31 pages.

Multiple linear regression techniques are used to evaluate the in-
fluence of selected factors on year-to-year variations in Florida
orange production. The factors considered are those used in the
Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting Service forecasting formula
and include tree numbers, number of fruit per tree, fruit size,
and rate of fruit drop.

8. A CONTINUING SURVEY FOR ESTIMATING CURRENT NUMBER OF FLORIDA
CITRUS TREES, by Roy G. Stout and J. W. Todd, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report EC 64-13, June 1964, 20 pages.

Florida citrus tree numbers are estimated for 1961, 1962, and
1963 based on an annual 20 percent sample of all citrus and po-
tential citrus land sections. The sampling procedure was de-
veloped as an alternative to conducting a periodic census to de-
termine citrus tree numbers. The statistical reliability of the
sample estimates is computed and suggests a high degree of relia-
bility for the total number of trees in the state.




-74-


Statistics on Trends in Production Shipments, Prices,
Income, etc., for Selected
Enterprises or Items


1. a. MONTHLY RAIL AND TRUCK UNLOADS OF CELERY, IRISH POTATOES
AND TOMATOES ON 16 TERMINAL MARKETS, 1950-51 SEASON, by
Donald L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 51-17, September
1951, 28 pages.

b. MONTHLY RAIL AND TRUCK UNLOADS OF CELERY, IRISH POTATOES
AND TOMATOES ON 16 TERMINAL MARKETS, 1951-52 SEASON, by
Donald L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 5Z-7, September
1952, 83 pages.

c. MONTHLY RAIL AND TRUCK UNLOADS OF CELERY, IRISH POTATOES
AND TOMATOES ON 16 TERMINAL MARKETS, 1952-53 SEASON, by
Donald L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 54-6, September
1953, 82 pages.

A compilation of rail and truck unloads of the three vege-
tables in 16 major markets by months and states of origin.

2. INDEX OF VOLUME OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES PRODUCED IN FLORIDA,
1910-1954, by A. H. Spurlock, Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-88,
September 1955, 39 pages.

Index numbers of production of important commodities and groups of
commodities 1910-1954. The base period used was 1935-39. All
products are totaled but no attempts were made to compute net farm
output. Contains indexes of acreages, livestock units and yields per
unit.
3. a. STATISTICS ON PRODUCTION SHIPMENTS AND PRICES OF FLORIDA
POTATOES, by R. E. L. Greene and W. E. Black, Agr. Econ. Mimeo
Report 56-3, November 1955, 31 pages.

b. STATISTICS ON PRODUCTION, SHIPMENTS AND PRICES OF FLORIDA "
IRISH POTATOES, by D. L. Brooke and R. E. L. Greene, Agr.
Econ. Mimeo Report 59-8, February 1959, 38 pages.

c. STATISTICS ON PRODUCTION, SHIPMENTS AND PRICES OF FLORIDA
IRISH POT4TOESLby.D.i L. Brooke and.R.-E. L. Greene,.Agr.
Econ. Himeo Report 62-13, April 1962, 38 pages.

A summary of statistical data on acres, yield and production
of Irish potatoes, relative trends in the production of po-
tatoes in the United States and Florida, seasonal price pat-
terns for Florida potatoes and competition of shipments from
Florida with shipments from late crop areas and also with
early shipments of new crop potatoes.

4. STATISTICS ON PRODUCTION, SHIPMENTS AND PRICES OF FLORIDA CUCUMBERS,
by Donald L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 56-9, April 1956,
37 pages.

Presents selected statistical data relating to the production and
marketing of cucumbers for fresh market including trends in acreages
planted, production marketed, prices received and competition
x:iring the Florida season.





-75-


5. RECENT TRENDS IN NUMBER, SIZE, TYPE AND VALUE OF FARMS IN FLORIDA,
(Based on the Census of Agriculture), by L. A. Reuss, Agr. Econ.
Mimeo Report 56-8, June 1956, 45 pages.

Data from the preliminary releases of the Census of Agriculture
1954 and from prior census reports are presented concerning farms
in Florida and in the four census districts in the state. Trends
are shown in number, land area, cropland, average size, type,
economic class and real property values of farms for the period
1940-54.

6. STATISTICS ON PRODUCTION, SHIPMENTS AND PRICES OF FLORIDA WATER-
MELONS WITH SUPPLEMENTAL DATA FOR GEORGIA AND SOUTH CAROLINA, by
Donald L. Brooke, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 57-1, August 1956, 42
pages.

A compilation of selected statistical data relating to the pro-
duction and marketing of watermelons including trends in acreage,
production and prices. Costs of production and harvesting, and
returns to growers in Florida are shown also for the period 1950
to 1955.

7. CHANGE AND GROWTH IN FLORIDA AGRICULTURE, by C. C. Moxley,
Economic Leaflet, Vol. XV, No. 8, August 1956, 4 pages.

A summary of the agricultural census of 1954 for Florida. An
analysis of trends and changes reflected by the census data and
implications of these changes.

8. FLORIDA'S FLOWER AND NURSERY BUSINESS, by Cecil N. Smith,
Economic Leaflet, Vol. XV, No. 12, December 1956, 4 pages.

A paper on the size and growth of Florida's flower and nursery
industry based upon data from the Special Census of Horticultural
Specialties of 1950 and the 1954 Census of Agriculture. Growth
factors, employment of labor, sizes of firms, marketing and
transportation and major industry divisions are discussed.

9. FLORIDA VEGETABLES, 1958-59, Committee, Ext. Ser. Mimeo Report,
September, 1958, 17 pages.

Discussion of probable demand for Florida vegetables during the
1958-59 season. Statistics for principal vegetable crops showing
acreage, yield per acre, total production and production of value
and price per unit; average for the 1952-53 1956-57 seasons,
preliminary estimates for the 1957-58 season and suggested acreage
and production for the 1958-59 season. Also, statistics on ship-
ments, terminal supplies, and FOB prices averaged daily by weeks
for the 1956-57 and 1957-58 seasons.

10. FLORIDA OUTLOOK INFORMATION: VEGETABLES OUTLOOK AND ACREAGE
MARKETING GUIDES FOR 1959-60 SEASON, Committee, Agr. Ext. Ser.
Mimeo Report, July 1959, 36 pages.





-76-


Statement of general outlook during the 1959-60 season. Statistics
for principal vegetable crops showing acreage, yield per acre,
total production, production marketed and price per unit for fresh
and process; average for the 1952-53 1956-57 seasons, prelimi-
nary estimates for the 1958-59 season and suggested acreage and
production for the 1959-60 season. Also statistics on vegetable
unloads in 38 major U. S. cities by origin and on shipments,
terminal supplies and FOB prices averaged daily by weeks for the
1958-59 season.

11. FLORIDA'S SUGAR INDUSTRY, by L. A. Reuss, Econ. Leaflet, Vol. XX,
No. 3, March 1961, 4 pages.

The economics of sugar cane production in Florida is reviewed and
analyzed in the framework of world and national historic patterns
with special emphasis upon the effects of the dramatic cut-off of
Cuban sugar quotas in 1960.

12. THE POTATO INDUSTRY IN THE SOUTHEAST, by R. E. L. Greene Talk
given at the Eleventh Annual Potato Utilization Conference,
Gainesville, Florida, May 1, 1961.

The discussion of the potato industry in the Southeast was limited
to five states Florida, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina
and Virginia. The talk covered the following points for the five
states: (1) Location of production areas and principal varieties
grown; (2) Trends in acreage, yield per acre and production of
potatoes in each state; (3) Importance of potatoes to the
agricultural economy of the various states; (4) Recent changes
in harvesting, packing and marketing practices in the various
areas; and (5) Brief description of the problems facing the
potato industry in the southeast.

13. INDEX NUMBERS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA, 1910-1960,
by A. H. Spurlock, Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-3, July 1961,
34 pages.

Indexes of gross farm production of each important crop and live-
stock product, and total farm output, 1910-1954. The base period
for price-weights and for production was 1947-49. Also contains
indexes of crop acreages, livestock units and yields of each.

14. FARMING IN FLORIDA PAYS-CASH FARM EARNINGS ECLIPSE 48 STATES, by
Cecil N. Smith and R. E. L. Greene, Sunshine State Agricultural
Research Report, Vol. 7, No. 1, Jan. 1962, 2 pages.

A discussion of cash receipts from marketing received by Florida
farmers showing trends by five year periods from 1925-29 to
1955-59 and annual data for 1958, 1959 and 1960. The proportion
that various groups of products was of total receipts is shown
for the five year period 1955-59 and annually for 1959 and 1960.

15. FLORIDA AGRIBUSINESS Compiled and written by E. W. Cake,
State Department of Agriculture Booklet, 24 pages. First Edition,
January 1962, Second Edition (revised), January 1963, Third
Edition (revised), December 1965.





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A summary is presented for each of the principal crops or groups
of crops in Florida as to their economic importance, their growth
through the years, and the principal counties or areas where they
are grown. The economic data is presented in terms of farm value,
in-state value, and retail value wherever:sold. Projections are
also made for 1980.

16. CHANGES IN THE CHARACTERISTICS OF FARMS AND IN FARM INCOME IN
FLORIDA COUNTIES 1954-1959, by W. K. McPherson, Fla. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Journal Series, 1474, June 1962, 10 pages.

Emphasis is placed on the changes that are taking place on
(a) six classes of commerical farms, (b) don-commercial farms
and (c) farms of different sizes.

17. THE SWEET CORN INDUSTRY, 1953-1962, by Donald L. Brooke, Agr.
Econ. Mimeo Report 63-4, December 1962, 23 pages.

Presents data on the production, harvesting and marketing of
Florida sweet corn during the ten-year period (1953-62) prior to
the approval of a State Marketing Agreement. It supersedes data
in Agricultural Economics Mimeo Report 60-8 (1960).

18. POPULATION CHANGES AND TRENDS, by D. E. Alleger, Sunshine State
Agricultural Research Report, Vol. 8, No. 1, March 1963, 2 pages.

The article is a brief review of rural-urban population changes
in Florida from 1850 to 1960, and features off-farm migrations
of young people.

19. FLORIDA FARM FACTS Compiled and written by E. W. Cake, Ext.
printed leaflet, November 1964, 5 pages.

A brief summary is given on each of the principal crops or groups
of crops in Florida as to their economic importance in the 1963-64
season. Also projections are made for 1975 based on information
from "DARE" reports.







-78-


Florida Truck Crop Competition Summaries


1. FLORIDA TRUCK CROP COMPETITION, I. INTER-STATE AND FOREIGN
(Supplement to Bul. 224), by C. V. Noble and Marvin A. Brooker.


a. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report, Se

b. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report, Se

c. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 52-

2. FLORIDA TRUCK CROP COMPETITION,
(Supplement to Bul. 224), by C.
D. L. Brooke.

a. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 54-

b. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 55-

c. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 56-

d. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 57-

e. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 58-

f. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 59-.

g. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-

h. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 61-

i. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-

j. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 63-

k. Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC


1. Agr. Econ.


Mimeo Report


EC


ptember 1950, 24 pages.

ptember 1951, 33 pages.

8, September 1952, 30 pages.

I. INTER-STATE AND FOREIGN
V. Noble, Marvin A. Brooker and


4,

2,

1,

2,

4,

3,

3,

3,

6,

2,


September 1953, 28 pages.

October 1954, 32 pages.

September 1955, 30 pages.

September 1956, 27 pages.

October 1957, 27 pages.

September 1958, 26 pages.

October 1959, 30 pages.

October 1960, 30 pages.

October 1961, 29 pages.

October 1962, 33 pages.


64-5, October 1963, 33 pages.

65-3, September 1964, 32 pages.


An annual enumeration of weekly carlot and truck shipments of
fruits and vegetables from Florida, competing states and foreign
sources during the Florida shipping season. It is compiled from
USDA, AMS, Fruit and Vegetable Market News, Weekly Shipment Summaries.





-79-


Florida Vegetable Crop Annual Summaries

1. a. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1950,
Vol. VI, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
Production Costs, by J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr., G. N.
Rose and Donald L. Brooke, Mimeo Report, 128 pages.

L. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1951,
Vol. VII, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
Production Costs, by J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr., G. N.
Rose and A. H. Spurlock, Mimeo Report, 129 pages.

c. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1952,
Vol. VIII, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
Production Costs, by J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr. G. N.
Rose and Donald L. Brooke, Mimeo Report, 122 pages.

d. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY'1953,
Vol. IX, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
Production Costs, by J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr., G. N.
Rose and Donald L. Brooke, Mimeo Report, 121 pages.

e. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1954,
Vol. X, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
Production Costs, by J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr., G. N.
Rose and Donald L. Brooke, Mimeo Report, 104 pages.

f. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1955,
Vol. XI, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
Production Costs, by J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr., G. N.
Rose, C. L. Crenshaw and Donald L. Brooke, Mimeo Report,
100 pages.

g. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1956,
Vol XII, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
Production Costs by J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr., G. N.
Rose, C. L. Crenshaw and Donald L. Brooke, Mimeo Report,
100 pages.

h. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1957,
Vol. XIII, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
Production Costs, by J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr., G. N.
Rose, C. L. Crenshaw and Donald L. Brooke, Mimeo Report,
101 pages.

i. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1958,
Vol. XIV, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
Production Costs, by J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr., G. N.
Rose, C. L. Crenshaw and Donald L. Brooke, Mimeo Report,
99 pages.

j. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY, 1959,
Vol XV, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments, by
J. B. Owens, J. C. Townsend, Jr., G. N. Rose and C. L.
Crenshaw, Mimeo Report, 87 pages.






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k. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1960,
Vol. XVI, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
by G. N. Rose, G. G. Goshorn, R. R. Hancock, and J. C.
Townsend, Jr., Mimeo Report, 84 pages.

1. FLORIDA VEGETABLE CROPS ANNUAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY 1961,
Vol. XVII, Acreage, Production and Value, Carlot Shipments,
by J. C. Townsend, Jr., Raymond R. Hancock, Dan L. Marquis,
Jr., G. Norman Rose and Glenn G. Goshorn, Mimeo Report,
120 pages.

m. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS VEGETABLE SUMMARY, 1962 ISSUE,
by Elmo F. Scarborough, Raymond R. Hancock and G. Norman Rose,
Processed Report, 122 pages.

n. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS VEGETABLE SUMMARY, 1963 ISSUE,
by Elmo F. Scarborough, Robert L. Addison, Jr., and G. Norman
Rose, Processed Report, 123 pages.

o. FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS VEGETABLE SUMMARY, 1964 ISSUE,
by Elmo F. Scarborough, Robert L. Addison, Jr., and G. Norman
Rose, Processed Report, 124 pages.

Data are presented on the acreage, yield, production, ship-
ment, value and season average prices of the major vegetable
crops in Florida by counties and geographic areas, histori-
cally and/or for the current season. More recent issues in-
clude monthly average FOB prices and weekly FOB price ranges
for the major vegetables.





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Movement of Citrus Trees


i. Movement of Citrus Trees from Florida Nurseries by Zach Savage.


a. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1952,


b. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1953,


c. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1954,


d. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1955,


e. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1956,


f. July 1, 1928 to June-30,.1957,


g. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1958,


h. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1959,


i. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1960,


j. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1961,


k. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1962,


1. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1963,


m. July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1964,


Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 53-1,
January, 1953, 29 pages.

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 54-9,
January, 1954, 28 pages.

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 55-3,
December, 1954, 33 pages.

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 56-4,
December, 1955, 34 pages.

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 57-5,
January, 1957, 37 pages.

.Agr..Econ. Mimeo Report 58-9,
March, 1958, 37 pages.

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 59-5,
November, 1958, 35 pages.

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 60-7,
December, 1959, 34 pages.

Agr. Econ, Mimeo Report 61-6,
January, 1961, 35 pages,

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 62-7,
December, 1961, 34 pages.

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 63-3,
November, 1962, 34 pages.

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 64-4,
November, 1963, 35 pages.

Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report EC 65-5,
October, 1964, 33 pages.


The movement of citrus nurserystock from nurseries to Florida
destinations increased over the years. Such annual movement
varied from 527,719 trees in 1934-35 to 3,657,312 in 1964-65.
More than half of these trees were varieties of oranges.

2. CITRUS TREE MOVEMENT SETS RECORD, by Zach Savage, Sunshine State
Agricultural Research Report, Vol. 3, No. 3, July, 1958, 1.5 pages.

3. CITRUS TREE MOVEMENT DOWN, by Zach Savage, Sunshine State Agri-
cultural Research Report, Vol. 6, No. 2, April, 1961, .5 page.





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VII. MISCELLANEOUS

1. SOME PROBLEMS AND OPPORTUNITIES CREATED BY FLORIDA'S CHANGING
POPULATION, by W. K. McPherson, Economic Leaflet, Vol. XII, No. 7,
June 1953, 4 pages.

An analysis of how the changes that took place in the characteristics
of the population from 1940 to 1950 will affect the economic well
being of the State in the future.

2. FARMERS AND FARM PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES, (A COOPERATIVE
REPORT TOBACCO AND PEANUT PRODUCERS AND PRODUCTION), by
R. E. L. Greene, Misc. Publication, 1954 Census of Agriculture,
Vol. III, pt. 9, Chap. III, Dec. 1956, 55 pages.

This report describes and analyzes some of the existing differences
and recent adjustments on tobacco and peanut farms in the United
States. Detailed data for the 1954 Census of Agriculture are used
to present facts regarding size of farms, capital, labor, and land
resources on farms, amounts and source of farm income and expenditures,
combination of crop and livestock enterprises, adjustment problems,
operator characteristics and variation in use of resources and size
of farms by areas for widely different production conditions.


3. a. CAREER EXPLORATION LEADER'S MANUAL
Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and
August 1960.

b. CAREER EXPLORATION MEMBER'S MANUAL
Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and
August 1960.

c. CAREER EXPLORATION WHAT'S IN THE FUTURE?
Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and
August 1960.

d. CAREER EXPLORATION KEY TO YOUR FUTURE
Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and
March 1963.

e. CAREER EXPLORATION MEMBER'S MANUAL
Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and
March 1963.


Home Economics,



Home Economics,



Home Economics,



Home Economics,



Home Economics,


Prepared by Dr. C. C. Moxley and other members of a sub-committee
of the Southern Farm Management Extension Committee. A series
of publications to help 4-H Club members evaluate themselves in
order that they might make better choices about their education,
their work experiences and their careers.

4. THE FARM CREDIT SYSTEM, by Marshall H. Edwards, Seminar Address,
Agr. Econ. Mimeo Report 61-2, Oct. 1960, 28 pages.

In this talk Mr. Edwards briefly outlined and described the
Farm Credit System and discussed the economic and sociological
philosophies of those who organized the System. He then gave an analysis






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of the position of FCA today among farm credit institutions; his
thinking as to present motivating philosophies of the Farm Credit
Administration and also his thinking as to the mission of the
Farm Credit Administration during the 1960's.

5. BETTER KEEP A GOOD CREDIT RATING YOU WILL NEED IT IN THE FUTURE,
by H. G. Hamilton, Sunshine State Agricultural Research Report, Vol.
6, No. 1, Jan. 1961.

A discussion of the increasing need of credit by farmers, types of
credit, ratio of real estate values to net income, the necessity of
fitting lending policies to the nature of agriculture, and the in-
creasing need of farmers for assistance in financial management.

6. PROGRESS BY DESIGN A STORY OF FLORIDA'S AGRICULTURE AND ITS
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Special Report, Sunshine State
Agricultural Research Report, Vol. 8, No. 1, March 1963.


People
Population Changes and Trends
Marketing Fresh Citrus
Marketing Processed Citrus
Marketing Fresh Vegetables
Marketing Processed Vegetables
Woody and Herbaceous Nursery Plants
Marketing Livestock
Marketing Milk
Marketing Poultry
Marketing Honey
Agricultural Economics:
Production
Marketing
Agricultural Policy:
Land Economics
Adjustment Programs


H. G. Hamilton
Daniel E. Alleger
H. G. Hamilton
H. G. Hamilton
A. H. Spurlock
A. H. Spurlock
Zach Savage
W. K. McPherson
W. K. McPherson
R. E. L. Greene
H. G. Hamilton

R. E. L. Greene
Cecil N. Smith

W. K. McPherson
H. G. Hamilton


A report on Florida's agriculture giving special recognition to the
75th year of operation of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station's
System. Many members of the Experiment Station's staff contributed
to this publication. Members of the staff of the Department of Agri-
cultural Economics prepared articles on the subjects listed.

7. DISCUSSION: THE IDEAL GRADUATE PROGRAM TO PRECEDE WORK IN MARKETING,
by W. W. McPherson, Proceedings of the Marketing Section, Association
of Southern Agricultural Workers 1963, Vol. 60, pp. 277-282,
pp. 267-287 Abstracts of Proceedings.

Importance of analysis to determine conditions likely to be faced by
marketing firms as well as analysis of firm's opportunities within
given conditions is stressed.




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8. HANDBOOK: CONSUMER EDUCATION SHORT COURSE, by Gladys Kendall,
Pauline N. Brimball and Ralph A. Eastwood, Florida Agr. Ext. Ser,
FSU, May 6-10, 1963.

The portion of this workshop assembled, developed and presented by
Dr. Eastwood included: Consumer Education SCOPE Subcommittee
Report; the marketing process; principles of plant layout; principles
of decision making in management; changing market structure; how
growers can obtain more bargaining power in marketing; the role of
prices; retail produce merchandising; theory of demand; population
of Florida; personal income and housing statistics for Florida;
factors associated with elasticity; theory of supply; table of
resource classes; business integration; brands and grades; breakeven
chart; taxation theory; advertising principles; and a list of
marketing problems faced by Florida producers.

9. DISCUSSION: PREDICTING YIELDS FROM OBJECTIVE COUNTS AND MEASUREMENTS,
by Max R. Langham, A discussion read at the Association of Southern
Agricultural Workers, Feb. 1964, p. 244 of Abstracts of Proceedings
and to appear in Frontiers in Southern Agricultural Marketing,
Iowa State University Press (in process).

This article reviews William E. Kibler's paper in which some of the
objective prediction methods being used by the Statistical Reporting
Service were presented.

10. OPERATION DARE, by E. T. York and W. K. McPherson,
The Progressive Farmer, Aug. 1964, 2 pages.

A summary of opportunities for and problems that will be encountered
in doubling the income of Florida farmers during the 15 year period
1960-1975.

11. AN INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES, by Max R. Langham, Mimeo
Report prepared for Farm Management School, December 1964, 34 pages.

The elementary economic principles of production are presented in
this publication. Class problems are included in the text materials.
The mimeograph concludes with an introduction to the use of linear
programming to solve minimization and maximization problems of the
type encountered in production decisions.

12. SITUATION ANALYSIS FOR FEEDS, by Max R. Langham, Presented at the
DARE Conference on Fertilizer, Feed, Pesticides, Seeds, Herbicides
and Agricultural Chemicals held at the University of Florida, June
15-16, 1964, 15 pages.

13. SITUATION ANALYSIS FOR PESTICIDES, HERBICIDES, AND MISCELLANEOUS
AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS, by Max R. Langham, Presented at the DARE
Conference on Fertilizer, Feed, Pesticides, Seeds, Herbicides and
Agricultural Chemicals held at the University of Florida, June 15-16,
1964, 19 pages.







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14. DISCUSSION: A DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR COMBINED PRODUCTION,
DISTRIBUTION, AND STORAGE, by Max R. Langham, A discussion read at
the Association of Southern Agricultural Workers and published in the
Proceedings Marketing Section, Association of Southern Agricultural
Workers, 1965, pp. 187-189, pp. 210-211 of Abstracts of Proceedings.

This article reviews Yao H. Chuang's and Wesley G. Smith's paper
in which dynamic programming is used to aid decision-makers in
planning plant or warehousing locations and in integrating production,
shipping and inventory control.







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VIII. THESES AND DISSERTATIONS


MSA Theses

1. MARKETING FLORIDA EGGS BY FIRMS OPERATING TRUCK PICK-UP ROUTES, by
Clyde E. Murphree, June 1950, 70 pages. Chairman: H. G. Hamilton.

In this study, information was obtained on the operation of truck
pick-up firms engaged in marketing Florida eggs on (1) size and
quality of eggs purchased, (2) prices paid, and (3) cost of handling
eggs. Information obtained was analyzed to show source of eggs,
quality, prices paid in June 1949, and average cost per firm per
dozen for marketing eggs.

2. COSTS AND MARGINS FOR MARKETING EARLY IRISH POTATOES FROM THE
SOUTHEASTERN REGION, by William N. Garrot, July 1950, 92 pages.
Chairman: R. E. L. Greene.

The data in this study shows the average margin taken to move
potatoes from the producer's field to consumer in specified terminal
markets. Costs of marketing are separated into five groups as
follows: (1) Cost of picking up and hauling to the grading shed,
(2) handling, grading, containers and selling at the shipping point,
(3) transportation and hauling to wholesale receivers, (4) whole-
sale margins and (5) retail margins. The data covers potatoes
marketed during the 1949 season from principal potato areas in
Florida, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia.

3. COMPOSITION OF THE MEMBERSHIP OF FLORIDA CITRUS MUTUAL, by
William R. Cotton, September 1950, 117 pages.
Chairman: H. G. Hamilton.

This study was undertaken to determine (1) extent to which members
of Florida Citrus Mutual were engaged solely in the production of
citrus or other businesses in which they were engaged; (2) types of
services the members felt Florida Citrus Mutual should undertake;
(3) location of producing groves which the organization controlled;
(4) acres of grove by variety and rootstock; (5) disposition of
members' fruit for the 1948-49 season as to type of firm and market;
and (6) production services performed for members by different types
of caretaking concerns.

4. AN ECONOMIC STUDY OF BROILER PRODUCTION IN THE PALATKA, FLORIDA AREA,
by Theo Huffman Ellis, February 1951, 165 pages.
Chairman: H. G. Hamilton.

The purpose of this study was to present the economic aspects of
broiler production in the Palatka, Florida area. Data were collected
from 31 producers showing capital investment and housing capacity.
Data were obtained for 207 lots these producers produced in slightly
over two years showing size of lots, gross receipts, costs and
profits. The data were analyzed to show various items of costs and
factors affecting profits.




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