Madison County carrier

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Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00449


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Full Text

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It would appear that after two weeks of turmoil in Ferguson, Missouri, that the noise and passion are dying down. I want to comment on this matter but look at it from a different perspective – respect for the law. I learned at a young age to respect law enforcement ofcials. I recall an incident in high school where I was riding with a friend. For whatever reason, we were pulled over by a Gainesville cop (no disrespect here – cop is an English acronym for constableon-patrol). My friend who was driving ‘mouthed off’ to the cop and boy, were we dressed down! Note to Joe: don’t give a policeman any lip. When I was in my 20s, I had several runins with Air Force Security Policemen (SP). I know that you are incredulous that a boy scout like me would get in trouble with the law, so allow me to explain. These were security incidents, not law enforcement. Military SPs are divided between law enforcement and security protection for things like nuclear weapons and aircraft. All of the infractions I was involved with were security matters in an alert area or on the ightline. In every case, I far outranked the SP (I was an ofcer and they were junior enlisted), but rank doesn’t matter – whoever has the badge (and gun) is in charge. No matter where the fault lay, I did exactly what that young SP ordered me to do. Hands up; lie down in the mud – whatever the order was, I complied. No backtalk; no argument; no lip. Believe me, when you hear the bolt slam a round into an M-16 or see the white fangs of a police dog at close range, there is no question who is giving the orders and who is obeying. Later, when cooler heads prevail and we’re sharing a cup of coffee, then we can sort matters out and use it as a learning experience. But in the heat of the moment, the cop is in charge – period! Many young people have lost their respect for law enforcement. In some cases, they never had respect in the rst place. That is wrong and may have led to the incident which cost Michael Brown his life. I don’t know exactly what happened in Ferguson on the afternoon of Aug. 9; none of us do. There are competing explanations for the events and stories are changing. Someone isn’t telling the truth. I think that is a violation of the 9thcommandment – something about false witness. It is an amazing and wonderful thing to understand the Bible and follow its guidance. A court of inquiry (grand jury) is looking at the evidence now to determine if wrong-doing took place and if Ofcer Darren Wilson should be charged with an infraction. We need to have faith in our system of laws and allow the facts of the case and (true) justice to determine guilt or innocence. What we shouldn’t do is take the law into our own hands and allow a mob to decide a matter like this. We have a term for that, and it’s called ‘lynch mob.’ That seems to have occurred on the streets of Ferguson for more than a week as police were assaulted, res set, property destroyed and stores looted. Apparently, most of the trouble makers were not Ferguson residents and took advantage of the turmoil for their own selsh and criminal reasons. What I didn’t see depicted in the news coverage was a prayer vigil led by clergy who would pray for peace, justice, and the hand of divine providence. I hope it took place … repeatedly, but maybe the news coverage passed it over. We need to pray for the soul of Michael Brown. We need to pray for Ofcer Wilson to recover from his injuries. We need to pray for truth and justice to prevail. We need to pray for equality and respect for those who are different from us. We need to pray that this tragic incident brings healing to this community and better understanding across our nation. I’ve titled this column “badge,” but a more appropriate word is “Shield.” A law enforcement ofcer is in the business of shielding the public from those who would break the law and endanger our lives or property. In some cases, they are protecting us from ourselves when we behave recklessly as some do on our highways. We need to thank our law enforcement ofcers, in fact, all rst responders, for the order and peace they bring to our lives. National Securitywww.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27, 2014 2A € Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS Joe Boyles Guest Columnist BADGE LETTER TO THE EDITOR To The Editor Too often in this life, I have found that we are confronted by evilness and sometimes just plain meanness. It is very rare these days to come face to face with real life angels. However, I can truly say that I encountered those very unique creatures on Friday, August 1, 2014, on the road fromMadison, Florida to Valdosta,Georgia. My car decided that it had reached the end of its journey, although I had not. Unfortunately, it stopped almost in themiddle of the road. After sitting in that position for a long time, an elderly couple came along, literally jumped from their car and came across the road to push my car to the side of the road. I tried to thank them as they made amad dash for their own car and perhaps to safety, since this is at times a very busy highway. I am hoping that they will read this and know howgrateful I am for their help. A few minutes later a truck came up and quickly turned around behind my car. At rst I could not see where the truck went and then I was surprised to see the gentleman standingbeside my car. After seeing his badge and phone, I realized that hewas an ofcer and that I w ould pr obably get a ticket for illegally parking. Instead, he introduced himself as the sheriff ofMadison County.He began to talk to me and reassureme that everythingwould be alright. I explain that I had talked with roadside service and that they would be sending a towtruck from Pinetta.He was not at all convinced that therewas a towtruck available at that particular repair shop. The Sheriff, who I came to know as Pastor Ben, took it upon himself to call dispatch to nd a towtruck in Madison. This wonderfulman took complete control of the situation. Itwas very hot to say the least. Sheriff Ben Stewart putme in his truck so that I could enjoy the comfort of his air. Itwas very cool and I felt so safe with him. It was overwhelming to meet a law enforcement ofcial who was kind, considerate and humble. I was not afraid. I did not believe that hewould harm me in anyway. I had heard so many horror stories in the past few weeks of law enforcement ofcials who hadmistreated the very people that they had sworn to serve and protect, that I was completely mystied by thisman’s behavior. Sheriff Ben and I had a chance to talk while we waited for the tow truck, so I got to knowa little about him. Madison County can be very proud of such a wonderful person. I wish that thewholeworld could get to know thisman. ToMrs. Stewart and friends at Dr. Shaw’s ofce along with their newemployee Brandy and to mywonderful towtruck operator from Certied Towing, thank all of you for allowingme to meet your angel. I pray that God will ever keep him safe andwell. Gratefully yours BeverlyMadison Valdosta GeorgiaLetters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. All submitted letters must be 600 words or less -Savvy Senior How to Get Social Security Benefits When Youre DisabledDear Savvy Senior, What do I need to do to get Social Security disability? I’m 57 years old and have some health issues that are keeping me from working, but I’ve heard it’s very difficult to get benefits. Need AssistanceDear Need, The process of getting Social Security disability benefits can be tricky and timeconsuming, but you can help yourself by doing your homework and getting prepared. Last year, around three million people applied for Social Security disability benefits, but two-thirds of them were denied, because most applicants fail to prove that they’re disabled and can’t work. Here are some steps you can take that will improve your odds. Get Informed The first thing you need to find out is if your health problem qualifies you for Social Security disability benefits. You generally will be eligible only if you have a health problem that is expected to prevent you from working in your current line of work (or any other line of work that you have been in over the past 15 years) for at least a year, or result in death. There is no such thing as a partial disability benefit. If you’re fit enough to work part-time, your application will be denied. You also need not apply if you still are working with the intention of quitting if your application is approved, because if you’re working, your application will be denied. Your skill set and age are factors too. Your application will be denied if your work history suggests that you have the skills to preform a less physically demanding job that your disability does not prevent you from doing. To help you determine if you are disabled, visit ssa.gov/dibplan/dqua lify5.htm and go through the five questions Social Security uses to determine disability. How to Apply If you believe you have a claim, your next step is to gather up your personal, financial and medical information so you can be prepared and organized for the application process. You can apply either online atssa.gov/applyfordisability, or call 800-7721213 to make an appointment to apply at your local Social Security office or to set up an appointment for someone to take your claim over the phone. The whole process lasts about an hour. If you schedule an appointment, a “Disability Starter Kit” that will help you get ready for your interview will be mailed to you. If you apply online, the kit is available atssa.gov/disability. It takes three to five months from the initial application to receive either an award or denial of benefits. The only exception is if you have a chronic illness that qualifies you for a “compassionate allowance” (seessa.gov/compassionateallowances), which fast tracks cases within weeks. If Social Security denies your initial application, you can appeal the decision, and you’ll be happy to know that roughly half of all cases that go through a round or two of appeals end with benefits being awarded. But the bad news is with backlog of about 900,000 people currently waiting for a hearing it may take a year or longer for you to get one. Get Help You can hire a representative to help you with your Social Security disability claim. By law, representatives can charge only 25 percent of past-due benefits up to a maximum of $6,000, if they win your case. It’s probably worth hiring someone at the start of the application process if your disability is something difficult to prove such as chronic pain. If, however, your disability is obvious, it might be worth initially working without a representative to avoid paying the fee. You can always hire a representative later if your initial application and first appeal are denied. To find a representative, check with the National Association of Social Security Claimants’ Representatives (nosscr.org,800-431-2804) or National Association of Disability Representatives (nadr.org, 800747-6131). Or, if you’re low-income, contact the Legal Services Corporation (lsc.gov/find-legalaid) for free assistance. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org.Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Se-

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f t r t n b b r t t b rb f n n f b n r & $ & # r $ r & r & r b & r b # r & b $ & $ r n r f & ) # & n r & b f & $ # b r & b # r b $ & b f & ) f & & t r & & b & & n f r & & b n & r r b & r b # r & $ $ ) r f & b & b $ b n # + & # b ' r & r $ & # b & & $ $ ) r $ & & $ # & b # r $ & b f $ ) f r $ & n b & t r & n f r & b & r & f & b f & t r r # b r $ & $ r # r f & t + & r & b f $ & ) + & n & $ # n b # r & $ b r & & + ) & b r & ) # r # & ) r $ $ & # & n n r # $ b t ) & r & ) n r & # & b + & r # & b $ r n & & ) # & f & $ r # n r $ & r # b & r b $ r & n b n & b & n b # ) r & b % ( ) < I b E 2 < ) B . B A 0 A 0 0 = r f t r b n r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f 3 ( ( ( f 0 0 + ( E B 4 A B 0 A , A 0 < = A 0 A E B I A 2 < 0 F ) A A F ) A = < ) 2 B ) 0 A A ) < B ) 0 A 0 B < F 5 ) B ) A B < A ) E B = A 0 A B A f A 0 < = G ) B A B A r ) = 0 A 0 ) A 2 < B B A = B 0 2 2 A G ) B A 0 E < A 0 0 < A = A 0 A f A B < B A B B A B B A = < ) 2 B ) 0 A & ) F A 0 E B 5 A A < ) F < A G = A A + A G 0 A 2 2 < A B 0 A A 2 < & . B A A G = ) B ) A = A n = = ) A < A 1 / A 0 A r ) = 0 5 A < A & F A B A r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f r b n r 0 E ) A A B A r ) = 0 A t ( 0 G A E B B 5 A ) 0 < A ) B ) J = A B < A ) = A = B A B 0 A < ) F A 1 K K K K G ) A B A < A 0 A 0 < A 0 0 ) A ( F 0 2 B A 0 E ) A A B A r ) = 0 A t ( 0 G E B B A G ) , A < ) F A D # K K A 5 A A ) 0 < A ) B ) ( J = A B < A G = A B A 0 I A 0 A B B A G = A 0 B A E B 5 A A t B A G = A = 0 A ) E A ) A B A E & B A B B A , F B = A 2 I A 1 K K A 2 < B A 0 A B A 0 F < B ) A 0 A 2 0 ) 0 < = A A 2 E ) A G 0 < + = 5 A A < A 0 A 0 ( < A G ) A 0 = B A 0 G A b 0 A I = A ) = A E < < B I B A 0 I A F B A B B A 2 I = A # K A 2 < B A 0 A B A 0 F < ( B ) A 0 A B A 2 0 ) A 0 < = A E B A 0 B A B A 2 E ) G 0 < + = 5 A A 0 ) = = ) 0 < = A 0 = = E = A G = A B B 1 K K A 2 < B A G = A B 0 0 A E A E B A B 0 A 0 B ) E A G ) B A B < < & B A 0 A # K A 2 < B A 0 A B A 2 0 ) A 0 < = 0 F < B ) A 0 < A , A F B = A 0 B A E = B A 0 G A b 0 A I = 5 A A 2 < 0 2 < B I A B H = A < A = B A 0 < A = F A ) = 5 A G B < A < B = A < A = B A B 0 A ) < = A 1 K A 2 < B 5 A G = B G B < A < B = A < A = B A B 0 A ) < = A 1 D 5 # A 2 < B A B A = ) B B ) 0 A ) = A = B A B 0 A ) < = A F A 2 < B 5 f b n r = 0 0 A G = A = F < 0 B = A ) A 0 A < B B A B ) < A ) ) B ) = A A = = A B A 0 0 E B A # K K K K A ) A ) B = A < = B I < A 0 A 0 2 < B ) 0 4 5 b 0 G F < A A < ( ) A B A 0 < A ( E = A B I A ) A 0 B A F B A E B 0 < ) B I A B 0 A = ) 2 I < = ) A B A < B < A 2 ( < ) 0 A 3 E = = A B A B = B I A A G < A 0 I A = B E B A G = A ) A ( & < 4 A G B A B I A A ( & E A B A B B A n E I B ) & A G = A = ) 2 I A B 2 < 0 = = A A 0 A 0 B ) I ) & G A r ) , . ) E A ) G < ) B ) & A A & ) F ) & A B = 0 0 A A A B 0 A < ( 6 E = B A A ) ) = B < ( B ) F A < ) & A A G ) A ) B ) 5 A A B < A B A < B A = A B = F = B A = 0 0 A 0 < A B ( A B 0 A F A ) B A < A I B A 2 < B B A 0 A ( ) ) = B < B ) F A b < ) & = 3 b 4 A ) A , = = 5 A = A G ) , A & 0 A 0 < A ) ) = B < B ) F A G E & A r 0 I A 2 B 5 A E B A ) B A 0 E A A E 2 A B 0 A C K I = A 0 < A B A E & ) = = E = A A 0 < < A 0 < A < ( 0 B ) 0 5 t A B A B ) B A = 0 0 A < ) F A F ) B ) 0 A 0 B ) A E < ) & n E I A G ) A 0 0 A E ( 2 < ) B . B A 0 E & < 0 G A < 0 E & B A 0 < B A = 0 0 A 0 < A G ) B 0 < = A B B A G A r ) ( . ) E A 0 A 0 & < A = E < A ) ) B ) = 5 A A A 0 A B A ) = B < ) B A = E = B 0 ) A 0 A E = A A A G ) B ' B A n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r G ) A F < I 0 B A B B A B A ) = B < ) B G ) B ' 0 = A B A E = = A 0 B < A 0 A 2 < ( B A ) A 2 B ) = @ ) B < ( = B A ) = A < E ) & A B B A ) B G ) , A F A B 0 A 2 I A 0 E B 5 B B 0 < I A , < 0 E & B A G = A B B A B F ) B ) 0 A 0 B ) A A E = B A ) = ) = = A ) A ) ) = B < B ) F A < ) & I A n E & A ) I A < 0 G ( ) & A A B B A G A r ) ( . ) E A G = A B ) F I G 0 < + ) & A G ) B A ) B = A ( 0 < A B 0 A = B B A B A ) ! < ( = 5 A A A = 0 0 A G = 0 2 A A 0 2 < B ) & G ) B A = B E B = A ) A B ) < = B = A A B < = A ) B ) < A 2 = 5 A A 8 t B A = A = ) A B B A B A B B A < 0 + = A B A < < E = A B A G 0 < A E B A ) B ; = B A A B B A 0 = A B 2 E < = A = B < ) & = A B B A < E = B A G 0 < 9 A = A B 0 A B 0 < 5 E < B < A B A = E 2 < ( ) B . B A A 0 < A 0 A < ) & B A B 0 A G ) B ( 0 A B A E = A < 0 n E I A A E & E = B A = ) B A = 0 0 A G = A B ) & ) A = E < A ) ) B ) = A B A F ) B ) 0 A 0 G ) = ) = = A G = A ) & < = 0 F A I A B A B G 0 A 2 < ( B ) = A A G = A A 0 ( ) = ( = E 5 A A = A 0 < A B A E & B < 5 A b I = A A 0 B A = E ( ) B B A A E & B A I B A ( E = A = A A 0 B A I B < ) F A B A E < = = A A E B A B G A r ) , . ) E A 0 < 0 A ) < B 0 < = A G = A 0 ( ) B B A B 0 A < I ) & B B 5 A A = A 0 < A B A = 0 0 ) = B < ) B A ) B = A ) B A = 0 A 0 B < B A F ) 0 B ) 0 = 0 A ) B = A = ) A I A < E = ) & B 0 A E A B A = 0 0 5 A A A B A = 0 0 ) = B < ) B ; = A . ) A 0 ( < A I A < ) A & F B A 0 < A E 2 B A ( < 0 , B A & E < = A 0 < G A r ) , . ) E A G ) B E 2 B A ) = E < = B 0 E B = A 0 A / / ? A ) ( = B A 0 A B A 2 < F ) 0 E = 0 E B A 0 A 1 # ? K K b I = A 2 < 0 B = B A B B B A 0 E B A 0 < A n E I A E & E = B A = 0 E A = A 0 A B A = B A = B E ( B A 0 E B A 2 < ) 0 < A B 0 = E < A = ) A G r ) , . ) E A ) A 0 B 0 A = E < A = 0 0 A B B A 2 B < = 0 E A A = A 0 A B E < < B A = B E B A 0 E B 5 A < 6 E = B A A B 0 A = ) B A 0 G A G ) B A < ) . A & 0 A 0 F < A B A E & B & E < = A E = B A = A = A 2 < F ) 0 E = I A 0 A G ) B I A < = A B A 0 < ( < A . ) A 0 < 5 F = A = B B A B B B A ) = ) 0 A G = G B < A B 0 A < = A B E = > A B A 0 E B A ) ( ; B A B B < 5 0 . , A F ) = = 2 0 + A E 2 A E < ) & A B 2 E ) A ) 2 E B A = & B 2 0 ) B ) & A B 0 A B A = 0 0 ; = 0 2 ) = B = A G ) B B A + ) = A E < ) & A B A 2 = B = 0 0 A I < A ) & A B B F A G ) B A , A B A 0 ( 2 ) B = A B A ) = B < ) B A & ) = B A G A r ) , . ) ( E A ) B A A = B ) , A ) < G I A 0 A 0 A B A B ( < = A B 0 A G 0 < + A B A B A ( B < A 0 0 A = 0 A B = 0 0 A E = B A A 0 ) & = 0 B ) & A < ) & B 5 8 0 E ; < A 0 ) & A B 0 I A 0 = B & A I 0 E ; < 0 ) & A B A + ) = 0 = B & 9 A A = ) 5 8 n = A r ) = 0 3 < 2 < B 0 < I A b ) & ' 0 0 A 0 B < A 2 E ) < B < A = 0 0 A ) A r ) ( = 0 A 0 E B I 4 A ) = A 0 B A & 0 ( ) & A B < 0 E & A = B E ! A ) + B ) = 5 9 = I A r 0 ) B ) I ) & A < = A = B A B < A G 0 A & 0 A B 0 A B A B < 0 0 A = ) A = A B G A r ) , . ) E A ( E = A < A 2 < = 0 A ( . = A 0 < A < A B 0 5 A A 8 t A F A + ) = 5 A t A F ) , = A B 0 A 2 I 9 A = A = ) 5 8 t ; A < A B 0 I A B 0 A = G B A A A G 0 < + 0 E B 5 9 0 < B ) A f E I A G r ) , . ) E ; = A E = ) B < A = ) A = A < ) F = 1 1 A ) = A B 0 A r ) = 0 F < I A I A 0 < A A B 0 A & A A ) 2 B ) F = 5 A A 8 t B ; = A B A < ) & B B ) & A B 0 A 0 9 A = A = ) 5 8 t ; A 2 = = ) 0 B A 0 E B G B A t A 0 5 9 A 8 A < = 2 B E , I A < ( 6 E = B A B B A I 0 E A ) = E < = B A E = 9 A = ) A , ) & A B B A b I = A < ) A 0 E A = ) B A 0 G 0 A B A . ) A E ( B ) 0 = A A F A A E ( & B A 2 < 2 < A G ) B ) A B I = 5 F = A = B B A B B G ) B A B A F ) B ) 0 A ) = ( ) = = A = E < A ) ) ( B ) = A G < A = = A 0 A A ) = ( = E A A B A 0 < E = B A ) A G B < A B 0 < = A 0 < A 0 B A < = B A E = 5 0 < A < < A ) + = A = + 0 E B A < 2 0 < B = A 0 A B ( ) & A A B < ) A 2 < 0 ( = A B A B A ) ) B I A E B G = A B 0 A B B A B A 0 E < = = < 0 0 = A B A ) ( < A G < A E = ) & A G < E 2 A B 0 A 0 5 A A A 0 B < 2 < B A 0 A B A ) ) B I G ) A A B A 2 < 0 ( = A G = A 0 B A ) & E = 5 A A B < A 0 < A ) = E = ( = ) 0 A + A A 0 < B ' 0 0 A 0 < A < B B A b & A , A 0 < B A F 0 B A A A B 0 B ) 0 A B B A B A n E I A E & E = B A E = A A < ( = 5 A A < A ) + = = 0 A B A 0 B ) 0 5 b & A A ) + = A F 0 B ( A B 0 A < = A B A E = > . I A b , A ) A 0 2 ( 2 , A A < B A 0 < F 0 B A & ) = B A ) B 5 8 I 7 9 A f E I A ( A < 0 A B A E ) ( 5 A A 8 ) = A ) = A 0 B < ) & B 5 A ) = A ) = A < ) = B 5 0 E A & E I = A < A G < 0 & 9 b & A B 0 A B A E ( ) A B 0 A 0 B B A B ) < 0 & < = = A A 0 B < < 2 < = B B ) F = A = A = & 0 B A E 2 A B 0 A F 5 A A 8 = A = 0 0 A 0 < A < A t = I A B ) = A ) = A E ) < 5 A t B ; = A < ) A ) = = E 5 A + A 0 E B 5 9 0 2 A ) A B A E ) ( A 0 B ) E A B 0 A 6 E = ( B ) 0 A = 0 0 A 0 < < = A = A B A B ( ) & A < 0 + A E 2 A A 2 0 ( 2 A & A F ) & 5 , A = B B A B < B B A ) B A G = A A 0 B < B = ) B E B ) 0 A G ) B A B A ) = ( B < ) B A = I ) & A B B A B = 0 0 A G = A ) A B < > A 0 G F < A B ) = B < ) B A G = A ) A B < A = A G , A I A G ) B ( 0 ) & A B A = 0 0 ; = E ) & 5 A 0 B A = A G A r ) , . ) E A ( ) F A B A 0 I A ) = = E G = A B A F ) B ) 0 A 0 B ) A B A = E < ) & A 0 A ( ) ) B ) = > A ) B A = = A B B B I A G < A 0 E B A B 0 A B E < A 0 < < A G ) B A B 0 < 5 A A ) = ) 0 = E < 2 < ) = A F < I 0 5 A r G ) A B = 0 0 A 0 B ) E = A B 0 B A A F < I 0 A G ) , G ) B A B 0 A = A G B A B 2 B 5 A 5 A < ) & A 0 = 5 t r f f r r t f n r t b t r I A f I B B A 0 < < ) = r n t b t f < = A , ( & 0 = A A 0 ( < 2 < B A G 0 A = A ( < = = A B A = 0 0 0 < A = F < A B ) = A ) B A 2 = B A = 2 0 + A B 0 A B 0 < A & ) A 0 E B G B A = A = G A = A A + 0 A 0 E ) B ) 0 A ( B G A B A = 0 0 A ) = ( B < ) B A A 2 < B = A 0 A B B B < A 0 A = 0 0 0 ) 5 8 F < I A I < A I 0 E = A 0 E B A B B < = A 0 E B = 0 0 A 0 ) 9 A = = ) 5 A A 8 A 0 A , A B B ) & = A B A = B B A = I = A G F A B 0 A 0 5 9 A A A 2 < 0 A = A = = G A ) B A G = A B B A B = 0 0 A ) = B < ) B A E = B A = B 0 E B A B A B B < = A G ) B 0 E B A G 0 A 0 B A 0 A 0 , 0 G ( E 2 0 E ) B ) 0 A G ) B B A 2 < B = A E = ) & A B H 2 A 0 A A < ) G 0 A A A A 2 2 ) ( B ) 0 A 0 < A < A ) A B 0 & 0 A B 0 A f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b 0 G A G A B < B 2 < B = 5 A A A ) ( 2 < 0 F B A ) A 0 G A G B < B A 2 < B = A ) A G G B A B 0 = A 2 < B = A B 0 2 < B ) ) 2 B 5 9 b t b n B 0 E 2 = A & < 0 G A ) A 0 < B A < ) A < A B E , I A B 0 E 2 = A B I > < A < B ) E B A E = + 0 = 5

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AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27, 2014 4A € Madison County Carrier Community CalendarAugust 31 Sunday, Aug. 31, from 4 – 7 p.m., the Madison Church of God is hosting a Labor Day Picnic on the church grounds at 771 NE Colin Kelly Highway, with free food, plenty of rides and carnival games – all free. The only thing requiring any money is the dunk tank, where you can buy chances to dunk a town or county official or other notable local person in the water. Rev. Jason Justus of the Madison Church of God invites everyone to come out, enjoy the food, fun and fellowship, and be a part of their family for a few hours on Aug. 31, from 4 – 7 p.m. For more information, contact the Madison Church of God at (850) 973-3339. August 31 Reverend Charles W. Evans, Sr., Pastor at Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church in Madison, will be begin serving his 16th consecutive year at the church, located at 576 SW Dade St. A celebration will be held in his honor on Sunday, Aug. 31, at Mt. Zion, from 3 – 5 p.m. The public is invited to attend, as he will be recognized for his religious and community services and as the church’s longest sitting Pastor. A healthy menu of food will be served immediately after the program. If there is anything special community members would like to declare, please contact Jerome Wyche at 464-0196. September 5, 6 The Senior Center at 1161 SW Harvey Greene Drive in Madison is holding an indoor yard sale, Friday and Saturday, Sept. 5 and 6. Come out and browse the vendor’s tables while helping the center reach their goal of buying a piano for their dining hall. Tables can be rented for $25 for the weekend, if paid in advance. For more information, call Phillip Combs at 973-2686 or 673-5555. September 9 The Sparkleberry Chapter of Florida Native Plant Society will meet Tuesday, Sept. 9, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Hatch Park Community Center, 403 SE Craven St. in Branford. The program will be on Native Bees, presented by Corey StanleyStahr, PhD., discussing native bees and the Integrated Crop Pollination Project (ICP) currently going on nationwide. The discussion will include identifying and encouraging the use of native bees for crop pollination instead of relying totally on the honeybee. This meeting is open to the public. For more information, please contact Betsy Martin at betsymartin@windstrea m.netor (386) 7190467. September 14 The New Bethel Primitive Baptist Church of Madison will be celebrating 70 years on Sunday, Sept. 14 at 3 p.m. Elder Albert Lee Barfield and First Antioch M.B. Church of Valdosta will render services. Elder Robert Johnson is the Pastor and Mother Annie Reddick is the Chairperson. September 15 The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety course in Madison starting Monday, Sept. 15 through Wednesday, Sept. 17, from 7 until 10 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 20, from 2 p.m. until completed. Students must attend all sessions to receive their certificate. Location for the class will be given to those who register in advance by calling the regional office at (386) 758-0525 or by going toMyFWC.com/Hunte rSafety. If interested in future hunter safety courses, you can use the same contact information. All firearms, ammunition and materials are provided free of charge. Students should bring a pen or pencil and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16 at all times. Obituaries Have something you would like to add to the Community Calendar? Simply call Greene Publishing, Inc. at (850) 973-4141 or email your information toRose@greenepublishing.com. Jane Steinhauer PriceJane Steinhauer Price, passed away Saturday, August 9. She was born on September 27, 1927, to the late William and Katherine Steinhauer in Birmingham, Ala. Her formative years were spent in Columbus, Ga., where she attended St. Elmo elementary school and returned to Birmingham to be inducted into the National Honor Society and complete her high school education in 1944. After graduation, Jane put aside her acceptance into the School of Engineering at Auburn University and married her high school sweetheart, Donald Corbett Price. She joined Don in the summer of 1944 when he was called for service in the Air Corp during World War II. After returning to Columbus, Ga. and birthing three wonderful daughters, the family moved to Tallahassee, in 1955 and Jane became a very active member of the community she loved. She was a member of the Tallassee Garden Club, where she served as President of the Club as well as chairman of her circle. Her love of gardening motivated her to attain the status of “Master Gardener.” Jane’s expertise in ower arranging earned her many blue ribbons as well as the privilege of doing the ower arrangements for many of the weddings around Tallahassee. She also served on the original “Tree and Landscaping” Ordinance Board and was instrumental in preserving the beautiful trees that have made Tallahassee such a lovely city over the years. In 1971, Jane was given the prestigious “Woman of the Year” award in Tallahassee. She served as President of the Town Club and both Don and Jane were founding members of Springtime Tallahassee. Jane also served as festival chairman of Springtime Tallahassee and she and Don were given the honor of representing Springtime Tallahassee as Andrew Jackson and Rachel in 1978. Jane was always at Don’s side, supporting him in his victorious bid for the State Legislature and was instrumental in his success as a public servant on both the Tallahassee City and County commissions. She worked tirelessly as the head bookkeeper for Peoples Bank and as Don’s bookkeeper at WONSWBGM radio stations. She was also a founding member of the Episcopal Church of the Advent on Piedmont Drive, where many of her grandchildren attended preschool. In her retirement years, Jane found time to continue gardening, decorating, shing, traveling the world and keeping her keen mind sharp by spending wonderful afternoons of bridge with her special group of “bridge buddies.” No matter where Jane was—whether in the North Georgia mountains or cruising around the world, there was always time for a good game of bridge! Jane is survived by her husband, Donald Corbett Price, of Westminster Oaks in Tallahassee. Don and Jane’s marriage lasted 70 wonderful years and they have been blessed with three devoted daughters (and sons-in-law): Katherine Price Harris (Ben) of Madison; Donna Price McGill (Buddy) of Lakeland, Ga.; and Janet Price Warner (Ronnie) of Havana, Fl. They have also been blessed with seven grandchildren: Andy Johnston (Lori) of McClenny, Fl.; Don Price Johnston of Miami; Michelle Johnston Rowe (Michael) of Monticello; Wendi Warner Sellers of Southport, Fl.; Commander Benjamin Wade Harris, USN (Heather) of Lexington Park, Md.; Mandi Warner Hartman (Paul) of Tallahassee; and William Price Harris (Nichole) of Dunnellon, Fl. She is also survived by 17 special great-grandchildren. A graveside service was held Thursday, August 14, at MeadowWood Memorial Park in Tallahassee. Memorial contributions may be made in Mrs. Price’s honor to the Tallahassee Garden Club (507 North Calhoun Street, Tallahassee, Fl. 32301). Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee assisted the family with their arrangements(www.bevisfh.com, (850) 385-2193).J Frank GuntnerJ. Frank Guntner, 86, passed away Saturday, August 23. A graveside service will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, August 28 at Lee Memorial Cemetery. Frank was a native of Westville, Fl., but a long-time resident of Lee. Frank retired from Florida Power, now Duke Energy, after 35 years of service. He was a member of First Baptist Church of Lee. He was predeceased by his wife, Ada Guntner. He is survived by his three children: Charlotte Griffin, Jerry Guntner (Julia), and Randy Guntner (Jeanette); his step-son, Brantley Humphrey (Pam); his sister, Elaine Hall; brothers: Charles D. Guntner and George Guntner; four grandchildren and an excellent caregiver, Barbara Moore.Eugene Thorpe GastonMr. Eugene T. Gaston, 65, of Madison went home to the Lord on Friday, August 22. He was a resident of Madison since 1998. Prior to 1998, he traveled the world in the United States Air Force. He retired from the USAF after 30 years, as a Chief Master Sgt. He was a member of Cherry Lake United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife, Linda Gaston, of Madison; four children: Doug Carnes, of Slapout, Ala.; Meredith Gaston, of Louisiana; Missy Gaston, of Jacksonville; and Leanne Stojak, of Prattville, Ala.; two brothers: Allen Gaston, of Greenville and Randy Gaston, of Madison; 10 grandchildren, four great grandchildren, an uncle, Steve Smith, and a number of nieces, nephews and cousins. He was predeceased by parents: Mitchell and Sarah Gaston, and two brothers: David and Leslie Gaston. Beggs Funeral Home of Madison will be handling the arrangements. Visitation will be on Thursday August 28, from 1-2 p.m. prior to the service. Service will be at 2 p.m., immediately following visitation. Burial will be in Ebenezer Cemetery in Madison County. In lieu of flowers, family request memorials in his memory be made to the United Methodist Children’s Home, Madison Youth Ranch, 51 Children’s Way, Enterprise, Fl. 32725 or the Cherry United Methodist Church, Building Fund, 260 NW Settlement Rd, Madison, Fl. 32340. You may send condolences to the family by visiting their website at www.beggsfuneral.com. BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252 Business Card Directory ROOFING SPECIALIST State Certified Building Contractor & Roofing Contractor License # CBC 1251818 / CCC 1328133 www.ewingconstructionandroofing.com Serving Madison & Surrounding CountiesLee (850) 971-5043€ Commercial / Residential € All Roof Types € Fully Insured € Proven Track Record € Free EstimatesQUALITY GUARANTEE! Halls Tire & Muffler Center(850) 973-3026Owner Daryl & Lee Anne Hall1064 E. US 90 € Madison, FlBeside Clover Farm

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday August 27, 2014Madison County Carrier € 5A AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Make Your House A Home Nominations Being Accepted For The George Townsend Good Neighbor AwardThe Madison County Farm Bureau is once again accepting nominations for the George Townsend Good Neighbor Award. This award was named after Mr. George Townsend, who exemplied generosity and a kind and loving spirit to everyone. He was truly a good neighbor with everyone he came in contact with. The deadline to nominate a resident of Madison County, for this prestigious award, is Aug. 30. There is no set length required for the nomination letter, so one can write as much as they want about their nominee. Please drop your letter off at the local Madison County Farm Bureau ofce, or mail it to 233 West Base Street Madison, Fl. 32340. The winner will be announced at the annual Farm Bureau meeting and dinner, which will be held on Sept. 17 at the Madison County Central School, at 6:30 p.m. On Saturday, August 16, a local Madison teen recently had his wish come true thanks to Make-A-Wish Foundation, Wal-Mart, and Governor Square Mall. Anthony “A.J.” Hamilton told Make-AWish of Central and Northern Florida that he wanted to go on a shopping spree in Tallahassee, and with the assistance of his Volunteer Wish Team, Elizabeth Rosado and Brent Coughlin, they were able to fulll A.J.’s wish. A.J., and his family, started their day by being picked up by Mike’s Limousine and driven to Tallahassee for a day of shopping. Their rst stop was WalMart, where A.J. was greeted by the Wal-Mart staff and his own personal shopper. In addition, Wal-Mart reserved a register to be used just by A.J. for checking out the items he picked. Following WalMart, A.J. went to the Governor Square Mall where he was met by Laura Seaton, a member of the Governor Square Marketing Team, and multiple store owners and managers who gave A.J. donations from their store. “Everyone was extremely excited and generous with their donations and their time,” said Elizabeth Rosado. “Most kids want to go to Disney or on a cruise but for the shopping sprees the wish team gets be involved and we get to see the kid smile and have fun,” she said. Since 1980, Make-AWish has been granting the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions in order to give them hope, strength, and joy. MakeA-Wish is now the largest wish-granting organization in the world with 65 chapters in the United States and its territories, and international afliates in 33 countries spanning ve continents. “There are numerous kids with lifethreatening conditions here in Northern Florida that are waiting to have their wish granted and there are some who don’t know about Make-A-Wish,” Rosado said. “I encourage anyone who wants to volunteer to get involved or knows a child that would qualify to contact Make-A-Wish.” Make-A-Wish of Central and Northern Florida can be contacted at (407)622-4673 or at www.wishcentral.wish.orgMake-A-WishFoundation Grants Local Wish

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AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY6A € Madison County Carrierwww.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27,2014 Apply in Person at: Annett Bus Lines 231 SE Cabot Trail A n n e t t B u s L i n e s Now Hiring in Madison, Florida FULL and PART Time Drivers Needed Sports Fan? Football Season Offers An Exciting Time Of Year To Join The Annett Team! I-10 To Exit 262. North 200 Yards Turn Left Onto Dale Leslie Dr. 1/4 Mile Turn Left Onto Cabot Trail. Annett Bus Lines Is The Brand New Facility That Borders I-10. € Competitive Pay € € Benefits € € Flexible Hours € Madison Senior Health Expo Well AttendedThe Senior Citizen Council of Madison County held their annual Senior Health Expo on August 13th, offering all seniors health information by way of special speakers and vendor tables as well as food, socializing and entertainment in the form of rafes and door prizes. The event was well attended and appeared to be enjoyed by all. The staff of the Senior Center, along with seniors and their caregivers, loved ones and friends, wish to express their appreciation to all who contributed in any way to make the event a success. To those health care providers and business owners who were not involved this time, don't worry because there will be another health expo next year, with an open space for you. The Senior Center offers a wide range of programs, services and activities for adults aged 60 and older, such as: health and wellness programs, nutrition, exercise, socialization, arts and crafts, computer training and a variety of other activities designed to improve the quality in the lives of seniors. If you are interested in learning more about the Senior Center in Madison, call them at (850) 973-4241 or stop by their location at 1161 SW Harvey Greene Drive. Written and photographed by ROSE KLEIN of GREENE PUBLISHING, INC.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Amy Mason Collins, an Elder Law Attorney from Waldoch & McConnaughhay, spoke to attendees at the health expo discussing laws relevant to elders such as Power of Attorney and Medicaid.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Taking a break from the scheduled speakers to enjoy some food and socializing, from left to right, are: Mosley Lee Bar“eld, Joann McCloud and Margie Medley.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Food in the buffet line was donated by businesses and individuals in Madison and enjoyed by those who attended the expo.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014OAAC (Older American Act Coordinator) Cheryl Scovel, from the Senior Center, announces the next speaker at the event.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Phillip Combs (left) and Leroy Alexander (right) stop for a picture before checking out the vendor tables.Greene Publishing, Inc. By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Jackie Johnson worked the raf”e table at the expo and was a key player in organizing the event.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Elder Care Services was one of the vendor tables at the expo, on hand to discuss and give out information on the many service programs available to seniors in order to improve their quality of life. From left to right, are: Deborah Latson, Program Coordinator and Deloris Jones, Director on the Board for Elder Care.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Two of the vendors at the expo exchange information. On the left is Donald Mackey from the Department of Educations Blind Services who is speaking with Kay Peacock, a new resident of Madison who attended the event to offer information on diabetes.Greene Publishing, Inc.Photo By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Dr. Blaine Payne representing the Family First Wellness Clinic, shares a light moment with Madison resident Mary Stout.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Robert McColskey checks out the vendor tables at the August 13thSenior Expo.Greene Publishing, Inc. By Rose Klein, August 13, 2014Viola Smith gives a happy smile before trying out some of the goodies offered on the buffet.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Lions Club Zone Chair David Mullis paid an official visit to the Madison Lions Club to talk about club growth, reaching out to the younger generation and setting up zone meetings for clubs in the region. Mullis, of the Live Oak Lions Club, explained that a zone chair was a spokesperson for a group of clubs within a specified region. Since the Lions Clubs in Florida has multiplied so rapidly the last few years, the Lions Club governor couldn't get around to personally visiting every single club in the state, so, zone chairs has been brought back, in a move towards more “grassroots” leadership. On the subject of reaching out to younger people, he acknowledged things have changed quite a bit and the younger generation lives in an entirely different environment dominated by things like Facebook. The challenge is convincing them to leave Facebook for an hour and come have lunch with the Lions Club to see what a service club is all about. Mullis also had several examples of “prospective member” brochures used by the Live Oak club that could be changed around a little and adapted for the Madison club, as well as some informative pamphlets discussing what the Lions Club organization is all about. As zone chair, he offered his assistance in setting up templates the Madison club could use to print their own brochures. Soon, the Madison Lions Club hopes to hold evening meetings in order to make their organization more accessible to people whose schedules are full during the day. The Lions Club now meets at noon every Tuesday at Shelby's restaurant. Anyone who is interested in membership is encouraged to contact any Lions Club member, or visit the website at www.madiosnlionclub.com. Be sure to leave the “s” off lion, or the browser will pull up the website for the club in Madison, Wisconsin. Click on “Our Leaders” for club officers' email addresses. www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier € 7A Wednesday, August 27, 2014 AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Lions Club New Members Get A Warm WelcomeGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, August 19, 2014Both Bill Bunting and Diana Maurice had been inducted into the Madison Lions Club earlier, so when their of“cial membership items arrived, Lions Club President Tim Dunn of“cially presented them at the August 19 meeting. In the photo on the left, Bill Bunting receives his of“cial bright gold Lions Club vest. In the right hand photo, Diana Maurice, of Madison Rehab and Nursing Center, receives her of“cial membership certi“cate. In both photos, Dunn is standing on the right. Lions Club Zone Chair Visits Madison ClubGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, August 19, 2014Lions Club President Tim Dunn welcomes Zone Chair David Mullis from the Live Oak Lions Club. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, August 19, 2014Lions Club Zone Chair David Mullis, of Live Oak, visits the Madison Lions Club to talk about attracting new members by getting information about the club to those who may be interested in joining. To empower volunteers to serve their communities, meet humanitarian needs, encourage peace and promote international understanding through Lions clubs. -Lions Club Mission Statement

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27, 2014 8A € Madison County Carrier Check HERE Each Week For Winners Names Check HERE Each Week For Winners Names1. Branford At ACA 2. Elon At Duke4. Florida Atlantic At Nebraska 5. Abaline At Georgia State6. Wake Forest At Louisiana Monroe7. Ole Miss At Boise State8. Western Carolina At USF 9. UCF At Penn. State 10. FSU At Oklahoma3. Tampa Catholic At MCHS

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27,2014Madison County Carrier € 9ASPORTS Madison Cowboys Beat Suwannee Bulldogs 28-27 In OvertimeBy Bryant Thigpen Courtesy of the Suwannee DemocratThe stands were full Friday night as the Madison County Cowboys took on their rival, the Suwannee High School Bulldogs. The football game was a thriller from kickoff until the clock expired, however, the Bulldogs fell short of a victory with a nal score of 28-27 in overtime. First quarter Suwannee County got the ball to begin the contest and began their drive at the 10 yard line. On second down, the Bulldogs were called for a holding penalty. However, that didn't stop the Bulldogs from the end zone. With 10:39 left on the clock, Aaron McAllister ran the ball in for a touchdown. The extra point attempt was good, 7-0. After a touchback, the Cowboys began their drive at the 20 yard line. However, the Cowboys were called for multiple penalties which kept moving the ball backwards. With 8:18 left to go, Madison County attempted to convert on fourth down, however, they were unsuccessful and the Bulldogs took over on downs. On the Bulldogs' rst play, Denzel Washington ran the ball from their own 30 yard line to the Cowboys' 19 yard line. Following two incomplete passes and two short runs, the Bulldogs were forced to settle for a eld goal. The attempt was good, 10-0. The Cowboys didn't let the rst quarter expire without putting points on the board. It took about 10 plays for Suwannee County to near the end zone. With 1:48 left to go in the rst quarter, Akevious Williams fumbled the snap. However, he was able to pick it up and threw a pass for a touchdown. The extra point attempt was good, 10-7. Second quarter Prior to the start of the second quarter, the Bulldogs had possession of the ball and was moving down the eld. However, a fumble by the home team was recovered by the Cowboys. Following the fumble recovery, the Cowboys had no success moving the ball, and was forced to punt. The Bulldogs elded the punt at the 40 yard line and returned the ball to the Cowboys' 20 yard line. The Bulldogs managed to get the ball to the six yard line and attempted to convert on fourth down but was unsuccessful. Madison County took over at their own ve yard line. The Cowboys did not move the ball on their rst two plays. On the third down, Tre Arnold ran the ball to the Bulldogs' 29 yard line. Three plays later, the Cowboys fumbled the ball and Suwannee County recovered it. After a big run on rst down, the Bulldogs completed short runs mixed with a few pass plays to get the ball within eld goal range. The Bulldogs were able to add a successful eld goal attempt, 13-7. Third quarter Madison County got the ball to start the second half. On second down, Eric Bright ran the ball to the 33 yard line for a rst down. However, the Bulldogs' defense held strong and forced the Cowboys to punt the ball. Suwannee got the ball back but they had trouble moving the ball. A few plays into their drive, the Bulldogs fumbled the ball and the Cowboys recovered it. On the rst play following the fumble recovery, Williams completed a long pass to Arnold for a touchdown with 8:47 left on the clock. The extra point attempt was successful, 14-13. For the remaining of the quarter, both teams punted once and fumbled the ball which was recovered by the opposing team. Fourth quarter Suwannee County punted the ball back to Madison just a few plays into the nal quarter. With 10:51 on the clock, Madison County took over at their own 38 yard line. On third down, Bright got the ball to the 47 yard line for a rst down. On the following play, Williams completed a pass to Jay West at the Bulldogs' 37 yard line for another rst down. Just a few plays later, the Cowboys marched the ball into the end zone for a touchdown with 7:04 on the clock. The extra point attempt was good, 21-13. Suwannee County moved the chains across the eld and was stopped just short of the goal line. However, two consecutive ve yard penalties drove the Bulldogs back to the 10 yard line. On second down, the Cowboys intercepted the pass and brought the ball back to their own 40 yard line. Before the end of that play, the Cowboys fumbled the ball and it was recovered by the Bulldogs. Two plays later, Washington took the ball in for a touchdown. The Bulldogs attempted a two-point conversion and it was good to tie the score at 21-21 with 1:01 left in the game. Madison County got the ball back, but was unable to score, sending the game into overtime. Overtime The Bulldogs got the ball at the 10 yard line to start the overtime period. On the rst play, McAllister got the ball and was stopped just short at the one yard line. The next play, the Bulldogs scored a touchdown. The extra point attempt was no good, 27-21. The Cowboys then got the ball at the 10 yard line. Just a few plays later, the Cowboys scored a touchdown and was able to convert on the extra point attempt, winning the game by one point, 28-27.New Scoreboard Ready For First Home GameGreen Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, August 22, 2014With the old scoreboard taken down and resting on the ground to the left, the new digital Electro Mech scoreboard is ready to shine. Needing only the top Boot Hill StadiumŽ title portion, it is almost completely installed and ready for the Madison County High School Cowboys' “rst home game. The white spaces around the new board will be leased to advertisers, and School Superintendent Doug Brown already has a few lined up. It is his intention to have the board pay for itself with advertising revenue within the “rst year of operation. After that, any additional revenue will go to the school. With their “rst game and “rst win of the season behind them, an away game where they defeated the Suwannee County Bulldogs 28 … 27, the Cowboys will take on the Tampa Catholic High School Crusaders, Friday, Aug. 29, on their home turf, and here's hoping that the “rst of“cial score this new sign records is also a win for MCHS. Good luck, Cowboys!

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Aucilla Christian Academy teachers, staff and students are excited about the new school year ahead. Principal Richard Finlayson, now in his 18thyear at ACA, started the rst week of school by training the fth grade class, as he does every year, on the importance of raising and lowering the American ag each and every day of the school year. He also addressed the student body to emphasize the importance of hiding this year's theme verse in their hearts. Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly handles the word of truth: II Timothy 2:15," said Finalyson. The number one mission at ACA is reaching students for Christ and a new way the school is achieving that mission is with an ACA student ambassador program. With an increase in enrollment this school year, now a 330 student body, ambassadors are assisting with student led tours and welcoming parents and prospective students to the school in addition to working with ACA alumni. Two new teachers, each of whom have three children attending ACA, have joined the ACA faculty. Michele Arceneaux, wife of Byron Arceneaux, is a graduate of Georgia Tech with a B.S. and is teaching Algebra II, while Cristi Beshears, wife of Halsey Beshears, our state representative, is a graduate of both the Mississippi University for Women with a B.S. and Mississippi State with a M.S. and is teaching Spanish I and II. Our generous Capital Campaign contributors funded numerous improvements around the school this summer, including: new audio visual technology in the school auditorium, a new handicap accessible ramp into the main building, a new drop-ceiling in the main building to reduce noise, new roofing, new web-based curriculum mapping, plus so much more. The active PTO organization also hosted a Boo Hoo Breakfast for new parents on the rst day of school and hosted a luncheon at New Family Orientation. "We welcome anyone in our area to tour our campus to see the exciting things happening at our school; God is blessing us greatly," said Finlayson. "ACA is just a short drive from the three main areas we serve: Perry, Madison and Monticello, and we'd love to introduce them to our ACA family." To schedule a visit or for more information, please call (850) 997-3597, visit aucilla.org or facebook.com/aucillachristianacademy. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27,2014 10A € Madison County CarrierSCHOOL MCHS New Band Teacher Dedicated To MusicBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Monica Brokenborough is the new band director at Madison County High School. She is from Atlanta, Ga. and this is her fifth year teaching. She previously taught in a school in South Carolina. "Music has been my life," said Brokenborough. She started with the clarinet when she was eight-years-old because her older sister played it and the instrument was available to her when she joined band. She has since added the saxophone and flute. She can play all of the instruments taught in band, however, the clarinet, saxophone and flute are the only one's she is willing to play in public. Brokenborough said that she has been teaching music for a majority of her life. She taught her younger brother to play the clarinet when he was seven. Also, when she was in band in school, the teachers gave her a lot of responsibility in helping other students. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Music Performance at the University of Cincinnati and a Masters in Music Education at West Virginia University. She currently resides in Tallahassee and commutes to work. Her goal for the upcoming year in band is to keep the students and build upon what they have already been taught. The band has been in competitions before but she would like to get the students more exposure to competition. She is also building a new website for the band to help promote the students and their music. Monica Brokenborough "" Music has been my life Getting Ready For Back-To-SchoolBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Students, teachers and parents aren't the only ones who have to get ready for back-toschool. "Getting ready" includes the entire district as a whole, and at the last school board meeting, the board members heard from Academic Services Ofcer James Mills and others about the district's plans to help students get the classes and credits they need, and a grant that might be able to help. Mills spoke to the board about intervention efforts with children who are falling behind or have fallen behind. Students who are "overage," meaning they have failed a grade or been held back a year, have already been identied. "We will meet them on day one with a plan to catch up to their peers," said Mills. His plans also including those who are already in credit recovery programs, making sure they are able to get what they need. "We're not going to wait until Christmas, and we're not going to wait until three weeks before graduation (to offer help)," he said. Studies have shown that these students are the most likely to drop out, and students dropping out would no longer be an acceptable scenario for the district. Academic Services was also prepared to work with the Boys and Girls Club. School Superintendent Doug Brown said he had an extensive meeting with the Boys and Girls Club directors and was satised that the supervision problems from last year had been resolved. Finally, the district had just received notication of a School Improvement Grant (SIG) of a little more than $100,000, renewable on a year to year basis, that it had received; the board had only to vote to accept it. School board member Bart Alford questioned the efcacy of the SIG, stating that the last two grants had been "an embarrassment," paying for school district employees to travel to conferences all over, but providing very little else of value. Speaking as a taxpayer, he added that he felt that the district wasn't being good stewards with federal money by accepting such grants. "I know some people feel entitled, but at some point, the money runs out" he said. Brown, however, said that he felt that this grant could be "a game-changer" for the district, allowing it to implement some needed programs. After making sure that the board could opt not to renew at the end of the year if the current grant in question did not provide what it was supposed to, Alford made the motion to accept the grant for the 2014-2015 school year. VeEtta Hagan seconded his motion and the board approved the grant which runs through June 30, 2015.ACA: Growing & Putting God First ACA Students Inducted Into National Society Of High School ScholarsPhoto SubmittedAucilla Christian Academy seniors, Cole Barclay and Sarah James, were inducted into the National Society of High School Students. James (right) attended the formal ceremony in Washington, D.C.Aucilla Christian Academy seniors, Cole Barclay, son of Kevin and Leslie Barclay of Greenville, and Sarah James, daughter of J.D. and April James of Monticello, were selected to become members of The National Society of High School Scholars. Both students are on the honor roll at ACA and participate in Living Waters, a Christian drama club. Cole is the Editor of the ACA Yearbook, where Sarah is also on staff and is involved in other activities, including: Beta Club, ACA Ambassadors, dance, horseback riding, summer camp counselor and was previously a People to People Ambassador. This Society recognizes top scholars who have demonstrated outstanding leadership, scholarship, and community commitment. The induction was held on August 2, 2014, in Washington, D.C.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27,2014Madison County Carrier € 11ASCHOOL C h u r c h D i r e c t o r yFirst United Methodist Church (850) 973-6295 Rev. Robert E. Laidlaw Pocko Vause, Youth Pastor Service of Word & Table...........................8:30 a.m. Sunday School............................................9:45 a.m. Worship Service........................................11:00 a.m. Wed. Jr. High Youth (grades 6 8)...........5 6 p.m. Wed. Sr. High Youth (grades 9 12)...6 7:30 p.m.Midway Church Of God 2485 SE Midway Church Rd € Lee (850) 971-5200 € Pastor Retis Flowers Sunday School..........................................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship.....................................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship........................................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Family Training Hour............7:00 p.m.Landmark Baptist Church 3399 W US Hwy 90 € Madison (850) 973-7190 € Pastor, Robert Ledford Sunday Sunday School............................................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship.....................................11:00 a.m. Evening BTC............................................6:30 p.m. Evening Worship........................................7:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting...........................................7:30 p.m.Macedonia Baptist Church 5539 E US 90 Lee, Florida 32059 Sunday School..........................................10:00 a.m. Worship Service........................................11:00 a.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting......................6:00 p.m. List Your Church Here Call (850) 973-4141 Southern Scholarship Foundation:Fro m H u mb le B e g innin g s T o 27 Scholarship H ousesBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.In 1953, Dr. Mode L. Stone realized that many topnotch students in small, rural communities were not going on to college. A native of Blountstown, one of those small, rural communities, he had been invited to give the commencement address at Altha High School, in Altha, an even smaller nearby community. Later, he spoke with two of the top graduates who wanted to attend FSU but had no plans to do so. Even with tuition scholarships, college was out of the the question for them, because the cost of room and board was beyond their modest means. This was in the years following World War Two, when thousands of returning soldiers had taken advantage of the G.I. Bill and received a college education, and the university system had expanded rapidly by the 1950s to accommodate the new inux of students. However, generational poverty still meant that college was unattainable for many bright, capable high school graduates who came later. A little later, while pondering how to help these two students achieve their dream, Stone realized that if housing could be provided at no cost, the boys could work together and pool their resources for other living expenses to make it work. He obtained permission for them to live in an abandoned barracks at Dale Mabry Field and prevailed upon local business leaders to donate furnishings and appliances. By the end of that semester, word had spread, and 11 young men were sharing the cooperative living arrangements at the barracks. From these humble beginnings, the Southern Scholarship Foundation was born. Two years later, the foundation incorporated as a non-prot and purchased its rst scholarship house. Kimberly GalbanCountryman, Director of Development at the Southern Scholarship Foundation, visited the Madison Rotary Club to tell the story of how the foundation had grown in the last 60 years, now serving six schools and housing 458 students in 27 scholarship houses. Last year, she told the club, 45 percent of the students in Southern Scholarship Houses were rst-generation college students, including many minorities and students from overseas. The students live together in a communitystyle setting, working together to keep up the house, sharing a regular schedule of chores, and sharing meals together four nights a week. All funds for maintenance of the scholarship houses come from donations from groups, businesses, civic clubs and other generous donors, while the students pay a modest food and service bill for the semester. It costs the Southern Scholarship Foundation about $3,000 a year to house each student, saving the students an average of $12,000 a year. In 1961, thanks to Rotary Club donations, the foundation opened the Rotary Club House on the FSU Campus. In Gainesville, the Rogers Rotary House serves female medical students studying any branch of medicine, including veterinary medicine. The community setting in each house is important, because it is an education for living. Supervised by a house manager, SSF students must learn to live and work together, learning cooperation and teamwork; these students, she believes, are better prepared for success and for life. As an example, she told the audience, three executives at CSX Railroad are former Southern Scholarship students. Many times, students stay in touch with the program and each other even after they leave. Often, former SSF students help with mentoring or setting up other events to help students. One former student has set up a recurring event to teach them how to dress for success, how to talk and how to behave during interviews to get the internship or the job. Each year about 100 students graduate, leaving about 100 openings in the houses. And each year, there are about 2,500 applications for those openings. The selection process considers income levels, but the students must be capable, motivated, and have a 3.0 or higher GPA. Since those humble beginnings in an abandoned barracks in 1953, more than 8,700 students have gone through the program, many graduating with little or no student debt. "It's a program that benets and helps the students," Galban-Countryman said, whether it is with a successful career that breaks the cycle of poverty...or the friendships that last a lifetime.

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By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, IncFirst Baptist Church held fundraisers and helped send 16 of its members to Monterrey, Mexico from Saturday, July 26 until Friday, Aug. 1. The people who went on the mission trip were, First Baptist Church Pastor Gabe Krell, Kara Washington (Team leader), Vernon Howard (Liaison with Back2Back), Ray and Sarah Pike, Heath and Becky Driggers, Joey and Shelly Smith, Bill and Ann McLeod, Nita Fico, Amy Kendrick, Chad Thurner, Taylor Money and Courtney Richardson. The mission trip was through Back2Back Ministries. According to Back2Back Ministries’ website, Back2Back Ministries is an international Christian non-profit organization that is dedicated to being a voice for orphans. Through their five-point Child Development Plan, they strive to provide holistic care to each child. Meeting spiritual, physical, educational, emotional and social needs that they might overcome their life circumstances and break free from the cycle of generational poverty. Back2Back Ministries is partnered with six children homes in Monterrey, Mexico. The group was assigned to a home with another group from Norway. According to Kara Washington, the people who went helped improve the living conditions of the children in the home. Some helped clean up rubble left from past projects, some helped paint playground equipment and some helped pour a new concrete sidewalk. The group was also able to help with Vacation Bible School, play games with the children, craft and take a field trip with the children. The group hiked a mountain with the children and was able to form a relationship with the them in the children’s home, according to Sarah Pike, who is a member of First Baptist Church and was apart of the mission trip. Pike’s favorite part of the trip was “getting to know the children and seeing how God can use us without knowing the language.” Pike admitted that she does not know much Spanish, but she was able to communicate nonverbally to the children. Washington’s favorite part of the trip was “getting to see the expanse of who God is and seeing a bigger picture of God’s love.” Pike said that on their last day, they were able to throw the children an ice cream party, which she realized was a treat to the children, when she spoke to a boy at the home. Ice cream is readily available to people in the U.S. but according to the boy, the children do not get ice cream on a regular basis. According to Pike, the public school system in Mexico ends at 9thgrade. If a student wishes to go further, they must pay for the education, which is difficult if the child is an orphan. Back2Back Ministries offers the Hope Education Program, which gives the orphaned children, they serve, the opportunity to pursue educational goals. Living in a family style setting, students are mentored, supported through scholarships and tutoring, and encouraged to pursue their dreams. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27, 2014 12A € Madison County CarrierCHURCH 16 First Baptist Church Members Go To Mexico On A Mission TripPhoto Courtesy Of Taylor MoneyThe First Baptist Church of Madison ladies were busy painting a swing set for the children in Mexico. Pictured from left to right are: Sarah Pike, Courtney Richardson, Taylor Money, Kara Washington (kneeling) and Shelly Smith. Vanessa, pictured on the far right, pitched in to help the ladies paint the swing set. ...Story Continued On Page 13A

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27, 2014Madison County Carrier € 13ACHURCH € Open 24/7 € Photo SubmittedThe men were able to “nish a sidewalk for an orphanage that was located in Monterrey, Mexico. The mission group had the privile ge of working at the orphanage everyday and was able to touch many hearts during their trip, through their good deeds. Photo Courtesy Of Taylor MoneyShelly Smith (left) and Taylor Money (right) walk with a little girl that they met during the mission trip.Photo Courtesy Of Taylor MoneyAlong with doing work for the citizens of Mexico, the group also got a chance to play with the children. Shown above is Courtney Richardson (far left) playing water duck duck goose with the children. Mission Trip Cont. From Page 12A Cal U Toda! Call us today to chat with one of our Metal Roof Specialists and “nd out how a Premium Metal Roof will not only add incredible curb appeal to your project, but will also help you save BIG on your next energy bill! All of our Roo“ng Systems are engineered and ready for installation, and in many cases can be mounted directly over your current roo“ng material.1(855) IT-LASTS (485-2787)www.GulfCoastSupply.com RECEIVE UP TO $500 TAX CREDITCALL OR STOP BY OUR SHOWROOM IN ALACHUA TODAY FOR DETAILS ApproveENERGYTAX CREDIT RECEIVE UP TO $500 TCALL OR STOP BY OUR SHOWROOM IN ALACHUA TODA to chat with one of our Metal Roof Specialists and A X CR T TA CALL OR STOP BY OUR SHOWROOM IN ALACHUA TODA to chat with one of our Metal Roof Specialists and AX CREDITAILS Y FOR DE T TOD A AY to chat with one of our Metal Roof Specialists and AX CREDI G ENERGY T TA ENERGXCREDIT Approve Aprove ApproveNER Call us today “nd out how a Pr appeal to your pr next energy bill! All of our Roo“ng Systems installation, and in many cases can be your curr Call us today to chat with one of our Metal Roof Specialists and emium Metal Roof will not only add incr “nd out how a Pr oject, but will also help you appeal to your pr next energy bill! All of our Roo“ng Systems installation, and in many cases can be oo“ng material. ent r your curr to chat with one of our Metal Roof Specialists and emium Metal Roof will not only add incr oject, but will also help you save BIG on your All of our Roo“ng Systems eady for ed and r e engineer ar installation, and in many cases can be mounted dir oo“ng material. to chat with one of our Metal Roof Specialists and edible curb emium Metal Roof will not only add incr save BIG on your eady for ectly over mounted dir Cal U Toda! LA S 1 ( 855 ) I T T.GulfCoastSupply www Cal U Toda!-LASTS (485-2787).com .GulfCoastSupply

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As a nal course assignment for students of the licensed practitioner nurse program at North Florida Community College, students Chelsea Musgrove, Deborah Buie, Lilly Eckels and Deb Kinsey chose to conduct a community-wide Ensure drive to aid the efforts of Big Bend Hospice. As a prelude to the group's "Pomp and Circumstance," $538.00 was raised by speaking to local community groups about the need for ongoing support of hospice. The donations requested and received garnered 433 cans of Ensure that will assist patients that reside in Madison County. Ensure is consumed by many of the patients with Big Bend Hospice, as a means to receive essential vitamins and nutrients needed to promote health and vitality while receiving hospice and palliative care. "Big Bend Hospice has been there to help families during difcult times," said Deb Kinsey, recent NFCC graduate. "Each of the groups in our class was very happy to help out their organization of choice, and my group was just as passionate about our nal project benetting our community's local hospice." Hospice care is 100 percent covered for Medicare and Medicaid beneciaries. This coverage includes: medical services from doctors, nurses and hospice aides, medicines prescribed for the terminal diagnosis, medical equipment and medical supplies, spiritual counsel from a hospice chaplain and grief support by a certied board counselor for families and patients. Medical services are billed to Medicare Part B, Medicaid, commercial health insurance or HMO plans. The Big Bend Hospice Foundation raises funds to help those who are unable to pay for all the care they receive. Foundation funds come from fundraising events and from individual and community donations. The donations received pay for music therapy and additional home care for the family all of which are not reimbursable by Medicare and Medicaid, but improve the quality of life for someone who is suffering from a life limiting illness. "Big Bend Hospice is able to help all community citizens that qualify for care, regardless of their ability to pay, because of generous community support and donations," said Michelle Brantley, community relations representative for Big Bend Hospice. "Each day, families deal with the difcult responsibility of caring for a companion, friend, or loved one living with a terminal illness, and we are here to share the journey." Licensed since 1983, Big Bend Hospice provides expert health care, encouragement, hope, compassion and companionship to people with a life-limiting illness, so that they can complete personal goals and nd spiritual and emotional peace. If you would like to volunteer, request bereavement services or to request more information about our services, please call (850) 878-5310 or visit www.bigbendhospice.org. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27, 2014 14A € Madison County CarrierHEALTH Enter for a chance to win FOUR FREE TICKETS to € No Photocopies Accepted € Tickets are good September 6 ONLY € € Deadline To Enter is September 2, 2014 € Winners will be announced September 3, 2014 €Name____________________________ ___________________________ Address__________________________ __________________________ Phone Number____________________ Fill out and return to Greene Publishing, Inc. at P.O. Drawer 772 or 1695 S. S.R. 53 Madison Fl, 32340 DAY OF PRAISE NFCC Students Conduct Ensure Drive For Big Bend Hospice

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Buy, Sell or Trade In The Classieds Call 973-4141 Call 973-4141www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . LEGALS Wednesday, August 27, 2014 Madison County Carrier € 15A Check us out on-line www.greenepublishing.com FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 8/25/2014 THROUGH 8/31/2014 Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ”ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message.7/23 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBecome A Certied Nursing Assistant Quest Training offers a nurse taught CNA prep class. No GED required if age 18. Professional training site, high pass rates. Now accepting students. 386-362-1065.8/13 8/27, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12'x18' building with 6' porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/cFor Rent Furnished 1 BD Trailer on Small Quiet Farm includes Direct TV. Background Check $300 month plus security (850) 673-1117.7/16 rtn, c Pressure Washing I can pressure wash your house, business, sidewalks and drive-ways. Call (850) 843-4405.7/23 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling, 18 tons, $350 load. Call Paul Kinsley at (850) 464-1230.8/27 rtn, n/cWanted To Hire Someone To Establish Network At Small ofce. Call 850-973-99808/6, rtn, n/c Immediate Opening At Madison Heights Apartments 3 Bedroom Unit Applications are available at 150 SW Bumgardener Drive., Monday through Friday 8 a.m. 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. 4 p.m.8/13 rtn, c Honey Lake Plantation in Greenville, FL is rapidly expanding. We are looking for team mates to ll the following open positions: € Corp Sales Manager € Hunting Sales/Activities Sales Director € Catering Conference Director € IT Tech …part time € 10 Event Servers part time … mostly weekends € 1 Event Setup Person € Banquet Bartender € Breakfast Cook € Painter € Marketing Coordinator For further information go to www.employorida.com e-mail ron@honeylake.com or call 850-848-9911 ext 802. Honey Lake Plantation offers competitive pay and bene“ts. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.8/27, cApartment For Rent 2 BD 1 BA Large Garage For Rent. Located in Lee. $400/month, $200 security deposit. (850) 971-5587.8/20 rtn, c Lake Park of Madison LPN and CNA Fulltime and PRN Positions. New higher PRN Pay. Contact Kim Browning HR or Connie Walker DON. (850) 973-8277.8/20, 8/27, cDrivers: CDL-A. Average $52,000 per yr. plus. Excellent Home Time + Weekends. Monthly Bonuses up to $650. 5,000w APU's for YOUR Comfort + E-Logs. Excellent Bene“ts. 100% no touch. 877-704-3773.8/20, 8/27, pdACCOUNTANT Madison County Memorial Hospital. Min. AA in Accounting with min 2 yrs accounting exp. Call Human Resources (850) 253-1906.8/20, 8/27, c Full Circle Dairy is seeking an Ofce Support Manager to coordinate and help manage the ofce functions. This position requires a dynamic, personable, professional individual with strong organizational skills who will facilitate the smooth functioning of the of“ce and work well with others. Speci“c responsibilities include but are not limited to € Be the of“ce point of contact € Manage and organize employee “les € Order parts and supplies € Organize and maintain general business “les € Provide support to managers € Maintain detailed spreadsheets € Document shipping and receiving MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS € Must be a team player “rst and foremost € Three or more years of experience in a similar capacity with one employer € Ability to work with minimal supervision € Strong computer skills with pro“ciency in MS Of“ce (Outlook, Word, and Excel) Candidate should also have € Professional verbal and written communication skills, including phone skills € Ability to effectively organize administrative work processes and tasks for multiple Senior Managers (e.g. GM, Bookkeeper, Farm Manager, etc.) € Willingness to pitch in to help with other than assigned standard tasks, someone whom takes initiative Compensation and Benets € $13 $17+ per hour depending on quali“cations € Health insurance € Paid vacation Please email resumes and inquires to: jobs@fcdlee.com.8/20 rtn, c Advent Christian Village Current JOBS Line Advertisement call (386) 658-5627 or visit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs / day, 7 days / week FT Licensed PA-C or ARNP FT position to deliver primary care in HPSAdesignated, established rural clinic with onsite board certi“ed physician. On-call rotation with two other practitioners for evenings / weekends and medical support for 161bed skilled nursing facility required. Experience preferred but not required. Unrestricted FL license required. Experience in electronic medical records and geriatrics a plus. Must be committed to compassionate healthcare. FT positions offer competitive compensation packages, retirement, paid time off, access to onsite daycare & “tness facilities. Apply in person at ACV Personnel of“ce Monday thru Friday, 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume / credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / DFW / Criminal background checks required.8/27, 9/3, c 8/20, 8/27, 9/3, 9/10 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: THE ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 2014-67-CP STEPHEN EDWARD GATLIN, a/k/a STEPHEN E. GATLIN, a/k/a STEPHEN GATLIN, Deceased. _________________________/ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of STEPHEN EDWARD GATLIN, a/k/a STEPHEN E. GATLIN, a/k/a STEPHEN GATLIN, deceased, whose death was June 17, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Madison County Clerk of Court, Probate Division, P. O. Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341. The name and address of the Joint Personal Representatives and their attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against Decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must “le their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against Decedents estate must “le their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of “rst publication of this Notice is August 20, 2014. Attorney for Joint Personal Representatives: Joint Personal Representatives: s/Scot B. Copeland s/Stephen Scott Gatlin Scot B. Copeland (FBN 0156681)Stephen Scott Gatlin Law Of“ces of Scot B. Copeland, P. L. 2705 Devon Street Post Of“ce Drawer 916 Paragould, AR 72450 Madison, FL 32341 Ph: (850) 973-4100 s/Lynda Christine Lameier scopeland@scotcopelandlaw.com Lynda Christine Lameier 2646 SW Dupont Street Greenville, FL 323318/20, 8/27 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA. MADISON COUNTY COMMUNITY BANKCIVIL ACTION NO. 2014-21-CA Post Office Box 834 Madison, Florida 32341 Plaintiff, vs.FORECLOSURE AND OTHER RELIEF WILLIAM D. OBERSCHLAKE 347 NE Ridge Loop Madison, Florida 32340 AMANDA MATHEWS OBERSCHLAKE 347 NE Ridge Loop Madison, Florida 32340 unknown tenants; and other unknown parties in possession, including the unknown spouse of any person in possession of the property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the named or described Defendants, Defendants. _______________________________/ NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered on August 19, 2014, in the above styled action I, TIM S ANDERS, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 132, CHERRY LAKE FARMS SUBDIVISION NO. 4, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK ONE, PAGE C, OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, PUBLIC RECORDS, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF RIDGE ROAD ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAS T HAVING A CHORD OF SOUTH 63 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 167.30 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 283.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 148.96 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 268.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. The sale will be held on September 18, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. (or as soon thereafter as possible, provided that said sale must be commenced prior to 2:00 p.m.) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the West door of the courthouse in Madison County, in Madison, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the owner of the above described property as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra Williams, court administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida 32056, telephone:(386)758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated:August 19, 2014. TIM SANDERS, As Clerk of the Court By:/s/ Ramona Dickinson As Deputy Clerk August 27, 2014 and September 3, 2014 8/27, 9/3 Drivers, CDL-A: Home EVERY Weekend! ALL Loaded/Empty Miles Paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or Walk Away Lease, No Money Down. 1-855-971-8524.8/27, pd HEY! WE’RE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]It’s never been easier to share your local news with friends and family! Adoption ADOPTloving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789. Autos Wanted We buy all vehicles with or without title. Any condition, running or not, bank liensno problem. We pay top dollar. 813-516-0847, 813-505-6939. Help Wanted Drivers CDL-A. NEW REGIONAL RUNS! FL, TN, GA, AL, & MS. Mostly Out & Back. Exp. Solos 40¢/mile. 1¢/mile yearly pay increaseNO CAP. Extra Pay for Hazmat! 888-928-6011 Drive4Total.com. "Can You Dig It"? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 Wk Hands On Program. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance w/National Certi“cations. VA Bene“ts Eligible! 1-866-362-6497. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin hereGet FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SAVE Up to 50% Today! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-800-605-0984. DirectTV 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirectTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-481-2137. Attention: VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special $99 FREE Shipping! 100 Percent Guaranteed. CALL NOW: 1-800-943-8953. Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800-605-6035 for $750 Off. OTR Drivers Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE.North Florida Community College, Madison FL., Director of Business & Tech Services. See www.nfcc.edu for details.8/27 9/3, c

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 27, 2014 16A € Madison County CarrierFARM Organic Farming 101 At Cherokee Creek FarmBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.Wayne Conger says that most people have never eaten a tomato. By that, he means that few people have tasted anything other than what passes for tomatoes at Winn-Dixie, Publix or other grocery stores. Not that they don't look great – big or small, they're nice, deep red, plump, round and virtually unblemished. Makes you wonder, he said once, how anything that looks so beautiful could taste so bland. Over the years, tomatoes and other food plants have been cross-bred for hardiness, insect resistance, disease resistance and colorful, good-looking end products; however, the qualities in these hybrids that made them easier to grow and better-looking on the produce aisle often came at the expense of tastiness. At Cherokee Creek Farm, Conger and his wife Alicia, have made a full-time operation out of raising heirloom fruits and vegetables, rather than modern-day hybrids. “Heirloom” varieties are the same as they were decades ago, perhaps as far back as the late 19thcentury; these are your grandfather's or great-grandfather's vegetable plants. Unfortunately, some are extinct, or have been lost, but many were saved year after year by farming families and gardening enthusiasts – people who appreciated them for the way they tasted, handing the seeds down to new generations of growers. Today, there are seed companies that handle heirloom seeds, which can be ordered online. Besides having only heirloom fruits and vegetables (with Aji Dulce shrubs scattered throughout to attract bees), Cherokee Creek Farm is completely organic. No chemicals, no fertilizers other than natural compost, and certainly, no pesticides. And since these heirloom plants aren't as disease or insect-resistant.... “It's labor-intensive,” Conger says, hand-picking worms off the wide leaves of the okra plants. “But when you're doing something you love, it doesn't seem like work,” Alicia adds. Farming is in their blood. Wayne grew up in Hialeah, a small town at that time, and recalls spending a lot of time with his grandfather in the garden, picking fresh vegetables. Wherever he lived as an adult, he always had a garden, even if it was only a collection of containers on a balcony. Alicia grew up on her grandparents' farm near Gainesville, where corn, watermelons and peanuts grew abundantly, where cows roamed the pastures and chickens provided fresh eggs. Fishing, swimming, gathering eggs and plenty of room to run around are some of her favorite childhood memories. Although they both pursued other rewarding professions as adults, they still held a love of the land close to their hearts. In 2003, they purchased land in Madison County and Cherokee Creek Farm was born, named for Wayne's great-great grandmother, a member of the eastern band of the Cherokee Nation, and Alicia's great grandmother, a Creek from the south Alabama region. Cherokee Creek Farm is Certied Naturally Grown, and is a reection of the Congers' belief in sustainable agriculture and respect for the land and the wildlife it supports. Most of the 100 acres is a wildlife sanctuary. High fences keep hungry critters out of the growing areas, but there are four feeding stations nearby, regularly supplied with corn. The whitetailed deer love it. “Certied Naturally Grown” seems to agree with the plants. In spite of having no chemical fertilizers, the plants are tall and the stems are sturdy. As an example, the okra plants tower overhead and the stems rising out of the soil are almost as thick as a small child's wrist. The difference is that, at Cherokee Creek Farm and other organic farms like it, they feed the soil, and the soil takes care of the plant. Most commercially produced fertilizers feed just the plant, adding nothing to the soil. Over time, the soil gradually becomes more and more depleted, requiring more and more fertilizer to get the same amount of yield, a cycle that eventually becomes unsustainable. The soil is the key. It has to be fed and cared for; at Cherokee Creek, that means a combination of mushroom compost, chicken manure and wheat straw. The one thing to remember about using manure is to add it to the soil at least one month before planting (and make sure that's at least three months before harvesting) so as not to burn the plants. The soil has to be loosened for planting, but not with a garden tiller which loosens only the top layer, compacting the layer directly beneath. A plant's root system cannot penetrate any lower than the tiller's blades can reach. Instead, Conger uses a “broadfork,” a twohandled pitchfork-type tool with 12-inch tines that can be sunk into the ground by stepping onto the top edge between the handles, much like one would step on the top edge of a shovel to push it down into the soil. Then, one steps back and pulls the handles backward to lift the soil upward. Then, just move back nine inches and repeat the process all over again. For a video demonstration (not Conger, but someone using the same technique), go tohttp:// www.youtube.co m/watch?v=22WjBjLiRoE).This is another labor-intensive part of the organic farming operation, but it helps create the mound of loosened soil that is weeded and shaped into eight-inch-high raised plant beds, getting them ready for the compost and the plants. Then, it's time for the plants to go in, each plant raised from seed in small “cow pots” (between 1000 and 2000 tiny pots each year, made from dried cow manure) that can be set into the ground, pot and all. Alicia plants everything by hand. Finally, there is the irrigation. The idea is to wet only the soil, not the plants, in order to inhibit mold, mildew and fungal growth, so that means no overhead irrigation or sprinkler systems. Instead, soaker hoses run the length of each row. Conger prefers soaker hoses, which spread the moisture more evenly along the rows and encourage better root growth. Drip hoses tend to make the roots concentrate around the drip holes. Cherokee Creek Farm is a year-round operation, with spring/summer crops including beets, cabbage, carrots, cucumbers, eggplant, lettuce, okra, onions, peas, peppers, radishes, summer squash and tomatoes. In the fall/winter rotation, they usually grow beets, cabbage, carrots, kale, lettuce, onions, swiss chard, rutabagas and turnips. Some years, they also have a fall crop of tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers, if the weather allows. Cherokee Creek Farm is a member of the Red Hills Small Farm Alliance, selling produce online atwww.rhomarket.comand to local restaurants. It will be one of several small farms featured in the New Leaf Market Co-op farm tour, Saturday, Oct. 25. People are invited to come out that day and see what organic farming is all about. For the broadforking demonstration, be there at 10 a.m. or 2 p.m. For more information on Cherokee Creek Farm, emailheirlooms@CherokeeCreekFarms.com.Greene Publishing Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, August 13, 2014Wayne Conger gives a broadfork demonstration for visitor Dale Stone, who is interested in learning the basics of organic farming.Greene Publishing Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, August 13, 2014Wayne Conger and Dale Stone inspect what Conger calls The Long Tunnel,Ž an enclosed space that can be shaded with screening material in the summer and covered with plastic in the winter to protect young plants and lengthen the growing seasons.Greene Publishing Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, August 13, 2014Underneath The Long Tunnel, dozens of small plants grow from seeds in their cow pots.Ž When the roots start growing through the sides of the pots, they're ready to be planted in the ground.Greene Publishing Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, August 13, 2014Clockwise from left: Thai long green, ping tung, Rosita and Aswad... different shapes and colors, but they're all eggplants. Heirloom vegetables include several varieties that may not be familiar to many people.Greene Publishing Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, August 13, 2014A large wooden box holds the collection of heirloom seed packages. Wayne and Alicia Conger are always willing to try different varieties at the farm.

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2B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday August 27, 2014 Bridal Guide

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Bridal Guide Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, August 27, 2014 € 3B C CLEANING LEANINGY YOUR OURW WEDDING EDDINGG GOWN OWN By Sally Lorensen Conant www.local-i-dos.com Chances are you know even before you make your first visit to a bridal salon just what style and fabric you think your wedding gown should be. But will the bridal gown that suits you be suitable for use? Before you fall in love with that bridal gown, take a second look. If there are beads, sequins, crystals or other decorative trims, be sure they are securely attached to the wedding gown. Glued decorations never hold up as well as those that are sewn although sewing can be done so carelessly that beads start falling on the way down the aisle. Now look inside the wedding gown. The bridal gown care label provides a guideline for cleaning. It may not be the only way to clean the wedding dress, it may not even be the best way to clean your wedding dress, but is the method specified by the bridal gown manufacturer. So if beads melt or glue melts or fabric shrinks, the manufacturer is liable for the damage to your bridal gown. You may find symbols as well as written directions on the wedding gown care label. After a transition period that ended in 1999, symbols only may be used. Although European bridal gown care labels carry slightly different graphics, those in the U.S., Canada and Mexico are expected to be identical. Five basic symbols stand for washing, bleaching, drying, ironing and dry cleaning. Much like the universally understood pictographs seen in airports and on roadways, a diagonal line through the symbol prohibits use of the process it represents. And there are wedding and other dresses, particularly specialty dresses and dresses for the mother of the bride that carry labels with lines through all five symbols! Marks added to the basic symbol indicate still more special handling. For example, a picture of a washing machine plus the image of a hand equals "hand wash." Less easily read are dots and dashes indicating temperatures for drying and ironing or cycle times for dry cleaning. As a rule, the fewer the dots, the lower the suggested temperature, but dashes appear more randomly. Then there are letters that stand for dry cleaning solvents. Unless you have no interest at all in whether or not your wedding gown can ever be cleaned or worn again, ask the bridal shop to advise you if you cannot read the bridal gown care label. Be wary if no one can answer your questions about the bridal gown's serviceability and think twice before you decide to buy such a bridal gown. Is this really the only bridal gown you will ever find that is just right for you -or should you look further for a bridal gown that not only suits you but is also suitable for wear?

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Bridal Guide 4B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, August 27, 2014 Our Guide To Writing Your Own Vows Planning to write your own vows? Here's how to declare your love for each other. www.bridalguide.com No doubt you’ve worked hard to stage a wedding reception with tons of individual style, so why should your ceremony be any different? Get personal, and consider writing your own vows. Don't stress: It’s not as daunting as you might think. Here’s how it’s done. What's Your Style? Decide if you want to say separate vows (you write yours, he writes his), or if you’d rather each recite an identical, all-encompassing vow that you compose together. You can also combine these options: Take turns making personalized promises to each other, and then solemnize these statements by exchanging more formal, traditional vows (“I, Jason, take you, Kimberly, to be my lawful wife, to have and to hold…”) or a variation you decide on together (“I, Stephanie, promise you, David, to always be your wife, your friend, your lover…”). What Makes a Good Vow? Keep in mind that at the heart of every vow is the idea that you’re making a pact. The “agreement” should have these three features, in no particular order: a declaration of love (“Sam, my beloved, I fill my heart with you, to love you until the end of my days”); promises for your marriage (“I pledge to embrace both our similarities and our differences” or “I promise to start family traditions”); and personal touches (“Four years ago, I thought men like you didn’t exist”). Before you both begin writing, decide on the tone you want to set. Your words may be different, but the style should be more or less the same. A practical note: Be sure to keep vows one to three minutes long. What Should You Say? It depends on what you want to emphasize. Maybe it’s fidelity (“I promise to be faithful”); the notion of two people coming together, but maintaining their individuality (“I promise to have the courage to let you be yourself”); or the importance of family (“I promise to create a family with you and to take yours as my own”). Consider where you first met, the first time he kissed you…can you tie any of this in to what you want to pledge? You can be specific, even humorous, about the requirements you plan to fulfill throughout your lives together. Consult a Pro Your officiant can guide you through the vow-writing process by directing you to resources and examples from clients. If you’re having a religious ceremony, he or she can help you write vows that pertain to your faith’s conventions, ideals and symbols. The Big Performance Things to remember before going live: Practice, but don’t overdo it—speak naturally. And if you become a little emotional? It’s okay to cry! Writer's Block? Need some inspiration? These vows appear in the Complete Book of Wedding Vows, by Diane Warner (Career Press): "I acknowledge my love for you and invite you to share my life as I hope to share yours. I promise to walk by your side, to love, help and encourage you. I vow to take time to share with you, to listen and to care. I will share all your laughter and all your tears as your partner, lover and friend. I promise always to respect you and honor you as an individual and to be conscious of your needs. I shall seek through kindness and compassion to achieve with you the life we have planned together." "You are a kind and gentle person, and it is with great joy that I take you as my husband/wife. May our love grow deeper every day of our marriage, and as the days grow to weeks, and the weeks to months and the months to years, may we never forget this joyous day and the vows of commitment we are pledging to each other. I will cherish you and be faithful to you for all eternity."

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Bridal Guide Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, August 27, 2014 € 5B Aairius DJ Entertainment, A Sound Investment By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc. Joe Sena is the CEO and President of Aairius DJ Entertainment, a mobile DJ service based out of Tallahassee. Sena has been in business since 2008 and specializes in weddings and corporate events, but has served as disc jockey for graduation parties, class reunions and birthday parties as well. Sena’s motto for his business is: “First in Quality, First in Your City.” When looking to hire a DJ for your wedding, Sena shares some tips for the future couple:  Always look for a professional. Find one with experience who knows what they’re doing, and make sure you’re not hiring someone who uses an ipod as their main source of music. An experienced professional offers quality sound.  Don’t hire family or friends. Family and friends of the bride or groom at some point will want to join in the celebration, which might leave the announcement microphone unattended, and leave guests unsure of what is happening next.  Hiring a professional will ensure you can relax at your wedding. A schedule of events and music choices will be covered so there won’t be any unexpected surprises the day of the wedding, and a professional will keep the entertainment flowing to keep guests dancing. If you’re considering hiring a professional DJ for your wedding, you can view Joe Sena’s website at www.airiusdj.com email him at joe@aairiusdj.com or call (850) 2244635. € B r i d a l R e g i s t r y € € S h o w e r & W e d d i n g D e c o r a t i n g € € I n v i t a t i o n s € 1900 S. Jefferson St. € Perry, Fl € 32348 (850) 223-4179Mellissa Allen, Manager A n d M o r e

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6B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, August 27, 2014 Bridal Guide Allen Adams Photography Focuses In On Family By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc. Allen Adams Photography is made up of a husband and wife photography team, Allen and Carol Adams, who focus their talents on Wedding and Family Photography. After meeting with the couple, viewing their website, or reading their blog, it becomes evident quickly why they chose to capture families’ special moments with their photography. Marriage and family are important to both Allen and Carol, and after 19 years together, still “love being married” and say family is extremely important to them, not just their own family, but families of those they photograph as well. The couple views their business as not just a job, but as a way to enrich the lives of those they photograph, and are as passionate about seeing clients’ marriages succeed as they are their own marriage. The Adams’ hope that when they photograph an engagement or wedding, their love for each other and their marriage “rubs off” on the couple in front of their lens. The two met in a youth group at church while teenagers, eventually married and started a family, with now three children of their own: Hope, 14; Rebekah, 12 and TJ, 8. Carol home schools, but when there is photography to be done, the kids all help Carol and Allen on the business end, making it a true family affair. Carol says they all do a really good job and each child shows their unique gifts when working alongside their parents. “Hope is really good and I can see her one day having her own photography business,” says Carol. Hope is already doing weddings and twelve-year-old Rebekah is now participating in engagement shoots. TJ does his part by helping out with equipment, but his talent is most appreciated when there are family shoots involving kids. Carol says he has a way of getting kids to smile for the camera, which is really helpful if a case of nerves or shyness has set in. The Adams’ live in Monticello and have for the past seven years, but Carol is a native of South Florida and Allen hails from South Georgia. The whole family loves the beach and all are surfers, but Carol admits she and Hope feel more comfortable on the beach taking pictures and building sandcastles than out riding the waves. Another adventure the family takes time to do together is missionary work. Their last trip was to Costa Rica where they traveled to work on a skateboard park in an effort to work with the kids there. It wasn’t until 2010 that Allen Adams decided to put his camera skills to work professionally. He had always been interested in photography and wife Carol said he always had a camera in his hand and a natural “eye” for photography. Allen dove into learning the technical aspects of photography and with the support of his family, opened Allen Adams Photography and his only regret is that he didn’t do it sooner. Carol said the business has worked out to be a “neat thing” the family can do together and they feel “honored and privileged” to be able to enter people’s lives, even if for a short while. If you are interested in speaking to Allen or Carol Adams, call (850) 510-9703. If you’re interested in learning more about this family business or would like to view their work, visit their Facebook page or website at www.allenadamsphotography.com. Photo SubmittedA snapshot, taken on a recent beach trip, shows the entire Allen Adams Photography family. From left to right, are: TJ, Rebekah, Hope, Carol and Allen.

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Bridal Guide Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, August 27, 2014 € 7B By Tresa Erickson Brides have been carrying bouquets for hundreds of years. In ancient times, bridal bouquets generally consisted of garlic, herbs and spices to keep evil spirits away. By Victorian times, fresh flowers had replaced the garlic, herbs and spices, and many of these flowers carried special meanings, like innocence, faith and love. Floriography, the language of flowers, continues to this day, with some brides researching flower meanings and basing their bouquet selections on those meanings. Floriography isn’t the only trend in bridal bouquets. There are many others. Here is a brief review. Bridal bouquets are traditionally pale in color, but today’s brides are branching out and choosing bolder colors, like burgundy, red and purple. Bouquet color schemes can be monochromatic—all shades of purple, for example—or complementary. With bouquets getting brighter, they have become a real feature in wedding photography, in particular black and white photography with selective coloring. Roses remain a bridal bouquet standard, but other flowers are starting to make their way into the mix. Daisies, hydrangeas, lilies, peonies and tulips are popular choices, as are orchids. Many brides, in fact, are asking for more tropical flowers in their bouquets, either because of their theme or for a unique twist. While cascades of flowers were once the norm in bridal bouquets, many brides today are opting to take a simpler route. Hand-tied bouquets are a popular choice. With the flowers gathered together and wrapped in ribbon, the bouquets are easier to handle and have a contemporary look to them. While today’s bridal bouquets might be somewhat simpler in design, brides can still add some dazzle to them with beads, crystals, feathers, pearls, sequins and other accessories. Brides with themed weddings can take it a step further and incorporate extra special touches into their bouquets, like miniature seashells, pinecones or butterflies. Bouquets featuring vintage brooches are also becoming popular. Bridal bouquets can run the gamut from the traditional all-white hand-tied rose bouquet drenched in crystals to the sassy gold, red and purple bouquet cuffed by feathers. It is up to the bride how she wants her bouquet to be. Brides should check out some samples, talk to their florist and select a bouquet design that speaks to them. Bouquet Bravado

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Bridal Guide 8B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday August 27, 2014