Madison County carrier

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00440


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National Security On this date in 1776, the Continental Congress voted unanimously to adopt a resolution made a month prior by Virginia delegate Richard Henry Lee that the colonies are and of right ought to be, free and independent states. They voted in republican manner by state delegation. The tally was 12-0, with the delegation from New York, still awaiting instructions from their legislature, abstaining. In anticipation of the vote on Lees resolution, the Congress had selected ve of their members from the most inuential colonies to draft a document stating the reasons for secession from the British crown. The committee would consist of Pennsylvanias Benjamin Franklin; Massachusetts John Adams; Virginias Thomas Jefferson; Connecticuts Roger Sherman; and New Yorks Robert Livingston. The committee quickly selected Jefferson to pen the draft. For two weeks in June, the 33-year-old Jefferson worked furiously on the draft resolution, relying on his classical education for the rationale of the revolutionary action he and his fellow delegates were contemplating. The seeds of revolution had been brewing for more than two years, but reached a breaking point when Britains king and parliament decided to hire 12,000 professional German-Hessian mercenaries to put down the rebellion and extinguish the re of liberty. This was too much, even for moderates. After Jefferson nished the draft, the committee sat down to edit his work and make it theirs. On July 1, the Congress held a preliminary vote on Lees resolution and voted 9-2 with one tie and one abstention to dissolve their allegiance to England. Overnight, Delawares Caesar Rodney arrived to break his states tie vote. History records that the vote on July 2 was unanimous. Over the next two days, the 56 delegates debated the resolution and voted on changes. As he watched his work get carved up, Thomas Jefferson watched in silence, refusing to enter the debate over his words. Adams was the master orator which was not Jeffersons long suit. Finally on July 4, the Continental Congress adopted the resolution which had been penned overnight by Congressional Secretary Charles Thompson. They called the resolution a Declaration of Independence. The Congress presiding ofcer John Hancock of Massachusetts boldly signed at the bottom of the original document. The Declaration of Independence which I refer to as the nations birth certicate is an amazing document. It begins with a preamble; then enumerates 27 charges against the king and parliament as justication for secession; followed by the personal pledge of the signers. In the second paragraph, there is this wonderful statement nearly intact from the way Jefferson wrote it. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving the just powers from the consent of the governed. This is a remarkable concept, even for today, but positively revolutionary for the times. No other nation up to that point in human history, had suggested any such concept: everyone is equal (except for women and minorities; that would come later); our rights are a gift from God; our rights include life, freedom, and the pursuit of our dreams; and government serves the people. How simple; how elegant. Most of the remaining 55 signers didnt add their signatures to the document until August. During that one month interval, Secretary Thompson accomplished administrative duties associated with printing and distributing the declaration. The signers paid dearly for their pledge. Their lives, families and property were persecuted by the British crown. Many did not live to see the liberty they had put in motion or the new nation they helped create. Among them were two future presidents, including the second, John Adams. He always felt until his dying day fty years later that the true date of independence and cause for celebration was the second, not the fourth of July, when the Congress voted in favor of the original resolution. Today, there are Americans who are inspired by the legacy of the men who created the Declaration of Independence. They are called the TEA (for taxed-enough-already) party but they arent really organized like a political party. Instead, it is a grassroots effort of many loosely formed organizations concerned about government that has become too big and too oppressive, similar to the complaints that Jefferson listed in the Declaration. They are electing representatives (including some representing Madison County) who share their views and vow to do their part to dissemble big government. Theyre considered such a threat to the governing class in Washington that the Internal Revenue Service has targeted them for special treatment. I think the Founding Fathers would see something very familiar with their 21stCentury counterparts.Below is a column that was published by Frank Kaiser. Through the years it has been mis-represented as an Andy Rooney commentary, however it was not. For all the 40+ women out there, sit back and enjoy this column knowing its all true. For all the men reading this column, read and learn. As I grow in age, I value women who are over 40 most of all. Here are just a few reasons why: An older woman will never wake you in the middle of the night to ask, "What are you thinking?" She doesn't care what you think. If an older woman doesn't want to watch the game, she doesn't sit around whining about it. She does something she wants to do. And it's usually something more interesting. An older woman knows herself well enough to be assured in who she is, what she is, what she wants and from whom. Few women past the age of 40 give a dang what you might think about her or what she's doing. Older women are dignied. They seldom have a screaming match with you at the opera or in the middle of an expensive restaurant. Of course, if you deserve it, they won't hesitate to shoot you if they think they can get away with it. Older women are generous with praise, often undeserved. They know what it's like to be unappreciated. An older woman has the self-assurance to introduce you to her women friends. A younger woman with a man will often ignore even her best friend because she doesn't trust the guy with other women. An older woman couldn't care less if you're attracted to her friends because she knows her friends won't betray her. Women get psychic as they age. You never have to confess your sins to an older woman. They always know. An older woman looks good wearing bright red lipstick. This is not true of younger women or drag queens. Once you get past a wrinkle or two, an older woman is far sexier than her younger counterpart. Older women are forthright and honest. They'll tell you right off you are a jerk if you are acting like one. You don't ever have to wonder where you stand with her. Yes, we praise older women for a multitude of reasons. Unfortunately, it's not reciprocal. For every stunning, smart, well-coiffed hot woman of 40+, there is a bald, paunchy relic in yellow pants making a fool of himself with some 22-year-old waitress. So much of this column is true, Ive learned through the years. Im proud to be a 40+ woman (quickly approaching 50). I am who I am take it or leave it. If you dont like me, I assure you I wont lose any sleep over it, nor will I spend all my time worrying, gossiping, or calling and texting my friends to discuss it, much like my younger counter-parts. I left the drama queen segment of life back in my 20s. For all the other women over 40 stand tall and be proud; living this long shows that we have survived the teenage drama scene, childbirth, potty-training, and child rearing years. We can now help our children through their young years with so much more wisdom and knowledge, than we once had. Now, if we could only get the men to grow up and mature as well as we have! Until then.see you around the town.Summer is here and what that means in terms of food is cooler and lighter. Even my morning cup of coffee ends up being poured over ice some days. Smoothies take the place of oatmeal; salads replace cooked vegetables and when it comes to desserts, chilled fruit is my favorite. Chilled summertime fruit for me usually means watermelon and I will keep some in my fridge almost everyday until the season is over, but sometimes I want something a little more decadent, something creamy and maybe a bit more sweet. Ice cream is probably the number one dessert during the summer and with the many varieties and avors available, you could eat a different one every day and still not get through them all by the time cool weather arrives. As much as I would like to take on that challenge, I know my waistline would not survive, and I decided to search for a healthier version. In my quest for healthy ice cream, what I actually found was not ice cream at all, but a substitute for the dessert I knew I would have to try. The recipe from thekitchn.com is not really a recipe, but instructions on how to use just one ingredient to make a really good soft-serve ice cream alternative. To make this dessert you need a blender or food processor and...a banana. Obviously, if youre not a fan of banana, go no further, but if you are, continue on. I keep bananas in my freezer all the time because I use them in smoothies, but to make this dessert, you should only freeze the fruit one to two hours. A little planning is necessary, but the pay off is a dessert that is creamy, healthy and delicious. Use as many bananas as you wish, slice them onto a paper plate or into a freezer-safe container and place in the freezer. The rst batch I tried I kept in for one hour. Processing the banana slices only took a minute to become creamy and smooth, and it really did resemble the silkiness of ice cream and scooped up nicely, although a little soft. This rst attempt, I decided to keep plain in order to test the results of the nished product. I loved the texture, but for as much as I love bananas, I did nd the avor a little overwhelming. The website gave additional suggestions such as peanut butter, honey, Nutella, cocoa and cinnamon. All sound wonderful, but I wanted to keep it as healthy as I could. For my next batch, I kept the banana slices in longer, actually too long because I got busy and forgot about the freezing bananas. After about four hours, I processed the frozen bananas and instead of a creamy concoction, what I ended up with was something that looked like small banana pearls. I added Greek yogurt to add some protein and hopefully smooth it out, which it did, but it also made the mixture softer than before, but still thick enough to enjoy. I knew it would need some sweetening with the plain yogurt, so I added a little honey and cinnamon as well. It was very good and the additional ingredients tempered the strong banana avor. I knew I had found a good summertime treat to add to my list of cold foods for hot weather. Of course, I was also left wondering about the many variations I could try next and I look forward to experimenting with some of them. The last time I was on thekitchn.com website, I saw a picture of something else I will absolutely have to try next, dark chocolate ice cubes. Looks like my freezers going to stay busy this summer.www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 2A Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS Emerald Greene Publisher Joe Boyles Guest ColumnistSearching For Ambrosia Emerald's Gem Box Rose KleinColumnistCold Food For Hot DaysIndependenceWomen Over 40 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 29, 2014Banana Ice Cream is a healthy summertime alternative to regular ice cream. First Time Home Buyers ClassInterested in becoming a home owner? Now is the time to take the Home buyers class beginning Monday, July 14that 6 p.m. at the Madison County Extension Service. The series will run four evenings beginning on the 14thand continuing on the 15th, 21stand 22nd. Lesson topics include credit, home selection, securing a home mortgage, home insurance and home maintenance. Funding for the State Housing Initiative Program (SHIP) is available to assist income eligible individuals and families with down payment and closing cost on the purchase of an existing home. This is a great opportunity for working people of low and moderate income to achieve home ownership. Upon completion of the class, participants receive a certicate that is required for SHIP assistants and rural development loans. As part of the process, complete and return a SHIP application, available at Suwannee River Economic Council on Bunker Street. If you are interested in attending the class to learn about the homeownership process, register by calling the Madison County Extension Service at 973-4138.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 4A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Thank You! ObituariesThe family of Mr. Eddie Branch Sr. would like to thank each of you for your prayers, messages of condolences, owers, food and all acts of kindness shown during this time of sorrow. Our sincere gratitude to you, who have come from far and near to pay your last respect to our love one. May God forever bless and keep each of you in his care and love.The Branch FamilyCharles D. McClure, Sr.Tallahassee said good-bye to one of its long time residents on Tuesday, June 24. Charles Davis McClure, Sr., loved Tallahassee and was a devoted public servant. He possessed the admired qualities of honesty, industriousness and creativity. He was loved by many. McClure was born in Birmingham, Ala., on May 22, 1935, to Florina Davis McClure and John Robert McClure. His family, including his older brother, John Robert McClure, Jr., moved to Madison, in 1937. His father practiced law in Madison with Florina's father, Charles E. Davis. They moved to Tallahassee in 1942 when his father accepted a job as Executive Secretary to Governor Spessard Holland. McClure was a 1953 graduate of Leon High School, where he was Student Body President during his senior year. Some of his early accomplishments are: the rank of Eagle Scout in The Boy Scouts of America and a delegate of Boys State, where he was elected Attorney General. Upon graduation, he attended the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he earned his Bachelor of Science in Journalism in 1957. He made many life-long friends in his fraternity of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. After graduation, he joined the United States Marine Corp., entered Ofcer Candidate School in Quantico, Va., serving for 39 months and was honorably discharged as a Captain. One of the highlights of his life was a memorable trip to Iwo Jima, traveling with many other fellow Marines. In his retirement, he enjoyed luncheons each Monday with other fellow Marine Veterans. After his military experience, he attended law school in St. Petersburg, Fl., graduating from Stetson Law School with his Juris Doctor. Professionally, McClure began his career as a General Counsel to the State Comptroller. It was his honor to work in that ofce during the time the property was being accumulated that would later become Walt Disney World. McClure had the special privilege of being introduced to Walt Disney and was proud of a signed photograph of himself with Disney. He proudly displayed this framed photo in his ofce for many years. Following that position, McClure practiced law in private practice with McClure, Wigginton and McClure for six years and was then appointed by Governor Reuben Askew to be a Leon County Judge in August 1973. He was in that position for 11 years, having been re-elected three times. McClure was then elected as Circuit Judge in 1984 for the Second Judicial Circuit and served as Chief Judge from 1989-1991. In total, Charles McClure was a presiding judge for over 28 years. During that time, he was an innovative thinker, creating programs to reform wayward, teenage drivers. For instance, there are more than a few Tallahasseans who, as teenage trafc offenders, have had to give up their Friday or Saturday nights to open the doors of the TMH emergency room for ambulance crews carrying injured car crash victims. Additionally, Judge McClure was nationally recognized for his enforcement procedures of child support. He was interviewed on The Today Show with Connie Chung for his efforts against what became known as the "Deadbeat Dads." During court session, McClure's "tough justice" efforts collected watches, boats, jewelry and cash as payment from fathers who were delinquent in their child support. He was also featured in People Magazine showcasing his creative efforts at curbing crime. After retiring from the bench, he returned to private practice for several years. All told, Charles McClure, a third generation attorney, was a member of the Florida Bar, retiring from the bar after 48 years of loyal and distinguished service. In addition to his notable career, McClure was also civically active in the Tallahassee community. He was past president of the Tallahassee Kiwanis Club and the Leon County Tuberculosis Club. He was a member of the Jaycees, the Colonel's Club and the Exchange Club. As a past member of Goodwill Industries, he was the Director of the Big Bend area. Judge McClure was a long-time member of St. John's Episcopal Church. In his later years, as a cancer survivor, he volunteered at Big Bend Hospice, visiting patients and offering free legal help wherever needed. Judge Charles McClure is survived by his brother, J. Robert McClure, Jr. (Rae). He was a loving father and will be missed by his three children: Elizabeth McClure Benoist (Blaise) of Orlando; Charles D. McClure, Jr., (Stephanie) of Tallahassee; and Susan F. McClure, of Jacksonville. McClure was very proud of his three grandchildren: Lauren McClure, of Greensboro, N.C.; Luc and Juliette Benoist. Visitation was held on Saturday, June 28, from 4-6 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home, located at 3322 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, Fl. 32311, (850) 942-2929. A memorial service was held Tuesday, July 1, at 2 p.m., at St. Peter's Anglican Church, 4784 Thomasville Rd, Tallahassee, Fl. 32309, followed by private interment. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, Fl. 32308. Harley Reed WessonHarley Reed Wesson, 78, formerly of Madison, passed away peacefully at the CCS State VA Nursing Home in Springeld, Fl., on Wednesday, June 18. Harley was a retired USAF Master Sergeant, serving our country proudly for 23 years. He retired from the Air Force and moved his family to Madison, where he then worked as an electrician for Dixie Packers for 20 years. He was a proud father, grandfather, great-grandfather, uncle, cousin and friend. He loved to spend time playing with the kids, tinkering on projects, helping others on odd jobs, working on cars and xing anything necessary with duct tape. Harley was born in Tallassee, Ala., and then, after starting his military career and serving abroad, lived in various states with his family. Harley is survived by one brother, Bobby Joe Wesson; one sister, Ada Paravicini; three sons: Ron, David and Wade; two daughters: Millie and Wanda (and all of their spouses). Harley was blessed with 10 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, numerous nieces and nephews and extended family members. Harley was preceded in death by his parents, seven brothers and two sisters. A visitation with the family was held at Beggs Funeral Home in Madison, on Saturday, June 21, from 6 to 8 p.m. A graveside service and burial was held at Elam Baptist Church Cemetery in Tallassee, Ala., on Monday, June 23 at 11 a.m. C.S.T. Harleys family would like to extend their gratitude and appreciation to his compassionate caregivers and friends at the CCS State VA Nursing home where Harley lived for the last 10 years of his life. In lieu of owers and gifts, please make donations in Harleys honor to Covenent Hospice at www.covenenthospice.org.Daniel Franklin BlountDaniel Danny Franklin Blount, 57, passed away on Friday, June 27, in Gainesville. Funeral service was held Monday, June 30, at 11 a.m. at Beggs Funeral Home, in Madison. Burial followed in the Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends at the funeral home on Sunday, June 29, from 6 to 8 p.m. Mr. Blount was born on September 3, 1956 in Quincy, Fl. He is the son of Harry Franklin Blount and Mary Kate Bland Blount. He spent most of his life in Madison. He was a Christian and a member of the Midway Church of God in Lee. He was a U.S. Navy veteran. He was employed as a USDA Food Safety Inspector at Pilgrims Pride in Live Oak. He loved to go on vacation, camping and concerts. He loved his cats, Blackie and Sarge. He was a people person and loved his church family. He is survived by his wife of 20 years Lori Tompkins Blount, of Lee; one daughter, Ashlyn Kate Blount of Lee; one son, Robert Franklin Blount of Orlando; father-in-law, Larry Tompkin; mother-inlaw, Myrtice Tompkins; step-mother, Carolyn Blount of Lee; one sister, Kathy Blount Norris and husband Dennis of Lee; nieces and nephews: Brittany Sivyer and husband, Steve of St. Augustine; Heather Norris of Taiwan; Jared Norris of Baltimore, Md.; Joseph Riley Tompkins of Lee; and Allen Harrison Bland of Chattanooga, Tenn.; one brother-in-law, Jody Tompkins and wife, Jessica of Lee, and one sister-inlaw, Kimberly Bland of Thomasville, Ga. He is also survived by many other relatives and a host of friends. Donations may be made to Madison County Community Bank, located at 301 East Base St., Madison, Fl. 32340, in memory of Daniel Danny Franklin Blount. Franklin Don MerrittFranklin Don Merritt, 75, of Carter Road, Albion, Pa., died on Friday, June 20. He was born on Aug. 12, 1939, in Lee, a son of the late Ervin F. and Frankie Mildred Ragans Merritt. Don was raised and educated in Madison County. He then enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served in the Vietnam War. Following his honorable discharge, Don moved to Albion and was a tool and die maker for Hytech Tool and Design until he retired. In addition to his parents, Don was preceded in death by an infant daughter, Chandra Merritt; four sisters: Annie Rodgers, Delores Neill, Josie Merritt and Shirley Merritt; and two brothers: E.F. and James Merritt. Don is survived by his wife, Jean R. Dingfelder Merritt of Albion; a daughter, Melissa Melsa Wirtz and her husband, Jeff, of Pittsburgh, Pa.; and a sister, Joyce Rutherford of Lee. He is also survived by many nieces and nephews. Family and friends were invited to call Tuesday, June 24 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m., at the Bracken Funeral Home, 315 N. Center St., Corry, Pa., and attend the funeral service there on Wednesday, June 25 at 11 a.m. Burial was held at Pine Grove Cemetery, Corry, Pa. Memorials may be made to the Erie Regional Cancer Center, 2500 W. 12thSt. Erie, Pa. 16505 or Albion VFD, 19 Smock Ave., Albion, Pa. 16401. To sign the guest book or send condolences, please visit www.brackenfh.com. Ronnie Gene Thompson, Sr.Ronnie Gene Thompson, Sr., 55, of Madison died Saturday, June 28 at his residence. Funeral service was held Monday, June 30, at 10 a.m. at ParkerBramlett Funeral Home with interment in Pebble City Church Cemetery. Rev. Tim Bozeman ofciated. Serving as pallbearer were Alan Sowell, Aaron Davis, Bubba Lambert, Jay Reagan, Jamie Harris and Jarrod Harris. Born April 30, 1959 in Mitchell County, Mr. Thompson was a Farm Manager for Birdsong Peanut Co. in Lee. He was preceded in death by his father, Ronald Thompson. Ronnie was a wonderful family man and devoted his life to his family and his profession, farming. Survivors include his wife, Janet Sis Thompson of Madison; sons: Ronnie Thompson, Jr. (Tomi Lynn) of Colquitt, Ga. and Jay Thompson (Brooke) of Sale City, Ga.; his mother, Vivian Thompson of Sale City, Ga.; sisters: Sherri Maddox (David) of Vero Beach, Fl., Tina Horne of Baconton, Ga. and Pam Dennis of Douglas, Ga.; grandchildren: Slayde Thompson, Bryson Thompson, Layton Heard and Ghanum Heard. Visitation was held Sunday, June 29 from 5-8 p.m. at Parker-Bramlett Funeral Home. Flowers will be accepted or memorials may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 225 SW Smith St., Madison, Fl. 32340. Parker-Bramlett Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. To sign the online guest registry, visit the website at www.parkerbramlett.com. CorrectionIn the story, Career And Technical Education Offers Choices To MCHS Students,that ran in the Friday, June 27 paper, we mistakenly wrote that the Criminal Justice courses and Business Technology Education courses at Madison County High School was under the instruction of Gwen Hubbard and Ramon Guess; that is incorrect. The instructor for the Criminal Justice Department at MCHS is Jason Fletcher and the instructor for the Business Technology Education courses at MCHS are Mike Radel and Donn Smith. We apologize for the mistake.

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Many people know the Salvation Army from seeing the bell ringers with their red kettles at Christmastime or from shopping in their thrift stores, now called Family Stores, but this is just a part of what this Christian-based organization is all about. The Salvation Armys wording on their logo, Doing The Most Good reects their mission statement of meeting human needs without discrimination and all done under the umbrella of sharing the gospel. Sergeant George Blevins, the commanding ofcer in the Salvation Army, along with his wife Gale, who is also a Sergeant, runs the North Central Florida Outpost made up of ve counties: Madison, Taylor, Jefferson, Suwannee and Hamilton. The outpost used to be located in downtown Madison in the old historical jail building on Pinckney Street, but as of this past March, the Army has moved their headquarters to Perry. Changing ofce locations didnt change the Armys presence in Madison County. One of the things the organization does through the school year is to teach music to students at Greenville and Lee Elementary. Brass instruments are provided to the children for learning music, but devotionals and character building are taught as well. This year at Greenville, an after school program was added with Madison County High School teacher Pat Shartran volunteering her time at the school. She also volunteers with the Army as the main music teacher when school is out, at a summer music camp that is held for kids, ages eight through 12, where they can choose between guitar, keyboard and violin. Also during the summer, the organization holds a Community Service Camp, where kids can have fun riding horses, swimming and lots of other fun activities for ve days. Salvation Army pays all expenses for the children, ages seven through 12, and works hard to make the camp a safe place with a loving environment. Christmastime is very busy for the Blevins and their volunteers. Bell ringers have to be found and organized, but its also a time when needs for families are high. Money earned through the red kettles and the family stores are now put to good use, as the Army will provide families with food and toys for the month through the Madison programs, Head Start and Kids, Inc. Blevins said he loves working with these organizations because it allows him and his team to reach out to entire families and cover whatever needs they have. Food and toys are on the list to give, but clothing, furniture or any other need could be met as well. Blevins has a heart for single mothers and sympathizes by saying, It breaks your heart to see how hard they have to work to make it. Joshua Webb, a Cadet and rst year seminary student from the Salvation Army training college, is assisting at the Perry outpost for the summer. Webb is at the North Florida post, putting into practice what he has learned at seminary, and one of his duties was to help Blevins give away bicycles to three Madison County Central School students, after having their name pulled in a drawing at the end of the school year. At the end of the summer, Webb will return to his studies and his bride-to-be, who is also in training. After Webb leaves in the fall, the Blevins wont be alone because George says they are helped out by a group of volunteers at their post and adds, We cant do what we do without volunteers. The Salvation Army is always looking for people who want to make a difference in the lives of others by volunteering their time and the Army has several avenues where you can help. Although there are no Family Stores closer than Tallahassee, Thomasville or Valdosta, donations are always appreciated and can be used to cover needs in the community. Monetary donations are always helpful because they can be used anywhere there is a need and a set of helping hands can always be used at the school or summer camp programs. The Salvation Army also has a disaster relief service that trains those interested in helping during times of crisis. You can visit the Salvation Armys North Central Florida Outpost site on Facebook at www.facebook.com/salvationar myncfo or call them at (850) 584-5678. For information on the disaster relief services, checkout their website at www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org.AROUNDMADISONCOUNTYMadison County Carrier 5Awww.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Serving Our Neighbors For Over 50 Years Competitive Rates Online Banking INTEREST CHECKINGSAVINGS MONEY MARKETBUSINESS CHECKING CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSITIRA 424 West Base Street P.O. Box 267 Madison, Florida 32340 Phone: 850.973.2600 www.csbdirect.com LOBBY HOURS Mon. Thurs. 9 am 4 pm Friday 9 am 5 pm DRIVE THRU HOURS Mon. Fri. 8:30 am 5 pm Friday 8:30 am 5 pm SALVATIONARMYDoing The Most Good In Madison County Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 4, 2014Cadet Joshua Webb, from the Salvation Army, was at the Central School, giving away bicycles to the winners of a name drawing, done at the previous awards ceremony.Photo SubmittedGeorge Blevins, Sergeant at the North Central Florida Outpost, and his bride Gale. Madison County Parks & RecreationWill Be Offering Adult Church League Softball This Summer. Games Will Be Played On Mondays And Tuesdays Starting July 14th. Teams May Sign Up At The Madison County Courthouse, Finance Recreation Complex, Monday Friday 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Teams May Also Sign Up At The Recreation Complex, Monday Friday 8 a.m. 3 p.m. The Fee For The League Will Be $300 Per Team. Age Limit To Play Is 16 Years Of Age. (Must Be 16 By The First Game.) Teams Must Have Two Females On The Field At All Times. League Rules And Team Roster Will Be Available At The Courthouse And The Recreation Complex. For More Information, Contact: Tommy Garner (850) 464-7221 Jim Bo Ratliff (850) 464-7072 By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School JV and Varsity Cheerleaders will be hosting a Cheer Camp for Girls in Pre-K through 8thgrade on Monday, July 14, Tuesday, July 15 and Wednesday, July 16, at the Madison County Central School gym from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The cost is $40 and the girls will learn cheers, chants, jumps, stunts and more. Water will be provided but each girl should bring her own snack for snack time. All proceeds from the camp will go to help send the MCHS Cheerleaders to Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) Cheer Camp at the end of July. All registration information and money is due by Tuesday, July 8. For more information, call Madison County High School at (850) 973-5061 ext. 5771 and leave a message for the sponsor, Ruth Ann Latner or call or text her at (850) 4640236 or email her at ruth.latner@madisonmail.us.MCHS To Host Cheer Camp In July

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AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY www.greenepublishing.com 6A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 NFCC Medical Administrative Specialist Class Of 2014 Pass National Boards At 100 PercentPhoto Submitted By NFCC Ofce Of College AdvancementNFCCs Medical Administrative Specialist graduates are shown in the front row, left to right: Emily Parsons (Madison), Gail Crawford (Taylor), Azucena Hernandez-Perez (Madison), Lori Salsgiver-Dowdy (Madison), Leola Seabrooks (Madison) and Pamela Barron (Madison). Pictured in the back row, from left to right are: Lisa West (Madison), Paula McGhee (Madison), Shirley Mattair (Madison), Laverne Smith (Madison) and NFCC Medical Administrative Specialist Instructor Tammy Kemp (Madison). Submitted by NFCC Ofce of College AdvancementNorth Florida Community Colleges Medical Administrative Specialist class of 2014 recently passed their National boards for Medical Administrative Assistants at 100 percent. NFCCs Medical Administrative Specialist Program is designed to prepare students for work as ofce clerks, secretaries or administrative specialists in a medical setting such as doctors ofces, hospitals and medical research facilities. The program also provides supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in any of these occupations. For more information about NFCCs Medical Administrative Specialist program, contact Medical Administrative Specialist Instructor Tammy Kemp at (850) 973-1633 or kempt@nfcc.edu.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.When Pre cinct #3 voters go to their polling place in Lee on Aug. 26 and Nov. 4, they will meet several members of the local Rotary Club. At the Precinct #11 polling place on SE Bunker Street, voters will find the polling positions staffed by members of the Kiwanis Club of Madison. Both clubs are participating in the Adopt-a-Precinct program through the Madison County Supervisor of Elections Office. The clubs will supply at least five members to be trained as poll workers, who will then work the polls from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. during the Aug. 26 Primary and the Nov. 4 General Election. Additionally, there are eight early voting dates for each election, or 16 in all. Eligible Madison County residents who wish to vote, but are not yet registered, should remember that the deadline for registering is 29 days before the election they wish to vote in. For the Aug. 26 primary, the registration books close July 28. Those wishing to register, or to switch party affiliations, must do so before this date. Additionally, those who have not done so recently are encouraged to stop by the Supervisor of Elections Office at 239 SW Pinckney St., (next to the Courthouse Annex) and update their signature cards, since many people's signatures tend to change over a period of years. In a pinch, should they have to vote a provisional ballot or vote absentee, whether or not their vote is ultimately certified and counted depends on whether or not the signatures provided match what is on file. In an effort to honor those who have served our country and played a role in preserving the right to vote, the Madison County Supervisor of Elections Office implemented the Vote In Honor Of A Veteran program Nov. 1, 2013. Citizens are encouraged to bring photos of friends and family who have served in the armed forces (old military photos as well current photos of active military personnel) to the Supervisor of Elections Office, and fill out a short biographical form on the service man or woman. The photos can be scanned into the computer to produce a display copy for the Wall of Honor, and the biographical forms will be kept in a notebook for interested citizens to read. Family or friends who bring in photos and bio sheets will be given a Vote in Honor of a Vet pin that they can proudly wear on Election Day.AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Madison County Carrier 7A BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252 Pickles, Yarn Dogs And The Holy Land Fundraiser Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 26, 2014The ladies from the Senior Center display some of their work. From left to right, are: Corrine Rayam, who had dropped by to purchase some pickles; Faye Ludwig, holding one end of a quilt made at the Greenville Senior Center; Ella Mae Brown, holding jars of the homemade pickles the group is selling; Lonnie Mae Robinson, holding a lacy lap cover for nursing home resident and Cheryl Scovel, the OAA Coordinator at the Senior Center.By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.The ladies of the Senior Citizens Center here in Madison are selling their wares to help pay for a much needed getaway to Orlando this October. The group of crafters work hard and devote their time and skills to help members of the community by making lap quilts for seniors in nursing centers and are now making full size quilts for the children who will be living in the new childrens home in Pinetta. Faye Ludwig says their groups coffers are empty and they are in desperate need of fabric, thread, lace or any other unused trim you might have lying around that they could use for these projects. The group also makes yarn dogs that have become very popular, and are in need of more yarn as well. Ludwig says any color yarn is good, and the same goes for material and thread. All crafting materials can be dropped off at the center on SW Harvey Greene Drive between the hours of 8 a.m. through 5 p.m. To help boost their fundraising, the ladies are now selling homemade pickles, that this writer can testify, are very, very good. Sales from the pint jars of pickles and yarn dogs will go towards their trip to see the Holy Land Experience in Orlando. Pickles sell for $5 and the dogs sell for $15. You can nd these items at the Senior Center at the address above, but also at some other locations around town. The Mail Room across from Four Freedoms Park and the Chamber of Commerce on Range both has the ladies items for sell. So next time youre out and about on the town, stop by one of these locations and buy a jar of pickles for your kitchen table, a yarn dog for your child or grandchild and help these ladies get to their fall destination of the Holy Land. Or, if you are doing some summer cleaning and need to nd a home for a sewing machine you no longer want or pint canning jars you no longer need, or any of the items mentioned above, the ladies at the Senior Citizen Center will be happy to receive your donation. Rotary And Kiwanis Clubs To Adopt-A-Precinct Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, June 30, 2014Beginning Nov. 1, 2013, the Madison County Supervisor of Elections has had the Wall of Honor (on the left as you enter the lobby) set aside for photos of American veterans, past and present. Families and friends who bring in the photos will receive a Vote in Honor of a Vet pin to wear on Election Day.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, June 26, 2014Kiwanis Club President Diane Head presents Supervisor of Elections Tommy Hardee with a certicate of appreciation shortly after he spoke to the club about the Adopt-A-Precinct program.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Buy, Sell or Trade In The ClassiedsOne Mans Junk Is Another Mans TreasureCall 973-4141 www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . .8A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Check us out on-linewww.greenepublishing.com FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 6/30/2014 THROUGH 7/6/2014I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Deadline for Classifieds Every Monday and Wednesday 3:00 p.m. Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper ofce is seeking an outstanding individual to join our sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison. A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Academic Case Manager/Student Disability Services Specialist wanted at North Florida Community College. See www.nfcc.edu for details.6/18 7/2, c CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Madison County Memorial Hospital. Min. BA/BS in Accounting with min 3 yrs accounting exp and 3 years management experience. Call Human Resources (850) 253-1906.6/27, 7/2, c Auctions Online Only 2-Day Auction, Furniture Liquidation including Rugs, Tables, Household Items, Furniture & More, Jamestown, NC, Guilford Co. 7/11 at 8am to 7/18 & 7/21 at 1pm. Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.com Business Opportunities BE THE 1st Medical Alert Company in your area! Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ return. Investment required. Free Call (844) 225-1200. Education TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS'T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709. Educational Services AIRLINE JOBS Start Here Get trained as FAA certied Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualied students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935. Help Wanted AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benets. CDL-A req. 888-602-7440 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. NOW HIRING! FloridaCall for Shift Availability(12 hours shifts on Saturday & Sunday for RNS & LPNs) Referral/Sign-on bonusfor employees and new hires.Full Time RNs/LPNsEmployee Bonus = $1000 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250, after one year $500 New Hire Bonus = $500 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250Any questions contact Human ResourcesAD/GW Tutens Farm Produce Squash String Beans Potatoes Cucumbers (850) 251-5463From Greenville Hwy. 221 S., Turn on Hwy. 360 4 to 5 miles on RightFrom Madison Hwy 14 Turn on 360 5-6 miles on Left.Mon Sat. 7:30 am 5:00 pm Closed On Sundays Family Owned & OperatedSince 1996Custom Slaughter Cows Hogs Sheep Goats Deer Mouth Watering Country Smoked Sausage Best Taste Best Prices305 Limestone Road Monticello, Fl. 32344 (17 Miles South Of Monticello Off Tram Rd.) (850) 997-4446 Recipes Cleaning, Preparing & Storing Wild GameCuring & SmokingMaking Sausage & Bologna Microwave Cooking Glossary Equivalents Substitutions Weights & MeasuresCan Sizes Herbs & Spices Helpful Cooking Hints Helpful Household Hints Detailed Drawing On How To Build & Use Your Own Water Oven/Smoker Historical Recipes and Little Known Facts About Floridas WildlifeFLORIDAWild Style Get your copy atMadison Sporting Goodsin Greenville, FLoridaStudstill Lumberin Madison, FLoridaFarmers Supplyin downtown Madison andGreene Publishing, INC.located at 1695 South SR 53 in Madison, FL.One Of A KindReg. $28 ,now only $20 Would you like to give up the name tag for a business card? Ready to sell that old TV to make room for a new one? Well, this is your chance. Check out the Classifieds today! Call us to submit your classified ad at:(850) 973-4141 orMail us at:Greene Publishing, Inc.P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Madison County Carrier 9A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com ----Legals---SECTION 000020 INVITATION TO BID MADISON COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX WINDOW REPLACEMENT CLEMONS, RUTHERFORD & ASSOCIATES, INC. 2027 THOMASVILLE ROAD TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32308 PHONE (850) 385-6153 You are invited to bid on a General Contract, for the removal and replacement of all exterior doors, windows, and louvers of the Madison County Courthouse Annex in Madison, Florida. All Bids must be on a lump sum basis; segregated Bids will not be accepted. All Bidders are to submit with Bid Package, a properly executed "Contractor's Qualication Statement" AIA Document A-305 which is to include a current nancial statement, an experience, competence and performance report, and references from at least three prior projects similar in size and scope, along with the name of a contact person on each of those projects. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held for General Contractors on July 8, 2014, at 2:00 PM at the project site, Room 107, 229 SW Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida. All questions at the Pre-Bid Conference by General Contractors and Subcontractors shall be presented on the Request for Clarication form. See Section 000100 Instructions to Bidders. Madison County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids until 2:00 PM on Wednesday, July 16, 2014 at the Madison County Courthouse Annex. Sealed bids must be delivered to Room 219, 229 S.W. Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida. Bids received after that time will not be accepted. Bids will be opened publicly and read aloud at 2:01 PM of the same date. The bids will then be considered and possibly awarded at the Madison Board of County Commissioners meeting on Wednesday, July 23rd at 4pm. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be examined at the Architect's ofce: Clemons, Rutherford & Associates 2027 Thomasville Road Tallahassee, Florida (850) 385-6153 and at F. W. Dodge, 823 Thomasville Rd, Tallahassee, Florida. General Contractors and Subcontractors may obtain copies of the Bidding Documents at the Architect's ofce in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders upon depositing the sum of $100.00 for each set of Documents. Contractors will be limited to two (2) sets of Bidding Documents and Subcontractors will be limited to one (1) set. Bidders may receive bid documents in one of the following manners: (1) bring deposit check and pick up bid documents at the Architects ofce; (2) mail in deposit check and separate shipping and handling check of $20. Other interested parties may purchase complete sets of Bidding Documents for the sum of $100.00 for each set, which is non-refundable. Bidders may obtain a refund of their deposit by returning the complete Bidding Documents in good condition no later than ten (10) calendar days after the opening of Bids. Bidders who do not submit a Bid will forfeit their deposits unless Bidding Documents are returned in good condition three (3) days prior to the Bid Opening. Bid Security in the amount of ve percent (5%) of the Bid must accompany each Bid in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. A letter from a bonding company must accompany each bid, stating that the bidder is capable of obtaining all bonds required by the Construction Documents. The Madison County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any and all Bids. END OF SECTION 0000206/18, 6/25, 7/2 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Arthur G. Smith and Florida D. Smith the holder of the following certicate has led said certicate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certicate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and name in which it is assessed is as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-231 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 NAME IN, WHICH ASSESSED: PROTG PROPERTIES INVESTMENTS PARCEL ID: 33-1S-10-1364-00D-009 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: PARCEL 9, BLOCK D OF TWIN RIVER FOREST SUBDIVISION, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33 AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 2562.98 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 1071.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 691.37 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 1154.85 FEET TO A POINT LYING 30 FEET FROM THE NEAREST POINT OF THE CENTERLINE OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD CONTINUE THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 31.28 FEET TO SAID CENTERLINE, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH; SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 44309.73 FEET; THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 07 SECONDS; FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 413.87 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENT; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 305.57 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 31.20 FEET TO A POINT LYING 30 FEET FROM THE NEAREST POINT ON SAID CENTERINE, CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 1365.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, EXCLUSIVE OF ANY LANDS LYING WITHIN THIRTY (30) FEET OF THE AFORESAID CENTERLINE. SUBJECT TO RIGHT OF WAY AND EASEMENTS HEREBY RESERVED, OVER AND ACROSS ANY PORTION THEREOF SITUATED WITHIN THIRTY (30) FEET OF THE AFORESAID COUNTY ROAD CENTERLINE(S) FOR THE PURPOSE OF PUBLIC ROADWAY AND PUBLIC UTILITIES. All of said property being in the County of Madison, State of Florida. Unless such certicate shall be redeemed according to the law, the property described in such certicate will be sold to the highest bidder at the west front door at the Madison County Courthouse on the 24TH day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 6th day of June 2014. TIM SANDERS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT MADISON COUNTY MADISON, FLORIDA BY: /s/ Renata Keeling DEPUTY CLERK 6/18, 6/25, 7/2, 7/9 Business Card Directory 6/25, 7/2 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statues Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ctitious name of Madison Medical Center located at 235 SW Dade Street, Suite A in the County of Madison, in the City of Madison, Florida 32340 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida-Dated at Tallahassee, Florida, this 25th day of June, 2014. North Florida Medical Centers, Inc. 7/2 The City of Madison, FL solicits proposals to provide citizens the capability to pay utility bills and other city payments by credit card and debit card. Proposals must address, among other topics: Types of cashiering services offered; training of city personnel; installation requirements; security; cost to the city; and cost to the customer. Email proposals to Tim.Bennett@CityofMadisonFL.com and write Credit Card Proposal in the subject line. Or, deliver or mail the proposal to: Attn: Credit Card Proposal, Tim Bennett, City Manager, 321 SW Rutledge St., Madison, FL, 32340. Deadline to submit a proposal is July 14, 2014 at 2 p.m. For more information, phone Tim Bennett at (850) 973-5081.7/2

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Story SubmittedAgriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the nomination period for local Farm Service Agency (FSA) county committees began Sunday, June 15. County committees are a vital link between the farm community and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said Vilsack. I hope that every eligible farmer and rancher will participate in this year's county committee elections. Through the county committees, farmers and ranchers have a voice; their opinions and ideas get to be heard on federal farm programs. Vilsack added, Weve seen an increase in the number of nominations of women and minority candidates, and I hope that trend continues. To be eligible to serve on an FSA county committee, a person must participate or cooperate in a program administered by FSA, be eligible to vote in a county committee election and reside in the local administrative area where the person is nominated. Farmers and ranchers may nominate themselves or others. Organizations representing minorities and women also may nominate candidates. To become a candidate, an eligible individual must sign the nomination form, FSA-669A. The form and other information about FSA county committee elections are available at www.fsa.usda.gov/elections. Nomination forms for the 2014 election must be postmarked or received in the local USDA Service Center by close of business on Aug. 1. Elections will take place this fall. While FSA county committees do not approve or deny farm ownership or operating loans, they make decisions on disaster and conservation programs, emergency programs, commodity price support loan programs and other agricultural issues. Members serve three-year terms. Nationwide, there are about 7,800 farmers and ranchers serving on FSA county committees. Committees consist of three to 11 members that are elected by eligible producers. FSA will mail ballots to eligible voters beginning Nov. 3. Ballots are due back to the local county ofce either via mail or in person by Dec. 1. Newly elected committee members and alternates take ofce on Jan. 1, 2015. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To le a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Ofce of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Ofce of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 202509410 or call (866) 6329992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).Story SubmittedThis June marks two years of improving hydrologic conditions beginning with Tropical Storm Debby in June 2012 and helped by continuing above-average rainfall. Tropical Storm Debby broke the second of two back-to-back droughts which caused record low river and groundwater conditions. Between December 2013 and June 20ththe District has received on average over 36 of rain which is about 25 percent higher than average, said Megan Wetherington, PE, District Senior Professional Engineer. This has been the wettest winter and spring since 1998. District-wide, May was the 5thstraight month of above average rainfall this year. In the two years after the end of the drought, parts of Lafayette, Suwannee and Taylor counties received nearly an extra years rainfall. Throughout much of the District, increased rain meant increased river levels and ooding. For example, until late this month Suwannee River levels were high enough to slow or block the ow from surrounding springs. While still above normal, river levels have been steadily dropping, allowing a number of springs to return to clear conditions. Aquifer levels have also increased with the increased rainfall, and levels were generally at their highest since 2005 when levels peaked after two hurricanes and a wet winter. Rising aquifer levels mean improved spring flow as the groundwater makes its way to the now-flowing springs. SRWMD partners with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) for flow measurements at numerous locations. USGS reported that on May 2, the measured flow at the Alapaha Rise was 790 million gallons per day (MGD). This was the highest measurement since record-keeping began there in 1975. First magnitude Madison Blue Springs flow was measured at 188 MGD, the second highest flow recorded there. Poe Springs was measured at 36 MGD, about 20 percent higher than its long-term average. These rates of flow are good indications for the rest of the springs District-wide, where high flows are expected throughout the summer. For additional information on hydrologic conditions contact SRWMD at (386) 362-1001 or http://www.mysuwanneeriver.com/ index.aspx?NID=35. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 10A Madison County CarrierFARM/OUTDOORS Rainfall 25 Percent Higher Than Average In The SRWMD Photo SubmittedBlue Springs in Madison Fl. Florida Fruit And Vegetable Production Grow The EconomyStory SubmittedFlorida's favorable agricultural climate positions the state as the second largest produce exporter in the nation, according to a new report from Florida TaxWatch, the independent, nonpartisan, nonprot taxpayer research institute and government watchdog. The report nds that farming and processing of Florida produce contributes more than $7.5 billion to the state economy. "Florida's agriculture industry is vital to diversifying our state's growing economy," said Dominic M. Calabro, president and CEO of Florida TaxWatch, the independent, nonpartisan, nonprot taxpayer research institute and government watchdog. "Fresh produce, such as fruits, vegetables and juices are a key part of the agriculture industry and enhances our global trade impact." Florida is home to more than 47,500 commercial farms covering 9.25 million acres, and producing fresh fruits, vegetables and juices. In addition to the positive impact on Florida's agricultural industry, the production of these crops benets other Florida industries, such as manufacturing. For example, 8.4 percent of Florida's food and kindred products manufacturing output is tied to produce. In 2012, Florida was the 7thlargest state exporter of agricultural products, sending the majority of exports to Canada, the Netherlands, the Bahamas, the Dominican Republic and Panama. Produce accounts for more than $500 million of the total agricultural exports in Florida. These exports help diversify Florida's economy and contribute to an already positive balance of trade. Unsurprisingly, citrus is one of Florida's highest produced crops. Florida oranges and grapefruits exceed 65 percent of the total U.S. production. However, Florida is the nation's leader in production of many other types of produce, including squash, snap beans, cucumbers, fresh sweet corn and watermelons. "These Florida-grown fresh fruits and vegetables provide healthy food for families and provide jobs for agricultural producers, for food processors, and transporters in our state and those who export Florida crops," said Jerry D. Parrish, Ph.D., Chief Economist and Director of the TaxWatch Center for Competitive Florida. Florida TaxWatch is a statewide, non-prot, non-partisan research institute that over its 32-year history has become widely recognized as the watchdog of citizens' hard-earned tax dollars. Its mission is to provide the citizens of Florida and public ofcials with high quality, independent research and education on government revenues, expenditures, taxation, public policies and programs and to increase the productivity and accountability of Florida state and local government. Its support comes from homeowners and retirees, small and large businesses, philanthropic foundations, and professional associations. On the web at www.Flori daTaxWatch.org Service Agency County Committee Nomination Period Began June 15

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Section B Madison County Carrier July 2, 2014

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"REST IN CHRIST" The Sabbath Day of the Old Covenant and keeping that Sabbath Day involved a day of "rest" and not necessarily a day of worship. It was meant to symbolize the "rest" which would be brought about in Christ, even as Paul so graphically brought out. When Jesus came, thereby fulfilling the Law in totality, which included the Sabbath Day, we find that keeping such a day is not brought over into the New Covenant, simply because it was satisfied in Christ. It represented Christ and the "rest" we would find in accepting Him as Lord and Savior; therefore, to continue to keep such a day, as was kept under the Old Covenant, in effect denies Christ. As stated, when one now accepts Christ, thereby serving Him, one is, at the same time, keeping the Sabbath, which was a Type of Christ and the rest that we find in serving Him. The Sabbath Day always pointed to Christ, always pertained to Christ, and always symbolized Christ; with the Coming of Christ, who satisfied all the demands of the Law, the symbol is no longer needed. THE CROSS: ENTERING INTO REST The "rest" which Paul so graphically illustrated in the Fourth Chapter of Hebrews has always reposed in Christ. However, it took the Cross, which satisfied the terrible sin debt, which man could not pay, for that "rest" to be given to us. Of this "rest," Christ is the source, while the Cross is the Means. When the Lord sanctified the Seventh Day, this also had reference to the fact that what Jesus did at the Cross, Who is the True Sabbath, makes it possible for the Believer to live a sanctified life. Many Christians understand somewhat the part the Cross plays in Salvation, but understand almost nothing regarding Sanctification. But it is impossible for the Believer to live a sanctified life unless he understands the Cross as it regards the great work of Sanctification. SANCTIFICATION The word "Sanctification" simply means "to be set apart exclusively unto the Lord." Sanctification is a place and position to which the Holy Spirit strives to bring each and every Believer, but to which the Believer cannot attain of his own ability and strength, which can be done only by the Holy Spirit. 2B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Path of Faith By Rev. Richard Sauls, Senior Pastor, Lee Worship CenterThe The Pulpit Pulpit CHRIST AND THE CROSS

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Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July, 2, 2014 3B Path of Faith Burnett Farm Invites Ladies To Dinner And Night Of Gospel Submitted Every month for four years, Burnett Farm in Jasper has welcomed men from adjoining counties to join them, eat grilled steak with all the fixings in the barn, and then listen to the funny Burnett Brothers band sing and pick Gospel songs to warm up the crowd. What happens next at these monthly meetings is church without the steeple laymen stand up to bring Bible truths home to regular guys who might never darken the door of a church, but they can enjoy this quail farm and soak in faith-filled encouragement. On May 13, the steaks were seasoned and ladies were invited to join the men: 260 guests arrived and packed out the barn. The ladies receive their invitation to the allmen ministry only in spring and fall, so they apparently were ready for this night-out opportunity. Dynamic performers from various churches included Jennifer Herndon, Roshunda Denson, Danny Graves, the Williams sisters and more. Its good to be in the barn tonight, said Kim Williams. Its our first time. The sisters sang several songs, most notably the ballad, I Wouldnt Miss It, Would You? from Wendy Bagwell and the Sunliters. They kidded that when they were growing up, the Burnett Brothers didnt sing. Pastor Timmy Dyke of Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church in Madison introduced Brother Larry Sweat by saying the Burnett Barn normally invites non-preachers as the guest speaker, but Sweat, a Baptist preacher, came highly recommended. At the podium, Larry Sweat said his life was miserable when he came back from Viet Nam, addicted to drugs and alcohol, and he asked God to show me a real life Christian dont show me another Baptist, I want to see a real life Christian. Sweat said his wife suffered through his bad behaviors and soul searching, eventually leading to a prayer on his knees to ask God to forgive him and to trust that Jesus is His Savior. One of the questions Sweat found intriguing was to ask, What will I have if I give my heart to Christ? He found out that by surrendering to Christ he was able to live the Christian life through the Holy Ghost living inside him and hed have the power to overcome the world (Ephesians 3:40). Sweat got a kick out of how evangelist Billy Sunday talked of hitting a home run for God. Walking up and down the church aisles, Sunday calling out, Where are you, Devil? Im gonna hit you! That old-time evangelist understood the power he had in his life as a born-again Christian. Sweat recalled how tough financially it was to go back to Bible College with three children and one son going blind. At one point, he considered going back to work as a plumber, but Gods hand is bigger than mine, said Sweat. He remembered an outpouring at one church when his family was desperate for gas and food: old farmers began filling Sweats pockets with cash and they stuffed the family car with food after he preached, reviving the familys spirits to go forward to serve God. Sweat ended his talk by saying, Lost friend, if I could drag you to the altar I would there are enough big fellows here that we could. Lay hold of that nail-scarred hand and come to Christ tonight! The next Burnett Farm fellowship meeting for men is Tuesday, July 8. For information, call (850) 464-8107 or (386) 590-1779. Photo submittedLarry Sweat shared his moving testimony about how he met Christ. Photo submittedTimmy Dyke welcomes everyone to the Burnett Barn in Hamilton County.

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4B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Path of Faith Madison County Truckers Invited To Truckers' Sunday By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Truckers from Madison County and surrounding counties and anyone within traveling distance is invited to the first ever Truckers' Sunday on July 13 at Dowling Park Church of God, just south of the county line in Suwannee County. Pastor Mike Carson invites everyone to bring a friend and be part of something awesome happening at Dowling Park Church of God. There will even be a special prize given away. There will be free food and great prizes including a giveaway of 50 gallons of diesel, and, as always, it will be a phenomenal time of fellowship in the Lord, Pastor Carson said. There is plenty of parking available in the parking lot at Dowling Park Church of God and truckers are asked to bring their big rigs. Every trucker that brings his or her rig will receive a special gift. The service will begin at 11 a.m. on Sunday, July 13. For more information, contact Amon Doyle at (850) 973-7546 or Pastor Mike Carson at (850) 6942608. Dowling Park Church of God is located at 23500 CR 250 in Dowling Park. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob BembryAmon Doyle, far right, of Lee, is helping plan this first ever Truckers' Sunday. He is shown with his daughter, Amanda Jo Doyle, and his father-inlaw, Retis Flowers. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob BembryPastor Mike Carson, shown with his wife, Angie, invites everyone to take part in the Truckers' Sunday on July 13. You're Invited!

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Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 5B Path of Faith

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Path of Faith 6B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Mondays Parenting with Values will occur each Monday from noon-1 p.m. This event will be located at Middle Florida Baptist Association, 349 SW Captain Brown Road in Madison. Wednesdays Celebrate Recovery ministry begins each Wednesday from noon-1:30 p.m. The Middle Florida Baptist Association, 349 SW Captain Brown Road, Madison. July 5 Everyone is invited to particpate in the prayer walk beginning at 9 a.m. at the Four Freedoms Park in Madison. July 7-11 First United Methodist Church will be having their Vacation Bible School Monday Friday, July 711, from 8:30-11:30 am. It is called "Workshop of Wonders: Imagine & Build With God." Ages 3rd-5thgrade are welcome. For more information contact, the church office at (850) 973-6295 or Ruth Ann Latner at (850) 464 0236 or ruthannlatner@yahoo. com.July 7-11 North Florida Teen Youth Camp, a five-day, four-night event is set for July 7-11, with guest speaker Phil Stacey for each evening's service. Registration fee is $90 per person, with a $25 deposit. A t-shirt is guaranteed if the camper pre-registers by June 20. Located at Live Oak Church of God's 34-acre campus on US 129 South in Live Oak. Registration forms may be picked up at Madison Church of God or Midway Church of God. July 8 The Pinetta area food ministry/mission will be distributing food beginning at 9 a.m. at the Pinetta food pantry.July 14-18 North Florida Primary/Junior Camp, a five-day, four-night event is set for July 1418, with guest speaker Kevin McGlamery for each evening's service. Registration fee is $90 per person, with a $25 deposit. A t-shirt is guaranteed if the camper pre-registers by June 20. Located at Live Oak Church of God's 34-acre campus on US 129 South in Live Oak. Registration forms may be picked up at Madison Church of God or Midway Church of God. July 20-25 Students will train to become Agency D3 agents during Vacation Bible School at Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church VBS set for Sunday, July 20, through Friday, July 25. The fun will begin at 5:30 p.m., with dinner served, and last until 8:45 p.m. each evening. Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church is located at 4084 NE Rocky Ford Road, north of Madison. July 22 The Pinetta area food ministry/mission will be distributing food beginning at 9 a.m. at the Pinetta food pantry.August 9 The 11thHour Gospel Group will be in concert at Sirmans Baptist Church on Saturday, Aug. 9, at 7 p.m. Sirmans Baptist Church is located at 168 SW Sirmans Church Way, off US 221, south of Greenville, south of Interstate 10, exit 241. Everyone is welcome to attend. Jimmy Fletcher is the church's pastor. Call (850) 948-4948 for more information. Church Calendar

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Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 7B Path of Faith Two New Ministries Offered At Middle Florida Baptist Association By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The Middle Florida Baptist Association is offering new ministries at their association office in the conference room. One of the ministries is a class entitled Parenting with Values. The sessions will be held from noon until 1 p.m. each Monday and will feature a video and a discussion. The classes began Monday, June 23. The Association is also holding Celebrate Recovery each Wednesday from noon until 1:30 p.m. The sessions are geared so everyone can learn from information presented in the study. Celebrate Recovery helps those who are co-dependent, have bad habits, hurts, hang-up, are being controlled, trying to control, grieving the death of a loved one, etc. Principles can be learned to help yourself and others. Celebrate Recovery began holding sessions on Wednesday, June 25. For more information on either of these ministries, contact Jan Miller at (850) 973-8607 (office) or (850) 295-5507 (cell). She can also be emailed at mfba@embarqmail.com or janmiller556@icloud.com. The Middle Florida Baptist Association is located at 349 SW Captain Brown Road in Madison. By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The First United Methodist Church of Madison will begin its annual Vacation Bible School beginning Monday, July 7, and going through Friday, July 11. The VBS is open to children, ages three up to the fifth grade. Sessions begin every morning at 8:30 a.m. and end at 11:30 a.m. The theme for this year's VBS is Workshop of Wonders: Imagine and Build with God. VBS students will discover how the ordinary becomes extraordinary with God as they meet people from the Bible, including Esther, Ezra and a young boy, who produces something amazing with God's help. Children will be taught to expect big things from God as He works wonders in them. The first session will be Imagine with God! as students learn the story of Esther, from the Book of Esther. Day two will be Build with God! as they discover the rebuilding of the Lord's House in Ezra 3:8-13. Day three will help students Grow with God! as they learn the Parable of the Mustard Seed from Matthew 13. On day four, children will learn to Work with God! as they learn the story of the feeding of the 5,000 from John 6:1-13. On day five, the lesson will be Walk with God! as the students learn about the walk to Emmaus, following Christ's death and resurrection, told in Luke 24:13-32. For further information, contact the First UMC office at (850) 973-6295 or Ruth Ann Latner at (850) 464-0236 or by email at ruthannlatner@yahoo.com. First UMC VBS To Begin Monday

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Path of Faith 8B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Lee First Baptist Church Hosts VBS By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Lee First Baptist Church kicked off its Agency D3 Vacation Bible School on Monday, June 23. The VBS focused on an apologetics theme, helping students to understand and defend what they believe. Everyone enjoyed delicious food each evening, cooked and served by volunteers before they went into classes to learn the lessons taught each evening. With the theme for the VBS as Agency D3: Discover, Decide, Defend, students, ages three to adult, collected and logged evidence about Jesus. Using their best high-tech operative skills, they examined eyewitness reports, physical proof and Biblical accounts to uncover and defend the truth about who Jesus really is. During VBS, they Discovered the truth of the gospel; Decided to believe it; and Defended the decision. The students became members of D3, an investigative agency organized to discover if Jesus is really who He claims to be and to examine if the Bible is true. This VBS was unusual because it has an apologetics theme, because people not only need to know the Bible is true and that Jesus is God's one and only Son, but they need to know how to defend what they believe when someone asks them why they believe it. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Students and teachers, many of them wearing their Agency D3 badges and t-shirts are excited about the VBS. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Friends enjoy a meal as they sit around the table at the Agency D3 VBS at Lee First Baptist Church. photos cont. on page 9B

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Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 9B Path of Faith VBS Photos Continued From Page 8B Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014A family enjoys some togetherness and a meal before heading into the VBS class for the evening. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Family and friends enjoy the meal before going on special assignments with Agency D3. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Two friends enjoy each other's company as they get ready to go into the VBS classes for the evening. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Two little friends sitting at the table anxiously await the Agency D3 VBS to begin.

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I love an old story that circulates in my family about my great-great grandfather, a fiery circuitriding preacher named John Martin McBrayer. The Reverend, or just Preacher, as he was known, traversed the Southern Appalachians on horseback, going church to church, camp meeting to camp meeting, and revival to revival preaching anywhere he was given an opportunity. Ultimately he settled down (I think his wife got tired of him leaving her with the 12 children each week) and started a Baptist church in North Georgia. He would fill that pulpit for the much of the remainder of his life, and when he died, he was laid to rest in the red dirt of that churchs cemetery. It was the early 1900s and drought was smothering the Georgia countryside. Farmers were desperate. Their crops were burning up in the fields, their cattle was dying of thirst, and everyone thought the river would run dry. So a Saturday prayer meeting was called, a meeting to pray for rain. A good portion of the community gathered, and in time, old John Martin came riding up on his pony. It took The Preacher a little while to come inside the church building, but when he did, he had his battered Bible in one hand and his heavy Western saddle and saddle blanket thrown over his shoulder. Well Preacher, one man asked, Whyd you bring your saddle in? You stayin all night till service in the morning? Everyone laughed. Im told that John Martin gave a mischievous chuckle himself. Then he answered, No, I thought wed be prayin for rain? I do believe the rest of you will be ridin home wet. Sure enough, before they all left the church that afternoon, the rains had come and the drought had been broken. And just as sure, most folks left on wet saddles and in drenched wagons while The Preacher trotted towards home as dry as dust (all while wearing that mischievous grin, I am certain). I often tell this story, not as a means of convincing people that they will always get what they pray for, but as an illustration of what faith looks like: Faith in God, not faith in a specific, pre-calculated outcome. John Martin trusted God his life was a testament to that fact whether the rains had come on that Saturday afternoon or not. This is reminiscent of an even older story found in the ancient book of Daniel, the story of the Three Hebrew Children, known as Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego. These three Jewish boys were ordered to bow and worship a god that was not their own, not the God that they knew and trusted. Such an act of false worship, for them, was beyond the pale, so they refused. For their noncompliance, Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego were to be cast into a fiery furnace and burned alive. But before the sentence was carried out they were given a final opportunity to acquiesce. Their response might be the greatest statement of defiant faith in religious history. They said, If we are thrown into the blazing furnace, the God whom we serve is able to save us. He will rescue us from your powerBut even if he doesnt, we want to make it clear to you that we will never bow and serve your gods. Here is mature faith: It is far more than a cheerful outcome contrived within our imaginations, or a happily ever after post-scripted to every story we tell. It is trust in the God behind all outcomes; it is hope in the God who is writing our stories. Enough of this faith that professes only the ability to change our circumstances; such faith is little more than a lucky rabbits foot. Instead, we need a faith that gives us resiliency, faith that strengthens our souls. We need faith that serves, not as a payoff for our prayers, but as growing confidence in a Person. We need that faith that sustains us, if the hoped-for rescue or drought-breaking rains come or not. Path of Faith 10B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Open 24/7 Praying For Rain

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Now Sarai, Abrams wife, bare him no children: and she had an handmaiden, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar. And Sarai said unto Abram, Behold now, the Lord hath restrained me from bearing: I pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her. And Abram hearkened unto the voice of Sarai. -Gen. 16: 1-2, KJV Some time during the late Bronze Age, between 2000 and 1500 B.C., roughly coinciding with the Middle Kingdom Era of Egypt, an Egyptian handmaid belonging to the wife of the nomadic clan leader would enter history, along with her tribe-woman mistress, as mothers of two great nations. The handmaids tale begins long before there was a kingdom known as Israel, before there were even the Twelve Tribes of Israel. It begins with a wandering clan leader, Abram (later Abraham) and his wife Sarai (later Sarah). Abram and Sarai are entering their twilight years, childless. Since God had already promised Abram some time ago that he would one day be the father of a great nation, the current situation presents quite a quandary: How is he to be the father of a great nation...with no heirs? It is here that Sarais handmaid, Hagar (whose name means stranger), enters the narrative. At Sarais insistence, Abram takes Sarais handmaid as a surrogate to provide him with heir. We do not know exactly how they first acquired an Egyptian handmaid, although their sojourns did take them through Egypt at times, but because of their position as head of their clan, we can surmise that they likely had an entire retinue of other servants as well. Hagar most likely came from an Egyptian household, a place of cities, temples and elaborate burial customs, with a complex political system and a thriving trade and market economy. If so, she must have found life among this nomadic tribe quite primitive. Coming from such a cosmopolitan background, she may have even considered it a step downward. As a slave or servant, it is unlikely that she had any say in becoming the chosen surrogate for a child that would be considered Sarais upon birth. There is no indication in the narrative of her being consulted. The decision was apparently made without her, and it was done. In fact, throughout the entire narrative, neither Sarai nor Abram refer to her by name, always speaking of her as the handmaid. It was not an unusual situation at the time; texts from many writings of that time period, including the Code of Hammurabi, allude to the custom of childless wives providing female slaves as surrogates for their husbands. Tivka Frymer-Kensky, author of Patriarchal Family Relationships and Near Eastern Law, summarizes the situation thusly in the Jewish Womens Archive: In the world of the ancient Near East, a slave woman could be seen as an incubator, a kind of womb-with-legs. However, this is not how Hagar views herself. She is now a person of importance, carrying the child of the clan leader, in a society that values mothers over childless women. Perhaps for the first time, she is even getting a little respect from other members of the household. In such a society, a female slave carrying a leaders child could rise dramatically in status, sometimes to the position of favored concubine or secondary wife. Yet, there was the knowledge that her child would be lawfully considered the fruit of that barren woman who still continued to lord it over her as if she were still a mere nothing; that barren mistress who had so completely failed in her childbearing function for the tribal leader. In the resulting mix of sexual jealousy and resentment, Hagar begins to see herself as equal to, or even superior to Sarai. Sarai, on the other hand, already upset by her childlessness, does not take kindly to Hagars new attitude. She responds with her own mix of jealousy and resentment, dealing harshly with that little nobody of a handmaid and her delusions of grandeur. Abram cannot intervene, for the women of the clan are ruled by Sarai, and under Sarais jurisdiction. There were some protections in the legal codes for slaves in this region; Sarai cannot kill Hagar outright. However, Hagar either fears for her life, or the situation becomes so intolerable she decides to take her chances in the unforgiving desert. Pregnant and desperate, she flees south, down through the Sinai Peninsula, back toward her homeland in Egypt. Following the road to Shur, she almost reaches Egypt. But, while resting at a wellspring in the wilderness of Shur, an angel of the Lord tells her that she must go back, for she will bear a son who will have descendants without number; a mighty nation will rise from him. He will be called Ishmael. With new purpose, and understanding the destiny of the child she carries, she turns and retraces her steps back to Egypt, giving birth to Ishmael when Abram (now Abraham), is 86 years old. Things appear to go well enough for the next 14 years until, Sarai (now Sarah), miraculously gives birth to a son, Isaac, whom the Lord has also promised will give rise to a great nation. The old rivalry soon reasserts itself, for whose son will now be Abrahams heir? Hagars, who was born first, or Sarahs, because Sarah is the wife? Things once again come to a head, and this time, Sarah has Abraham banish Hagar and Ishmael into the desert, where they soon run out of food and water. Believing that she is dying, Hagar places her son under the shade of a bush and cries out to the Lord, who shows her a well of water that she had previously overlooked. She and Ishmael survive, and make their home in the wilderness of Paran, where Ishmael grows to manhood. The story of Hagar is that of the outsider, the one who was never accepted by the people she lived among, and was eventually expelled from their society. It is the story of being absolutely alone, with no one to turn to in a harsh environment, both figuratively and literally, no one except God. When she cried out to God in the wilderness, she was protected by Him and survived, along with her child, living her life as a free woman, no longer a slave, raising a son who would one day be regarded as the father of the Arab nations. According to the Koran, it is at Mecca that God saved Hagar and Ishmael with the live-giving wellspring, and later brought forth from Ishmaels descendants the great nation he had promised Hagar so long ago. Like Jacob, Ishmeal had 12 sons, who gave rise to twelve tribes. Today, the Koran as well as the Jewish Midrash regard Hagar as a princess. In more modern times, she is a symbol of women who persevere and survive, especially when the odds are stacked against them. Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 11B Path of FaithWomen of the Bible: Hagar

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Path of Faith 12B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014



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National Security On this date in 1776, the Continental Congress voted unanimously to adopt a resolution made a month prior by Virginia delegate Richard Henry Lee that the colonies “are and of right ought to be, free and independent states.” They voted in republican manner by state delegation. The tally was 12-0, with the delegation from New York, still awaiting instructions from their legislature, abstaining. In anticipation of the vote on Lee’s resolution, the Congress had selected ve of their members from the most inuential colonies to draft a document stating the reasons for secession from the British crown. The committee would consist of Pennsylvania’s Benjamin Franklin; Massachusetts’ John Adams; Virginia’s Thomas Jefferson; Connecticut’s Roger Sherman; and New York’s Robert Livingston. The committee quickly selected Jefferson to pen the draft. For two weeks in June, the 33-year-old Jefferson worked furiously on the draft resolution, relying on his classical education for the rationale of the revolutionary action he and his fellow delegates were contemplating. The seeds of revolution had been brewing for more than two years, but reached a breaking point when Britain’s king and parliament decided to hire 12,000 professional German-Hessian mercenaries to put down the rebellion and extinguish the re of liberty. This was too much, even for moderates. After Jefferson nished the draft, the committee sat down to edit his work and make it theirs. On July 1, the Congress held a preliminary vote on Lee’s resolution and voted 9-2 with one tie and one abstention to dissolve their allegiance to England. Overnight, Delaware’s Caesar Rodney arrived to break his state’s tie vote. History records that the vote on July 2 was unanimous. Over the next two days, the 56 delegates debated the resolution and voted on changes. As he watched his work get carved up, Thomas Jefferson watched in silence, refusing to enter the debate over his words. Adams was the master orator which was not Jefferson’s long suit. Finally on July 4, the Continental Congress adopted the resolution which had been penned overnight by Congressional Secretary Charles Thompson. They called the resolution a Declaration of Independence. The Congress’ presiding ofcer John Hancock of Massachusetts boldly signed at the bottom of the original document. The Declaration of Independence which I refer to as the nation’s “birth certicate” is an amazing document. It begins with a preamble; then enumerates 27 charges against the king and parliament as justication for secession; followed by the personal pledge of the signers. In the second paragraph, there is this wonderful statement nearly intact from the way Jefferson wrote it. “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving the just powers from the consent of the governed.” This is a remarkable concept, even for today, but positively revolutionary for the times. No other nation up to that point in human history, had suggested any such concept: everyone is equal (except for women and minorities; that would come later); our rights are a gift from God; our rights include life, freedom, and the pursuit of our dreams; and government serves the people. How simple; how elegant. Most of the remaining 55 signers didn’t add their signatures to the document until August. During that one month interval, Secretary Thompson accomplished administrative duties associated with printing and distributing the declaration. The signers paid dearly for their pledge. Their lives, families and property were persecuted by the British crown. Many did not live to see the liberty they had put in motion or the new nation they helped create. Among them were two future presidents, including the second, John Adams. He always felt until his dying day fty years later that the true date of independence and cause for celebration was the second, not the fourth of July, when the Congress voted in favor of the original resolution. Today, there are Americans who are inspired by the legacy of the men who created the Declaration of Independence. They are called the TEA (for taxed-enough-already) party but they aren’t really organized like a political party. Instead, it is a grassroots effort of many loosely formed organizations concerned about government that has become too big and too oppressive, similar to the complaints that Jefferson listed in the Declaration. They are electing representatives (including some representing Madison County) who share their views and vow to do their part to dissemble ‘big government.’ They’re considered such a threat to the ‘governing class’ in Washington that the Internal Revenue Service has targeted them for “special treatment.” I think the Founding Fathers would see something very familiar with their 21stCentury counterparts.Below is a column that was published by Frank Kaiser. Through the years it has been mis-represented as an Andy Rooney commentary, however it was not. For all the 40+ women out there, sit back and enjoy this column knowing it’s all true. For all the men reading this column, read and learn. As I grow in age, I value women who are over 40 most of all. Here are just a few reasons why: An older woman will never wake you in the middle of the night to ask, "What are you thinking?" She doesn't care what you think. If an older woman doesn't want to watch the game, she doesn't sit around whining about it. She does something she wants to do. And it's usually something more interesting. An older woman knows herself well enough to be assured in who she is, what she is, what she wants and from whom. Few women past the age of 40 give a dang what you might think about her or what she's doing. Older women are dignied. They seldom have a screaming match with you at the opera or in the middle of an expensive restaurant. Of course, if you deserve it, they won't hesitate to shoot you if they think they can get away with it. Older women are generous with praise, often undeserved. They know what it's like to be unappreciated. An older woman has the self-assurance to introduce you to her women friends. A younger woman with a man will often ignore even her best friend because she doesn't trust the guy with other women. An older woman couldn't care less if you're attracted to her friends because she knows her friends won't betray her. Women get psychic as they age. You never have to confess your sins to an older woman. They always know. An older woman looks good wearing bright red lipstick. This is not true of younger women or drag queens. Once you get past a wrinkle or two, an older woman is far sexier than her younger counterpart. Older women are forthright and honest. They'll tell you right off you are a jerk if you are acting like one. You don't ever have to wonder where you stand with her. Yes, we praise older women for a multitude of reasons. Unfortunately, it's not reciprocal. For every stunning, smart, well-coiffed hot woman of 40+, there is a bald, paunchy relic in yellow pants making a fool of himself with some 22-year-old waitress. So much of this column is true, I’ve learned through the years. I’m proud to be a 40+ woman (quickly approaching 50). I am who I am – take it or leave it. If you don’t like me, I assure you I won’t lose any sleep over it, nor will I spend all my time worrying, gossiping, or calling and texting my friends to discuss it, much like my younger counter-parts. I left the “drama queen” segment of life back in my 20’s. For all the other women over 40 – stand tall and be proud; living this long shows that we have survived the teenage drama scene, childbirth, potty-training, and child rearing years. We can now help our children through their young years with so much more wisdom and knowledge, than we once had. Now, if we could only get the men to grow up and mature as well as we have! Until then….see you around the town.Summer is here and what that means in terms of food is cooler and lighter. Even my morning cup of coffee ends up being poured over ice some days. Smoothies take the place of oatmeal; salads replace cooked vegetables and when it comes to desserts, chilled fruit is my favorite. Chilled summertime fruit for me usually means watermelon and I will keep some in my fridge almost everyday until the season is over, but sometimes I want something a little more decadent, something creamy and maybe a bit more sweet. Ice cream is probably the number one dessert during the summer and with the many varieties and avors available, you could eat a different one every day and still not get through them all by the time cool weather arrives. As much as I would like to take on that challenge, I know my waistline would not survive, and I decided to search for a healthier version. In my quest for healthy ice cream, what I actually found was not ice cream at all, but a substitute for the dessert I knew I would have to try. The recipe from thekitchn.com is not really a recipe, but instructions on how to use just one ingredient to make a really good soft-serve ice cream alternative. To make this dessert you need a blender or food processor and...a banana. Obviously, if you’re not a fan of banana, go no further, but if you are, continue on. I keep bananas in my freezer all the time because I use them in smoothies, but to make this dessert, you should only freeze the fruit one to two hours. A little planning is necessary, but the pay off is a dessert that is creamy, healthy and delicious. Use as many bananas as you wish, slice them onto a paper plate or into a freezer-safe container and place in the freezer. The rst batch I tried I kept in for one hour. Processing the banana slices only took a minute to become creamy and smooth, and it really did resemble the silkiness of ice cream and scooped up nicely, although a little soft. This rst attempt, I decided to keep plain in order to test the results of the nished product. I loved the texture, but for as much as I love bananas, I did nd the avor a little overwhelming. The website gave additional suggestions such as peanut butter, honey, Nutella, cocoa and cinnamon. All sound wonderful, but I wanted to keep it as healthy as I could. For my next batch, I kept the banana slices in longer, actually too long because I got busy and forgot about the freezing bananas. After about four hours, I processed the frozen bananas and instead of a creamy concoction, what I ended up with was something that looked like small banana “pearls.” I added Greek yogurt to add some protein and hopefully smooth it out, which it did, but it also made the mixture softer than before, but still thick enough to enjoy. I knew it would need some sweetening with the plain yogurt, so I added a little honey and cinnamon as well. It was very good and the additional ingredients tempered the strong banana avor. I knew I had found a good summertime treat to add to my list of cold foods for hot weather. Of course, I was also left wondering about the many variations I could try next and I look forward to experimenting with some of them. The last time I was on thekitchn.com website, I saw a picture of something else I will absolutely have to try next, dark chocolate ice cubes. Looks like my freezer’s going to stay busy this summer.www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 2A € Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS Emerald Greene Publisher Joe Boyles Guest ColumnistSearching For Ambrosia Emerald's Gem Box Rose KleinColumnistCold Food For Hot DaysIndependenceWomen Over 40 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 29, 2014Banana Ice CreamŽ is a healthy summertime alternative to regular ice cream. First Time Home Buyers ClassInterested in becoming a home owner? Now is the time to take the Home buyer’s class beginning Monday, July 14that 6 p.m. at the Madison County Extension Service. The series will run four evenings beginning on the 14thand continuing on the 15th, 21stand 22nd. Lesson topics include credit, home selection, securing a home mortgage, home insurance and home maintenance. Funding for the State Housing Initiative Program (SHIP) is available to assist income eligible individuals and families with down payment and closing cost on the purchase of an existing home. This is a great opportunity for working people of low and moderate income to achieve home ownership. Upon completion of the class, participants receive a certicate that is required for SHIP assistants and rural development loans. As part of the process, complete and return a SHIP application, available at Suwannee River Economic Council on Bunker Street. If you are interested in attending the class to learn about the homeownership process, register by calling the Madison County Extension Service at 973-4138.

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/ / B J B C ( < ( C & 8 B ( + + = 1 J = ( 4 B 7 b B < 1 = B / B J # / / < B B & B F = C B & G B 1 + J ( % B ( B ( C B F = B & B = C < B ( C / H B C & B = ( B / B J H + + = 4 B & B = C ( B ( = B % / + + J B C & B % / / = = 4 8 B & B ( + J B ( = B F 1 = C B F = B ( = C B / < < = C ( % B / / = B & H = B / + J B ( C B H ( C & C H / B ( = / < = 4 F B 1 / + ( B & = B ( C C B C & B < = 1 / ( % B / < B = & / F + B & G < < = C B / / = 4 & ( B F % & C B C < B f G ( % B / / B / F C B 1 B C B t B C 4 B F + B r ( 4 B + + % B C & ( B H = B < < = C B F = B & B ( B C / B & B / F C B & ( = / / B 1 < / + B F < ( % B B & / B < / < J B / < % / C B C / B + / % B / F C B / < B + G ( % 4 B ( & / + = ( % B < / B ( C / B C & & / B / B n = B / / C ( % B < ( C B < = = & B B B H C & 4 B b + C B & ( B B 1 ( < B / ( B C ( = B = & / = ) = B B B + C B 1 1 < C + J B F B C / B ( % B H C < / B < ( B F C B & B + = / + C B & ( B & ( = B / 1 / / B / F C 4 B C < B / / B < C F < & / B & B / F B C & / 1 B / F C B B % B 1 / = C ( % B / B ( % : = 1 < / + B B C & B E @ J < / + B G C F + + J B C I C & ( 4 B & J B B 1 + = C / B I & % B ( C = B C < H < = B H & ( + / / B H = B / F C B H + ( % & B = H B ( % B B + + 1 / + ( 4 B & B ( % B H = < < = C B & B H = B H < ( % B / / : = B H C & 4 n 1 = = % < = 4 B B E L L @ B ( = = B C < < B < ( G B J ( % ( B b H C & / < B $ 0 B / + + & = = B H = B C < G + ( % B H = C / F B ( B C & ( = ( B H = C / F B + / B t 0 L B I C B C / B C & / % B B H ( C & B C & < ( / < B 1 = = % < = 4 B B & B H / < C & B / G C B C < G + B < / = = B C & C < + ( B ( C / B C & B ( = ( B = C / F B + F = ( % B C & B / < B r F = C % B C / B C < G + B C & < / F % & C & B ( B B ( C / / C & B H = C / F B C < G + + = 4 B & B < / C B / B C & / % B B / + + ( H ( C & B C & B < ( % & C B = ( B / C & B / < B r F = C % 4 B & / % B B B ( = = C < < B C & B C < G + ( C / B C & B ( B C & B + C B = ( B / B / % B / + + ( B H ( C & B C & < ( % & C B = ( B / B ( = = C < < 4 B & B H / < C & B / G C B / C ( F B C < G + ( % B = C / F 4 B & / < B r F = C % B B C / B + B < = C B ( % B = / F C & ( B / C & B H = C / F + = B / B t 0 L 4 B & / % B B B ( = = C < < B B C / B B + < = C B ( % B = / F C & = C B ( C & B ( B / B t 0 L 4 & B < ( G < B / B C & / < B r F = C % B H = C < = 1 / < C B C / B + + & = = B r / < ( + B b / = 1 ( C + B / < B < ( C ( + ( ) F < ( = 4 B B C & B C & < F + C B 1 = = % < = B ( B C & / % B B < F < + B $ B & F B F < + B E E < ( G B ( / < B ( ) F < ( = B B / E E B < ( G B < ( C ( + B ( ) F < ( = B + + B H < B C < = 1 / < C B C / B + + & = = r / < ( + B b / = 1 ( C + 4 / < ( % B C / B C & b B < 1 / < C B C < B H = C B / = ( < + J F B C / B < / B + / % < / B C & B < = & 4 t r n C < C B < / B B 4 4 B F C ( + B D B 1 4 4 B B & B B 4 f 4 4 4 B r / ( + B / = B / C B % ( G B H < ( C C B C = C = B / < B / F C B < / C = C = B F C B ( C B / = B 1 < / G ( B / C & < B = < G ( = B / < B J B F + + J = C B 1 < C B / 4 B B & B = < G ( = G ( + + B ( + F B & % ( % B J / F < B / F C / = C C B < ( G < = B + ( = B C / B B + / < ( B + ( = > B < H + = > B < 1 + C B / < B B + / = C B / < B = C / + B + ( = > < = = A B & % = > B = C C B ( C ( C ( / B < = > < ( = C C C = > B ( = = F ( % A < H ( % B ( = + B 1 < ( % B 1 + < = B B < % J B / C C B t / < C ( / < % ( = C < C ( / 4 t B J / F B < B 1 1 + J ( % B / < B J / F < B < = C B < ( G < = B + ( = B / < B = C C B t B < B ( B J / F < B F < < C B + ( = B / < t B < B & = B I 1 ( < B B J / F B & G B + < J B F = B C & / C ( B 7 / G ( 8 B < H + B / 1 C ( / B / < B ( B J / F + % + + J B & % B J / F < B B 2 / < B I 1 + B J B < < ( % B / < B ( G / < 3 B C & B 1 < C C B / B b / + F < ( C J B B 2 = ( B n 4 B E L 0 L 3 B < 5 F ( < = B / F C C ( / B / B J / F < B ( C ( C J B = / ( + B = F < ( C J B F < B < = ( C ( + B < = = 4 B B / B B / F C B H & ( & B / F C = J / F B B C / B < ( % B G ( = ( C& C C 1 A A H H H 4 % C & < % / % C 4 / A B + + B ( B C & B = = < J B ( / < C ( / B B % < C B J / F < B / H B 1 < = / + & + ( = C B / B C & B / F C = B J / F B H ( + + B B C / B < ( % H ( C & B J / F 4 F < ( % B n F + J B J / F B B B C & B 4 f 4 4 4 B r / ( + ( B C & B ( B ( I ( B 1 < ( % B + / C B / B r / J B n F + J B ? B % ( B / B r / J B n F + J B E 0 > B / C & B C = B H ( + + B < / B B 4 4 B F C ( + B D B 1 4 4 B B / < B / < B ( / < C ( / B / B / B C & B 4 f 4 4 4 B r / ( + B B ( C = B = & F + B + + B C & B + / < ( B r B C B 2 L 3 @ 0 ? E @ L L 4 B / < B C & B C & C B C & J & G B H / B B 1 < ( K B F + = = B C & J B & G B C < B 1 < / / C ( / + B % B / < = / B & B < H ( % B / B C & B / ( ( + + / < ( B f / C C < J B H = ( C B / < B = / ( + B ( 1 % = 4 B t ( G ( F + = B H & / < ( G B B ( + B = ( ( + < B C / B C & B / B = < ( B = & / F + B / C < = 1 / B C / B C & B ( + 4 / < B / < B ( / < C ( / B C / B ( B / C & < B C ( 1 = C / B 1 < / C C B J / F < = + 1 + = B G ( = ( C + + / C C < J 4 / ,4 B / B < 1 / < C B B + / C C < J B = / = F < = B = & / F + B / C C B C & B + / < ( B f / C C < J : = B ( G ( = ( / B / F < ( C J B C B 2 L 3 B $ ? ? ? D L 4 f n f r b n ( = B < = 1 / = ( + B / < B + + / C ( % B H C < B < = / F < = B G + F C ( % B C & B H C < F = B 1 1 + ( C ( / = B ( % B = F < C & < ; = B / F % & B / B C & 7 H C < B 1 ( 8 B C / B % / < / F 4 C G B r ( ( = B / B r B B G ( < ( % & C B B % ( < H ( C & B C & B = / F < B r % C B ( G ( = ( / B H ( C & ( B r B < = = C & B r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t B ( C / = ; C B B C & B H H + + B F = = B J B 1 < / + = B ( B C & B ( % & / < ( % B < B ( C B ( = B = & F C / H B B C & B 1 < ( C < G / 4 B B & B 1 < ( C C B F < = C = B & = B C / B C B C & C B ( + B < ( = B C & C B B H H + + B & B = B / < B % / C B 1 1 < / G B B & ( = C + + B ( % & C B = = ( + B / < ( % B C / C & B C B F C B = C ( + + B / C H / < B / F C B ( B < + B + ( 4 B B & B C < ( ( % C & B = ( ( + ( C J B / B + + / H ( % B B H B + < % F = B 1 < ( C B C & B = ( C ( B C ( = B = C B C / B B 7 ( ( F # / H B + G + 8 B ( B + + B < ( G < = B = 1 < ( % = B C & B + / H = C + G + B C & = B B < & H ( C & / F C B G < = + J B C ( % B = & B H ( + + ( B H C + = 4 B B & C B ( = C & B 7 / 8 B 1 / ( C B / < B C & r 4 B B t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r B H / F + H < < C B B ( G = C ( % C ( / B B ( B B H C < B F = 1 < / ) C B H = B / F B C / B F = ( % B B < % ( / + 1 < / + B C & B r % / G < ( % B / < B B % / B B B = & F C B ( C B / H 4 B & < B ( = B + = / B B 1 < / G ( = ( / B / < B / F = B < G / C ( / 4 B B t B B F = < B ( = % < C B B 1 < ( C B C & B / = ; C B B F = / B ( C B / < B C H / B / < B / < J < = B C & B / < B 1 F + + B C & C B 1 < ( C 4 & B ( C B / = B C / % < / H C & B r B C < ( = C / B = C J B & B / B C & F < G B J B C ( ( 1 C ( % H C < F = B B = 1 < / ) C B % < / H C & B H ( + + < ( % B / < B C & B I C B G J < = B B < F ( % C & = B C ( ( 1 C B = B C & < / F % & B C & / 1 F C < B / + 4 t B C & B F C F < < ( % & C B 1 < ( C B C & C C & B % < ( F + C F < + 1 < / = = B H ( + + B / , / < B F C / C B / < B ( C 4 B B r / ( = C F < B = = / < = B ( B < / 1 = H ( + + B B + B C / B C + + B C & = J = C B H & B C & B 1 + C = B H C < B 1 < G C ( % H = C B C & < / F % & B / G < H C < ( % B B + + / H ( % B C & r B C / B C C < B + + / C B B = C < C & B C & 7 H C < B 1 ( 4 8 b / H G < B C & < B ( = / B 1 B / < B + ( ( C B / B C / C + / F C J B H C < B F = B / B 1 < C ( + B 1 < / ) C C & C B B = J B 7 C & B / F C J B B = F 1 1 / < C B B F < B / B ( + + ( / B % + + / = 1 < B J 8 B = B / F C J B C C / < J B / , J B G = I 1 + ( B ( B < = 1 / = C / B B 5 F = C ( / 4 B B 7 t C ; = B / C B B C B H ( C & B F & B / B = C < H = = C ( ( % B / F C B / B ( C 8 B = ( G = 4 B B t C B ( = B ( = C B / G ( % B J ( B = J = C 4 B B 7 & < ; = B / C B < + + J B B % / / B H J B C / B % C C & C B F < 4 8 7 t C ; = B ( F + C B C / B 1 F C B 1 B / B B C ( < B / F C J 8 B < ( % & C B 4 B B 7 t C + / = C B & = B C / B B = ( C = 1 ( 4 8 B B & B / 1 F C < B / + ( % B C + + = B C & H & B C & J B % C B + / = B C / C & ( < B 7 / 8 B 1 / ( C B C & 1 / ( C B C B H & ( & B C & J = C / 1 B ( = = F ( % B 1 < ( C = 4 7 t B B < = ( C B + ( G ( % < B = G < + B 1 ( G / C = B & = H + + B 1 < / + = B C & B & = & / F + B % / B C / B C & B r 8 B = ( B G = 4 7 & J ; < B C & B ( G = C ( % C / < = B B / < < = 4 8 < ( % & C B / F < < F C B B C & B G C C & C B ( B C & B = B / B B ( < C B + ( B ( 4 4 B H & B C & 1 ( G / C = B H < B < F ( % B C & B ( % & / < = ; H + + = B < B < J B ( C B H / F + B ( < + J B = J B C / B = C + ( = & ( % B F = ' C B F C B ( B H + + 1 < / + = B H < B ( C < ( C C C B H & B C & B 1 ( G / C = H < B < F ( % B 7 ( C B B & < B C / B C & B F 1 4 8 C ( + + B C & B r B ( = B C & % / C / B % J B / < B I ( % + / + B 1 < / + = B H ( C & < = ( C ( + B H + + = B + / C B < B + < % F = B H + + = 4 7 & ( = B ( = B 5 F ( C B B ( < C B = J = C B & < C & B / F C B = C 8 B G = / C 4 B B t B + / < ( B H C < B ( = / = ( < B 7 / , / 1 < / 1 < C J 4 8 B B F < % < / F B = C < B B < F ( < C + J B F < B = / / ; = B & / F = B F C B C & C 1 < = / B / = ; C B 7 / H 8 C & B H C < B F C ( + B & B / < = & B < H = B ( C B F 1 B ( C / B C & & / F = B B 7 1 C F < = 8 ( C 4 B B F C B = C B H C < < ( % & C = B < B ( B C / B ( < + B < ( % & C = B B < B / = ( < B 1 < C B / B C & 1 < / 1 < C J 4 B B C < B < ( % & C = B H C < B = B B / F % & C B = / + B B / < C % % 4 7 B < + + J B + ( G B ( B K ( % B 1 + 8 B = ( < ( % & C B / B C & B / < C & + / < ( B < % ( / B B 1 + 7 H ( C & B = F & B 1 < / F C ( G 5 F ( < = 4 8 / < B / < B ( / < C ( / B / B C & B r G ( = ( C B C & B H = ( C B C& C C 1 A A H H H 4 = < H 4 = C C 4 # 4 F =/ < B + + B C & B ( F < B C B 2 D @ 3 B D @ E 0 L L 0 4

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 4A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Thank You! Obituaries The family of Mr. Eddie Branch Sr. would like to thank each of you for your prayers, messages of condolences, owers, food and all acts of kindness shown during this time of sorrow. Our sincere gratitude to you, who have come from far and near to pay your last respect to our love one. May God forever bless and keep each of you in his care and love.The Branch FamilyCharles D. McClure, Sr.Tallahassee said good-bye to one of its long time residents on Tuesday, June 24. Charles Davis McClure, Sr., loved Tallahassee and was a devoted public servant. He possessed the admired qualities of honesty, industriousness and creativity. He was loved by many. McClure was born in Birmingham, Ala., on May 22, 1935, to Florina Davis McClure and John Robert McClure. His family, including his older brother, John Robert McClure, Jr., moved to Madison, in 1937. His father practiced law in Madison with Florina's father, Charles E. Davis. They moved to Tallahassee in 1942 when his father accepted a job as Executive Secretary to Governor Spessard Holland. McClure was a 1953 graduate of Leon High School, where he was Student Body President during his senior year. Some of his early accomplishments are: the rank of Eagle Scout in The Boy Scouts of America and a delegate of Boys State, where he was elected Attorney General. Upon graduation, he attended the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he earned his Bachelor of Science in Journalism in 1957. He made many life-long friends in his fraternity of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. After graduation, he joined the United States Marine Corp., entered Ofcer Candidate School in Quantico, Va., serving for 39 months and was honor ably discharged as a Captain. One of the highlights of his life was a memorable trip to Iwo Jima, traveling with many other fellow Marines. In his retirement, he enjoyed luncheons each Monday with other fellow Marine Veterans. After his military experience, he attended law school in St. Petersburg, Fl., graduating from Stetson Law School with his Juris Doctor. Professionally, McClure began his career as a General Counsel to the State Comptroller. It was his honor to work in that ofce during the time the property was being accumulated that would later become Walt Disney World. McClure had the special privilege of being introduced to Walt Disney and was proud of a signed photograph of himself with Disney. He proudly displayed this framed photo in his ofce for many years. Following that position, McClure practiced law in private practice with McClure, Wigginton and McClure for six years and was then appointed by Governor Reuben Askew to be a Leon County Judge in August 1973. He was in that position for 11 years, having been re-elected three times. McClure was then elected as Circuit Judge in 1984 for the Second Judicial Circuit and served as Chief Judge from 1989-1991. In total, Charles McClure was a presiding judge for over 28 years. During that time, he was an innovative thinker, creating programs to reform wayward, teenage drivers. For instance, there are more than a few Tallahasseans who, as teenage trafc offenders, have had to give up their Friday or Saturday nights to open the doors of the TMH emergency room for ambulance crews carrying injured car crash victims. Additionally, Judge McClure was nationally recognized for his enforcement procedures of child support. He was interviewed on The Today Show with Connie Chung for his efforts against what became known as the "Deadbeat Dads." During court session, McClure's "tough justice" efforts collected watches, boats, jewelry and cash as payment from fathers who were delinquent in their child support. He was also featured in People Magazine showcasing his creative efforts at curbing crime. After retiring from the bench, he returned to private practice for several years. All told, Charles McClure, a third generation attorney, was a member of the Florida Bar, retiring from the bar after 48 years of loyal and distinguished service. In addition to his notable career, McClure was also civically active in the Tallahassee community. He was past president of the Tallahassee Kiwanis Club and the Leon County Tuberculosis Club. He was a member of the Jaycees, the Colonel's Club and the Exchange Club. As a past member of Goodwill Industries, he was the Director of the Big Bend area. Judge McClure was a long-time member of St. John's Episcopal Church. In his later years, as a cancer survivor, he volunteered at Big Bend Hospice, visiting patients and offering free legal help wherever needed. Judge Charles McClure is survived by his brother, J. Robert McClure, Jr. (Rae). He was a loving father and will be missed by his three children: Elizabeth McClure Benoist (Blaise) of Orlando; Charles D. McClure, Jr., (Stephanie) of Tallahassee; and Susan F. McClure, of Jacksonville. McClure was very proud of his three grandchildren: Lauren McClure, of Greensboro, N.C.; Luc and Juliette Benoist. Visitation was held on Saturday, June 28, from 4-6 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home, located at 3322 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, Fl. 32311, (850) 942-2929. A memorial service was held Tuesday, July 1, at 2 p.m., at St. Peter's Anglican Church, 4784 Thomasville Rd, Tallahassee, Fl. 32309, followed by private interment. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, Fl. 32308. Harley Reed WessonHarley Reed Wesson, 78, formerly of Madison, passed away peacefully at the CCS State VA Nursing Home in Springeld, Fl., on Wednesday, June 18. Harley was a retired USAF Master Sergeant, serving our country proudly for 23 years. He retired from the Air Force and moved his family to Madison, where he then worked as an electrician for Dixie Packers for 20 years. He was a proud father, grandfather, great-grandfather, uncle, cousin and friend. He loved to spend time playing with the kids, tinkering on projects, helping others on odd jobs, working on cars and xing anything necessary with duct tape. Harley was born in Tallassee, Ala., and then, after starting his military career and serving abroad, lived in various states with his family. Harley is survived by one brother, Bobby Joe Wesson; one sister, Ada Paravicini; three sons: Ron, David and Wade; two daughters: Millie and Wanda (and all of their spouses). Harley was blessed with 10 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, numerous nieces and nephews and extended family members. Harley was preceded in death by his parents, seven brothers and two sisters. A visitation with the family was held at Beggs Funeral Home in Madison, on Saturday, June 21, from 6 to 8 p.m. A graveside service and burial was held at Elam Baptist Church Cemetery in Tallassee, Ala., on Monday, June 23 at 11 a.m. C.S.T. Harley's family would like to extend their gratitude and appreciation to his compassionate caregivers and friends at the CCS State VA Nursing home where Harley lived for the last 10 years of his life. In lieu of owers and gifts, please make donations in Harley's honor to Covenent Hospice at www.covenenthospice.org.Daniel Franklin BlountDaniel "Danny" Franklin Blount, 57, passed away on Friday, June 27, in Gainesville. Funeral service was held Monday, June 30, at 11 a.m. at Beggs Funeral Home, in Madison. Burial followed in the Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends at the funeral home on Sunday, June 29, from 6 to 8 p.m. Mr. Blount was born on September 3, 1956 in Quincy, Fl. He is the son of Harry Franklin Blount and Mary Kate Bland Blount. He spent most of his life in Madison. He was a Christian and a member of the Midway Church of God in Lee. He was a U.S. Navy veteran. He was employed as a USDA Food Safety Inspector at Pilgrim's Pride in Live Oak. He loved to go on vacation, camping and concerts. He loved his cats, Blackie and Sarge. He was a people person and loved his church family. He is survived by his wife of 20 years Lori Tompkins Blount, of Lee; one daughter, Ashlyn Kate Blount of Lee; one son, Robert Franklin Blount of Orlando; father-in-law, Larry Tompkin; mother-inlaw, Myrtice Tompkins; step-mother, Carolyn Blount of Lee; one sister, Kathy Blount Norris and husband Dennis of Lee; nieces and nephews: Brittany Sivyer and husband, Steve of St. Augustine; Heather Norris of Taiwan; Jared Norris of Baltimore, Md.; Joseph Riley Tompkins of Lee; and Allen Harrison Bland of Chattanooga, Tenn.; one brother-in-law, Jody Tompkins and wife, Jessica of Lee, and one sister-inlaw, Kimberly Bland of Thomasville, Ga. He is also survived by many other relatives and a host of friends. Donations may be made to Madison County Community Bank, located at 301 East Base St., Madison, Fl. 32340, in memory of Daniel "Danny" Franklin Blount. Franklin DonŽ MerrittFranklin "Don" Merritt, 75, of Carter Road, Albion, Pa., died on Friday, June 20. He was born on Aug. 12, 1939, in Lee, a son of the late Ervin F. and Frankie Mildred Ragans Merritt. Don was raised and educated in Madison County. He then enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served in the Vietnam War. Following his honorable discharge, Don moved to Albion and was a tool and die maker for Hytech Tool and Design until he retired. In addition to his parents, Don was preceded in death by an infant daughter, Chandra Merritt; four sisters: Annie Rodgers, Delores Neill, Josie Merritt and Shirley Merritt; and two brothers: E.F. and James Merritt. Don is survived by his wife, Jean R. Dingfelder Merritt of Albion; a daughter, Melissa "Melsa" Wirtz and her husband, Jeff, of Pittsburgh, Pa.; and a sister, Joyce Rutherford of Lee. He is also survived by many nieces and nephews. Family and friends were invited to call Tuesday, June 24 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m., at the Bracken Funeral Home, 315 N. Center St., Corry, Pa., and attend the funeral service there on Wednesday, June 25 at 11 a.m. Burial was held at Pine Grove Cemetery, Corry, Pa. Memorials may be made to the Erie Regional Cancer Center, 2500 W. 12thSt. Erie, Pa. 16505 or Albion VFD, 19 Smock Ave., Albion, Pa. 16401. To sign the guest book or send condolences, please visit www.brackenfh.com. Ronnie Gene Thompson, Sr.Ronnie Gene Thompson, Sr., 55, of Madison died Saturday, June 28 at his residence. Funeral service was held Monday, June 30, at 10 a.m. at ParkerBramlett Funeral Home with interment in Pebble City Church Cemetery. Rev. Tim Bozeman ofciated. Serving as pallbearer were Alan Sowell, Aaron Davis, Bubba Lambert, Jay Reagan, Jamie Harris and Jarrod Harris. Born April 30, 1959 in Mitchell County, Mr. Thompson was a Farm Manager for Birdsong Peanut Co. in Lee. He was preceded in death by his father, Ronald Thompson. Ronnie was a wonderful family man and devoted his life to his family and his profession, farming. Survivors include his wife, Janet "Sis" Thompson of Madison; sons: Ronnie Thompson, Jr. (Tomi Lynn) of Colquitt, Ga. and Jay Thompson (Brooke) of Sale City, Ga.; his mother, Vivian Thompson of Sale City, Ga.; sisters: Sherri Maddox (David) of Vero Beach, Fl., Tina Horne of Baconton, Ga. and Pam Dennis of Douglas, Ga.; grandchildren: Slayde Thompson, Bryson Thompson, Layton Heard and Ghanum Heard. Visitation was held Sunday, June 29 from 5-8 p.m. at Parker-Bramlett Funeral Home. Flowers will be accepted or memorials may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 225 SW Smith St., Madison, Fl. 32340. Parker-Bramlett Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. To sign the online guest registry, visit the website at www.parkerbramlett.com. Correction In the story, Career And Technical Education Offers Choices To MCHS Students,that ran in the Friday, June 27 paper, we mistakenly wrote that the Criminal Justice courses and Business Technology Education courses at Madison County High School was under the instruction of Gwen Hubbard and Ramon Guess; that is incorrect. The instructor for the Criminal Justice Department at MCHS is Jason Fletcher and the instructor for the Business Technology Education courses at MCHS are Mike Radel and Donn Smith. We apologize for the mistake.

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Many people know the Salvation Army from seeing the bell ringers with their red kettles at Christmastime or from shopping in their thrift stores, now called Family Stores, but this is just a part of what this Christian-based organization is all about. The Salvation Army’s wording on their logo, “Doing The Most Good” reects their mission statement of meeting human needs without discrimination and all done under the umbrella of sharing the gospel. Sergeant George Blevins, the commanding ofcer in the Salvation Army, along with his wife Gale, who is also a Sergeant, runs the North Central Florida Outpost made up of ve counties: Madison, Taylor, Jefferson, Suwannee and Hamilton. The outpost used to be located in downtown Madison in the old historical jail building on Pinckney Street, but as of this past March, the Army has moved their headquarters to Perry. Changing ofce locations didn’t change the Army’s presence in Madison County. One of the things the organization does through the school year is to teach music to students at Greenville and Lee Elementary. Brass instruments are provided to the children for learning music, but devotionals and character building are taught as well. This year at Greenville, an after school program was added with Madison County High School teacher Pat Shartran volunteering her time at the school. She also volunteers with the Army as the main music teacher when school is out, at a summer music camp that is held for kids, ages eight through 12, where they can choose between guitar, keyboard and violin. Also during the summer, the organization holds a Community Service Camp, where kids can have fun riding horses, swimming and lots of other fun activities for ve days. Salvation Army pays all expenses for the children, ages seven through 12, and works hard to make the camp a “safe place with a loving environment.” Christmastime is very busy for the Blevins’ and their volunteers. Bell ringers have to be found and organized, but it’s also a time when needs for families are high. Money earned through the red kettles and the family stores are now put to good use, as the Army will provide families with food and toys for the month through the Madison programs, Head Start and Kids, Inc. Blevins said he loves working with these organizations because it allows him and his team to reach out to entire families and cover whatever needs they have. Food and toys are on the list to give, but clothing, furniture or any other need could be met as well. Blevins has a heart for single mothers and sympathizes by saying, “It breaks your heart to see how hard they have to work to make it.” Joshua Webb, a Cadet and rst year seminary student from the Salvation Army training college, is assisting at the Perry outpost for the summer. Webb is at the North Florida post, “putting into practice what he has learned at seminary,” and one of his “duties” was to help Blevins give away bicycles to three Madison County Central School students, after having their name pulled in a drawing at the end of the school year. At the end of the summer, Webb will return to his studies and his bride-to-be, who is also in training. After Webb leaves in the fall, the Blevins’ won’t be alone because George says they are helped out by a group of volunteers at their post and adds, “We can’t do what we do without volunteers.” The Salvation Army is always looking for people who want to make a difference in the lives of others by volunteering their time and the Army has several avenues where you can help. Although there are no Family Stores closer than Tallahassee, Thomasville or Valdosta, donations are always appreciated and can be used to cover needs in the community. Monetary donations are always helpful because they can be used anywhere there is a need and a set of helping hands can always be used at the school or summer camp programs. The Salvation Army also has a disaster relief service that trains those interested in helping during times of crisis. You can visit the Salvation Army’s North Central Florida Outpost site on Facebook at www.facebook.com/salvationar myncfo or call them at (850) 584-5678. For information on the disaster relief services, checkout their website at www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org .AROUNDMADISONCOUNTYMadison County Carrier € 5Awww.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 S e r v i n g O u r N e i g h b o r s F o r O v e r 5 0 Y e a r s Competitive Rates Online Banking I N T E R E S T C H E C K I N GS A V I N G S M O N E Y M A R K E TB U S I N E S S C H E C K I N G C E R T I F I C A T E O F D E P O S I TI R A 424 West Base Street P.O. Box 267 Madison, Florida 32340 Phone: 850.973.2600 www.csbdirect.com LOBBY HOURS Mon. Thurs. 9 am 4 pm Friday 9 am 5 pm DRIVE THRU HOURS Mon. Fri. 8:30 am 5 pm Friday 8:30 am 5 pm SALVATIONARMYDoing The Most GoodŽ In Madison County Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 4, 2014Cadet Joshua Webb, from the Salvation Army, was at the Central School, giving away bicycles to the winners of a name drawing, done at the previous awards ceremony.Photo SubmittedGeorge Blevins, Sergeant at the North Central Florida Outpost, and his bride Gale. Madison County Parks & Recreation Will Be Offering Adult Church League Softball This Summer. Games Will Be Played On Mondays And Tuesdays Starting July 14th. Teams May Sign Up At The Madison County Courthouse, Finance Recreation Complex, Monday Friday 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Teams May Also Sign Up At The Recreation Complex, Monday Friday 8 a.m. 3 p.m. The Fee For The League Will Be $300 Per Team. Age Limit To Play Is 16 Years Of Age. (Must Be 16 By The First Game.) Teams Must Have Two Females On The Field At All Times. League Rules And Team Roster Will Be Available At The Courthouse And The Recreation Complex. For More Information, Contact: Tommy Garner (850) 464-7221 Jim Bo Ratliff (850) 464-7072 By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School JV and Varsity Cheerleaders will be hosting a Cheer Camp for Girls in Pre-K through 8thgrade on Monday, July 14, Tuesday, July 15 and Wednesday, July 16, at the Madison County Central School gym from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The cost is $40 and the girls will learn cheers, chants, jumps, stunts and more. Water will be provided but each girl should bring her own snack for snack time. All proceeds from the camp will go to help send the MCHS Cheerleaders to Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) Cheer Camp at the end of July. All registration information and money is due by Tuesday, July 8. For more information, call Madison County High School at (850) 973-5061 ext. 5771 and leave a message for the sponsor, Ruth Ann Latner or call or text her at (850) 4640236 or email her at ruth.latner@madisonmail.us.MCHS To Host Cheer Camp In July

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AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY www.greenepublishing.com 6A € Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 NFCC Medical Administrative Specialist Class Of 2014 Pass National Boards At 100 PercentPhoto Submitted By NFCC Ofce Of College AdvancementNFCCs Medical Administrative Specialist graduates are shown in the front row, left to right: Emily Parsons (Madison), Gail Cra wford (Taylor), Azucena Hernandez-Perez (Madison), Lori Salsgiver-Dowdy (Madison), Leola Seabrooks (Madison) and Pamela Barron (Madison). Pictured in the back row, from left to right are: Lisa West (Madison), Paula McGhee (Madison), Shirley Mattair (Madison), Laverne Smith (Madison) and NFCC Medical Administrative Specialist Instructor Tammy Kemp (Madison). Submitted by NFCC Ofce of College AdvancementNorth Florida Community College’s Medical Administrative Specialist class of 2014 recently passed their National boards for Medical Administrative Assistants at 100 percent. NFCC’s Medical Administrative Specialist Program is designed to prepare students for work as ofce clerks, secretaries or administrative specialists in a medical setting such as doctor’s ofces, hospitals and medical research facilities. The program also provides supplemental training for persons previously or currently employed in any of these occupations. For more information about NFCC’s Medical Administrative Specialist program, contact Medical Administrative Specialist Instructor Tammy Kemp at (850) 973-1633 or kempt@nfcc.edu

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.When Pre cinct #3 voters go to their polling place in Lee on Aug. 26 and Nov. 4, they will meet several members of the local Rotary Club. At the Precinct #11 polling place on SE Bunker Street, voters will find the polling positions staffed by members of the Kiwanis Club of Madison. Both clubs are participating in the “Adopt-a-Precinct” program through the Madison County Supervisor of Elections Office. The clubs will supply at least five members to be trained as poll workers, who will then work the polls from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. during the Aug. 26 Primary and the Nov. 4 General Election. Additionally, there are eight early voting dates for each election, or 16 in all. Eligible Madison County residents who wish to vote, but are not yet registered, should remember that the deadline for registering is 29 days before the election they wish to vote in. For the Aug. 26 primary, the registration books close July 28. Those wishing to register, or to switch party affiliations, must do so before this date. Additionally, those who have not done so recently are encouraged to stop by the Supervisor of Elections Office at 239 SW Pinckney St., (next to the Courthouse Annex) and update their signature cards, since many people's signatures tend to change over a period of years. In a pinch, should they have to vote a provisional ballot or vote absentee, whether or not their vote is ultimately certified and counted depends on whether or not the signatures provided match what is on file. In an effort to honor those who have served our country and played a role in preserving the right to vote, the Madison County Supervisor of Elections Office implemented the “Vote In Honor Of A Veteran” program Nov. 1, 2013. Citizens are encouraged to bring photos of friends and family who have served in the armed forces (old military photos as well current photos of active military personnel) to the Supervisor of Elections Office, and fill out a short biographical form on the service man or woman. The photos can be scanned into the computer to produce a display copy for the “Wall of Honor,” and the biographical forms will be kept in a notebook for interested citizens to read. Family or friends who bring in photos and bio sheets will be given a “Vote in Honor of a Vet” pin that they can proudly wear on Election Day.AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014Madison County Carrier € 7A BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252 Pickles, Yarn Dogs And The Holy Land Fundraiser Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 26, 2014The ladies from the Senior Center display some of their work. From left to right, are: Corrine Rayam, who had dropped by to purchase some pickles; Faye Ludwig, holding one end of a quilt made at the Greenville Senior Center; Ella Mae Brown, holding jars of the homemade pickles the group is selling; Lonnie Mae Robinson, holding a lacy lap cover for nursing home resident and Cheryl Scovel, the OAA Coordinator at the Senior Center.By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.The ladies of the Senior Citizens Center here in Madison are selling their wares to help pay for a much needed getaway to Orlando this October. The group of crafters work hard and devote their time and skills to help members of the community by making lap quilts for seniors in nursing centers and are now making full size quilts for the children who will be living in the new children’s home in Pinetta. Faye Ludwig says their group’s coffers are empty and they are in desperate need of fabric, thread, lace or any other unused trim you might have lying around that they could use for these projects. The group also makes yarn dogs that have become very popular, and are in need of more yarn as well. Ludwig says any color yarn is good, and the same goes for material and thread. All crafting materials can be dropped off at the center on SW Harvey Greene Drive between the hours of 8 a.m. through 5 p.m. To help boost their fundraising, the ladies are now selling homemade pickles, that this writer can testify, are very, very good. Sales from the pint jars of pickles and yarn dogs will go towards their trip to see the Holy Land Experience in Orlando. Pickles sell for $5 and the dogs sell for $15. You can nd these items at the Senior Center at the address above, but also at some other locations around town. The Mail Room across from Four Freedoms Park and the Chamber of Commerce on Range both has the ladies’ items for sell. So next time you’re out and about on the town, stop by one of these locations and buy a jar of pickles for your kitchen table, a yarn dog for your child or grandchild and help these ladies get to their fall destination of the Holy Land. Or, if you are doing some summer cleaning and need to nd a home for a sewing machine you no longer want or pint canning jars you no longer need, or any of the items mentioned above, the ladies at the Senior Citizen Center will be happy to receive your donation. Rotary And Kiwanis Clubs To Adopt-A-Precinct Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, June 30, 2014Beginning Nov. 1, 2013, the Madison County Supervisor of Elections has had the Wall of HonorŽ (on the left as you enter the lobby) set aside for photos of American veterans, past and present. Families and friends who bring in the photos will receive a Vote in Honor of a VetŽ pin to wear on Election Day.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, June 26, 2014Kiwanis Club President Diane Head presents Supervisor of Elections Tommy Hardee with a certi“cate of appreciation shortly after he spoke to the club about the Adopt-A-PrecinctŽ program.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Buy, Sell or Trade In The ClassiedsOne Mans Junk Is Another Mans TreasureCall 973-4141 www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . .8A € Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Check us out on-linewww.greenepublishing.com FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 6/30/2014 THROUGH 7/6/2014 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ”ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Deadline for Classifieds Every Monday and Wednesday 3:00 p.m. Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper of“ce is seeking an outstanding individual to join our sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper of“ce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison. A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12’x18’ building with 6’ porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Academic Case Manager/Student Disability Services Specialist wanted at North Florida Community College. See www.nfcc.edu for details.6/18 7/2, c CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Madison County Memorial Hospital. Min. BA/BS in Accounting with min 3 yrs accounting exp and 3 years management experience. Call Human Resources (850) 253-1906.6/27, 7/2, c Auctions Online Only 2-Day Auction, Furniture Liquidation including Rugs, Tables, Household Items, Furniture & More, Jamestown, NC, Guilford Co. 7/11 at 8am to 7/18 & 7/21 at 1pm. Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.com Business Opportunities BE THE 1st Medical Alert Company in your area! Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ return. Investment required. Free Call (844) 225-1200. Education TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS'T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709. Educational Services AIRLINE JOBS Start Here … Get trained as FAA certi“ed Aviation Technician. Financial aid for quali“ed students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935. Help Wanted AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Bene“ts. CDL-A req. 888-602-7440 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. NOW HIRING! Florida Call for Shift Availability(12 hours shifts on Saturday & Sunday for RNS & LPNs) Referral/Sign-on bonusfor employees and new hires.Full Time RNs/LPNsEmployee Bonus = $1000 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250, after one year $500 New Hire Bonus = $500 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250Any questions contact Human ResourcesAD/GW T u t e n  s F a r m P r o d u c e € Squash € String Beans € Potatoes € Cucumbers €(850) 251-5463From Greenville Hwy. 221 S., Turn on Hwy. 360 4 to 5 miles on RightFrom Madison Hwy 14 Turn on 360 5-6 miles on Left.Mon Sat. 7:30 am 5:00 pm Closed On Sundays Family Owned & Operated Since 1996Custom Slaughter € Cows € Hogs € Sheep € € Goats € Deer € Mouth Watering Country Smoked Sausage Best Taste Best Prices 305 Limestone Road € Monticello, Fl. € 32344 (17 Miles South Of Monticello Off Tram Rd.) (850) 997-4446 €Recipes €Cleaning, Preparing & Storing Wild Game€Curing & Smoking€Making Sausage & Bologna €Microwave Cooking €Glossary €Equivalents €Substitutions €Weights & Measures€Can Sizes €Herbs & Spices €Helpful Cooking Hints €Helpful Household Hints €Detailed Drawing On How To Build & Use Your Own Water Oven/Smoker Historical Recipes and Little Known Facts About Floridas WildlifeFLORIDAWild Style Get your copy atMadison Sporting Goodsin Greenville, FLoridaStudstill Lumberin Madison, FLoridaFarmers Supplyin downtown Madison andGreene Publishing, INC.located at 1695 South SR 53 in Madison, FL. One Of A KindŽReg. $28 ,now only $20 Would you like to give up the name tag for a business card? Ready to sell that old TV to make room for a new one? Well, this is your chance. Check out the Classifieds today! Call us to submit your classified ad at:(850) 973-4141 orMail us at:Greene Publishing, Inc.P.O. Drawer 772 €Madison, FL 32341

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014Madison County Carrier € 9A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com ----Legals---SECTION 000020 INVITATION TO BID MADISON COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX WINDOW REPLACEMENT CLEMONS, RUTHERFORD & ASSOCIATES, INC. 2027 THOMASVILLE ROAD TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32308 PHONE (850) 385-6153 You are invited to bid on a General Contract, for the removal and replacement of all exterior doors, windows, and louvers of the Madison County Courthouse Annex in Madison, Florida. All Bids must be on a lump sum basis; segregated Bids will not be accepted. All Bidders are to submit with Bid Package, a properly executed "Contractor's Quali“cation Statement" AIA Document A-305 which is to include a current “nancial statement, an experience, competence and performance report, and references from at least three prior projects similar in size and scope, along with the name of a contact person on each of those projects. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held for General Contractors on July 8, 2014 at 2:00 PM at the project site, Room 107, 229 SW Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida. All questions at the Pre-Bid Conference by General Contractors and Subcontractors shall be presented on the Request for Clari“cationŽ form. See Section 000100 Instructions to Bidders. Madison County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids until 2:00 PM on Wednesday, July 16, 2014 at the Madison County Courthouse Annex. Sealed bids must be delivered to Room 219 229 S.W. Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida. Bids received after that time will not be accepted. Bids will be opened publicly and read aloud at 2:01 PM of the same date. The bids will then be considered and possibly awarded at the Madison Board of County Commissioners meeting on Wednesday, July 23rd at 4pm. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be examined at the Architect's of“ce: Clemons, Rutherford & Associates 2027 Thomasville Road Tallahassee, Florida (850) 385-6153 and at F. W. Dodge, 823 Thomasville Rd, Tallahassee, Florida. General Contractors and Subcontractors may obtain copies of the Bidding Documents at the Architect's of“ce in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders upon depositing the sum of $100.00 for each set of Documents. Contractors will be limited to two (2) sets of Bidding Documents and Subcontractors will be limited to one (1) set. Bidders may receive bid documents in one of the following manners: (1) bring deposit check and pick up bid documents at the Architects of“ce; (2) mail in deposit check and separate shipping and handling check of $20. Other interested parties may purchase complete sets of Bidding Documents for the sum of $100.00 for each set, which is non-refundable. Bidders may obtain a refund of their deposit by returning the complete Bidding Documents in good condition no later than ten (10) calendar days after the opening of Bids. Bidders who do not submit a Bid will forfeit their deposits unless Bidding Documents are returned in good condition three (3) days prior to the Bid Opening. Bid Security in the amount of “ve percent (5%) of the Bid must accompany each Bid in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. A letter from a bonding company must accompany each bid, stating that the bidder is capable of obtaining all bonds required by the Construction Documents. The Madison County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any and all Bids. END OF SECTION 0000206/18, 6/25, 7/2 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Arthur G. Smith and Florida D. Smith the holder of the following certi“cate has “led said certi“cate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certi“cate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and name in which it is assessed is as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-231 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 NAME IN, WHICH ASSESSED: PROTG PROPERTIES INVESTMENTS PARCEL ID: 33-1S-10-1364-00D-009 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: PARCEL 9, BLOCK D OF TWIN RIVER FOREST SUBDIVISION, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33 AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 2562.98 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 1071.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 691.37 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 1154.85 FEET TO A POINT LYING 30 FEET FROM THE NEAREST POINT OF THE CENTERLINE OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD CONTINUE THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 31.28 FEET TO SAID CENTERLINE, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH; SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 44309.73 FEET; THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 07 SECONDS; FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 413.87 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENT; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 305.57 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 31.20 FEET TO A POINT LYING 30 FEET FROM THE NEAREST POINT ON SAID CENTERINE, CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 1365.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, EXCLUSIVE OF ANY LANDS LYING WITHIN THIRTY (30) FEET OF THE AFORESAID CENTERLINE. SUBJECT TO RIGHT OF WAY AND EASEMENTS HEREBY RESERVED, OVER AND ACROSS ANY PORTION THEREOF SITUATED WITHIN THIRTY (30) FEET OF THE AFORESAID COUNTY ROAD CENTERLINE(S) FOR THE PURPOSE OF PUBLIC ROADWAY AND PUBLIC UTILITIES. All of said property being in the County of Madison, State of Florida. Unless such certi“cate shall be redeemed according to the law, the property described in such certi“cate will be sold to the highest bidder at the west front door at the Madison County Courthouse on the 24TH day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 6th day of June 2014. TIM SANDERS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT MADISON COUNTY MADISON, FLORIDA BY: /s/ Renata Keeling DEPUTY CLERK 6/18, 6/25, 7/2, 7/9 B u s i n e s s C a r d D i r e c t o r y 6/25, 7/2 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statues Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the “ctitious name of Madison Medical Center located at 235 SW Dade Street, Suite A in the County of Madison, in the City of Madison, Florida 32340 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida-Dated at Tallahassee, Florida, this 25th day of June, 2014. North Florida Medical Centers, Inc. 7/2 The City of Madison, FL solicits proposals to provide citizens the capability to pay utility bills and other city payments by credit card and debit card. Proposals must address, among other topics: Types of cashiering services offered; training of city personnel; installation requirements; security; cost to the city; and cost to the customer. Email proposals to Tim.Bennett@CityofMadisonFL.com and write Credit Card ProposalŽ in the subject line. Or, deliver or mail the proposal to: Attn: Credit Card Proposal, Tim Bennett, City Manager, 321 SW Rutledge St., Madison, FL, 32340. Deadline to submit a proposal is July 14, 2014 at 2 p.m. For more information, phone Tim Bennett at (850) 973-5081.7/2

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Story SubmittedAgriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the nomination period for local Farm Service Agency (FSA) county committees began Sunday, June 15. “County committees are a vital link between the farm community and the U.S. Department of Agriculture,” said Vilsack. “I hope that every eligible farmer and rancher will participate in this year's county committee elections. Through the county committees, farmers and ranchers have a voice; their opinions and ideas get to be heard on federal farm programs.” Vilsack added, “We’ve seen an increase in the number of nominations of women and minority candidates, and I hope that trend continues.” To be eligible to serve on an FSA county committee, a person must participate or cooperate in a program administered by FSA, be eligible to vote in a county committee election and reside in the local administrative area where the person is nominated. Farmers and ranchers may nominate themselves or others. Organizations representing minorities and women also may nominate candidates. To become a candidate, an eligible individual must sign the nomination form, FSA-669A. The form and other information about FSA county committee elections are available at www.fsa.usda.gov/elections Nomination forms for the 2014 election must be postmarked or received in the local USDA Service Center by close of business on Aug. 1. Elections will take place this fall. While FSA county committees do not approve or deny farm ownership or operating loans, they make decisions on disaster and conservation programs, emergency programs, commodity price support loan programs and other agricultural issues. Members serve three-year terms. Nationwide, there are about 7,800 farmers and ranchers serving on FSA county committees. Committees consist of three to 11 members that are elected by eligible producers. FSA will mail ballots to eligible voters beginning Nov. 3. Ballots are due back to the local county ofce either via mail or in person by Dec. 1. Newly elected committee members and alternates take ofce on Jan. 1, 2015. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To le a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Ofce of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Ofce of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 202509410 or call (866) 6329992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).Story SubmittedThis June marks two years of improving hydrologic conditions beginning with Tropical Storm Debby in June 2012 and helped by continuing above-average rainfall. Tropical Storm Debby broke the second of two back-to-back droughts which caused record low river and groundwater conditions. “Between December 2013 and June 20ththe District has received on average over 36” of rain which is about 25 percent higher than average,” said Megan Wetherington, PE, District Senior Professional Engineer. “This has been the wettest winter and spring since 1998. District-wide, May was the 5thstraight month of above average rainfall this year.” In the two years after the end of the drought, parts of Lafayette, Suwannee and Taylor counties received nearly an extra year’s rainfall. Throughout much of the District, increased rain meant increased river levels and ooding. For example, until late this month Suwannee River levels were high enough to slow or block the ow from surrounding springs. While still above normal, river levels have been steadily dropping, allowing a number of springs to return to clear conditions. Aquifer levels have also increased with the increased rainfall, and levels were generally at their highest since 2005 when levels peaked after two hurricanes and a wet winter. Rising aquifer levels mean improved spring flow as the groundwater makes its way to the now-flowing springs. SRWMD partners with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) for flow measurements at numerous locations. USGS reported that on May 2, the measured flow at the Alapaha Rise was 790 million gallons per day (MGD). This was the highest measurement since record-keeping began there in 1975. First magnitude Madison Blue Springs’ flow was measured at 188 MGD, the second highest flow recorded there. Poe Springs was measured at 36 MGD, about 20 percent higher than its long-term average. These rates of flow are good indications for the rest of the springs District-wide, where high flows are expected throughout the summer. For additional information on hydrologic conditions contact SRWMD at (386) 362-1001 or http://www.mysuwanneeriver.com/ index.aspx?NID=35. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 10A € Madison County CarrierFARM/OUTDOORS Rainfall 25 Percent Higher Than Average In The SRWMD Photo SubmittedBlue Springs in Madison Fl. Florida Fruit And Vegetable Production Grow The EconomyStory SubmittedFlorida's favorable agricultural climate positions the state as the second largest produce exporter in the nation, according to a new report from Florida TaxWatch, the independent, nonpartisan, nonprot taxpayer research institute and government watchdog. The report nds that farming and processing of Florida produce contributes more than $7.5 billion to the state economy. "Florida's agriculture industry is vital to diversifying our state's growing economy," said Dominic M. Calabro, president and CEO of Florida TaxWatch, the independent, nonpartisan, nonprot taxpayer research institute and government watchdog. "Fresh produce, such as fruits, vegetables and juices are a key part of the agriculture industry and enhances our global trade impact." Florida is home to more than 47,500 commercial farms covering 9.25 million acres, and producing fresh fruits, vegetables and juices. In addition to the positive impact on Florida's agricultural industry, the production of these crops benets other Florida industries, such as manufacturing. For example, 8.4 percent of Florida's food and kindred products manufacturing output is tied to produce. In 2012, Florida was the 7thlargest state exporter of agricultural products, sending the majority of exports to Canada, the Netherlands, the Bahamas, the Dominican Republic and Panama. Produce accounts for more than $500 million of the total agricultural exports in Florida. These exports help diversify Florida's economy and contribute to an already positive balance of trade. Unsurprisingly, citrus is one of Florida's highest produced crops. Florida oranges and grapefruits exceed 65 percent of the total U.S. production. However, Florida is the nation's leader in production of many other types of produce, including squash, snap beans, cucumbers, fresh sweet corn and watermelons. "These Florida-grown fresh fruits and vegetables provide healthy food for families and provide jobs for agricultural producers, for food processors, and transporters in our state and those who export Florida crops," said Jerry D. Parrish, Ph.D., Chief Economist and Director of the TaxWatch Center for Competitive Florida. Florida TaxWatch is a statewide, non-prot, non-partisan research institute that over its 32-year history has become widely recognized as the watchdog of citizens' hard-earned tax dollars. Its mission is to provide the citizens of Florida and public ofcials with high quality, independent research and education on government revenues, expenditures, taxation, public policies and programs and to increase the productivity and accountability of Florida state and local government. Its support comes from homeowners and retirees, small and large businesses, philanthropic foundations, and professional associations. On the web at www.Flori daTaxWatch.org Service Agency County Committee Nomination Period Began June 15

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Section B Mad i s on C o u nt y Carr ie r July 2, 2014

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"REST IN CHRIST" The Sabbath Day of the Old Covenant and keeping that Sabbath Day involved a day of "rest" and not necessarily a day of worship. It was meant to symbolize the "rest" which would be brought about in Christ, even as Paul so graphically brought out. When Jesus came, thereby fulfilling the Law in totality, which included the Sabbath Day, we find that keeping such a day is not brought over into the New Covenant, simply because it was satisfied in Christ. It represented Christ and the "rest" we would find in accepting Him as Lord and Savior; therefore, to continue to keep such a day, as was kept under the Old Covenant, in effect denies Christ. As stated, when one now accepts Christ, thereby serving Him, one is, at the same time, keeping the Sabbath, which was a Type of Christ and the rest that we find in serving Him. The Sabbath Day always pointed to Christ, always pertained to Christ, and always symbolized Christ; with the Coming of Christ, who satisfied all the demands of the Law, the symbol is no longer needed. THE CROSS: ENTERING INTO REST The "rest" which Paul so graphically illustrated in the Fourth Chapter of Hebrews has always reposed in Christ. However, it took the Cross, which satisfied the terrible sin debt, which man could not pay, for that "rest" to be given to us. Of this "rest," Christ is the source, while the Cross is the Means. When the Lord sanctified the Seventh Day, this also had reference to the fact that what Jesus did at the Cross, Who is the True Sabbath, makes it possible for the Believer to live a sanctified life. Many Christians understand somewhat the part the Cross plays in Salvation, but understand almost nothing regarding Sanctification. But it is impossible for the Believer to live a sanctified life unless he understands the Cross as it regards the great work of Sanctification. SANCTIFICATION The word "Sanctification" simply means "to be set apart exclusively unto the Lord." Sanctification is a place and position to which the Holy Spirit strives to bring each and every Believer, but to which the Believer cannot attain of his own ability and strength, which can be done only by the Holy Spirit. 2B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Path of Faith By Rev. Richard Sauls, Senior Pastor, Lee Worship CenterThe The Pulpit Pulpit CHRIST AND THE CROSS

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Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July, 2, 2014 € 3B Path of Faith Burnett Farm Invites Ladies To Dinner And Night Of Gospel Submitted Every month for four years, Burnett Farm in Jasper has welcomed men from adjoining counties to join them, eat grilled steak with all the fixings in the barn, and then listen to the funny Burnett Brothers band sing and pick Gospel songs to warm up the crowd. What happens next at these monthly meetings is church without the steeple laymen stand up to bring Bible truths home to regular guys who might never darken the door of a church, but they can enjoy this quail farm and soak in faith-filled encouragement. On May 13, the steaks were seasoned and ladies were invited to join the men: 260 guests arrived and packed out the barn. The ladies receive their invitation to the allmen ministry only in spring and fall, so they apparently were ready for this night-out opportunity. Dynamic performers from various churches included Jennifer Herndon, Roshunda Denson, Danny Graves, the Williams sisters and more. “It’s good to be in the barn tonight, “ said Kim Williams. “It’s our first time.” The sisters sang several songs, most notably the ballad, “I Wouldn’t Miss It, Would You?” from Wendy Bagwell and the Sunliters. They kidded that when they were growing up, the Burnett Brothers didn’t sing. Pastor Timmy Dyke of Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church in Madison introduced Brother Larry Sweat by saying the Burnett Barn normally invites non-preachers as the guest speaker, but Sweat, a Baptist preacher, came highly recommended. At the podium, Larry Sweat said his life was miserable when he came back from Viet Nam, addicted to drugs and alcohol, and he asked God to “show me a real life Christian – don’t show me another Baptist, I want to see a real life Christian.” Sweat said his wife suffered through his bad behaviors and soul searching, eventually leading to a prayer on his knees to ask God to forgive him and to trust that Jesus is His Savior. One of the questions Sweat found intriguing was to ask, “What will I have if I give my heart to Christ?” He found out that by surrendering to Christ he was able to live the Christian life through the Holy Ghost living inside him and he’d have the power to overcome the world (Ephesians 3:40). Sweat got a kick out of how evangelist Billy Sunday talked of “hitting a home run for God.” Walking up and down the church aisles, Sunday calling out, “Where are you, Devil? I’m gonna hit you!” That old-time evangelist understood the power he had in his life as a born-again Christian. Sweat recalled how tough financially it was to go back to Bible College with three children and one son going blind. At one point, he considered going back to work as a plumber, but “God’s hand is bigger than mine,” said Sweat. He remembered an outpouring at one church when his family was desperate for gas and food: old farmers began filling Sweat’s pockets with cash and they stuffed the family car with food after he preached, reviving the family’s spirits to go forward to serve God. Sweat ended his talk by saying, “Lost friend, if I could drag you to the altar I would –there are enough big fellows here that we could. Lay hold of that nail-scarred hand and come to Christ tonight!” The next Burnett Farm fellowship meeting for men is Tuesday, July 8. For information, call (850) 464-8107 or (386) 590-1779. Photo submittedLarry Sweat shared his moving testimony about how he met Christ. Photo submittedTimmy Dyke welcomes everyone to the Burnett Barn in Hamilton County.

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4B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Path of Faith Madison County Truckers Invited To Truckers' Sunday By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Truckers from Madison County and surrounding counties and anyone within traveling distance is invited to the first ever Truckers' Sunday on July 13 at Dowling Park Church of God, just south of the county line in Suwannee County. Pastor Mike Carson invites everyone to bring a friend and be part of something awesome happening at Dowling Park Church of God. There will even be a special prize given away. “There will be free food and great prizes including a giveaway of 50 gallons of diesel, and, as always, it will be a phenomenal time of fellowship in the Lord,” Pastor Carson said. There is plenty of parking available in the parking lot at Dowling Park Church of God and truckers are asked to bring their big rigs. Every trucker that brings his or her rig will receive a special gift. The service will begin at 11 a.m. on Sunday, July 13. For more information, contact Amon Doyle at (850) 973-7546 or Pastor Mike Carson at (850) 6942608. Dowling Park Church of God is located at 23500 CR 250 in Dowling Park. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob BembryAmon Doyle, far right, of Lee, is helping plan this first ever Truckers' Sunday. He is shown with his daughter, Amanda Jo Doyle, and his father-inlaw, Retis Flowers. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob BembryPastor Mike Carson, shown with his wife, Angie, invites everyone to take part in the Truckers' Sunday on July 13. You're Invited!

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Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014 € 5B Path of Faith

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Path of Faith 6B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Mondays “Parenting with Values” will occur each Monday from noon-1 p.m. This event will be located at Middle Florida Baptist Association, 349 SW Captain Brown Road in Madison. Wednesdays “Celebrate Recovery” ministry begins each Wednesday from noon-1:30 p.m. The Middle Florida Baptist Association, 349 SW Captain Brown Road, Madison. July 5 Everyone is invited to particpate in the prayer walk beginning at 9 a.m. at the Four Freedoms Park in Madison. July 7-11 First United Methodist Church will be having their Vacation Bible School Monday Friday, July 711, from 8:30-11:30 am. It is called "Workshop of Wonders: Imagine & Build With God." Ages 3rd-5thgrade are welcome. For more information contact, the church office at (850) 973-6295 or Ruth Ann Latner at (850) 464 0236 or ruthannlatner@yahoo. com.July 7-11 North Florida Teen Youth Camp, a five-day, four-night event is set for July 7-11, with guest speaker Phil Stacey for each evening's service. Registration fee is $90 per person, with a $25 deposit. A t-shirt is guaranteed if the camper pre-registers by June 20. Located at Live Oak Church of God's 34-acre campus on US 129 South in Live Oak. Registration forms may be picked up at Madison Church of God or Midway Church of God. July 8 The Pinetta area food ministry/mission will be distributing food beginning at 9 a.m. at the Pinetta food pantry.July 14-18 North Florida Primary/Junior Camp, a five-day, four-night event is set for July 1418, with guest speaker Kevin McGlamery for each evening's service. Registration fee is $90 per person, with a $25 deposit. A t-shirt is guaranteed if the camper pre-registers by June 20. Located at Live Oak Church of God's 34-acre campus on US 129 South in Live Oak. Registration forms may be picked up at Madison Church of God or Midway Church of God. July 20-25 Students will train to become Agency D3 agents during Vacation Bible School at Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church VBS set for Sunday, July 20, through Friday, July 25. The fun will begin at 5:30 p.m., with dinner served, and last until 8:45 p.m. each evening. Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church is located at 4084 NE Rocky Ford Road, north of Madison. July 22 The Pinetta area food ministry/mission will be distributing food beginning at 9 a.m. at the Pinetta food pantry.August 9 The 11thHour Gospel Group will be in concert at Sirmans Baptist Church on Saturday, Aug. 9, at 7 p.m. Sirmans Baptist Church is located at 168 SW Sirmans Church Way, off US 221, south of Greenville, south of Interstate 10, exit 241. Everyone is welcome to attend. Jimmy Fletcher is the church's pastor. Call (850) 948-4948 for more information. Church Calendar

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Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014€ 7B Path of Faith Two New Ministries Offered At Middle Florida Baptist Association By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The Middle Florida Baptist Association is offering new ministries at their association office in the conference room. One of the ministries is a class entitled “Parenting with Values.” The sessions will be held from noon until 1 p.m. each Monday and will feature a video and a discussion. The classes began Monday, June 23. The Association is also holding “Celebrate Recovery” each Wednesday from noon until 1:30 p.m. The sessions are geared so everyone can learn from information presented in the study. “Celebrate Recovery” helps those who are co-dependent, have bad habits, hurts, hang-up, are being controlled, trying to control, grieving the death of a loved one, etc. Principles can be learned to help yourself and others. “Celebrate Recovery” began holding sessions on Wednesday, June 25. For more information on either of these ministries, contact Jan Miller at (850) 973-8607 (office) or (850) 295-5507 (cell). She can also be emailed at mfba@embarqmail.com or janmiller556@icloud.com. The Middle Florida Baptist Association is located at 349 SW Captain Brown Road in Madison. By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The First United Methodist Church of Madison will begin its annual Vacation Bible School beginning Monday, July 7, and going through Friday, July 11. The VBS is open to children, ages three up to the fifth grade. Sessions begin every morning at 8:30 a.m. and end at 11:30 a.m. The theme for this year's VBS is “Workshop of Wonders: Imagine and Build with God.” VBS students will discover “how the ordinary becomes extraordinary with God” as they meet people from the Bible, including Esther, Ezra and a young boy, who produces something amazing with God's help. Children will be taught to expect big things from God as He works wonders in them. The first session will be “Imagine with God!” as students learn the story of Esther, from the Book of Esther. Day two will be “Build with God!” as they discover the rebuilding of the Lord's House in Ezra 3:8-13. Day three will help students “Grow with God!” as they learn the Parable of the Mustard Seed from Matthew 13. On day four, children will learn to “Work with God!” as they learn the story of the feeding of the 5,000 from John 6:1-13. On day five, the lesson will be “Walk with God!” as the students learn about the walk to Emmaus, following Christ's death and resurrection, told in Luke 24:13-32. For further information, contact the First UMC office at (850) 973-6295 or Ruth Ann Latner at (850) 464-0236 or by email at ruthannlatner@yahoo.com. First UMC VBS To Begin Monday

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Path of Faith 8B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Lee First Baptist Church Hosts VBS By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Lee First Baptist Church kicked off its “Agency D3” Vacation Bible School on Monday, June 23. The VBS focused on an apologetics theme, helping students to understand and defend what they believe. Everyone enjoyed delicious food each evening, cooked and served by volunteers before they went into classes to learn the lessons taught each evening. With the theme for the VBS as “Agency D3: Discover, Decide, Defend,” students, ages three to adult, collected and logged evidence about Jesus. Using their best high-tech operative skills, they examined eyewitness reports, physical proof and Biblical accounts to uncover and defend the truth about who Jesus really is. During VBS, they “Discovered the truth of the gospel; Decided to believe it; and Defended the decision.” The students became members of D3, an investigative agency organized to discover if Jesus is really who He claims to be and to examine if the Bible is true. This VBS was unusual because it has an apologetics theme, because people not only need to know the Bible is true and that Jesus is God's one and only Son, but they need to know how to defend what they believe when someone asks them why they believe it. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Students and teachers, many of them wearing their Agency D3 badges and t-shirts are excited about the VBS. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Friends enjoy a meal as they sit around the table at the Agency D3 VBS at Lee First Baptist Church. photos cont. on page 9B

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Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014€ 9B Path of Faith VBS Photos Continued From Page 8B Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014A family enjoys some togetherness and a meal before heading into the VBS class for the evening. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Family and friends enjoy the meal before going on special assignments with Agency D3. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Two friends enjoy each other's company as they get ready to go into the VBS classes for the evening. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jacob Bembry, June 24, 2014Two little friends sitting at the table anxiously await the Agency D3 VBS to begin.

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I love an old story that circulates in my family about my great-great grandfather, a fiery circuitriding preacher named John Martin McBrayer. “The Reverend,” or just “Preacher,” as he was known, traversed the Southern Appalachians on horseback, going church to church, camp meeting to camp meeting, and revival to revival preaching anywhere he was given an opportunity. Ultimately he settled down (I think his wife got tired of him leaving her with the 12 children each week) and started a Baptist church in North Georgia. He would fill that pulpit for the much of the remainder of his life, and when he died, he was laid to rest in the red dirt of that church’s cemetery. It was the early 1900s and drought was smothering the Georgia countryside. Farmers were desperate. Their crops were burning up in the fields, their cattle was dying of thirst, and everyone thought the river would run dry. So a Saturday prayer meeting was called, a meeting to pray for rain. A good portion of the community gathered, and in time, old John Martin came riding up on his pony. It took The Preacher a little while to come inside the church building, but when he did, he had his battered Bible in one hand and his heavy Western saddle and saddle blanket thrown over his shoulder. “Well Preacher,” one man asked, “Why’d you bring your saddle in? You stayin’ all night till service in the morning?” Everyone laughed. I’m told that John Martin gave a mischievous chuckle himself. Then he answered, “No, I thought we’d be prayin’ for rain? I do believe the rest of you will be ridin’ home wet.” Sure enough, before they all left the church that afternoon, the rains had come and the drought had been broken. And just as sure, most folks left on wet saddles and in drenched wagons while The Preacher trotted towards home as dry as dust (all while wearing that mischievous grin, I am certain). I often tell this story, not as a means of convincing people that they will always get what they pray for, but as an illustration of what faith looks like: Faith in God, not faith in a specific, pre-calculated outcome. John Martin trusted God – his life was a testament to that fact – whether the rains had come on that Saturday afternoon or not. This is reminiscent of an even older story found in the ancient book of Daniel, the story of the “Three Hebrew Children,” known as Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego. These three Jewish boys were ordered to bow and worship a god that was not their own, not the God that they knew and trusted. Such an act of false worship, for them, was beyond the pale, so they refused. For their noncompliance, Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego were to be cast into a fiery furnace and burned alive. But before the sentence was carried out they were given a final opportunity to acquiesce. Their response might be the greatest statement of defiant faith in religious history. They said, “If we are thrown into the blazing furnace, the God whom we serve is able to save us. He will rescue us from your power…But even if he doesn’t, we want to make it clear to you that we will never bow and serve your gods.” Here is mature faith: It is far more than a cheerful outcome contrived within our imaginations, or a “happily ever after” post-scripted to every story we tell. It is trust in the God behind all outcomes; it is hope in the God who is writing our stories. Enough of this faith that professes only the ability to change our circumstances; such faith is little more than a lucky rabbit’s foot. Instead, we need a faith that gives us resiliency, faith that strengthens our souls. We need faith that serves, not as a payoff for our prayers, but as growing confidence in a Person. We need that faith that sustains us, if the hoped-for rescue or drought-breaking rains come or not. Path of Faith 10B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014 € Open 24/7 € Praying For Rain

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. “Now Sarai, Abram’s wife, bare him no children: and she had an handmaiden, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar. And Sarai said unto Abram, Behold now, the Lord hath restrained me from bearing: I pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her. And Abram hearkened unto the voice of Sarai.” Gen. 16: 1-2, KJV Some time during the late Bronze Age, between 2000 and 1500 B.C., roughly coinciding with the Middle Kingdom Era of Egypt, an Egyptian handmaid belonging to the wife of the nomadic clan leader would enter history, along with her tribe-woman mistress, as mothers of two great nations. The handmaid’s tale begins long before there was a kingdom known as Israel, before there were even the Twelve Tribes of Israel. It begins with a wandering clan leader, Abram (later Abraham) and his wife Sarai (later Sarah). Abram and Sarai are entering their twilight years, childless. Since God had already promised Abram some time ago that he would one day be the father of a great nation, the current situation presents quite a quandary: How is he to be the father of a great nation...with no heirs? It is here that Sarai’s handmaid, Hagar (whose name means “stranger”), enters the narrative. At Sarai’s insistence, Abram takes Sarai’s handmaid as a surrogate to provide him with heir. We do not know exactly how they first acquired an Egyptian handmaid, although their sojourns did take them through Egypt at times, but because of their position as head of their clan, we can surmise that they likely had an entire retinue of other servants as well. Hagar most likely came from an Egyptian household, a place of cities, temples and elaborate burial customs, with a complex political system and a thriving trade and market economy. If so, she must have found life among this nomadic tribe quite primitive. Coming from such a cosmopolitan background, she may have even considered it a step downward. As a slave or servant, it is unlikely that she had any say in becoming the chosen surrogate for a child that would be considered Sarai’s upon birth. There is no indication in the narrative of her being consulted. The decision was apparently made without her, and it was done. In fact, throughout the entire narrative, neither Sarai nor Abram refer to her by name, always speaking of her as “the handmaid.” It was not an unusual situation at the time; texts from many writings of that time period, including the Code of Hammurabi, allude to the custom of childless wives providing female slaves as surrogates for their husbands. Tivka Frymer-Kensky, author of Patriarchal Family Relationships and Near Eastern Law, summarizes the situation thusly in the Jewish Women’s Archive: “In the world of the ancient Near East, a slave woman could be seen as an incubator, a kind of womb-with-legs.” However, this is not how Hagar views herself. She is now a person of importance, carrying the child of the clan leader, in a society that values mothers over childless women. Perhaps for the first time, she is even getting a little respect from other members of the household. In such a society, a female slave carrying a leader’s child could rise dramatically in status, sometimes to the position of favored concubine or secondary wife. Yet, there was the knowledge that her child would be lawfully considered the fruit of that barren woman who still continued to lord it over her as if she were still a mere nothing; that barren mistress who had so completely failed in her childbearing function for the tribal leader. In the resulting mix of sexual jealousy and resentment, Hagar begins to see herself as equal to, or even superior to Sarai. Sarai, on the other hand, already upset by her childlessness, does not take kindly to Hagar’s new attitude. She responds with her own mix of jealousy and resentment, dealing harshly with that little nobody of a handmaid and her delusions of grandeur. Abram cannot intervene, for the women of the clan are ruled by Sarai, and under Sarai’s jurisdiction. There were some protections in the legal codes for slaves in this region; Sarai cannot kill Hagar outright. However, Hagar either fears for her life, or the situation becomes so intolerable she decides to take her chances in the unforgiving desert. Pregnant and desperate, she flees south, down through the Sinai Peninsula, back toward her homeland in Egypt. Following the road to Shur, she almost reaches Egypt. But, while resting at a wellspring in the wilderness of Shur, an angel of the Lord tells her that she must go back, for she will bear a son who will have descendants without number; a mighty nation will rise from him. He will be called Ishmael. With new purpose, and understanding the destiny of the child she carries, she turns and retraces her steps back to Egypt, giving birth to Ishmael when Abram (now Abraham), is 86 years old. Things appear to go well enough for the next 14 years until, Sarai (now Sarah), miraculously gives birth to a son, Isaac, whom the Lord has also promised will give rise to a great nation. The old rivalry soon reasserts itself, for whose son will now be Abraham’s heir? Hagar’s, who was born first, or Sarah’s, because Sarah is the wife? Things once again come to a head, and this time, Sarah has Abraham banish Hagar and Ishmael into the desert, where they soon run out of food and water. Believing that she is dying, Hagar places her son under the shade of a bush and cries out to the Lord, who shows her a well of water that she had previously overlooked. She and Ishmael survive, and make their home in the wilderness of Paran, where Ishmael grows to manhood. The story of Hagar is that of the outsider, the one who was never accepted by the people she lived among, and was eventually expelled from their society. It is the story of being absolutely alone, with no one to turn to in a harsh environment, both figuratively and literally, no one except God. When she cried out to God in the wilderness, she was protected by Him and survived, along with her child, living her life as a free woman, no longer a slave, raising a son who would one day be regarded as the father of the Arab nations. According to the Koran, it is at Mecca that God saved Hagar and Ishmael with the live-giving wellspring, and later brought forth from Ishmael’s descendants the great nation he had promised Hagar so long ago. Like Jacob, Ishmeal had 12 sons, who gave rise to twelve tribes. Today, the Koran as well as the Jewish Midrash regard Hagar as a princess. In more modern times, she is a symbol of women who persevere and survive, especially when the odds are stacked against them. Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014€ 11B Path of FaithWomen of the Bible: Hagar

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Path of Faith 12B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, July 2, 2014