Madison County carrier

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00413


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Full Text

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Christmas is exactly two weeks away, and everyone is busy buying and wrapping presents in preparation of the holidays. I would like to take this time/space to encourage everyone to shop locally, as much as you can. I know, and understand, that by living in a small town there are some things that we have to go out of town for, in order to purchase. Things such as certain designer jeans, electronic games, iPhones and iPads, and certain childrens toys can only be found in some of the big, out-oftown businesses. However, there are so many gift ideas that are available in our town: hunting and shing supplies, jewelry, purses, dinner plate sets, antique furniture and clothing, artwork, theme-related items, knick-knacks, tools, auto parts, lawn and garden items, and other memorabilia. Some non-traditional ideas for the hard to buy for person on your list (or someone who already has it all) could be a facial, massage or hair cut from a local salon; a plant or tree from a local orist; a gift card to a local restaurant, pharmacy, gas station; a home-made cake, or a local home-based independent salesperson (such as Avon, Mary Kay, Tupperware, etc.) Use your imagination; there are tons of ideas that can be thought up, all while staying within our small community. Go walk around and walk in our home-owned businesses; you might surprise yourself with the amount of gift ideas you will nd. Top reasons to shop locally: 1) Save Time, Gas and Energy without having to drive long distances or spend countless hours on the road you will save money on gas and save your time and energy for fun this holiday season. 2) Boost Employment More sales in our community means more people are needed. Thats good for the economy and providing jobs for your family, friends, neighbors, and possibly you. 3) To Promote Economic Development More local sales mean more money in circulation. That means more businesses can grow and new businesses can start. That improves the area for everyone. 4) To Get Personal Service You know you can trust the person behind the counter to give you the best advice and value when you know them personally. 5) To Give To Your Community When you shop locally, a portion of the money from your purchases pays the wages of your friends, family and neighbors who work at local businesses. 6) To Help Others Owners and employees of local businesses support a wide range of community services and charitable projects with their time, talents and money. So, get busy and get ready for Christmas. Santa Claus will be coming down our chimneys in a matter of weeks. Just make sure you check local shops before you bust off out of town. And, no matter what you buy be sure to throw in a one-year subscription to your local newspapers! Your family/friends will thank you for it! But, most importantly remember the true meaning of Christmas is NOT Santa Claus its Jesus Christ. Until then.see you around the town. Last week, I was treated to a tour of the PCA (Packaging Corporation of America) factory in Clyattville. I mentioned to Matt Webb of Greenville Timber that I wanted to see where the wood we grow is processed, so he and Jerry Gray set up our visit. First let me say that PCA is a huge publicly traded company headquartered in Chicago. They have many mills and sites spread across the country, one of which is in neighboring Lowndes County, Ga. employing 350 workers some of whom live in Madison and commute north each day for work. Here the company produces kraft paper or linerboard which is used in the manufacture of corrugated boxes and packing material. That sounds pretty simple but they do this on an industrial scale. A roll of paper measuring 18+ feet across and weighing 35 tons comes out of their manufacturing process about twice each hour. Their product is shipped to hundreds of industrial customers throughout the world. The raw material going into the plant through their impressive wood yard totals between 40 and 50 thousand tons of pine logs each week. Three massive cranes ofoad the trucks quickly and efciently. The Clyattville plant has been in operation for nearly sixty years, but it is much different today from when it was founded in 1954. Equipment upgrades; improved wood handling; power generation; environmental upgrades; and new safety measures are just a few of drivers which have resulted in changes at the plant over the years. They are a model for efciency which explains why they have adapted and continue to lead their industry today. PCA Clyattville uses a lot of water and electricity in their process, but interestingly, they manufacture 90 percent of the energy they use by burning wood chips and other byproducts. I have it on good authority that the purity and cleanliness of the Withlacochee is directly attributable to the environmental record of PCA. They also reclaim and recycle a huge amount (95 percent) of the chemicals used in their processes. Thats obviously good for the environmental quality of the water and soil, but it also makes good economic sense those chemicals are expensive. Im not sure how many Madison County residents are employed at PCA Clyattville, but Im sure it is a major economic factor in our community. And these are really good paying jobs with impressive benets and retirement plans, much higher than the average for our rural community. Another interesting fact PCA is the largest taxpayer in Lowndes County. Some people complain about the sulfur smell that we occasionally detect, but I dont smell it very often and the people who have lived here much longer than I tell me that the noxious odors are not nearly as frequent or as bad as in earlier years. As a wood producer, Im grateful for factories like PCA. Without them, there would be no customer for the wood we grow. And Im certain that our local economy is greatly improved by businesses like PCA.www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 2A Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist PCAIf you hear the word buckeyes, what comes to mind? Maybe you think of the college football team or the buckeye tree that produces the shiny, dark nuts carried around in pockets for good luck. If so, both images would be correct, but if you think like me, you envision a peanut butter candy, enrobed in just enough chocolate so that it resembles a real buckeye. All forms of the mentioned buckeyes are indigenous to the state of Ohio. The football team resides at Ohio State University, the buckeye tree is the ofcial state tree of Ohio, and as far as the confection, the buckeye recipe has been traced back to the early 20thcentury but without any reliable ownership of its creation. I, however, can say with certainty that my mother, who lived in Ohio most of her adult life, is the one who gave the recipe to me. Also, my mother-inlaw, who lived for many years in Indiana (a neighboring state of Ohio), gave me her version as well. To make the candy, you start with a peanut butter mixture, roll it into balls and then dip the balls into chocolate. The chocolate part is where I usually disregard tradition. Instead of dipping the balls partway, leaving enough peanut butter exposed to resemble the light tan spot on the buckeye nut, I submerge the balls into the chocolate, covering them completely. They may not look like the original buckeye, but I figure a little more chocolate will make even the staunch traditionalist approve. Having the candy during the Christmas holiday is a tradition in my family and often times given as gifts. I remember one year my mom came to visit and we were all traveling to my sisters house in Dallas. While talking about our gifts we had made we discovered both my mother and I had made buckeyes for our family that year. Our stockings definitely overflowed with sugar and I hate to think of the weight we all gained that Christmas. This year, a fellow co-worker asked if I had a recipe for buckeyes and I am more than happy to share our traditional Christmas candy with her, and you. If you prefer smooth and creamy, you will like my moms recipe (which she dips the traditional way). If you are a fan of the crisped rice chocolate candy bars, you will love my mother-in-laws recipe as it contains crisped rice cereal. No matter what recipe you choose to make, if you love the combination of peanut butter and chocolate, you cant go wrong. Moms BUCKEYES (Smooth) c. butter 2 tbls. vanilla 2 tbls. milk 3 c. creamy peanut butter 4 c. confectioners sugar Jennys BUCKEYES (Crispy) 4 c. creamy peanut butter 1 c. butter one (2 lb.) package confectioners sugar 3 c. crispy rice cereal Choose a peanut butter mixture and mix all ingredients together to make a dough. Roll mixture into one-inch balls and place on a baking sheet lined with waxed paper. Freeze the balls for about 20 minutes before dipping. Dipping Chocolate There are several choices when choosing dipping chocolate: Seasoned cooks may use a product called almond bark, found on the baking aisle in grocery stores; there are several kinds of dipping wafers, some on the baking aisle, some in cake decorating sections; or you can use chocolate chips melted with a little shortening to make the chocolate a bit more fluid which will also aid in hardening the chocolate after the balls are dipped. Personally I use a mixture of wafers and chocolate chips because the wafers help to set the chocolate and the chips give the candy a true chocolate taste and mouth-feel. One of the recipes above will take 12 ounces of chocolate candy wafers combined with 12 ounces of semisweet chocolate chips. Or use four cups chips combined with 2 teaspoons shortening. Melt chocolate of choice in a double boiler and dip balls in chocolate and put back onto baking sheet for chocolate to harden. My mom dips her candy using toothpickspoke toothpicks into candy, dip into chocolate, remove excess at bottom of ball with a knife and place dipped balls back onto baking sheet. I use a forkplace candy on (not in) fork, gently dip candy into chocolate, tap fork on pan and scrape across to remove excess chocolate before placing back onto pan. Repeat, repeat, repeat; the above recipes makes about 100 buckeyes each.Buckeyes For Christmas Rose Klein Columnist Searching For Ambrosia Emerald's Gem BoxShop Locally For ChristmasEmerald Greene PublisherGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, December 8, 2013My mom shows her expertise in dipping buckeyes. BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 Madison County Carrier 3AWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Torching Goat Is Christmas Tradition In Galve, Sweden, a giant goat, standing about 40 feet tall and made of straw has been erected every Christmas season since 1966. The goat usually doesnt make it to Christmas and is torched as a prank. This year, Galves tourism board spokesman said the straw goat was soaked in an anti-ammable chemical in an effort to keep it from being burned down. One year, a U.S. tourist was charged with arson after trying to light the goat on re, thinking it was an annual tradition. Fire hasnt been the only threat however; one year an attempt was made to steal the goat by helicopter. A different year, a group of local teens got suspicious goat tattoos the day after the goat burned down. Last year, the goat made it to Dec. 12 before being burned down. The tourism ofce said, Were aware the goat is only famous because it gets burned. It would be great if it didnt actually burn down this year, because that would be the most unexpected result, then we might really get a lot of attention. Cannibalism Website Breeds Murder In Germany, a second case of murder involving cannibalism has occurred. The rst case was the Cannibal of Rotenburg case that occurred in 2006 and resulted in a life sentence for Armin Meiwes. This year, a German policeman has been arrested for murder after reportedly chopping up the body of a man he met on a cannibalism website. The victim, a 59year-old man from Hanover, had been fantasizing about being killed and eaten by someone else since his youth, Dresden police chief Dieter Kroll stated in a news conference. The body parts were found buried in the garden of the 55-year-old policeman, who worked as a technical expert in the criminal investigation department. It is not clear whether any act of cannibalism had taken place. Underwear Fights Flatulence In the UK, Shreddies, a new brand of underwear, is purported to keep the release, and smells, of lower-intestinal gas and allow it to escape unnoticed. The Shreddies website says the patented lter underwear removes odors through the use of a thin and exible carbon cloth. A reporter for the UK paper Star tested the atulence-ltering underwear by wearing it around town for three days, with no plans or worry of controlling gas pains. Rajn Mudhar said he was able to test the underwear out in a crowded elevator and at home in bed with his wife and had no negative responses. Mudhar said, Success! The Shreddies seem to do what they say. FROMPAGEONE Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Ofce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersTori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn, Shanna SwopeBookkeeping Brooke KinsleyClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) identied as Deander Lidel Williams, 39, of Jacksonville, walking in the westbound trafc lane. Williams was observed making obscene gestures toward vehicles as they passed him. Deputies stopped and made contact with Williams who was clearly agitated for unknown reasons. Williams used profanity towards the deputies and refused to identify himself. As deputies were trying to calm Williams and identify him, Williams stepped out in front of oncoming trafc nearly causing a trafc crash. Deputies told Williams he was under arrest and Williams began to approach deputies in an aggressive manner with both of his sts clenched. Deputies drew a Taser and ordered Williams to get on the ground and warned Williams that failure to comply would result in Williams being tased. At that point Williams attempted to ee on foot forcing deputies to successfully deploy the Taser to subdue him. Williams was then arrested and placed in wrist restraints without further incident. Williams was charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. Resisting Arrest Cont. From Page 1A second occurrence Deputies were called to the area regarding physical altercations. Upon arrival, deputies located one of the subjects involved in the altercation and attempted to take him into custody. As deputies were clearing the subject for transport, he became more belligerent and resisted ofcers as they attempted to take him into custody. The subjects mother, Betty Jean Blackshear, jumped on the back of the deputy as he was attempting to gain control of the subject. Other ofcers present on scene immediately removed the mother from the ofcers back and the subject was hand cuffed and secured in the patrol unit. The mother suddenly complained of medical issues and was transported via ambulance to the Madison County Memorial Hospital for alleged chest pains. Betty Jean Blackshear was not arrested at the time of incident and probable cause afdavits have been submitted for future warrants. OBrien Calvin Richardson, 27, was arrested and charged with disorderly intoxication and resisting with violence. Disorderly Intoxication Cont. From Page 1A And theres no better place than the newspaper. Call one of our representatives today. They can help you on the way to a great advertising plan. 973-4141(Fax) 973-4121P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FLIt Pays To Advertise x Deadline For Toys For Tots Extended Until FridayBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Toys can be dropped off Monday-Friday, from 7:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. at Wallace Automotive, located at 1182 East US 90, in Madison. Toys may also be dropped off during business hours at Beckys Dance Steps Studio, located at 438 East Base Street in Madison. The last day for drop-off has been extended to Friday, Dec. 13. The US Marines Reserve Office in Tallahassee will pick up toys for distribution. All toys must be new and unwrapped.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 4A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Obituaries December 11The 55 Plus Club has a special treat in store for its December meeting: a performance by the Madison Boys Choir, under the direction of Daniel Graham. The club meets at 12 noon on the second Wednesday of every month at the UMCM Center, 135 NW Dill Ave., on the corner of Dill and Colin Kelly Hwy (Highway 145) near Hanson, about ve miles north of town, for a free lunch provided by one of the member churches, and a guest speaker or musical performance. Come on out Wednesday, Dec. 11 at noon, and bring some friends to enjoy food, fellowship and some ne Christmas singing. For more information on the Club, or for directions to the UMCM Center contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929-4938.December 13SkillsUSA will hold a fundraiser on Friday, Dec. 13, from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on the Courthouse Lawn. Funds will be used to help MCHS SkillsUSA compete in Regional and State Competitions. A grilled chicken plate will be available for $6 in advance or $7 at the lawn. It will include potato salad, green beans, roll and dessert. Sweet tea will be available for $1. For tickets or questions, contact Paige Thomas at (386) 965-6771. December 14Greenville Country Christmas at Haffye Hays Park in Greenville, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Join in for fun, food, a parade, live entertainment and arts and crafts. December 15Season of Advent candlelight service, 5:30 p.m., Genesis Missionary Baptist Church, 2062 NE Colin Kelly Highway. December 18The First Baptist Church of Madison will go caroling at 6 p.m. Prayer meeting for those not caroling at 6:30 p.m. at the church. December 18Madisons historic St. Marys Episcopal Church will host an Ordination and Celebration of New Ministry on Wednesday, Dec. 18 at 6 p.m. The Right Reverend John Howard, 8thBishop of the Diocese of Florida, will ofciate at the service and install David Joseph Boyles as priest and vicar of St. Marys. This is St. Marys rst ordination since Advent 1992. A reception will follow. The public is cordially invited to attend and participate in this important event in the life of St. Marys.Community Calendar William McCoyWilliam Henry McCoy III, born in Jacksonville on February 8, 1928, to William McCoy, Jr. and Thelma Windham McCoy, died on December 4, 2013. He was preceded in death by his parents and rst wife, Diane Greico, deceased 1999, and brother Edward Windham McCoy, Sr. Bill is survived by his wife, Eileen Leake McCoy; sisters, Margaret Ashey, Richmond, Va.; Thelma Tami Smith, Jacksonville Beach; Ann Wooten, Neptune Beach; and Martha Burgess, Tampa; brother, John McCoy St.Augustine; and sister-in-law, Sandra McCoy, Jacksonville. He is also survived by a stepson, Jonathan Yowell (Nadine), Sanford, and one granddaughter, Gracie, also of Sanford; two brothers-in-law, Michael Leake (Jill), St. Louis, Mo., and Clyde Leake (Cathy), St. Joseph, Mo,; and sister-in-law, Linda Leake, Spring Hill, Tenn.; and many beloved nieces and nephews. Bill was a 1945 graduate of Landon High School and received his BA degree in history from the University of Florida in 1949, where he was a member of Blue Key and Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He then served his country as Battery Commander in the U.S. Army from 1950-1953. In the mid 50s, he served as legislative assistant to Congressman Paul Rogers, in Washington, DC. Bill then worked in South Florida for the USDA as an inspector until he accepted a teaching position at Terry Parker High School from 1957-1961. He then became Jacksonville Universitys News Bureau Director, Director of Placement, and Registrar. After his service to JU, Bill returned to his beloved University of Florida, where he became Assistant Professor of Education and Special Assistant to President Steve OConnell, whom he considered his mentor and friend. While serving UF, Bill obtained his Masters of Arts in Administration, a Specialist in Administration degree and a Doctorate of Higher Education Administration degree. He continued his postdoctoral work at the University of Virginia. Bill accepted the honor of becoming the First and Founding President of Lord Fairfax Community College in Middletown, Virginia, from 19691987. Also, with his time in Virginia, he assisted in founding and serving as the rst chairman of the Commission on Small Rural Colleges as part of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges. Bill served as president of the Shenandoah Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America; president, and later director of the Wayside Foundation of the Arts in Middletown, Va.; organized the Winchester Apple Harvest Festival and served for ten years as chairman. He was president of the St. Thomas Trust, which renovated and restored the St. Thomas Chapel of Middletown. Bill also held membership of the Winchester Rotary Club, and also served as a member of the Board of Directors. With great pride, Bill received one of his most prized honors: that of Distinguished Forester from the Commonwealth, for his planting of over 40,000 pine trees on his farm with the help of his nephew, Daniel Wes Cornwell. In August, 1987, Bill became the fth President of North Florida Community College in Madison, during which time he administered many important programs, including the rebuilding of the campus after the 1988 tornado. He retired and returned to his hometown Jacksonville, in 1995. Bill loved God, his family, friends and students, his farms and his dogs. He was also an avid reader. Bill served the educational community long and well as a professional educator of stature and steadfastness, as an insightful and capable leader, as a gracious and wise benefactor, as an example dened by high principles and right action. Bill was a good husband and friend, trusted and loyal. Visitation was held from 4 to 6 p.m., with the Rosary beginning at 5 p.m., Sunday, December 8 in St. Pauls Catholic Church. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at 11 a.m., Monday, December 9 in St. Pauls Catholic Church, 224 North 5th St. Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250, with The Reverend William Kelly and The Very Reverend Edward Murphy ofciating. Interment followed at 3 p.m. in Oaklawn Cemetery of Jacksonville. In lieu of owers, contributions may be made to The University of Florida Cancer Research Center, P.O. Box 103633, Gainesville, FL 32610, www. CANCER.UFL.EDU; Dr. William H. McCoy Scholarship Fund, c/o Lord Fairfax Community College, 173 Skirmisher Lane, Middletown, VA 22645; or North Florida Community College General Scholarship Fund in memory of Dr. William H. McCoy, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr. Madison, FL 32340. Please visit our online Tribute at www.quinnshalz.com. Arrangements by Quinn-Shalz Family Funeral Home, Jacksonville Beach, FL. Jessica Lee Green McGuireJessica Lee Green McGuire passed away on December 6, 2013 at Shands Hospital in Gainesville. Jessica was born November 9, 1976 in Deland and lived most of her life in Madison. She was employed as an executive assistant for the North Florida Regional Workforce Board in Madison. She was a student at North Florida Community College, and received her degree in Secretarial Science from Suwannee Hamilton Technical Center. Mrs. McGuire is survived by her husband, John C. (Steve) McGuire; son, Matthew Keagan Gassler; mother, Jan Louise Parker Green; brother, Robert Green and sister-in-law, Cheri Green; stepson, Stephen McGuire; and stepdaughter, Katlyn McGuire. Her father, Theodore Robert Green, and a sister, Kelly Green, preceded her in death. Funeral services were held on Dec. 10 at 2 p.m. at San Pedro Cemetery in Madison. Visitation was on Monday from 5-7 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel. (Though she be but little, she is erce. Shakespeare)

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I have been in the Child Care eld for over 20 years. Waitdid I say Child Care and not Day Care or babysitter? Why, yes I did! I have been battling with this for all of these 20 years. Those of you, who know me, know I believe the word babysitter should be taken out of the dictionary! Even though I cant seem to get the words Day Care to go away, I am ready to go to battle to make the words Child Care obsolete. When child care began, it was a necessity for moms who wanted to return to work. Now it seems that it is more a necessity to adequately prepare them to begin Kindergarten. Just in case you havent noticed, what your child is learning in Kindergarten now, is what you learned when you were in rst grade! From the time a child is enrolled into a child care center, even as young as six weeks, their day is intricately planned, scaffold and prepared to provide each child with many different learning experiences to prepare them for school. Before any daily planning begins, the pre-school teacher strategically plans the classroom environment so the children feel safe and encouraged to learn. Most classrooms are set up into learning centers that allow the children to play. These centers usually are art, science, blocks, reading, writing, math and manipulatives, music, dramatic play, water and sensory play, circle time and small group time. Then the daily lesson planning can begin for each center and small group while remembering that enough activities need to be planned to last the entire day and meet each childs individual needs and interests. Lesson plans begin with the physical needs of each individual child in the classroom, still not forgetting feeding, diaper changes/potty training/bathroom time, love and attention, and maintaining the health and safety issues in the classroom. Then the planning begins for each center and small group that covers each developmental domain; cognitive development, social and emotional development, language and communication, physical development and their approach to learning. Keeping in mind that each child learns and develops at their own pace and in their own way, activities are planned to challenge and encourage each childs curiosity to learn. Also keeping in mind they are children and play is not only what they do, but it plays an important role in the way they learn. Young children learn best through hands on experiences allowing them to explore using all ve of their senses. Now our classroom lesson plans are done, its time to plan all of our outside centers and activities! (We will leave observations, assessments, trainings, meetings and programs for another time.) Now, as I was saying Babysitting? You know better than that. Day Care? We are not here to care for the day. Child Care? Thats better, but join me in my crusade. Let us start calling it by what it really is, Pre-School. Its just the right thing to do! Dawn Phillips Director of Richies Early Learning Academy www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 Madison County Carrier 5AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Letter To The EditorLetters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. No More Daycare!Jean Fiori Shows Garden Club Recycle Project Of The MonthGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Flipping ip-ops: After the summer is over, a lot of people probably have a few pairs of broken ip-ops around the house. Jean Fiori saved three colorful pairs of broken ip-ops from the trash and used Plumbers Goop to glue them all together and make an interesting wall hanging for a porch, sunroom, play area, or anywhere that lends itself to a light-hearted, summery motif.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.In 1889, Saint Leo University was founded in Saint Leo, about 35 miles north of Tampa, by an order of Benedictine monks and named in honor of Pope Leo the Great. Today, it is the oldest Catholic university in the state of Florida, and the sixthlargest in the country. It also reaches well beyond the geographical location of its original campus, through partnerships, with stand-alone sites, on military bases and through online courses of study. It has established its presence through 17 education centers operating in seven states, including California, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia, as well as Florida. Saint Leo University enrolls about 15,000 students per year, the majority of whom are military, but only about 2,500 attend class on the original campus in Saint Leo. Saint Leo University today is one of the largest providers of higher education to military-related personnel in the United States, opening its rst military-site program on MacDill Air Force Base. It also began a program of online courses in 1993 for military personnel stationed overseas, long before online classes were a mainstream part of higher education. Today, it serves military personnel with on-base education centers all over the country. In the near future, it plans to open yet another center at Moody Air Force Base. By 2013, U.S. News and World Report had named St. Leo University as one of the top ranked universities in the country. Since 2004, Saint Leo University has partnered with North Florida Community College to operate an education center in Madison. It opened with an offering of three bachelors degree programs, and today, nine years later, it offers seven. Enrollment in the Madison Center is currently over 300 students, Assistant Director of Enrollment Christy Roebuck told the Rotary Club, an outstanding number for this area. The students take courses either through the center or online, as wells as blended courses that make use of traditional classroom instruction combined with technological advances such as webinars and webcams, bringing in a wide range of quality instruction from all over the country. When Roebuck herself was a student at Saint Leo Universitys Madison Center, studying business law, one of her instructors was an attorney who worked at the Pentagon. Saint Leo Universitys presence in Madison had made four-year degrees accessible to those who might not otherwise be able to obtain one; those who, because of family, job or other responsibilities, could not travel to Valdosta Ga., or Tallahassee to attend classes. At the graduation ceremony for the class of 2013 in May of this year, commencement speakers noted that many of those who were about to walk across the stage to receive their diplomas had juggled job demands and family responsibilities to bring themselves to that moment of achievement. We bring education to those who cant come to us to get it, said Roebuck, whether they are veterans, single parents or displaced workers. Cost for Saint Leo University averages about the same as being at a state college, and there are grants and scholarships that can help. An A.A. degree is required for enrollment at the Madison Center, because we are not competing with NFCC for students, said Roebuck. If (high school graduates) come in, I always tell them theres a wonderful community college just down the street where they can get their A.A. The Madison Center has now produced 223 graduates, 85 of them from Madison, many now teaching in Madisons school system, giving back to their community, and making a better life for future generations of Madison County residents. Statistics show that if the parents are college graduates, the children are more likely to also attend college and those who are educated locally, where they have put down roots, are more likely to remain with their community and serve. The Madison Center is a community-focused center and Saint Leo University as a whole places heavy emphasis on community service. Next year, it will celebrate its 125thanniversary as an institution of higher learning, and its goal for that year is a total of 125,000 hours of community service. Our goal is to educate, but also to have them (the graduates) serve in our community, she said. Were getting out there and helping the community. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 6A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY When Saint Leo University Came To MadisonGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris November 20, 2013Christy Roebuck, Assistant Director of Enrollment at Saint Leo Universitys Madison Center, speaks to the Rotary Club about the center and how it benets not only its students, but the community as a whole.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 Madison County Carrier 7AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Story SubmittedDespite an overcast and rainy day, an enthusiastic group of children enjoyed the opportunity to leave their home-based classrooms and tour the Nestl Waters Madison County Bottling Plant and Madison Blue Spring on Nov. 15. After seeing everything from how water is ltered to how bottles get labeled, the kids had a deeper appreciation for the natural resources at the heart of it all. The homeschooled children are part of a program called R.E.A.C.H Madison Restoring Education Achieved by Community Homeschooling. The organization enables parents of homeschooled children to share ideas, take their children on group eld trips and support one another in the homeschooling process. The group included children from ages ve to 17, along with a number of parents. At the start of the plant tour, the guests donned hair nets, hard hats, earplugs and safety glasses before exploring the world of water bottling and packaging. The kids marveled at every piece of machinery, but the oohs and ahhs and pointed ngers were most prominent when the visitors saw the labeling machine for the rst time. When the industrial part of the tour was completed, the children had an opportunity to learn about the environment from Nestl Waters Florida Natural Resource Manager Kent Koptiuch, who described how land resources must be properly managed in order to protect the precious water resource. Koptiuch described how Nestl Waters manages its land resources as State Certied Tree Farms using Best Management Practices for sustainable timber harvesting and replanting, while ensuring they harvest water from the spring in a sustainable manner. The kids learned that to be categorized as a spring, a body of water must have a consistent year-round temperature, and that Madison Blue Spring always remains a pleasing 71 degrees. The kids were clearly interested, as shouts of this is so cool and this is awesome lled the air around the spring. One of the most enjoyable parts of the eld trip for the children was a hands-on portion where they got to work with homemade lters. First, the children took a tub of clean water and put in different types of items that could foul it things like dirt, sand, packing peanuts and paper. They then worked to turn their dirty water into clean water, using portions of plastic bottles holding different sediments and rocks to lter the debris from the dirty water. The childrens determination was obvious as they made repeated, untiring efforts to get the water as clear as possible, showing they understood the importance of ltration for drinking water. The lesson certainly sank in and the children left with a greater appreciation of how important it is to manage our precious land and water resources in a manner that ensures that they will be around for future generations to enjoy.Nestle Waters Madison County Bottling Plant Hosts Field Trip For Homeschooled Children Photo SubmittedKent Koptiuch and four of the children who visited the Nestle Waters Bottling Plant during a recent eld trip pause in front of Madison Blue Springs, which supplies the plant with pure spring water. Make 2013 the year you change your life CLASSES IN MADISON STARTJANUARY 6Bachelors Degree Programs Business Administration with specialization in Management Computer Information Systems Criminal Justice Elementary Education Health Care Management Human Services Psychology Full-time students may be eligible for the Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Approved for VA Benets/GI Bill Classes now forming in Madison(850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu What you need for where youre going Now offering The Doctorate of Business Administration (Online and On Campus) ou need for wher What y e y ou need for wher e going r ou ee egr re s D achelor B dministration A usiness B Classes ograms r ro ee P dministration Classes dministration A usiness B with specialization in anagement M nformation Computer I ystems S ustice riminal J C ducation lementary E E anagement e M ealth Car H dministrationanuarJ in M with specialization in nformation ducation anagement N The D ing ttarS y 6anuar adisonin M fer w of o N octorate of The D ervices uman S H chology sy P ull-time students may F be eligible for the esident ida R lor F G) rant (FRA G ervices ull-time students may be eligible for the ccess A esident The D usiness B nline and O (O octorate of The D dministration A usiness ampus) n C nline and O V ed for v o ppr ro A ill enets/GI B B w for Classes no adison in Mwww A VA ming w for (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp www (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Just in time for the holidays, when shopping takes a bite out of the budget, Mina Bloodworth and Sara Adams demonstrated several low-cost but dramatic oral arrangement techniques for holiday decorating. Flowers dont have to be expensive; they can come from grocery stores or backyards, and not every arrangement requires owers, as Bloodworth and Adams demonstrated, using found objects, wooden skewers, Gorilla Glue, Christmas tree ornaments, gathered backyard greenery, spray paint, wire, yard sale items, and bargain items from hobby stores, the Dollar Store and Lowes. One the rst things to remember about gathering backyard owers or greenery, is: Forget Martha Stewart, and ditch the pretty wicker basket for a plain old bucket of water. Cut plants need to be placed directly in water, not a basket, and ideally, their stems should be cut again under the water to prevent air bubbles that can block water absorption. Another thing to remember: gather cuttings in the early morning or late evening, when the sap is down. Each table in the room held a centerpiece created with lowcost items, ranging from a small, traditional rose bouquet in a decorative metal vase, to large horizontal arrangements that would add drama over a mantle piece. Some of the arrangements with dried elements could last for months, and others could be changed for different seasons by just switching out some of the decorative elements. This really res the imagination, said one Garden Club member afterward. Now, when I see something by the roadside, Ill think, oh, I can use that. After the meeting, the arrangements were auctioned off as a club fundraiser, going for $25-$55 each. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 8A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Aucilla Christian Baseball Coach, First High School Coach To Receive National Honor-Character In Coaching Award Presented To Ray Hughes-Submitted by ACACharacter in Coaching Award to be Presented to Ray Hughes in January View photos of the surprise announcement at ACA at http://www.flickr.com/p hotos/aucillachristianacad emy/sets/7215763839907085 4/Aucilla Christian Academy is proud to announce that retired head baseball coach Ray Hughes is the 2014 recipient of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes Jerry Kindall Character in Coaching Award, a national honor that includes all divisions of college and high school baseball coaching. Presented each year by FCA, Hughes was one of three finalists considered for the distinguished award. The award is named for legendary University of Arizona head coach Jerry Kindall who was the first recipient of FCAs Character in Coaching Award. He is wellknown for leading Arizona to three College World Series championships and his membership in FCAs Hall of Champions and the College Baseball Hall of Fame. For the past ten years, the award has been presented annually to a coach who best exemplifies the Christian principles of character, integrity, excellence, teamwork and service both on and off the baseball field. The FCA national committee reviewed award candidates during their annual meeting and voted to honor Hughes with the distinction. This is a historic moment, said FCAs North Florida Representative Steve McHargue. Coach Hughes is the first high school coach in the nation to win this honor. During Hughes 38year ACA coaching career, he had over 500 career wins and 13 district championships as head coach. His former student athlete, Bobby Thigpen, a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball and currently bullpen coach for the Chicago White Sox, highly recommended Hughes for the award. Coach Hughes had a strong influence on the player and coach I am today, said Thigpen. ACA Principal Richard Finlayson, who played for Hughes as an ACA student, said, He is a special kind of coach who not only helped athletes become better players, he helped us become better people. As principal during Hughes career at ACA, Finlayson said Hughes had numerous opportunities to advance his career along the path of success in the worlds eyes, but he remained committed to ACA and, most importantly, to Jesus Christ. Hughes was humbled by the news of the award. This is a great honor, said Hughes, who was surprised with a documentary about the award and a special joint presentation by ACA and FCA during the half-time of an ACA basketball game he was attending with his wife, Juanice. The FCA Jerry Kindall Character in Coaching Award award will officially be presented to Hughes on Jan. 4, 2014, during the American Baseball Coaches Association Convention, to be held in Dallas. wens Propane, IncService With A Smile Serving North FloridaMADISON, JEFFERSON, SUWANNEE& HAMILTONCOUNTIES SIMPLY EVERYDAY FAIR PRICING W e A r e H e r e T o E a r n Y o u r B u s i n e s s & K e e p Y o u r B u s i n e s s FREE TANK SETS HEATER SERVICE NEW HEATERS TANKLESS WATER HEATERS GAS LOGS PRICE COMPARISONS Madison Office137 SW Shelby Avenue Madison, Florida 32340(850) 253-3761 $3.19 PER GALLON NO DELIVERY FEES NO SEASONAL PRICES NO GIMMICKS (Ask For Becky) Garden Club Demonstrates Low-Cost Floral ArrangementsGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013In a more exotic vein, Adams used pine cone lilies and trimmed palm fronds spray-painted silver to set off a featured object: in this case, a calm, smiling Buddha face. Pinecone lilies should be squeezed out like a sponge before use in arrangements, so they wont be too top-heavy.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Mina Bloodworth and Sara Adams demonstrate how a yard sale vase can be dressed up with xanadu leaves, palm frond sticks rescued from the courthouse lawn, peacock feathers and plastic Christmas ornaments on wooden skewers.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013A spray-painted straw vase lends itself to more naturalistic elements. Here, Bloodworth and Adams use artichokes on skewers, red yaupon holly berries, evergreen, bamboo, and red metallic Christmas ribbon.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Garden Club members gather around with the oral arrangements they bought after the meeting. Mina Bloodworths husband Jeff conducted the auction and the funds raised will go toward the clubs community service/charitable projects. Standing, left to right, are Tootie Walley, Laura Coleman, Jeanette Mitchell, Kaye Harris and Martha Beggs. Coach Ray Hughes

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 Madison County Carrier 9ASCHOOL Lee Elementary Students Visit CourthouseBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Madison County Clerk of the Court Tim Sanders took several third grade students from Lee Elementary School on a guided tour of the Madison County Courthouse and told them about the history of the soon-to-be-100-yearold-building and the county itself. The third graders from Ms. Gurleys class, Ms. Sauls class and Mr. Hickmans class learned that Madison County, with a population of only 250 people formed as the 14thcounty in 1827, before Florida was even a state (that occurred in 1845), and that the original county seat for Madison was originally ten miles further south, in San Pedro. Sanders explained one of the courthouses most important functions, that of keeping and preserving records of the countys history and the functions and business of government and the citizens, a function so important that the building has a fire safety system installed from basement to clock tower. Two previous courthouse buildings, made of wood, burned down. The first was located where Madison County Community Bank now stands, and the second one was built on the present location. After that one also burned down, construction began on the present day courthouse. The cornerstone was laid Dec. 19, 1913, and construction continued the following year, and the courthouse opened in 1914. Dec. 19, 2013, the landmark building will officially reach the century mark.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 4, 2013Some of the Lee Elementary third graders waiting to tour the courthouse, line up outside next to the tree they decorated for Light Up Madison.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 4, 2013In the courtroom, Sanders tells the children a little more about how county government ofcials work and answers questions.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 4, 2013Court Clerk Tim Sanders tells the children a little about the buildings history before they go inside to see the big courtroom upstairs. MCHS Forms New SkillsUSA Club Photo SubmittedThe SkillsUSA members include (left to right), Kaitlyn Farnell, Beverly Oro, Sunni Mays, Paige Thomas, Bianca Serrano, Kelli Garner and Roxy Whitman. In front, Wade Braswell.Photo SubmittedAll SkillsUSA members are shown above pausing for a brief picture. Front row, left to right: Kaitlyn Farnell, Beverly Oro, Sunni Mays, Bianca Serrano, Kelli Garner and Roxy Whitman. Middle Row, left to right, Hope Smith, Sarah Kauffman, Tyler Burnette, Keesha Frontera, Ceridwyn Grifs, Faith Siplin, Bethany Greenwood, Hank Thompson, Brett Shipley and Steven Walden. Back Row, left to right, Hunter Burt, Houston Wagner and Zack Sprenkle. Not Pic tured: Ashton Pickels, Camryn Alderman, Kayla Joseph, Kristen Dawson, Myasia Arnold, Mykaela Mercer, Simeria Alexander, Wade Braswell and Taylor Killin gsworth.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 10A Madison County CarrierCHRISTMASGIFTIDEAS It's Okay To Say Merry Christmas!!

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 Madison County Carrier 11AGREENVILLECOUNTRYCHRISTMAS 28thAnnual Greenville Country ChristmasThe Greenville Country Christmas Committee invites you to join with them in celebrating the 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas on Dec. 13 and Dec. 14. Festivities begin at 6 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 13, at the gazebo in Haffye Hayes Park. Entertainment will include Christmas carols, a live nativity and a tree-lighting ceremony. Following the festivities in the park, everyone is welcome to enjoy refreshments and a slideshow at the Greenville Madison Multi Purpose Center on SW Grand Street in Greenville. The celebration continues on Saturday, Dec.14, at Haffye Hayes Park. Arts and crafts vendors will be open at 9 a.m. with formal opening ceremonies commencing at 10 a.m. Commander Roy Scott and Vice Commander, Arthur Paquette, of American Legion Post 131 are our Co-Citizens of the Year. The Grand Marshal for this years parade, which starts at 11 a.m., is State Representative Halsey Beshears. The 2013 Entertainment Headliner is Brett Wellman and the Stone Cold Blues Band who will perform at 1 p.m. From 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., you can enjoy fine Christian rap performed by Georgia Red Music of Cairo, Ga. 2013 heralded the opening of the new building for American Legion Post 131 in Greenville. The building will be open during Saturdays events. On display will be entries in this years Childrens Art Contest and Gingerbread House Contest. Please help us this year in giving the Gift of Life. The American Legion Post 131 and OneBlood will be hosting a blood drive at this years Greenville Country Christmas Festival. The blood mobile will be in front of the American Legion building from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. All donors will receive a wellness checkup, a cholesterol screening and a t-shirt. Dont miss your chance to win one of the many door prizes donated by our local vendors from Greenville, Madison, Monticello and Perry. Vendors will provide raffle tickets when you make a purchase. The Greenville High School Reunion will be held at 6 p.m. at the Greenville Baptist Church Fellowship Hall on South Grand Street. We hope youll join us in celebrating the 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas. For more information, visit mygreenvillefl.com or contact Stuart MacIver at (850) 371-0042 or Kathy Reams at (850) 948-1709. Theres Something for Everyone at Greenville Country Christmas THANK YOU to our 2013 Sponsors! GOLD LEVEL Kessler Construc- tion, LLC SILVER LEVEL Capital City Bank Badcock Furniture Beggs Funeral Home-Madison Chapel Florida Plywoods, Inc. Greenville Fertiliz- er & Chemical Co. Kaney & Olivari, PL Madison County Community Bank Madison County Farm Bureau Ronnie and Rhon- da Moore Parish and Associ- ates Scott Realty, LLC Tri-County Elec- tric Cooperative, Inc. BRONZE LEVEL John and Leigh Barfield Double H Diner Hickory Hill Auc- tions Hickory Hill Farms Madison Veteri- nary Clinic, LLC 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas Bake-Off ContestOnce again, its time to show off your baking skills! The Greenville Country Christmas Committee invites you to enter the 28thAnnual Bake-Off Contest. A total of 15 cash prizes will be awarded. First place, second place and third place will be awarded in ve different categories: Cakes, Cookies, Candies, Breads and Pies. First place winners will receive a ribbon and $15; second prize winners will receive a ribbon and $10; and third prize winners will receive a ribbon and $5. All participants must have a Greenville address and entries must be marked with name, phone number and the title of their entry. Please submit your entry at the Greenville Madison Multi Purpose Center on SW Grand Street in Greenville between 4-5 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 13. Judging will begin at 5 p.m. For more information, please contact Elesta Pritchett at (850) 948-7501 or Frances Norris at (850) 948-4900. The Greenville Country Christmas Committee would appreciate it if participants will leave their entries so that they may be enjoyed during refreshment time at 7 p.m.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE YARD SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED WANTED TO BUY Buy, Sell or Trade In The Classieds Call 973-4141 Call 973-4141O n e M a n s J u n k I s A n o t h e r M a n s T r e a s u r e www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 12A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 11, 2013 AUCTION FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 12/9/2013 THROUGH 12/15/2013I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age18 yr. Day and evening classes. Next classes Jan. 6 (day) and Jan. 20 (night). 386-362-1065.12/4 12/25, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cWasher And Dryer For Sale! Kenmore series 70 washer, top load. Series 80 dryer, front load (door opens from top down). White in color and both are in perfect working order. $400 rm. Call (229) 460-5296. Newspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.One Person Cabin On Farm $395/month. Background check required. Call (850) 673-1117.10/16 rtn, cCASH FOR FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES! $1000 for Madison Co enamel Tags dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL tags starting with #35 for years 1938, 39, 40, 43, 49, and 54. Jeff Francis gobucs13@aol.com or 727 424 1576.www.oridalicenseplates.com10/23 -12/25, pdPart time curriculum developer wanted. See www.nfcc.edu for details.12/11, cNew and Repo Homes 25 to pick from. Come to Lake City the dual makers at Freedom Homes. Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cNov and Dec special 4/2 28x80 home only $49,900 cash deal only. Call Magic Mike at Freedom Homes (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cBeen turned down? Have 10k to 15k? Call me I can make a deal. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cLand home package with 10k down in Lake City Florida. We do the deals. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cIn house nancing with 10k down on used or repo houses. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cTriple wide $29,900 as is. Wholesale price, hardwood oors, ceramic tile. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cReduced $10,000 Lot Model 4/2, new 2014. 2,016 square feet. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cCASH special up to $5,000. Reduced price on new or used qualied models. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cUltimate home 2,027 square feet 3/2 $69,900. Beautiful new home with replace. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cLive Oak or Merit Homes. Low prices. Freedom Mobile Homes. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, c Ad Builder/Graphic Artist needed for the Madison County Carrier and the Madison EnterpriseRecorder. Must be a team player and able to handle multiple tasks. Experience with Adobe Photoshop a must, experience with Quark Express a plus. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.11/20 rtn, n/c Receptionist: When was the last time YOU had FUN at WORK? Its a great time to join our team of super dedicated staff. Not only do we take pride in what we do, WE HAVE FUN! Are you the type of person that never meets a stranger and has a GENUINE love of people? Are your physical appearance and cosmetics important to you? Do you already have great computer skills? How well do you adapt to learning new things, do you embrace it or resist it? This growing dental ofce needs more helpers, and if you answered yes to these questions, then call 888-486-2408 to hear more about this position on our amazing team and how to apply.11/22 rtn, c AUCTION SATURDAY DECEMBER 14 at 6:30pm. Madison Auction House. 1693 SW Moseley Hall Rd (CR360) 850 973-1444 WE ARE AGAIN PARTNERING WITH THE SALVATION ARMY AND LOCAL VFD TO COLLECT TOYS FOR CHILDREN THAT WOULD NOT OTHERWISE RECEIVE ONE. BRING ONE OR BUY ONE AT THE AUCTION AND HELP THESE KIDS OUT! LOTS OF GREAT ITEMS SELLING FOR AS MUCH AS 80% OFF RETAIL 10% Buyers Premium. MC, Visa, Discover, Debit Cards, Checks and Cash Accepted. AU691 Ron Cox, AB2490.12/6, 12/11, cJob Vacancy Madison County is accepting applications for occasional E.M.T.s and paramedics. These positions have no fringe benets and there are no minimum hours guaranteed. Applications can be obtained at Workforce Career Center, 705 E. Base St, Madison, FL 32340. All applicants must possess current State of Florida Certication and clean driving record and meet all qualications as outlined on 64J-1.008 and 1.009 Florida Administrative Code and must agree to a background check and submit to a drug screening. If chosen for an interview, applicants must pass additional tests conducted by the agency. Applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, December 20, 2013. Submit applications to: Workforce, Career Center, 705 E. Base St, Madison, FL 32340. If you have any questions, contact Workforce Development at (850) 973-9675. Madison County is a drug free workplace and an equal opportunity employer.12/6, 12/11, cPatterson remodeling, carpentry, all aspects renovation, handyman and landscaping We do it all big and small. References, free estimates. (850) 464-1513.12/11, pd Yard Sale Saturday Dec. 14 from 8:30 a.m. ? Located at Kountry Kitchen restaurant in Lee (255 and I-10). Many things to choose from.12/11, cSet of four (4) Weld (Mountain Crusher) billet aluminum wheels. 8 lug with bolt on center caps. Fits Dodge or Chevy. $400 OBO. Call 229-460-5296.12/11 rtn, n/c 3 BD 2 BA Singlewide Mobile Home Near Blue Springs. No pets. 1 year lease. $500 month, $500 security. (850) 274-5805.10/24-rtn, c CDL Class A Truck DriverRuns mostly SE extended area. 2 years driving experience. Good 2 year MVR. Home weekends and some during the week. (850) 973-2747.12/11 rtn, c Business Opportunities BE YOUR OWN BOSS! OWN A YOGURT, DOLLAR, MAILBOX, PARTY, TEEN, CLOTHING, OR FITNESS STORE. WORLDWIDE, 100% FINANCING, OAC. FROM $55,900 COMPLETE TURNKEY (800)385-2160 WWW.DRSS3.COM. Help Wanted Top 1% Pay & CSA Friendly Equip, Full Benets + Quality Hometime, No slip seating -Take truck home, CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com. Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certications. GI Bill Benets Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage Tennessee Log Cabin on 6 acres with FREE Boat Slip! Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excellent nancing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453. 10 ACRE MOUNTAIN TOP ESTATE! Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent nancing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 92. Schools & Instruction You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-OnlineEducation.com.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 Madison County Carrier 13A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com L e g a l s 12/11, 12/18 12/11, 12/18 12/11, 12/18 12/11, 12/18

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A heart attack (myocardial infarction) occurs when blood ow to a part of the heart is blocked, usually by a blood clot lodged in one of the coronary arteries. As a result, part of the heart muscle is damaged or dies. The most common symptom is chest pain that feels like a tight band around the chest. The pain can move to the arms, shoulders, neck, teeth, jaw, abdomen or back. It can be severe or mild. In some cases, the pain feels like bad indigestion, but it also may feel as if something heavy is sitting on the chest, like the chest is being squeezed, or like heavy pressure is being applied. Typically, the pain lasts longer than 20 minutes and isnt relieved by rest or by taking nitroglycerin, a medication which may have been prescribed for angina, a classic symptom of cardiovascular disease that sometimes predicts heart attacks. Heart attack pain may ease and then return. Other symptoms can include anxiety, cough, fainting, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, palpitations (the heart seems to be beating too fast), shortness of breath and/or heavy sweating. It is also possible to have a heart attack that causes no symptoms these are called silent heart attacks. Women are more likely to experience atypical symptoms in the presence of coronary artery disease and are less likely than men to experience crushing chest pain. In fact, chest pain occurs in only a little more than half of women during a heart attack. The location of pain related to diminished blood ow to the heart is more likely to vary in women, and can include the upper back, neck and jaw for reasons that are not well understood. Underlying most heart attacks is atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, a disease that occurs when cholesterol-rich plaque builds up along arterial walls creating conditions that can lead to a heart attack. These tests can help a physician determine the level of risk of heart attack in a given patient: Computed Tomography (CT Scan): This test provides computer-generated pictures of the heart, brain or other areas of the body. In the case of the heart, it can help evaluate the condition of the coronary arteries that supply the heart. A CT scan may show narrowing of large arteries and reveal calcium build-ups in coronary artery walls. Stress Test: An assessment of how long you can continue to walk on a treadmill as the speed increases and how fast your heart rate returns to normal after 30 minutes or less of exercise. A stress test can also reveal abnormal changes in heart rate or blood pressure, or elicit shortness of breath or chest pains and abnormal changes in the hearts rhythm or electrical activity when cardiovascular disease is present (which is why there is usually someone there to monitor you during the examination). Angiography: With this test, a thin, exible tube (catheter) is placed in and fed up a blood vessel of the arm, groin or neck towards the heart. Then dye that can be seen on an X-ray is injected through the catheter to show the coronary arteries. X-rays are then taken to show whether plaque or a clot is blocking any of the coronary arteries; they can also show how severe the blockage is and how much or little blood is owing through the arteries. This test is typically used to either help establish whether or not a persons chest pain, acute or chronic, is due to blockage of the arteries or, in the case of an already diagnosed acute heart attack, to dene the problem and intervene to open the specic vessel that is blocked if possible, often by the placement of a stent. When the symptoms are compatible with a heart attack, a number of tests still need to be performed to denitively diagnose a heart attack, beginning with a physical exam during which a physician or a nurse listens to the heart via a stethoscope. The diagnostic process can include the following tests and procedures: Electrocardiogram (EKG): This test to record the hearts electrical activity shows how fast the heart is beating, as well as the regularity of its rhythm. It also can reveal signs of a past or present heart attack. Comparing old and new EKGs is one way physicians can identify changes that may indicate heart disease. Troponin Test: A blood test to determine blood levels of the proteins troponin T and troponin I, which are specic to the heart and released when the heart muscle is damaged. The results of this test can help conrm that a heart attack has occurred. The higher the levels of these two proteins, the greater the damage to the heart. Echocardiogram: Sound waves are used to create a moving picture of the heart. It also yields information about the size and shape of the heart and how well the hearts chambers and valves are working. Echocardiography can also reveal areas of poor blood ow to the heart and areas of the heart that arent contracting normally due to new or previous injury to the heart muscle. Heart attack patients usually are treated with drugs to limit damage to the heart by breaking up clots and preventing the formation of new blood clots, stabilizing plaque and improving blood ow to the heart. Giving these types of drugs within 30 minutes of the onset of symptoms provides the best opportunity to limit the amount of damage to the heart. The longer the wait, the more damage can occur. Consequently, if a reader is having symptoms compatible with a heart attack that last more than ve minutes, dont wait call, or get someone to call, 911. The drugs given may include aspirin and other anti-platelet medications given to prevent additional blood clotting, and clot busting drugs called thrombolytics which may help dissolve the obstructing blood clot before signicant damage is done if given ideally within three hours of the rst heart attack symptom. In addition, certain procedures may be necessary, including angioplasty to open blocked or narrowed coronary arteries, improve blood ow and relieve angina; installation of a stent, a small mesh tube inserted to increase the internal diameter of a blood vessel narrowed by disease; or coronary bypass surgery, in which blood vessels taken from other areas in the body are used to route blood around (bypass) blockages in the coronary arteries. In addition to drugs and medical procedures to help manage and limit heart damage with an acute heart attack, conventional medical treatment emphasizes reducing risk factors that might contribute to future heart disease and heart attacks, including high cholesterol, diabetes and high blood pressure, with lifestyle changes such as losing weight, if necessary; stopping smoking; following a heart healthy diet; getting regular exercise and learning to deal with stress. Specic drug therapy is also initiated as indicated. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 14A Madison County CarrierHEALTH D i d Y o u K n o w . Frank NathanFormer Executive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness Tips Dear Savvy Senior, When I had a mild heart attack about six months ago my doctor told me I needed to be extra careful during the winter when recurring heart attacks are more common. Is this true? How can the seasons affect your heart? Leery Senior Dear Leery, Everyone knows winter is cold and u season, but most people dont know that its also the prime season for heart attacks too, especially if you already have heart disease or have suffered a previous heart attack. Heres what you should know, along with some tips to help you protect yourself. Heart Attack Season In the U.S., the risk of having a heart attack during the winter months is twice as high as it is during the summertime. Why? There are a number of factors, and theyre not all linked to cold weather. Even people who live in warm climates have an increased risk. Here are the areas you need to pay extra attention to this winter. Cold temperatures: When a person gets cold, the body responds by constricting the blood vessels to help the body maintain heat. This causes blood pressure to go up and makes the heart work harder. Cold temperatures can also increase levels of certain proteins that can thicken the blood and increase the risk for blood clots. So stay warm this winter, and when you do have to go outside, make sure you bundle up in layers with gloves and a hat, and place a scarf over your mouth and nose to warm up the air before you breathe it in. Snow shoveling: Studies have shown that heart attack rates jump dramatically in the rst few days after a major snowstorm, usually a result of snow shoveling. Shoveling snow is a very strenuous activity that raises blood pressure and stresses the heart. Combine those factors with the cold temperatures and the risks for heart attack surges. If your sidewalk or driveway needs shoveling this winter, hire a kid from the neighborhood to do it for you, or use a snow blower. Or, if you must shovel, push rather than lift the snow as much as possible, stay warm, and take frequent breaks. New Years resolutions: Every Jan. 1, millions of people join gyms or start exercise programs as part of their New Years resolution to get in shape, and many overexert themselves too soon. If youre starting a new exercise program this winter, take the time to talk to your doctor about what types and how much exercise may be appropriate for you. Winter weight gain: People tend to eat and drink more, and gain more weight during the holiday season and winter months, all of which are hard on the heart and risky for someone with heart disease. So keep a watchful eye on your diet this winter and avoid binging on fatty foods and alcohol. Shorter days: Less daylight in the winter months can cause many people to develop seasonal affective disorder or SAD, a wintertime depression that can stress the heart. Studies have also looked at heart attack patients and found they usually have lower levels of vitamin D (which comes from sunlight) than people with healthy hearts. To boost your vitamin D this winter, consider taking a supplement that contains between 1,000 and 2,000 international units (IU) per day. And to nd treatments for SAD, visit the Center for Environmental Therapeutics website at cet.org. Flu season: Studies show that people who get u shots have a lower heart attack risk. Its known that the inammatory reaction set off by a u infection can increase blood clotting which can lead to heart attacks in vulnerable people. So, if you havent already done so, get a u shot for protection. See ushot.healthmap.org to nd a nearby vaccination site. Savvy Senior How to Guard Against Wintertime Heart Attacks VISIT OUR TOY DEPARTMENT HURRY BEFORE THEYRE GONE! NOW IN STOCK! Madame Alexander Dolls Doll House Police Set Toads & Teacups Childrens Shop Clothing Department Puddle Jumpers, Lamore, Angel, Ga Boot, Wee Squeak, Pediped, Keds, Chooze, Willets & Riley RoosSHOE DEPARTMENTSHOE DEPARTMENT Remember Nguyen Frumpy Rumps Rosalina Young Colors Petite Ami Bailey Boys Mud Pie229-244-72201601 Baytree Rd., Suite B2 Valdosta229-244-7220 www.toadsandteacupschildrensshop.com



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Christmas is exactly two weeks away, and everyone is busy buying and wrapping presents in preparation of the holidays. I would like to take this time/space to encourage everyone to shop locally, as much as you can. I know, and understand, that by living in a small town there are some things that we have to go out of town for, in order to purchase. Things such as certain designer jeans, electronic games, iPhones and iPads, and certain children’s toys can only be found in some of the big, out-oftown businesses. However, there are so many gift ideas that are available in our town: hunting and shing supplies, jewelry, purses, dinner plate sets, antique furniture and clothing, artwork, theme-related items, knick-knacks, tools, auto parts, lawn and garden items, and other memorabilia. Some “non-traditional” ideas for the “hard to buy for” person on your list (or someone who already “has it all”) could be a facial, massage or hair cut from a local salon; a plant or tree from a local orist; a gift card to a local restaurant, pharmacy, gas station; a home-made cake, or a local “home-based” independent salesperson (such as Avon, Mary Kay, Tupperware, etc.) Use your imagination; there are tons of ideas that can be thought up, all while staying within our small community. Go walk around and walk in our home-owned businesses; you might surprise yourself with the amount of gift ideas you will nd. Top reasons to shop locally: 1) Save Time, Gas and Energy – without having to drive long distances or spend countless hours on the road you will save money on gas and save your time and energy for fun this holiday season. 2) Boost Employment – More sales in our community means more people are needed. That’s good for the economy and providing jobs for your family, friends, neighbors, and possibly you. 3) To Promote Economic Development – More local sales mean more money in circulation. That means more businesses can grow and new businesses can start. That improves the area for everyone. 4) To Get Personal Service – You know you can trust the person behind the counter to give you the best advice and value when you know them personally. 5) To Give To Your Community – When you shop locally, a portion of the money from your purchases pays the wages of your friends, family and neighbors who work at local businesses. 6) To Help Others – Owners and employees of local businesses support a wide range of community services and charitable projects with their time, talents and money. So, get busy and get ready for Christmas. Santa Claus will be coming down our chimneys in a matter of weeks. Just make sure you check local shops before you bust off out of town. And, no matter what you buy – be sure to throw in a one-year subscription to your local newspapers! Your family/friends will thank you for it! But, most importantly – remember the true meaning of Christmas is NOT Santa Claus – it’s Jesus Christ. Until then….see you around the town. Last week, I was treated to a tour of the PCA (Packaging Corporation of America) factory in Clyattville. I mentioned to Matt Webb of Greenville Timber that I wanted to see where the wood we grow is processed, so he and Jerry Gray set up our visit. First let me say that PCA is a huge publicly traded company headquartered in Chicago. They have many mills and sites spread across the country, one of which is in neighboring Lowndes County, Ga. employing 350 workers some of whom live in Madison and commute north each day for work. Here the company produces kraft paper or linerboard which is used in the manufacture of corrugated boxes and packing material. That sounds pretty simple but they do this on an industrial scale. A roll of paper measuring 18+ feet across and weighing 35 tons comes out of their manufacturing process about twice each hour. Their product is shipped to hundreds of industrial customers throughout the world. The raw material going into the plant through their impressive wood yard totals between 40 and 50 thousand tons of pine logs each week. Three massive cranes ofoad the trucks quickly and efciently. The Clyattville plant has been in operation for nearly sixty years, but it is much different today from when it was founded in 1954. Equipment upgrades; improved wood handling; power generation; environmental upgrades; and new safety measures are just a few of drivers which have resulted in changes at the plant over the years. They are a model for efciency which explains why they have adapted and continue to lead their industry today. PCA Clyattville uses a lot of water and electricity in their process, but interestingly, they manufacture 90 percent of the energy they use by burning wood chips and other byproducts. I have it on good authority that the purity and cleanliness of the Withlacochee is directly attributable to the environmental record of PCA. They also reclaim and recycle a huge amount (95 percent) of the chemicals used in their processes. That’s obviously good for the environmental quality of the water and soil, but it also makes good economic sense – those chemicals are expensive. I’m not sure how many Madison County residents are employed at PCA Clyattville, but I’m sure it is a major economic factor in our community. And these are really good paying jobs with impressive benets and retirement plans, much higher than the average for our rural community. Another interesting fact – PCA is the largest taxpayer in Lowndes County. Some people complain about the sulfur smell that we occasionally detect, but I don’t smell it very often and the people who have lived here much longer than I tell me that the noxious odors are not nearly as frequent or as bad as in earlier years. As a wood producer, I’m grateful for factories like PCA. Without them, there would be no customer for the wood we grow. And I’m certain that our local economy is greatly improved by businesses like PCA.www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 2A € Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist PCAIf you hear the word “buckeyes,” what comes to mind? Maybe you think of the college football team or the buckeye tree that produces the shiny, dark nuts carried around in pockets for good luck. If so, both images would be correct, but if you think like me, you envision a peanut butter candy, enrobed in just enough chocolate so that it resembles a “real” buckeye. All forms of the mentioned buckeyes are indigenous to the state of Ohio. The football team resides at Ohio State University, the buckeye tree is the ofcial state tree of Ohio, and as far as the confection, the buckeye recipe has been traced back to the early 20thcentury but without any reliable ownership of its creation. I, however, can say with certainty that my mother, who lived in Ohio most of her adult life, is the one who gave the recipe to me. Also, my mother-inlaw, who lived for many years in Indiana (a neighboring state of Ohio), gave me her version as well. To make the candy, you start with a peanut butter mixture, roll it into balls and then dip the balls into chocolate. The chocolate part is where I usually disregard tradition. Instead of dipping the balls partway, leaving enough peanut butter exposed to resemble the light tan spot on the buckeye nut, I submerge the balls into the chocolate, covering them completely. They may not look like the original buckeye, but I figure a little more chocolate will make even the staunch traditionalist approve. Having the candy during the Christmas holiday is a tradition in my family and often times given as gifts. I remember one year my mom came to visit and we were all traveling to my sister’s house in Dallas. While talking about our gifts we had made we discovered both my mother and I had made buckeyes for our family that year. Our stockings definitely overflowed with sugar and I hate to think of the weight we all gained that Christmas. This year, a fellow co-worker asked if I had a recipe for buckeyes and I am more than happy to share our traditional Christmas candy with her, and you. If you prefer smooth and creamy, you will like my mom’s recipe (which she dips the traditional way). If you are a fan of the crisped rice chocolate candy bars, you will love my mother-in-law’s recipe as it contains crisped rice cereal. No matter what recipe you choose to make, if you love the combination of peanut butter and chocolate, you can’t go wrong. Moms’ BUCKEYES (Smooth) c. butter 2 tbls. vanilla 2 tbls. milk 3 c. creamy peanut butter 4 c. confectioner’s sugar Jenny’s BUCKEYES (Crispy) 4 c. creamy peanut butter 1 c. butter one (2 lb.) package confectioner’s sugar 3 c. crispy rice cereal Choose a peanut butter mixture and mix all ingredients together to make a “dough.” Roll mixture into one-inch balls and place on a baking sheet lined with waxed paper. Freeze the balls for about 20 minutes before dipping. Dipping Chocolate There are several choices when choosing dipping chocolate: Seasoned cooks may use a product called almond bark, found on the baking aisle in grocery stores; there are several kinds of dipping wafers, some on the baking aisle, some in cake decorating sections; or you can use chocolate chips melted with a little shortening to make the chocolate a bit more fluid which will also aid in hardening the chocolate after the balls are dipped. Personally I use a mixture of wafers and chocolate chips because the wafers help to set the chocolate and the chips give the candy a true chocolate taste and mouth-feel. One of the recipes above will take 12 ounces of chocolate candy wafers combined with 12 ounces of semisweet chocolate chips. Or use four cups chips combined with 2 teaspoons shortening. Melt chocolate of choice in a double boiler and dip balls in chocolate and put back onto baking sheet for chocolate to harden. My mom dips her candy using toothpicks…poke toothpicks into candy, dip into chocolate, remove excess at bottom of ball with a knife and place dipped balls back onto baking sheet. I use a fork…place candy on (not in) fork, gently dip candy into chocolate, tap fork on pan and scrape across to remove excess chocolate before placing back onto pan. Repeat, repeat, repeat; the above recipes makes about 100 buckeyes each.Buckeyes For Christmas Rose Klein Columnist Searching For Ambrosia Emerald's Gem Box Shop Locally For ChristmasEmerald Greene PublisherGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, December 8, 2013My mom shows her expertise in dipping buckeyes. BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013Madison County Carrier € 3AWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Torching Goat Is Christmas Tradition In Galve, Sweden, a giant goat, standing about 40 feet tall and made of straw has been erected every Christmas season since 1966. The goat usually doesn’t make it to Christmas and is torched as a prank. This year, Galve’s tourism board spokesman said the straw goat was soaked in an anti-ammable chemical in an effort to keep it from being burned down. One year, a U.S. tourist was charged with arson after trying to light the goat on re, thinking it was an annual tradition. Fire hasn’t been the only threat however; one year an attempt was made to steal the goat by helicopter. A different year, a group of local teens got suspicious goat tattoos the day after the goat burned down. Last year, the goat made it to Dec. 12 before being burned down. The tourism ofce said, “We’re aware the goat is only famous because it gets burned. It would be great if it didn’t actually burn down this year, because that would be the most unexpected result, then we might really get a lot of attention.” Cannibalism Website Breeds Murder In Germany, a second case of murder involving cannibalism has occurred. The rst case was the “Cannibal of Rotenburg” case that occurred in 2006 and resulted in a life sentence for Armin Meiwes. This year, a German policeman has been arrested for murder after reportedly chopping up the body of a man he met on a cannibalism website. The victim, a 59year-old man from Hanover, “had been fantasizing about being killed and eaten by someone else since his youth,” Dresden police chief Dieter Kroll stated in a news conference. The body parts were found buried in the garden of the 55-year-old policeman, who worked as a technical expert in the criminal investigation department. It is not clear whether any act of cannibalism had taken place. Underwear Fights Flatulence In the UK, “Shreddies,” a new brand of underwear, is purported to keep the release, and smells, of lower-intestinal gas and allow it to escape unnoticed. The Shreddies website says the “patented lter underwear removes odors through the use of a thin and exible carbon cloth.” A reporter for the UK paper “ Star ” tested the atulence-ltering underwear by wearing it around town for three days, with no plans or worry of controlling gas pains. Rajn Mudhar said he was able to test the underwear out in a crowded elevator and at home in bed with his wife and had no negative responses. Mudhar said, “Success! The Shreddies seem to do what they say.” FROMPAGEONE Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Of“ce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersTori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn, Shanna SwopeBookkeeping Brooke KinsleyClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classi“eds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) identied as Deander Lidel Williams, 39, of Jacksonville, walking in the westbound trafc lane. Williams was observed making obscene gestures toward vehicles as they passed him. Deputies stopped and made contact with Williams who was clearly agitated for unknown reasons. Williams used profanity towards the deputies and refused to identify himself. As deputies were trying to calm Williams and identify him, Williams stepped out in front of oncoming trafc nearly causing a trafc crash. Deputies told Williams he was under arrest and Williams began to approach deputies in an aggressive manner with both of his sts clenched. Deputies drew a Taser and ordered Williams to get on the ground and warned Williams that failure to comply would result in Williams being tased. At that point Williams attempted to ee on foot forcing deputies to successfully deploy the Taser to subdue him. Williams was then arrested and placed in wrist restraints without further incident. Williams was charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. Resisting Arrest Cont. From Page 1A second occurrence Deputies were called to the area regarding physical altercations. Upon arrival, deputies located one of the subjects involved in the altercation and attempted to take him into custody. As deputies were clearing the subject for transport, he became more belligerent and resisted ofcers as they attempted to take him into custody. The subject’s mother, Betty Jean Blackshear, jumped on the back of the deputy as he was attempting to gain control of the subject. Other ofcers present on scene immediately removed the mother from the ofcer’s back and the subject was hand cuffed and secured in the patrol unit. The mother suddenly complained of medical issues and was transported via ambulance to the Madison County Memorial Hospital for alleged chest pains. Betty Jean Blackshear was not arrested at the time of incident and probable cause afdavits have been submitted for future warrants. O’Brien Calvin Richardson, 27, was arrested and charged with disorderly intoxication and resisting with violence. Disorderly Intoxication Cont. From Page 1A And there’s no better place than the newspaper. Call one of our representatives today. They can help you on the way to a great advertising plan. 973-4141(Fax) 973-4121P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FLIt Pays To Advertise x Deadline For Toys For Tots Extended Until FridayBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Toys can be dropped off Monday-Friday, from 7:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. at Wallace Automotive, located at 1182 East US 90, in Madison. Toys may also be dropped off during business hours at Becky’s Dance Steps Studio, located at 438 East Base Street in Madison. The last day for drop-off has been extended to Friday, Dec. 13. The US Marines Reserve Office in Tallahassee will pick up toys for distribution. All toys must be new and unwrapped.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 4A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Obituaries December 11The 55 Plus Club has a special treat in store for its December meeting: a performance by the Madison Boys Choir, under the direction of Daniel Graham. The club meets at 12 noon on the second Wednesday of every month at the UMCM Center, 135 NW Dill Ave., on the corner of Dill and Colin Kelly Hwy (Highway 145) near Hanson, about ve miles north of town, for a free lunch provided by one of the member churches, and a guest speaker or musical performance. Come on out Wednesday, Dec. 11 at noon, and bring some friends to enjoy food, fellowship and some ne Christmas singing. For more information on the Club, or for directions to the UMCM Center contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929-4938.December 13SkillsUSA will hold a fundraiser on Friday, Dec. 13, from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on the Courthouse Lawn. Funds will be used to help MCHS SkillsUSA compete in Regional and State Competitions. A grilled chicken plate will be available for $6 in advance or $7 at the lawn. It will include potato salad, green beans, roll and dessert. Sweet tea will be available for $1. For tickets or questions, contact Paige Thomas at (386) 965-6771. December 14Greenville Country Christmas at Haffye Hays Park in Greenville, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Join in for fun, food, a parade, live entertainment and arts and crafts. December 15"Season of Advent" candlelight service, 5:30 p.m., Genesis Missionary Baptist Church, 2062 NE Colin Kelly Highway. December 18The First Baptist Church of Madison will go caroling at 6 p.m. Prayer meeting for those not caroling at 6:30 p.m. at the church. December 18Madison's historic St. Mary's Episcopal Church will host an Ordination and Celebration of New Ministry on Wednesday, Dec. 18 at 6 p.m. The Right Reverend John Howard, 8thBishop of the Diocese of Florida, will ofciate at the service and install David Joseph Boyles as priest and vicar of St. Mary's. This is St. Mary's rst ordination since Advent 1992. A reception will follow. The public is cordially invited to attend and participate in this important event in the life of St. Mary's. Community Calendar William McCoyWilliam Henry McCoy III, born in Jacksonville on February 8, 1928, to William McCoy, Jr. and Thelma Windham McCoy, died on December 4, 2013. He was preceded in death by his parents and rst wife, Diane Greico, deceased 1999, and brother Edward Windham McCoy, Sr. Bill is survived by his wife, Eileen Leake McCoy; sisters, Margaret Ashey, Richmond, Va.; Thelma "Tami" Smith, Jacksonville Beach; Ann Wooten, Neptune Beach; and Martha Burgess, Tampa; brother, John McCoy St.Augustine; and sister-in-law, Sandra McCoy, Jacksonville. He is also survived by a stepson, Jonathan Yowell (Nadine), Sanford, and one granddaughter, Gracie, also of Sanford; two brothers-in-law, Michael Leake (Jill), St. Louis, Mo., and Clyde Leake (Cathy), St. Joseph, Mo,; and sister-in-law, Linda Leake, Spring Hill, Tenn.; and many beloved nieces and nephews. Bill was a 1945 graduate of Landon High School and received his BA degree in history from the University of Florida in 1949, where he was a member of Blue Key and Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He then served his country as Battery Commander in the U.S. Army from 1950-1953. In the mid 50's, he served as legislative assistant to Congressman Paul Rogers, in Washington, DC. Bill then worked in South Florida for the USDA as an inspector until he accepted a teaching position at Terry Parker High School from 1957-1961. He then became Jacksonville University's News Bureau Director, Director of Placement, and Registrar. After his service to JU, Bill returned to his beloved University of Florida, where he became Assistant Professor of Education and Special Assistant to President Steve O'Connell, whom he considered his mentor and friend. While serving UF, Bill obtained his Masters of Arts in Administration, a Specialist in Administration degree and a Doctorate of Higher Education Administration degree. He continued his postdoctoral work at the University of Virginia. Bill accepted the honor of becoming the First and Founding President of Lord Fairfax Community College in Middletown, Virginia, from 19691987. Also, with his time in Virginia, he assisted in founding and serving as the rst chairman of the Commission on Small Rural Colleges as part of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges. Bill served as president of the Shenandoah Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America; president, and later director of the Wayside Foundation of the Arts in Middletown, Va.; organized the Winchester Apple Harvest Festival and served for ten years as chairman. He was president of the St. Thomas Trust, which renovated and restored the St. Thomas Chapel of Middletown. Bill also held membership of the Winchester Rotary Club, and also served as a member of the Board of Directors. With great pride, Bill received one of his most prized honors: that of Distinguished Forester from the Commonwealth, for his planting of over 40,000 pine trees on his farm with the help of his nephew, Daniel "Wes" Cornwell. In August, 1987, Bill became the fth President of North Florida Community College in Madison, during which time he administered many important programs, including the rebuilding of the campus after the 1988 tornado. He retired and returned to his hometown Jacksonville, in 1995. Bill loved God, his family, friends and students, his farms and his dogs. He was also an avid reader. Bill served the educational community long and well as a professional educator of stature and steadfastness, as an insightful and capable leader, as a gracious and wise benefactor, as an example dened by high principles and right action. Bill was a good husband and friend, trusted and loyal. Visitation was held from 4 to 6 p.m., with the Rosary beginning at 5 p.m., Sunday, December 8 in St. Paul's Catholic Church. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at 11 a.m., Monday, December 9 in St. Paul's Catholic Church, 224 North 5th St. Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250, with The Reverend William Kelly and The Very Reverend Edward Murphy ofciating. Interment followed at 3 p.m. in Oaklawn Cemetery of Jacksonville. In lieu of owers, contributions may be made to The University of Florida Cancer Research Center, P.O. Box 103633, Gainesville, FL 32610, www. CANCER.UFL.EDU; Dr. William H. McCoy Scholarship Fund, c/o Lord Fairfax Community College, 173 Skirmisher Lane, Middletown, VA 22645; or North Florida Community College General Scholarship Fund in memory of Dr. William H. McCoy, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr. Madison, FL 32340. Please visit our online Tribute at www.quinnshalz.com. Arrangements by Quinn-Shalz Family Funeral Home, Jacksonville Beach, FL. Jessica Lee Green McGuireJessica Lee Green McGuire passed away on December 6, 2013 at Shands Hospital in Gainesville. Jessica was born November 9, 1976 in Deland and lived most of her life in Madison. She was employed as an executive assistant for the North Florida Regional Workforce Board in Madison. She was a student at North Florida Community College, and received her degree in Secretarial Science from Suwannee Hamilton Technical Center. Mrs. McGuire is survived by her husband, John C. (Steve) McGuire; son, Matthew Keagan Gassler; mother, Jan Louise Parker Green; brother, Robert Green and sister-in-law, Cheri Green; stepson, Stephen McGuire; and stepdaughter, Katlyn McGuire. Her father, Theodore Robert Green, and a sister, Kelly Green, preceded her in death. Funeral services were held on Dec. 10 at 2 p.m. at San Pedro Cemetery in Madison. Visitation was on Monday from 5-7 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel. (“Though she be but little, she is erce.” – Shakespeare)

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I have been in the Child Care eld for over 20 years. Waitdid I say Child Care and not Day Care or babysitter? Why, yes I did! I have been battling with this for all of these 20 years. Those of you, who know me, know I believe the word babysitter' should be taken out of the dictionary! Even though I can't seem to get the words Day Care to go away, I am ready to go to battle to make the words Child Care obsolete. When child care began, it was a necessity for moms who wanted to return to work. Now it seems that it is more a necessity to adequately prepare them to begin Kindergarten. Just in case you haven't noticed, what your child is learning in Kindergarten now, is what you learned when you were in rst grade! From the time a child is enrolled into a child care center, even as young as six weeks, their day is intricately planned, scaffold and prepared to provide each child with many different learning experiences to prepare them for school. Before any daily planning begins, the pre-school teacher strategically plans the classroom environment so the children feel safe and encouraged to learn. Most classrooms are set up into learning centers that allow the children to play. These centers usually are art, science, blocks, reading, writing, math and manipulatives, music, dramatic play, water and sensory play, circle time and small group time. Then the daily lesson planning can begin for each center and small group while remembering that enough activities need to be planned to last the entire day and meet each child's individual needs and interests. Lesson plans begin with the physical needs of each individual child in the classroom, still not forgetting feeding, diaper changes/potty training/bathroom time, love and attention, and maintaining the health and safety issues in the classroom. Then the planning begins for each center and small group that covers each developmental domain; cognitive development, social and emotional development, language and communication, physical development and their approach to learning. Keeping in mind that each child learns and develops at their own pace and in their own way, activities are planned to challenge and encourage each child's curiosity to learn. Also keeping in mind they are children and play is not only what they do, but it plays an important role in the way they learn. Young children learn best through hands on experiences allowing them to explore using all ve of their senses. Now our classroom lesson plans are done, it's time to plan all of our outside centers and activities! (We will leave observations, assessments, trainings, meetings and programs for another time.) Now, as I was saying Babysitting? You know better than that. Day Care? We are not here to care for the day. Child Care? That's better, but join me in my crusade. Let us start calling it by what it really is, Pre-School. It's just the right thing to do! Dawn Phillips Director of Richie’s Early Learning Academy www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013Madison County Carrier € 5AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Letter To The Editor Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. No More Daycare!Jean Fiori Shows Garden Club Recycle Project Of The MonthGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Flipping ”ip-”ops: After the summer is over, a lot of people probably have a few pairs of broken ”ip-”ops around the house. Jean Fiori saved three colorful pairs of broken ”ip-”ops from the trash and used Plumbers Goop to glue them all together and make an interesting wall hanging for a porch, sunroom, play area, or anywhere that lends itself to a light-hearted, summery motif.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.In 1889, Saint Leo University was founded in Saint Leo, about 35 miles north of Tampa, by an order of Benedictine monks and named in honor of Pope Leo the Great. Today, it is the oldest Catholic university in the state of Florida, and the sixthlargest in the country. It also reaches well beyond the geographical location of its original campus, through partnerships, with stand-alone sites, on military bases and through online courses of study. It has established its presence through 17 education centers operating in seven states, including California, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia, as well as Florida. Saint Leo University enrolls about 15,000 students per year, the majority of whom are military, but only about 2,500 attend class on the original campus in Saint Leo. Saint Leo University today is one of the largest providers of higher education to military-related personnel in the United States, opening its rst military-site program on MacDill Air Force Base. It also began a program of online courses in 1993 for military personnel stationed overseas, long before online classes were a mainstream part of higher education. Today, it serves military personnel with on-base education centers all over the country. In the near future, it plans to open yet another center at Moody Air Force Base. By 2013, U.S. News and World Report had named St. Leo University as one of the top ranked universities in the country. Since 2004, Saint Leo University has partnered with North Florida Community College to operate an education center in Madison. It opened with an offering of three bachelor's degree programs, and today, nine years later, it offers seven. Enrollment in the Madison Center is currently over 300 students, Assistant Director of Enrollment Christy Roebuck told the Rotary Club, an outstanding number for this area. The students take courses either through the center or online, as wells as blended courses' that make use of traditional classroom instruction combined with technological advances such as webinars and webcams, bringing in a wide range of quality instruction from all over the country. When Roebuck herself was a student at Saint Leo University's Madison Center, studying business law, one of her instructors was an attorney who worked at the Pentagon. Saint Leo University's presence in Madison had made four-year degrees accessible to those who might not otherwise be able to obtain one; those who, because of family, job or other responsibilities, could not travel to Valdosta Ga., or Tallahassee to attend classes. At the graduation ceremony for the class of 2013 in May of this year, commencement speakers noted that many of those who were about to walk across the stage to receive their diplomas had juggled job demands and family responsibilities to bring themselves to that moment of achievement. "We bring education to those who can't come to us to get it," said Roebuck, whether they are veterans, single parents or displaced workers. Cost for Saint Leo University averages about the same as being at a state college, and there are grants and scholarships that can help. An A.A. degree is required for enrollment at the Madison Center, "because we are not competing with NFCC for students," said Roebuck. "If (high school graduates) come in, I always tell them there's a wonderful community college just down the street where they can get their A.A." The Madison Center has now produced 223 graduates, 85 of them from Madison, many now teaching in Madison's school system, giving back to their community, and making a better life for future generations of Madison County residents. Statistics show that if the parents are college graduates, the children are more likely to also attend college and those who are educated locally, where they have put down roots, are more likely to remain with their community and serve. The Madison Center is a community-focused center and Saint Leo University as a whole places heavy emphasis on community service. Next year, it will celebrate its 125thanniversary as an institution of higher learning, and its goal for that year is a total of 125,000 hours of community service. "Our goal is to educate, but also to have them (the graduates) serve in our community," she said. "We're getting out there and helping the community." www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 6A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY When Saint Leo University Came To MadisonGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris November 20, 2013Christy Roebuck, Assistant Director of Enrollment at Saint Leo Universitys Madison Center, speaks to the Rotary Club about the center and how it bene“ts not only its students, but the community as a whole.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013Madison County Carrier € 7AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Story SubmittedDespite an overcast and rainy day, an enthusiastic group of children enjoyed the opportunity to leave their home-based classrooms and tour the Nestl Waters’ Madison County Bottling Plant and Madison Blue Spring on Nov. 15. After seeing everything from how water is ltered to how bottles get labeled, the kids had a deeper appreciation for the natural resources at the heart of it all. The homeschooled children are part of a program called R.E.A.C.H Madison –Restoring Education Achieved by Community Homeschooling. The organization enables parents of homeschooled children to share ideas, take their children on group eld trips and support one another in the homeschooling process. The group included children from ages ve to 17, along with a number of parents. At the start of the plant tour, the guests donned hair nets, hard hats, earplugs and safety glasses before exploring the world of water bottling and packaging. The kids marveled at every piece of machinery, but the “oohs” and “ahhs” and pointed ngers were most prominent when the visitors saw the labeling machine for the rst time. When the industrial part of the tour was completed, the children had an opportunity to learn about the environment from Nestl Waters’ Florida Natural Resource Manager Kent Koptiuch, who described how land resources must be properly managed in order to protect the precious water resource. Koptiuch described how Nestl Waters manages its land resources as State Certied Tree Farms using Best Management Practices for sustainable timber harvesting and replanting, while ensuring they harvest water from the spring in a sustainable manner. The kids learned that to be categorized as a spring, a body of water must have a consistent year-round temperature, and that Madison Blue Spring always remains a pleasing 71 degrees. The kids were clearly interested, as shouts of “this is so cool” and “this is awesome” lled the air around the spring. One of the most enjoyable parts of the eld trip for the children was a hands-on portion where they got to work with “homemade” lters. First, the children took a tub of clean water and put in different types of items that could foul it – things like dirt, sand, packing peanuts and paper. They then worked to turn their “dirty” water into “clean” water, using portions of plastic bottles holding different sediments and rocks to lter the debris from the “dirty” water. The children’s determination was obvious as they made repeated, untiring efforts to get the water as clear as possible, showing they understood the importance of ltration for drinking water. The lesson certainly sank in and the children left with a greater appreciation of how important it is to manage our precious land and water resources in a manner that ensures that they will be around for future generations to enjoy.Nestle Waters’ Madison County Bottling Plant Hosts Field Trip For Homeschooled Children Photo SubmittedKent Koptiuch and four of the children who visited the Nestle Waters Bottling Plant during a recent “eld trip pause in front of Madison Blue Springs, which supplies the plant with pure spring water. Make 2013 the year you change your life CLASSES IN MADISON STARTJANUARY 6Bachelors Degree Programs € Business Administration with specialization in Management € Computer Information Systems € Criminal Justice € Elementary Education € Health Care Management € Human Services € Psychology Full-time students may be eligible for the Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Approved for VA Bene“ts/GI Bill Classes now forming in Madison(850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu What you need for where youre going Now offering The Doctorate of Business Administration (Online and On Campus) ou need for wher What y e y ou need for wher e going r  ou ee egr re s D  achelor B dministration A usiness € B Classes ograms r ro ee P dministration Classes dministration A usiness € B with specialization in anagement M nformation € Computer I ystems S ustice riminal J € C ducation lementary E € E anagement e M ealth Car € H dministrationanuar J in M with specialization in nformation ducation anagement N The D ing t tar S y 6 anuar adison in M fer w of o N octorate of The D ervices uman S € H chology sy € P ull-time students may F be eligible for the esident ida R lor F G) rant (FRA G ervices ull-time students may be eligible for the ccess A esident The D usiness B nline and O (O octorate of The D dministration A usiness ampus) n C nline and O V ed for v o ppr ro A ill ene“ts/GI B B w for Classes no adison in Mwww A VA ming w for (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp www (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Just in time for the holidays, when shopping takes a bite out of the budget, Mina Bloodworth and Sara Adams demonstrated several low-cost but dramatic oral arrangement techniques for holiday decorating. Flowers don't have to be expensive; they can come from grocery stores or backyards, and not every arrangement requires owers, as Bloodworth and Adams demonstrated, using found objects, wooden skewers, Gorilla Glue, Christmas tree ornaments, gathered backyard greenery, spray paint, wire, yard sale items, and bargain items from hobby stores, the Dollar Store and Lowe's. One the rst things to remember about gathering backyard owers or greenery, is: Forget Martha Stewart, and ditch the pretty wicker basket for a plain old bucket of water. Cut plants need to be placed directly in water, not a basket, and ideally, their stems should be cut again under the water to prevent air bubbles that can block water absorption. Another thing to remember: gather cuttings in the early morning or late evening, when the sap is down. Each table in the room held a centerpiece created with lowcost items, ranging from a small, traditional rose bouquet in a decorative metal vase, to large horizontal arrangements that would add drama over a mantle piece. Some of the arrangements with dried elements could last for months, and others could be changed for different seasons by just switching out some of the decorative elements. "This really res the imagination," said one Garden Club member afterward. "Now, when I see something by the roadside, I'll think, oh, I can use that.'" After the meeting, the arrangements were auctioned off as a club fundraiser, going for $25-$55 each. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 8A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Aucilla Christian Baseball Coach, First High School Coach To Receive National Honor-Character In Coaching Award Presented To Ray Hughes-Submitted by ACACharacter in Coaching Award to be Presented to Ray Hughes in January View photos of the surprise announcement at ACA at http://www.flickr.com/p hotos/aucillachristianacad emy/sets/7215763839907085 4/Aucilla Christian Academy is proud to announce that retired head baseball coach Ray Hughes is the 2014 recipient of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes' Jerry Kindall Character in Coaching Award, a national honor that includes all divisions of college and high school baseball coaching. Presented each year by FCA, Hughes was one of three finalists considered for the distinguished award. The award is named for legendary University of Arizona head coach Jerry Kindall who was the first recipient of FCA's Character in Coaching Award. He is wellknown for leading Arizona to three College World Series championships and his membership in FCA's Hall of Champions and the College Baseball Hall of Fame. For the past ten years, the award has been presented annually to a coach who best exemplifies the Christian principles of character, integrity, excellence, teamwork and service both on and off the baseball field. The FCA national committee reviewed award candidates during their annual meeting and voted to honor Hughes with the distinction. "This is a historic moment," said FCA's North Florida Representative Steve McHargue. "Coach Hughes is the first high school coach in the nation to win this honor." During Hughes' 38year ACA coaching career, he had over 500 career wins and 13 district championships as head coach. His former student athlete, Bobby Thigpen, a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball and currently bullpen coach for the Chicago White Sox, highly recommended Hughes for the award. "Coach Hughes had a strong influence on the player and coach I am today," said Thigpen. ACA Principal Richard Finlayson, who played for Hughes as an ACA student, said, "He is a special kind of coach who not only helped athletes become better players, he helped us become better people." As principal during Hughes' career at ACA, Finlayson said Hughes had numerous opportunities to advance his career along the path of success in the world's eyes, but he remained committed to ACA and, most importantly, to Jesus Christ. Hughes was humbled by the news of the award. "This is a great honor," said Hughes, who was surprised with a documentary about the award and a special joint presentation by ACA and FCA during the half-time of an ACA basketball game he was attending with his wife, Juanice. The FCA Jerry Kindall Character in Coaching Award award will officially be presented to Hughes on Jan. 4, 2014, during the American Baseball Coaches Association Convention, to be held in Dallas. wens Propane, IncService With A SmileŽ Serving North FloridaMADISON, JEFFERSON, SUWANNEE& HAMILTONCOUNTIES SIMPLY EVERYDAY FAIR PRICING We Are Here To Earn Your Business&K ee p Your Business€FREE TANK SETS € HEATER SERVICE € € NEW HEATERS € TANKLESS WATER HEATERS €€ GAS LOGS € PRICE COMPARISONS € Madison Office137 SW Shelby Avenue  Madison, Florida 32340(850) 253-3761 $3.19 PER GALLON  NO DELIVERY FEES   NO SEASONAL PRICES  NO GIMMICKS  (Ask For Becky) Garden Club Demonstrates Low-Cost Floral ArrangementsGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013In a more exotic vein, Adams used pine cone lilies and trimmed palm fronds spray-painted silver to set off a featured object:Ž in this case, a calm, smiling Buddha face. Pinecone lilies should be squeezed out like a sponge before use in arrangements, so they wont be too top-heavy.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Mina Bloodworth and Sara Adams demonstrate how a yard sale vase can be dressed up with xanadu leaves, palm frond sticks rescued from the courthouse lawn, peacock feathers and plastic Christmas ornaments on wooden skewers.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013A spray-painted straw vase lends itself to more naturalistic elements. Here, Bloodworth and Adams use artichokes on skewers, red yaupon holly berries, evergreen, bamboo, and red metallic Christmas ribbon.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Garden Club members gather around with the ”oral arrangements they bought after the meeting. Mina Bloodworths husband Jeff conducted the auction and the funds raised will go toward the clubs community service/charitable projects. Standing, left to right, are Tootie Walley, Laura Coleman, Jeanette Mitchell, Kaye Harris and Martha Beggs. Coach Ray Hughes

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013Madison County Carrier € 9ASCHOOL Lee Elementary Students Visit CourthouseBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Madison County Clerk of the Court Tim Sanders took several third grade students from Lee Elementary School on a guided tour of the Madison County Courthouse and told them about the history of the soon-to-be-100-yearold-building and the county itself. The third graders from Ms. Gurley’s class, Ms. Sauls’ class and Mr. Hickman’s class learned that Madison County, with a population of only 250 people formed as the 14thcounty in 1827, before Florida was even a state (that occurred in 1845), and that the original county seat for Madison was originally ten miles further south, in San Pedro. Sanders explained one of the courthouse’s most important functions, that of keeping and preserving records of the county’s history and the functions and business of government and the citizens, a function so important that the building has a fire safety system installed from basement to clock tower. Two previous courthouse buildings, made of wood, burned down. The first was located where Madison County Community Bank now stands, and the second one was built on the present location. After that one also burned down, construction began on the present day courthouse. The cornerstone was laid Dec. 19, 1913, and construction continued the following year, and the courthouse opened in 1914. Dec. 19, 2013, the landmark building will officially reach the century mark.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 4, 2013Some of the Lee Elementary third graders waiting to tour the courthouse, line up outside next to the tree they decorated for Light Up Madison.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 4, 2013In the courtroom, Sanders tells the children a little more about how county government of“cials work and answers questions.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 4, 2013Court Clerk Tim Sanders tells the children a little about the buildings history before they go inside to see the big courtroom upstairs. MCHS Forms New SkillsUSA Club Photo SubmittedThe SkillsUSA members include (left to right), Kaitlyn Farnell, Beverly Oro, Sunni Mays, Paige Thomas, Bianca Serrano, Kelli Ga rner and Roxy Whitman. In front, Wade Braswell.Photo SubmittedAll SkillsUSA members are shown above pausing for a brief picture. Front row, left to right: Kaitlyn Farnell, Beverly Oro, Sunn i Mays, Bianca Serrano, Kelli Garner and Roxy Whitman. Middle Row, left to right, Hope Smith, Sarah Kauffman, Tyler Burnette, Keesha Frontera, Ceridwyn Grif“s, Faith Siplin, Bethany Greenwood, Hank Thompson, Brett Shipley and Steven Walden. Back Row, left to right, Hunter Burt, Houston Wagner and Zack Sprenkle. Not Pic tured: Ashton Pickels, Camryn Alderman, Kayla Joseph, Kristen Dawson, Myasia Arnold, Mykaela Mercer, Simeria Alexander, Wade Braswell and Taylor Killin gsworth.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 10A € Madison County CarrierCHRISTMASGIFTIDEAS It's Okay To Say Merry Christmas!!

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013Madison County Carrier € 11AGREENVILLECOUNTRYCHRISTMAS 28thAnnual Greenville Country ChristmasThe Greenville Country Christmas Committee invites you to join with them in celebrating the 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas on Dec. 13 and Dec. 14. Festivities begin at 6 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 13, at the gazebo in Haffye Hayes Park. Entertainment will include Christmas carols, a live nativity and a tree-lighting ceremony. Following the festivities in the park, everyone is welcome to enjoy refreshments and a slideshow at the Greenville Madison Multi Purpose Center on SW Grand Street in Greenville. The celebration continues on Saturday, Dec.14, at Haffye Hayes Park. Arts and crafts vendors will be open at 9 a.m. with formal opening ceremonies commencing at 10 a.m. Commander Roy Scott and Vice Commander, Arthur Paquette, of American Legion Post 131 are our Co-Citizens of the Year. The Grand Marshal for this year’s parade, which starts at 11 a.m., is State Representative Halsey Beshears. The 2013 Entertainment Headliner is Brett Wellman and the Stone Cold Blues Band who will perform at 1 p.m. From 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., you can enjoy fine Christian rap performed by Georgia Red Music of Cairo, Ga. 2013 heralded the opening of the new building for American Legion Post 131 in Greenville. The building will be open during Saturday’s events. On display will be entries in this year’s Children’s Art Contest and Gingerbread House Contest. Please help us this year in giving the Gift of Life. The American Legion Post 131 and OneBlood will be hosting a blood drive at this year’s Greenville Country Christmas Festival. The blood mobile will be in front of the American Legion building from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. All donors will receive a wellness checkup, a cholesterol screening and a t-shirt. Don’t miss your chance to win one of the many door prizes donated by our local vendors from Greenville, Madison, Monticello and Perry. Vendors will provide raffle tickets when you make a purchase. The Greenville High School Reunion will be held at 6 p.m. at the Greenville Baptist Church Fellowship Hall on South Grand Street. We hope you’ll join us in celebrating the 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas. For more information, visit mygreenvillefl.com or contact Stuart MacIver at (850) 371-0042 or Kathy Reams at (850) 948-1709. There’s Something for Everyone at Greenville Country Christmas THANK YOU to our 2013 Sponsors! GOLD LEVEL Kessler Construc tion, LLC SILVER LEVEL Capital City Bank  Badcock Furniture  Beggs Funeral  Home-Madison Chapel Florida Plywoods,  Inc. Greenville Fertiliz er & Chemical Co. Kaney & Olivari,  PL Madison County  Community Bank Madison County  Farm Bureau Ronnie and Rhon da Moore Parish and Associ ates Scott Realty, LLC  Tri-County Elec tric Cooperative, Inc. BRONZE LEVEL John and Leigh  Barfield Double H Diner  Hickory Hill Auc tions Hickory Hill  Farms Madison Veteri nary Clinic, LLC 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas Bake-Off ContestOnce again, it’s time to show off your baking skills! The Greenville Country Christmas Committee invites you to enter the 28thAnnual Bake-Off Contest. A total of 15 cash prizes will be awarded. First place, second place and third place will be awarded in ve different categories: Cakes, Cookies, Candies, Breads and Pies. First place winners will receive a ribbon and $15; second prize winners will receive a ribbon and $10; and third prize winners will receive a ribbon and $5. All participants must have a Greenville address and entries must be marked with name, phone number and the title of their entry. Please submit your entry at the Greenville Madison Multi Purpose Center on SW Grand Street in Greenville between 4-5 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 13. Judging will begin at 5 p.m. For more information, please contact Elesta Pritchett at (850) 948-7501 or Frances Norris at (850) 948-4900. The Greenville Country Christmas Committee would appreciate it if participants will leave their entries so that they may be enjoyed during refreshment time at 7 p.m.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE YARD SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED WANTED TO BUY Buy, Sell or Trade In The Classi“eds Call 973-4141 Call 973-4141One Man’s Junk Is Another Man’s Treasure www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 12A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 11, 2013 AUCTION FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 12/9/2013 THROUGH 12/15/2013 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Of“ce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age18 yr. Day and evening classes. Next classes Jan. 6 (day) and Jan. 20 (night) 386-362-1065.12/4 12/25, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cWasher And Dryer For Sale! Kenmore series 70 washer, top load. Series 80 dryer, front load (door opens from top down). White in color and both are in perfect working order. $400 “rm. Call (229) 460-5296. Newspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.One Person Cabin On Farm $395/month. Background check required. Call (850) 673-1117.10/16 rtn, cCASH FOR FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES! $1000 for Madison Co enamel Tags dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL tags starting with #35 for years 1938, 39, 40, 43, 49, and 54. Jeff Francis gobucs13@aol.com or 727 424 1576.www.”oridalicenseplates.com10/23 -12/25, pdPart time curriculum developer wanted. See www.nfcc.edu for details.12/11, cNew and Repo Homes 25 to pick from. Come to Lake City the dual makers at Freedom Homes. Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cNov and Dec special 4/2 28x80 home only $49,900 cash deal only. Call Magic Mike at Freedom Homes (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cBeen turned down? Have 10k to 15k? Call me I can make a deal. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cLand home package with 10k down in Lake City Florida. We do the deals. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cIn house “nancing with 10k down on used or repo houses. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cTriple wide $29,900 as is. Wholesale price, hardwood ”oors, ceramic tile. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cReduced $10,000 Lot Model 4/2, new 2014. 2,016 square feet. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cCASH special up to $5,000. Reduced price on new or used quali“ed models. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cUltimate home 2,027 square feet 3/2 $69,900. Beautiful new home with “replace. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cLive Oak or Merit Homes. Low prices. Freedom Mobile Homes. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, c Ad Builder/Graphic Artist needed for the Madison County Carrier and the Madison EnterpriseRecorder. Must be a team player and able to handle multiple tasks. Experience with Adobe Photoshop a must, experience with Quark Express a plus. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.11/20 rtn, n/c Receptionist: When was the last time YOU had FUN at WORK? Its a great time to join our team of super dedicated staff. Not only do we take pride in what we do, WE HAVE FUN! Are you the type of person that never meets a stranger and has a GENUINE love of people? Are your physical appearance and cosmetics important to you? Do you already have great computer skills? How well do you adapt to learning new things, do you embrace it or resist it? This growing dental of“ce needs more helpers, and if you answered yes to these questions, then call 888-486-2408 to hear more about this position on our amazing team and how to apply.11/22 rtn, c AUCTION SATURDAY DECEMBER 14 at 6:30pm. Madison Auction House. 1693 SW Moseley Hall Rd (CR360) 850 973-1444 WE ARE AGAIN PARTNERING WITH THE SALVATION ARMY AND LOCAL VFD TO COLLECT TOYS FOR CHILDREN THAT WOULD NOT OTHERWISE RECEIVE ONE. BRING ONE OR BUY ONE AT THE AUCTION AND HELP THESE KIDS OUT! LOTS OF GREAT ITEMS SELLING FOR AS MUCH AS 80% OFF RETAIL 10% Buyers Premium. MC, Visa, Discover, Debit Cards, Checks and Cash Accepted. AU691 Ron Cox, AB2490.12/6, 12/11, cJob Vacancy Madison County is accepting applications for occasional E.M.T.s and paramedics. These positions have no fringe bene“ts and there are no minimum hours guaranteed. Applications can be obtained at Workforce Career Center, 705 E. Base St, Madison, FL 32340. All applicants must possess current State of Florida Certi“cation and clean driving record and meet all quali“cations as outlined on 64J-1.008 and 1.009 Florida Administrative Code and must agree to a background check and submit to a drug screening. If chosen for an interview, applicants must pass additional tests conducted by the agency. Applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, December 20, 2013. Submit applications to: Workforce, Career Center, 705 E. Base St, Madison, FL 32340. If you have any questions, contact Workforce Development at (850) 973-9675. Madison County is a drug free workplace and an equal opportunity employer.12/6, 12/11, cPatterson remodeling, carpentry, all aspects renovation, handyman and landscaping We do it all big and small. References, free estimates. (850) 464-1513.12/11, pd Yard Sale Saturday Dec. 14 from 8:30 a.m. ? Located at Kountry Kitchen restaurant in Lee (255 and I-10). Many things to choose from.12/11, cSet of four (4) WeldŽ (Mountain Crusher) billet aluminum wheels. 8 lug with bolt on center caps. Fits Dodge or Chevy. $400 OBO. Call 229-460-5296.12/11 rtn, n/c 3 BD 2 BA Singlewide Mobile Home Near Blue Springs. No pets. 1 year lease. $500 month, $500 security. (850) 274-5805.10/24-rtn, c CDL Class A Truck DriverRuns mostly SE extended area. 2 years driving experience. Good 2 year MVR. Home weekends and some during the week. (850) 973-2747.12/11 rtn, c Business Opportunities BE YOUR OWN BOSS! OWN A YOGURT, DOLLAR, MAILBOX, PARTY, TEEN, CLOTHING, OR FITNESS STORE. WORLDWIDE, 100% FINANCING, OAC. FROM $55,900 COMPLETE TURNKEY (800)385-2160 WWW.DRSS3.COM. Help Wanted Top 1% Pay & CSA Friendly Equip, Full Bene“ts + Quality Hometime, No slip seating -Take truck home, CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com. Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certi“cations. GI Bill Bene“ts Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here … Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage Tennessee Log Cabin on 6 acres with FREE Boat Slip! Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excellent “nancing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453. 10 ACRE MOUNTAIN TOP ESTATE! Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent “nancing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 92. Schools & Instruction You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-OnlineEducation.com.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013Madison County Carrier 13A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com ----Legals ---12/11, 12/18 12/11, 12/18 12/11, 12/18 12/11, 12/18

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A heart attack (myocardial infarction) occurs when blood ow to a part of the heart is blocked, usually by a blood clot lodged in one of the coronary arteries. As a result, part of the heart muscle is damaged or dies. The most common symptom is chest pain that feels like a tight band around the chest. The pain can move to the arms, shoulders, neck, teeth, jaw, abdomen or back. It can be severe or mild. In some cases, the pain feels like bad indigestion, but it also may feel as if something heavy is sitting on the chest, like the chest is being squeezed, or like heavy pressure is being applied. Typically, the pain lasts longer than 20 minutes and isn't relieved by rest or by taking nitroglycerin, a medication which may have been prescribed for angina, a classic symptom of cardiovascular disease that sometimes predicts heart attacks. Heart attack pain may ease and then return. Other symptoms can include anxiety, cough, fainting, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, palpitations (the heart seems to be beating too fast), shortness of breath and/or heavy sweating. It is also possible to have a heart attack that causes no symptoms these are called "silent" heart attacks. Women are more likely to experience atypical symptoms in the presence of coronary artery disease and are less likely than men to experience crushing chest pain. In fact, chest pain occurs in only a little more than half of women during a heart attack. The location of pain related to diminished blood ow to the heart is more likely to vary in women, and can include the upper back, neck and jaw for reasons that are not well understood. Underlying most heart attacks is atherosclerosis, or "hardening of the arteries," a disease that occurs when cholesterol-rich plaque builds up along arterial walls creating conditions that can lead to a heart attack. These tests can help a physician determine the level of risk of heart attack in a given patient: Computed Tomography (CT Scan): This test provides computer-generated pictures of the heart, brain or other areas of the body. In the case of the heart, it can help evaluate the condition of the coronary arteries that supply the heart. A CT scan may show narrowing of large arteries and reveal calcium build-ups in coronary artery walls. Stress Test: An assessment of how long you can continue to walk on a treadmill as the speed increases and how fast your heart rate returns to normal after 30 minutes or less of exercise. A stress test can also reveal abnormal changes in heart rate or blood pressure, or elicit shortness of breath or chest pains and abnormal changes in the heart's rhythm or electrical activity when cardiovascular disease is present (which is why there is usually someone there to monitor you during the examination). Angiography: With this test, a thin, exible tube (catheter) is placed in and fed up a blood vessel of the arm, groin or neck towards the heart. Then dye that can be seen on an X-ray is injected through the catheter to show the coronary arteries. X-rays are then taken to show whether plaque or a clot is blocking any of the coronary arteries; they can also show how severe the blockage is and how much or little blood is owing through the arteries. This test is typically used to either help establish whether or not a person's chest pain, acute or chronic, is due to blockage of the arteries or, in the case of an already diagnosed acute heart attack, to dene the problem and intervene to open the specic vessel that is blocked if possible, often by the placement of a stent. When the symptoms are compatible with a heart attack, a number of tests still need to be performed to denitively diagnose a heart attack, beginning with a physical exam during which a physician or a nurse listens to the heart via a stethoscope. The diagnostic process can include the following tests and procedures: Electrocardiogram (EKG): This test to record the heart's electrical activity shows how fast the heart is beating, as well as the regularity of its rhythm. It also can reveal signs of a past or present heart attack. Comparing old and new EKGs is one way physicians can identify changes that may indicate heart disease. Troponin Test: A blood test to determine blood levels of the proteins troponin T and troponin I, which are specic to the heart and released when the heart muscle is damaged. The results of this test can help conrm that a heart attack has occurred. The higher the levels of these two proteins, the greater the damage to the heart. Echocardiogram: Sound waves are used to create a moving picture of the heart. It also yields information about the size and shape of the heart and how well the heart's chambers and valves are working. Echocardiography can also reveal areas of poor blood ow to the heart and areas of the heart that aren't contracting normally due to new or previous injury to the heart muscle. Heart attack patients usually are treated with drugs to limit damage to the heart by breaking up clots and preventing the formation of new blood clots, stabilizing plaque and improving blood ow to the heart. Giving these types of drugs within 30 minutes of the onset of symptoms provides the best opportunity to limit the amount of damage to the heart. The longer the wait, the more damage can occur. Consequently, if a reader is having symptoms compatible with a heart attack that last more than ve minutes, don't wait call, or get someone to call, 911. The drugs given may include aspirin and other anti-platelet medications given to prevent additional blood clotting, and "clot busting" drugs called thrombolytics which may help dissolve the obstructing blood clot before signicant damage is done if given ideally within three hours of the rst heart attack symptom. In addition, certain procedures may be necessary, including angioplasty to open blocked or narrowed coronary arteries, improve blood ow and relieve angina; installation of a stent, a small mesh tube inserted to increase the internal diameter of a blood vessel narrowed by disease; or coronary bypass surgery, in which blood vessels taken from other areas in the body are used to route blood around (bypass) blockages in the coronary arteries. In addition to drugs and medical procedures to help manage and limit heart damage with an acute heart attack, conventional medical treatment emphasizes reducing risk factors that might contribute to future heart disease and heart attacks, including high cholesterol, diabetes and high blood pressure, with lifestyle changes such as losing weight, if necessary; stopping smoking; following a heart healthy diet; getting regular exercise and learning to deal with stress. Specic drug therapy is also initiated as indicated. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 11, 2013 14A € Madison County CarrierHEALTH Did You Know...Frank NathanFormer Executive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness Tips Dear Savvy Senior, When I had a mild heart attack about six months ago my doctor told me I needed to be extra careful during the winter when recurring heart attacks are more common. Is this true? How can the seasons affect your heart? Leery Senior Dear Leery, Everyone knows winter is cold and u season, but most people don't know that it's also the prime season for heart attacks too, especially if you already have heart disease or have suffered a previous heart attack. Here's what you should know, along with some tips to help you protect yourself. Heart Attack Season In the U.S., the risk of having a heart attack during the winter months is twice as high as it is during the summertime. Why? There are a number of factors, and they're not all linked to cold weather. Even people who live in warm climates have an increased risk. Here are the areas you need to pay extra attention to this winter. Cold temperatures: When a person gets cold, the body responds by constricting the blood vessels to help the body maintain heat. This causes blood pressure to go up and makes the heart work harder. Cold temperatures can also increase levels of certain proteins that can thicken the blood and increase the risk for blood clots. So stay warm this winter, and when you do have to go outside, make sure you bundle up in layers with gloves and a hat, and place a scarf over your mouth and nose to warm up the air before you breathe it in. Snow shoveling: Studies have shown that heart attack rates jump dramatically in the rst few days after a major snowstorm, usually a result of snow shoveling. Shoveling snow is a very strenuous activity that raises blood pressure and stresses the heart. Combine those factors with the cold temperatures and the risks for heart attack surges. If your sidewalk or driveway needs shoveling this winter, hire a kid from the neighborhood to do it for you, or use a snow blower. Or, if you must shovel, push rather than lift the snow as much as possible, stay warm, and take frequent breaks. New Year’s resolutions: Every Jan. 1, millions of people join gyms or start exercise programs as part of their New Year's resolution to get in shape, and many overexert themselves too soon. If you're starting a new exercise program this winter, take the time to talk to your doctor about what types and how much exercise may be appropriate for you. Winter weight gain: People tend to eat and drink more, and gain more weight during the holiday season and winter months, all of which are hard on the heart and risky for someone with heart disease. So keep a watchful eye on your diet this winter and avoid binging on fatty foods and alcohol. Shorter days: Less daylight in the winter months can cause many people to develop "seasonal affective disorder" or SAD, a wintertime depression that can stress the heart. Studies have also looked at heart attack patients and found they usually have lower levels of vitamin D (which comes from sunlight) than people with healthy hearts. To boost your vitamin D this winter, consider taking a supplement that contains between 1,000 and 2,000 international units (IU) per day. And to nd treatments for SAD, visit the Center for Environmental Therapeutics website at cet.org. Flu season: Studies show that people who get u shots have a lower heart attack risk. It's known that the inammatory reaction set off by a u infection can increase blood clotting which can lead to heart attacks in vulnerable people. So, if you haven't already done so, get a u shot for protection. See ushot.healthmap.org to nd a nearby vaccination site. Savvy Senior How to Guard Against Wintertime Heart Attacks VISIT OUR TOY DEPARTMENT HURRY BEFORE THEYRE GONE! NOW IN STOCK! Madame Alexander Dolls Doll House Police Set SHOEDEPARTMENT Toads & Teacups Childrens Shop Clothing Department SHOE DEP Puddle Jumpers, Lamore, Angel, Ga Boot, Wee Squeak, Pediped, Keds, Chooze, Willets & Riley RoosSHOE DEPARTMENT SHOE DEPARTMENT Remember Nguyen € Frumpy Rumps € Rosalina Young Colors € Petite Ami € Bailey Boys € Mud Pie 229-244-72201601 Baytree Rd., Suite B2 € Valdosta 229-244-7220 www.toadsandteacupschildrensshop.com