Madison County carrier

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00412


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Wed. December 4, 2013VOL. 50 NO. 16 www.greenepublishing.com 50 cents Index2 Sections, 24 Pages Local Weather Viewpoints 2A Around Madison4-9A Sports 10-11A School 12A Health 13A Classieds 14A Legals 15A Path of Faith Section B Wed 12/4 79/62 Intervalsofcloudsandsunshine. High79F.WindsSat5to10mph. Sat12/7 78/58 Fewshowers.Highsintheupper 70sandlowsintheupper50s. Fri 12/6 79/62 Partlycloudy.Highsintheupper 70sandlowsinthelow60s. Thu12/5 79/58 Partlycloudy.Highsintheupper 70sandlowsintheupper50s.Man Arrested For Manufacturing MethMadison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports that on Saturday, Nov. 30, at approximately 2:30 a.m., deputies with the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce went to 2314 NE Cattail Drive in Madison in an attempt to locate and arrest a fugitive identied as Mark Bareld, 28 years old. Deputies possessed an active warrant on Bareld for violation of probation. Upon arrival, deputies strategically positioned themselves to prevent Bareld from escaping. Deputies attempted contact with Bareld at the front door and observed him through a window running through the residence toward the back door carrying a backpack. As Bareld attempted to escape out the back door he was greeted by a deputy and ordered to stop and get down on the ground. Bareld failed to comply and ed back inside the residence as deputies gave chase. Bareld was apprehended when he tripped and fell on the living room oor. Bareld was then taken into custody without further incident. A functional meth lab was located in the backpack that Bareld was carrying. Deputies also discovered several other items commonly used to manufacture methamphetamine, along with a pipe that Mark Bareld See Meth Arrest On Page 3AMysterious Sounds Heard At New Hospital SiteBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Madison Police Department ofcers and the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce responded to the new hospital construction site on Sunday evening, Dec. 1. According to the MPD, Ofcer Anthony Land responded to a suspicious incident at 8:45 p.m. A North Florida Community College security ofcer told Land that he had heard a loud banging coming from inside the fence at the site. Land walked around but did not see anyone. Later, he was Log Truck Turns And BurnsAlog truck turned over on County Road 255 in Lee on Monday afternoon, Dec. 2. Driver Jose Castro Arriola, 62, of Live Oak, noticed smoke and bailed out of the cab before the truck caught on re. The truck became totally engulfed in ames. Photos by RUSSELL, December 2, 2013 See Mysterious Sounds On Page 3A Light Up Madison Set For This Weekend By Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. The Kiwanis Club of Madison helps the community kick off the Christmas season with Light Up Madison, scheduled for Dec. 6 and 7. Things get rolling on Friday evening, Dec. 6, at 7 p.m., as the RATT Pact presents Dickens in the theater building on SW Range Avenue. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children, ages 5-12. The Rotary and Kiwanis Clubs will host the Light Up Madison Golf Tournament to support Madison Cares Projects on Saturday morning, Dec. 7, at the Madison Country Club. Registration begins at 8 a.m. At 8:30 a.m., registration will begin for a 5K Diaper Dash. The race will begin at 9:30 a.m. along the College Route. An Antique Car Show and Cook-off will be held beginning at 9 a.m. at Yogi Bears Jellystone Park. The Junior Auxiliary Jingle Jog will be held with check-in set at 4 p.m. This is a onemile fun run. Costumes are encouraged, but not required. Prizes will be awarded for the best costume. Beckys Dance Steps Studio will present Jump, Jive & Jingle beginning at 4:45 p.m. in downtown Madison. The Christmas Parade will wind its way through downtown, beginning at 6 p.m. Lake Park of Madison will sponsor the parade. There will be a Winter Wonderland inSee Light Up Madison On Page 3A Santas making a list and hes checking it twice. Its that time of year to show Santa who the good girls and boys have been and for them to write letters to Santa Claus. Greene Publishing, Inc. can save children the cost of postage to send letters to the North Pole. Children can instead send their letters to Greene Publishing, which will publish the letters in the newspaper. Santa will get a copy, so he can read it and check what each child wants. The deadline for entries is Dec. 18 at 5 p.m. and they will be published in the Dec. 20 Madison Enterprise-Recorder. Letters must be written in black ink to Santa in care of Greene Publishing, Inc., P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32340 or dropped off at Greene Publishing, on Highway 53 South in Madison. Teachers will also be collecting letters for publication so Santa can see them. Its Time For Santa LettersChristmas In The ParkBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Its that time of year again, when Four Freedoms Park in downtown Madison becomes Winter Wonderland, and the members of the Madison Garden Club are getting an early start with their part of the decorating. On a cool, overcast December morning, Garden Club president Laura Coleman and Garden Club members Lura Fine, Jean Fiori, Louanna Forness, Nell Ring and Thelma Dehart gathered at theGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 2, 2013Angels with angels: (Left to right) Jean Fiori, Lura Fine and Thelma Dehart hold up three of the handmade angels that will adorn the south side of the park.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 2, 2013Joining in the reindeer games this year are these two big guys, pulling the little red sleigh. Lura Fines husband, John, made the deer and sleigh.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 2, 2013Nell Ring puts the nal touches on Minnie Mouse while Snoopy supervises. See Christmas On Page 3A D a y c a r e P r o v i d e s K i d s A L e s s o n I n G i v i n g See Page 12A

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Iget hundreds of emails a day. Most are business related, some are trash/spam, and then a few are from family or friends. I dont have time to sit and read a lot of non-business email. In fact, I dont read them at all just about. I either hit delete or save them for another day. From time to time, I try to remember to go back through a lot of those old emails. Last week, I was doing a search through my emails for something particular and I came across an email I hadnt read in a long time. It was an email I had received from a friend. I loved it then (thus the reason I had saved it) and I still love it now so much I thought Id share it with all of you. Well call this a parable because there IS a lesson to be learned from this. A chemistry professor in a large college had some exchange students in the class. One day while the class was in the lab, the Professor noticed one young man (exchange student) who kept rubbing his back and stretching as if his back hurt. The professor asked the young man what was the matter. The student told him he had a bullet lodged in his back. He had been shot while ghting Communists in his native country who were trying to overthrow his country's government and install a new Communist government. In the midst of his story, he looked at the professor and asked a strange question. He asked, Do you know how to catch wild pigs? The professor thought it was a joke and asked for the punch line. The young man said this was no joke. You catch wild pigs by nding a suitable place in the woods and putting corn on the ground. The pigs nd it and begin to come every day to eat the free corn. When they are used to coming every day, you put a fence down one side of the place where they are used to coming. When they get used to the fence, they begin to eat the corn again and you put up another side of the fence. They get used to that and start to eat again. You continue until you have all four sides of the fence up with a gate in the last side. The pigs, which are used to the free corn, start to come through the gate to eat; you slam the gate on them and catch the whole herd. Suddenly, the wild pigs have lost their freedom. They run around and around inside the fence, but they are caught. Soon they go back to eating the free corn. They are so used to it that they have forgotten how to forage in the woods for themselves, so they accept their captivity. The young man then told the professor that is exactly what he sees happening to America. The government keeps pushing us toward socialism and keeps spreading the free corn out in the form of programs such as supplemental income, tax credit for unearned income, tobacco subsidies, dairy subsidies, payments not to plant crops (CRP), welfare, medicine, drugs, etc. While we continually lose our freedoms -just a little at a time. One should always remember: There is no such thing as a free lunch! Also, a politician will never provide a service for you cheaper than you can do it yourself. Also, if you see that all of this wonderful government 'help' is a problem confronting the future of democracy in America; you might want to send this story on to your friends. If you think the free ride is essential to your way of life then you will probably be offended by this story, but God help you when the gate slams shut! "A government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take away everything you have" Thomas Jefferson Please, please keep this in mind each and every time you go to vote! Stop turning a blind eye to the problems in our country and start standing up and voicing your opinion. We have all been too quiet, for far too long. Until then.see you around the town. Irecently returned from my second trip to Cumberland, Ga.'s southernmost barrier island. This trip was different than the first four years ago because now, the National Park Service (NPS) offers a Land and Legacy Tour. In a 15-passenger van, a guide takes visitors northward along the 17 mile Grand Avenue (its actually a single lane dirt trail) to spots that are generally beyond the reach of day visitors. For example, we visited Plum Orchard, one of the surviving Carnegie mansions from the late Victorian era; Stafford with its haunting slavery quarters; and the Settlement where dozens of post-slavery AfricanAmericans lived for the better part of a century. We also saw, from a distance, many of the retained rights homes grandfathered-in when the island was largely acquired by the NPS forty years ago. The weather was a little raw. In fact, during the afternoon at Terrapin Point, it seemed like we were experiencing the Georgia equivalent of a Noreaster. I was prepared for insects and sun, but these were no problem during our visit. The visit to Plum Orchard was certainly a highlight. Lucy, the Carnegie matriarch, had this huge mansion built for one of her sons as a wedding present. I was struck by how difficult and expensive it was to build. Since there is no bridge to the island, all of the materials and workers had to be shipped (literally) from the mainland. This is an enormous logistical problem and very expensive to overcome. And, as the Carnegie heirs found, equally expensive to maintain. As a result, much of the infrastructure has disintegrated. To me, the most beautiful and haunting experience is the maritime forest. The trees, especially the oaks, shaped by wind and storm, are truly magnificent and protected by wilderness designation over a quarter of the island. We saw quite a bit of wildlife during our day-long tour including raccoons, pigs, horses, and a variety of birds. The wild horses are quite a draw for the tourists visiting Cumberland. Another important wildlife feature of the island is a nesting place for sea turtles. The secret to Cumberland is that there is no bridge to the island and likely, will never be. That limits visitors riding the two daily 45 minute ferry runs from St. Marys to 300, not a heavy population count. Accordingly, the island has never been a money-making affair as the Carnegie heirs discovered. It is simply too costly to ship people and goods to and from the island. A lesson about stewardship I learned from my father was to never take more from the land than nature intends or permits. In my opinion, this is the mistake that was made by the Carnegies. When they realized that they could no longer care for their home, they invited the federal government to take over stewardship. That was pr obably a wise decision although even the feds have encountered difficulty in keeping the property in good repair. Over time, nature will continue to reclaim its right.www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 2A Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist Wild CumberlandIused to be a saver. I saved almost everything. For example, I used to have furniture that belonged to my parents, quilts from my grandmother, Easter hats and gloves from my childhood, books from my elementaryaged years, band medals and football ribbons from middle school and jeans I was wearing only a few years after high school. Over the years with several relocations later, some of these items I relinquished to my sister and some were sold when I felt it was time to downsize my life. What I have discovered is that material items, even though unnecessary in our lives, can still have enough memories attached to them, that they can evoke feelings of loss when they are gone. One way Ive found to recover this loss is by exploring ea markets and antique stores. Rows and rows of old, dusty items for sale can bring comments such as, Oh my gosh, we used to have one of those when I was a kid! On occasion, I have bought a treasure to help me reconnect with my past, such as the beautiful old percolating coffee pot my Papa used to make his morning cup of java with. As a child, I used to watch and listen, mesmerized by the coffee perking away as I tried to wake from the previous nights sleep. After getting my treasure home and giving it a thorough cleaning, I brewed myself a cup of coffee, sat back and remembered the times I was given my own small cup of coffee (lots of milk and sugar with just enough coffee to color the milk). Today, I cant remember how much I paid for the antique coffee maker, but the memories Ive received every time I see the pot are worth, to me, whatever was on that price tag the day I purchased the pot and brought it home. Browsing through ea markets, junk stores and estate sales is one of the many things my mother and I have in common. This past weekend, while we were out exploring we came upon a few really great markets. What makes them great is they did not contain the polished, orderly rows of antiques that have prices for collectors, but dusty shelves and boxes sitting on the oor, containing hidden treasures priced for xer-uppers and junkers, such as us. And, treasures were denitely found. One treasure in particular, my mother found, and gave to me as a gift, a wafe iron. Years ago, the death of my stepfather caused my mother to have a necessary downsizing of her own and one of the things my mom parted with was her wafe maker. I wasnt able to be at the sale and when I found out, I was devastated. The wafes she made me from that wafe iron were super crispy on the outside and wonderfully chewy on the inside and something you cant achieve with the Teon-coated wafe makers of today. My disappointment wasnt just for the loss of the wafes, but for the wafe iron itself, because it was hers and it was gone. So, for years we have both searched. Ive searched so that I could have those wonderful wafes again as well as the memories my mother gave me when eating them. My mother has searched to please, and appease, her whiny daughter. The replacement wafe iron she bought for me had been well cared for and is in perfect condition. It is a classic old-timer with heavy, removable metal plates and a stainless steel covering that shined up beautifully. I cant wait to have her over for breakfast.Waffles And Buried Treasure Rose Klein Columnist Searching For Ambrosia Emerald's Gem BoxCatching Wild PigsEmerald Greene Publisher Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, December 1, 2013My beautiful new wafe iron, found on a junking spree by my mother.

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Photos submitted by Pat LightcapWith a morning low of 27 degrees and enough moisture in the air the City of Madison saw frost on windshields and rooftops to start Thanksgiving Day a little colder than expected in downtown Madison. Cleaning the windshield with a putty knife helped. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Madison County Carrier 3AWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Man Ordered To Dig Up Wife From Front Yard In Stevenson, Ala., a man lost his battle to keep his wife buried in the front yard of the home the couple shared for years. The remains of Patsy Davis, who died in 2009, was removed after Jim Davis lost his legal battle with the Stevenson City Council, who has been battling with the 74-year-old Davis for over a year. An attorney for the city said in rural Stevenson, drainage or runoff from the grave could have seeped in to nearby wells or into the system of a nearby restaurant. After the court ruling, Davis had his wifes remains cremated at a local funeral home. Wedding Celebration Turns Deadly On Dance Floor In Yemen, a dance at a wedding resulted in injuries and three deaths of attendees. As the Korean pop star Psys Gangnam Style played, a man with an AK-47 joined the dance oor and as the song reached its chorus, began spraying bullets from the assault rie in an attempt to celebrate. A video from a cell phone showed dancers around the man, falling to the ground, injured or dead. Although it is illegal to carry weapons to weddings in Yemen, gunre during celebrations are reported to be quite common. Designer Produces Picture Frames Made From Placenta In Brighton, England, a recent graduate of Brighton University and now designer for a company in London, produces picture frames for newborns made from the mothers placenta. Amanda Cotton adds dried and crushed pieces of the placenta to molds with clear casting resin to create marble-effect frames. Cotton uses the entire placenta, that is preserved for her in a cool box after the birth, by rst boiling and cooking it, then grinding it into small pieces before placing it in the molds. She says, I have had lots of positive feedback from mothers and fathers to be, and I already have clients. Cotton developed the picture frame technique before graduating at the Faculty of Arts. She says, I chose the placenta because during my time at Brighton, I lived with a midwife and it became apparent through her studies that there was little importance placed on the placenta, even though it is the link between the mother and baby throughout the entire pregnancy. It is quite common for people to keep their babys by-products such as the umbilical cord, rst tooth or hair clippings.the placenta is one of the rst creations the mother and baby make together, why not celebrate that with a keepsake. AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Ofce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersTori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn, Shanna SwopeBookkeeping Brooke Kinsley Classified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252patrolling Marion Street and noticed the fence had been bent as if someone had stepped on it to climb over. Footprints were found on the other side of the fence. Land, MPD Sgt. Chris Cooks and MCSO Sgt. Mike Maurice searched the scene but no one was located. Mysterious Sounds Cont. From 1A had been previously used to smoke methamphetamine lying out in plain sight. A small plastic bag that contained methamphetamine was recovered from Barelds pants pocket and a second small plastic bag containing more methamphetamine was recovered from his wallet. Bareld was charged with violation of probation, manufacturing and possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Meth Arrest Cont. From 1Athe Four Freedoms Park, sponsored by the Madison Womans Club, AKA, Garden Club, Johnson & Johnson, Lions Club, the Madison Genealogy Association, Madison Trail Riders, MCAODP, Madison County Community Bank, Rotary Club, Sons of the Confederacy and the Treasures of Madison County. Tentbuilders will present movies on the Courthouse Green. There will be downtown Christmas trees, sponsored by MCCB. Tudor Rose Photography and AccountAbility will sponsor pictures with Santa. Brightwell DJ will present Kid Karaoke. A hayride will be sponsored by Kenny McLeod and Gordon Tractor. Studstill Lumber & Hardware and Madison Sporting Goods will hold a giveaway for a Power Wheels. There will be food booths, an entertainment stage and other great activities for the whole family. For more information, contact Diann Head at (850) 253-5451 or Deena Hames at (850) 973-8277. Light Up Madison Cont. From 1Apark with boxes of angels, trees, snowmen and tree ornaments to set up across the south side of the park facing Base Street. We thought wed better get going while we had transportation, said Coleman. Lura Fines husband, John, had provided the truck for transporting all the goodies, and had also made some new reindeer and a sleigh to add to the decorations. When its time to Light Up Madison at the end of the week (Saturday, Dec. 7 from 5 to 9 p.m.), about half a dozen other civic clubs in Madison will have their park sections all dressed up and ready to glow as well. Downtown businesses will also participate in the festive annual event. Christmas Cont. From 1A Woman Arrested For ShopliftingMadison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports that on Thursday, Nov. 28, at approximately 12:48 p.m., Madison County Sheriffs Ofce deputies were dispatched to the Dollar General Store located in Greenville, in reference to a possible theft. Upon arrival, deputies made contact with the store employee who reported an unidentied female entered the store carrying what appeared to be an empty purse. The unidentied female walked around to several different areas of the store then departed without purchasing any items. The employee further stated that when the unidentied female departed her purse now appeared to be full. A second employee overheard the female tell a second unidentied female that they would return later as they walked out. Deputies informed the store employee that they would remain in the area and to call back as soon as the two females returned. At approximately 1:50 p.m., the two females returned again to the Dollar General Store and deputies were called to return. Deputies waited until the two females exited the store and made contact with them. While questioning Romane Breanna Morris, 20, of Greenville, the female with the purse, it was discovered that the purse did contain items from the store that were stolen. Morris was arrested for retail theft.Romane Morris Frosty Thanksgiving Morning In Madison Businesses Help Collect Toys For ChristmasBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Toys can be dropped off Monday-Friday, from 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at Wallace Automotive, located at 1182 East US 90, in Madison. Toys may also be dropped off during business hours at Beckys Dance Steps Studio, located at 438 East Base Street in Madison. The last day for drop-off will be Tuesday, Dec. 10. Toys will be collected by the US Marines Reserve Ofce in Tallahassee for distribution. All toys must be new and unwrapped.

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Pastor Larry D. Law, 68, of Mayo, passed away Saturday, November 30, 2013 at Haven Hospice of Lake City. Bro. Larry was born January 12, 1945 in Live Oak, to Norman and Grace (Ellis) Law. Brother Larry was a successful restaurant entrepreneur for many years, owning and operating seven Western Sizzlin Steak Houses, a Pizza Inn, and founded his own franchise in Ocala called Sea Corral. When the Lord called him to ministry, he sold it all, and moved his family to Marianna, where he could attend the Florida Baptist Theological College, receiving his bachelors degree in Theology at the age of 40. He was chosen by his class to lead in the preaching at his class graduation, and continued his ministry for the next 28 years. Brother Larry rst pastored at Piney Grove Baptist Church in Cottondale, for two years, he then pastored at Mayo Baptist Church for four years, next he went to First Baptist Waldo for eight years, he then came back to Lafayette County and pastored Airline Baptist Church for eight years. He was then asked by Brother Eddie Blalock to come and serve as Associate Pastor and be the church administrator at the First Baptist Church of Perry, which he did for four years. Brother Larry served in numerous interims for several local churches, fullling his ministry at the First Baptist Church of Madison. During his ministry, he noticed the need for an assisted living home, and set out to achieve this. With the help of some friends, they started Oak Ridge in Mayo, in which Brother Larry was the administrator and operator for the rst ve years. Pastor Larrys ministry was just not limited here in north Florida, but also around the world. He made four visits to the Ukraine where he help create the rst Bible college in that countrys history called the Vinizta Bible Institute. He also made several trips to Israel, and helped situate and start the International House of Prayer in Jerusalem. Brother Law was preceded in death by his parents, Norman and Grace Law; his sisters: Joe Betenbaugh, Melba Carter and Frances Lavonia Law; and a brother, Gerome Law. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Diane Law of Day; two sons: Larry D. Law, Jr. of Day and Phillip Law and his wife, Melissa, of Mayo; a daughter, Connie Lynn Hodges, and her husband, Mike, of Marianna; a brother, James Law, of the Villages; three sisters: Jeanette Hatch of Wellborn, Erin Blasingame of Hiwassee, Ga., and Hilma Rain of Live Oak; six grandchildren; and a host of nieces and nephews also survive him. Memorial services will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, December 7, 2013, at Airline Baptist Church in Mayo with Pastor Rusty Bryan ofciating. A private family burial will take place at Mt. Olive Baptist Church Cemetery in Wellborn. Memorial contributions can be made to Haven Hospice of Lake City at 6037 W US Highway 90, Lake City, Fl 32055. All arrangements are under the care of Joe P. Burns Funeral Home. You may send condolences to the family at www.joepburnsfuneralhomes.com. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 4A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Obituaries December 4 The Tall Pines Club will meet on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at noon in the Mill Conference Room in Clyattville, Ga. Ham, turkey and dressing will be furnished. Please bring a side dish. December 7 Get in the spirit of Christmas with Cherry Lake United Methodist Churchs Legends of Christmas Adventure Day on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9-11 a.m. Children, ages ve and up, will enjoy learning about the Legends of Christmas and make Christmas crafts while glorifying the true meaning of Christmas. Festive refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome. December 8 The First United Methodist Church of Madison will present the cantata I Hear a Prophet Calling on Sunday, December 8, during the 11 a.m. service at the church in Madison. Lynn Corbin is the director. December 8 Ribbon cutting for the new Sumpter James Park, located at the intersection of SW Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive and SW Bunker Street, 3 p.m. December 8 The community is invited to attend the Christmas Cantata at Grace Presbyterian Church on Sunday, December 8, at 6 p.m. This presentation of Christ Was Born for This will be presented by the combined choirs of Grace and Community Presbyterian of Live Oak. Following the presentation, a light supper will be served in the Fellowship Hall. Please join us as we celebrate the birth of our Savior. The church is located at 1200 N. Washington Street (Highway 53 North). December 8 The First Baptist Church of Madison will present their Christmas cantata, Come Messiah King, on Sunday, December 8, at 6 p.m. at the church in Madison. December 11 The 55 Plus Club has a special treat in store for its December meeting: a performance by the Madison Boys Choir, under the direction of Rev. Marcus Hawkins. The club meets at 12 noon on the second Wednesday of every month at the UMCM Center, 135 NW Dill Ave., on the corner of Dill and Colin Kelly Hwy (Highway 145) near Hanson, about ve miles north of town, for a free lunch provided by one of the member churches, and a guest speaker or musical performance. Come on out Wednesday, Dec. 11 at noon, and bring some friends to enjoy food, fellowship and some ne Christmas singing. For more information on the Club, or for directions to the UMCM Center contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929-4938. December 13 SkillsUSA will hold a fundraiser on Friday, Dec. 13, from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on the Courthouse Lawn. Funds will be used to help MCHS SkillsUSA compete in Regional and State Competitions. A grilled chicken plate will be available for $6 in advance or $7 at the lawn. It will include potato salad, green beans, roll and dessert. Sweet tea will be available for $1. For tickets or questions, contact Paige Thomas at (386) 965-6771. December 14 Greenville Country Christmas at Haffye Hays Park in Greenville, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Join in for fun, food, a parade, live entertainment and arts and crafts. December 18 The First Baptist Church of Madison will go caroling at 6 p.m. Prayer meeting for those not caroling at 6:30 p.m. at the church. December 21 Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church, 407 NE Mt. Zion Church Avenue in Cherry Lake, will hold a Hanson, Pinetta and Cherry Lake Community Christmas Outreach Dinner on Saturday, Dec. 21, from 12:303:30 p.m. Meals will be delivered to community residents beginning at 9:30 a.m. Anyone interested in helping with the event is welcome to go serve with them. Anyone needing transported to the church or who is sick or shut-in can call Brother Johnnie Woods at (850) 9294141. For more information, please call Savilla Murphy at (850) 929-4386. December 21 Live Nativity from 5-7 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of Madison. Please join them in the church parking lot as they go back in time to the village of Bethlehem and what the rst Christmas might have looked like.Community Calendar William "Ski LescrynskiWilliam Ski Lescrynski, age 79, passed away, Tuesday, November 26, 2013, in Madison. The funeral service was held Saturday, November 30, 2013, at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison. Burial was at Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends from 5-8 p.m. on Friday, November 29, 2013 at the funeral home. He was born September 10, 1934 to Alexander and Jenny Lescrynski, in Sherman, Conn. He was the youngest of 13 children and raised on a dairy farm. He is rst generation American as his parents emigrated from Poland in the early 1900s. He served in the US Air Force during the Korean War, also served in England and North Africa. After he was discharged from the military at Avon Park, Fl, he moved to Orlando. While in Orlando he worked in construction, often supervising building projects that involved hundreds of employees. He got tired of the rat race and moved to Madison about 30 years ago, where he was owner and operator of Skis Concrete LLC. He was a workaholic and nothing pleased him more than getting the mud on the ground. He was a non-practicing Catholic, but attended Hopewell Baptist church. His favorite saying was I tell it like it is. He is survived by his wife: Estelle Ragans Lescrynski of Madison; one daughter: Marie Lescrynski Boyd and husband Hershell of Ray City, Ga.; sons: Roger Lescrynski and wife Diane of Port Charlotte, Mike Pippin and Cathy of Madison and Nathan Pippin of Texas; one step-son, Jimmy OQuinn (Melissa) of Madison; his special sister-inlaw: Margaret Bailey of Madison; nine grandchildren: Travis, Emily, David, Valarie, Jimmy, Carol, Michael, Christopher and Tina; and three great-grandchildren: Caleb, Anissa, and Amber. His rst wife and mother of his children, Della Lescrynski, and two daughters, June Marie Lescrynski and Janice Lawrence, predeceased him. Beggs Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements (850) 973-2258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website www.beggsfuneral.com. Mary Waldrep OlsenMary Waldrep Olsen, age 96 died Saturday, November 30, 2013 in Madison. Graveside funeral services were held on Monday, December 2, 2013 at 2 p.m. at Harmony Cemetery near Cherry Lake with Rev. Steve McHargue ofciating. Mike McHargue played Amazing Grace on the trumpet. The family received friends Sunday evening from 6-8 p.m. at T. J. Beggs, Jr. & Sons Funeral Home in Madison. She was born in Lovett and was a lifelong resident of Madison County. In her early years, she was a schoolteacher. She taught in Sirmans and also a short time in Pensacola. She also was a sales clerk for Kramers Department Store in Madison. She was a previous member of Harmony Baptist Church before becoming a member of Cherry Lake Baptist Church. Her daughter, Betty Jean McHargue, preceded her in death. Survivors include two step-sons: Richard L. Olsen, Jr. and Harold Olsen; two grandchildren: Carye Rebecca McHargue of Monticello and Sherri Lynn Cheng (Steven) of Baytown, Texas; six greatgrandchildren: Amy Crider (Dock) of Jennings, Susan Gillean (Oscar) of Chester, Va., Chad Gillean (Amanda) of Greenville, Pamela Moore (Jimmy) of Monticello, Troy Rewis of Destin and Joshua Moore of Greenville; and eight great great-grandchildren: Darren, Kaden, Karter, Gabriel, Samuel, Juliet, Mason, and Presley. T. J. Beggs, Jr. & Sons Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements (850) 973-2258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website www. beggsfuneral.com. Larry D. Law

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.In 2004, a few days shy of the 60thanniversary of DDay and two days before Memorial Day, President George W. Bush dedicated the U.S. National World War II Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Consisting of 56 large granite pillars with bas-relief sculptures, arranged in two semi-circles around an enormous oval plaza and fountain, with a pair of massive triumphal arches at each end, the memorial lies at the end of the reecting pool on the National Mall, halfway between the Washington and Lincoln Memorials. As many as four-anda-half million people visit the WWII Memorial each year. How many of those are WWII veterans, the very ones being honored? At the time of the dedication in 2004, 60 years had passed since the war ended; simple math meant that the youngest veterans would have been, at the very least, in their very, very late 70s, if they were teenagers when the war ended. After 60 years, the WWII veterans were elderly men, some dealing with disabilities, or mostly on xed incomes. Its a big country, and plane tickets are expensive. In North Carolina, retired Air Force captain/physicians assistant Earl Morse and small business owner Jeff Miller realized that many of the WWII veterans in their region would never get a chance to see their new monument without someone to help them. Together, Morse and Miller began looking for volunteers and organizing a network that would send the rst ight of veterans and volunteer escorts to Washington D.C. in May of 2005. This is Honor Flight. Today, the youngest surviving WWII veterans are now in their mid-80s, and Honor Flight has grown rapidly in the intervening decade to an umbrella organization with chapters throughout the country. Recent statistics show that Americas population of WWII veterans is dwindling at the rate of 900 a day. Honor Flights mission is make sure that as many of those veterans as possible get a chance to see their monument in Washington, at no expense to them or their families. Honor Flight volunteers include personally assigned guardians to push wheelchairs and assist those who need help getting around, and a team of volunteer medics for veterans with medical conditions those, for example, who need regularly scheduled medication during the trip or need help with oxygen bottles. Honor Flight Tallahassee was established in 2012 to bring this service to North Florida and South Georgia veterans. Its inaugural ight left Tallahassee for Washington, D.C. with 80 veterans aboard in April 2013. The youngest veteran on that ight was 85; the oldest was 96. Among the veterans on that ight was Madison County resident Willis Moore, Sgt. First Class and Bronze Star recipient, U.S. Army. Moore, former chair of the board for United Methodist Cooperative Ministries, was also a founder of the 55 Plus Club, along with co-chair Margaret Throgmorton, in September of 2003. Moores wife spoke briey about that very special ight during the recent Veterans Day ceremony at Madison County Community Bank, and again two days later at the Veterans Day-themed November meeting of the 55 Plus Club. It was a wonderful trip, she said. The veterans were well taken care of and treated like celebrities both in Washington, D.C. and again when they returned home to Tallahassee. As they were brought off the plane one by one, a band at the airport played patriotic music, and each man was given a gift bag that included an Honor Flight medallion. The medic who had escorted Moore throughout the trip even loaned Moore his camera, since Moore had forgotten to bring his own. Mrs. Moore wanted to spread the word about the program for other veterans and their families in the Madison County area who might not be aware of it. Honor Flight Tallahassee is preparing another charter ight for April of 2014 and they are accepting applications for it. For questions or more information about the Honor Flight program, call 1-888-881-1566, or visit the website http://honorighttallahassee.org/faq/. To ll out an application for an Honor Flight, go to http://honorighttallahassee.org/applications/ and ll out the form. For questions about other veterans services available in Madison Contact Veterans Services Ofce Oliver Bradley at (850) 464-1191, or visit him in the Veterans Services Ofce on the rst oor of the Courthouse Annex, just past Tax Collector Lisa Tutens ofce. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Madison County Carrier 5AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.There will be a memorial blood drive in memory of Misti Mae (Mimi) Wyno at Clyattville, Ga., United Methodist Church on Saturday, Dec. 7. The blood drive will take place in the churchs fellowship hall from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. For those who may not know, Misti Mae lost her life from loss of blood and injuries she sustained from a dog attack on December 2011. Misti Mae had been in an accident in September of that year and left unable to walk. She had just begun recovery with the use of a walker and on Dec. 8, walked to a neighbors house to visit. On her way home, she was in the driveway of another neighbors house when she was attacked by a neighborhood dog and was not found until the neighbor returned home later that day. Misti Mae was taken to South Georgia Medical Center, where she succumbed to her injuries and blood loss. In memory of Misti Mae, her parents, Irvin and Sandy Casey of Valdosta, Ga., and her in-laws, Frank and Emogene Wyno from Cherry Lake, ask you to join them to celebrate the life and to honor the memory of Misti Mae, by donating blood to the Red Cross. At the church, there will also be a gift drive for The Haven, a battered womens shelter, where you can donate unwrapped gifts for women and toys for children that will be taken to the shelter for Christmas. Clyattville United Methodist Church is located at 5311 Railroad Street in Valdosta, Ga.Misti Mae Wyno Memorial Blood Drive Set For Saturday This Is Honor FlightGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 13, 2013At the November 55 Plus Club Meeting Mrs. Moore talks about her husband Williss Honor Flight trip to the WWII Monument in Washington D.C.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Christmas music has a special place in the hearts of many people. A favorite Christmas carol we grew up singing with friends and family or a yuletide hymn that brings back memories of church services or choir specials, or a Christmas song we like ...just because. Choir specials and Christmas music abound during the season, and the 55 Plus Club has a special treat in store for its December meeting: a performance by the Madison Boys Choir, under the direction of Daniel Graham. The 55 Plus Club is an outreach of United Methodist Cooperative Ministries, and is free and open to anyone 55 years of age or older. The club meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every month at the UMCM Center, 135 NW Dill Ave., on the corner of Dill and Colin Kelly Hwy (Highway 145) near Hanson, about five miles north of town, for a free lunch provided by one of the member churches, and a guest speaker or musical performance. There are no fees, dues, registrations or even reservations required. Just come on out Wednesday, Dec. 11 at noon, bring some friends along with you, and be prepared to enjoy food, fellowship and some fine Christmas singing. For more information on the Club, or for directions to the UMCM Center contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929 4938.The Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourisms 2013 Annual Banquet brought area businesses together on Nov. 4 for a faceto-face meeting with the Tallahassee agency and business leader who regulates them. Secretary Ken Lawson of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation served as keynote speaker. The Banquet was made possible by the generous support of Duke Energy and many local and regional businesses that provided items for the Chambers annual Silent Auction. Lawson recounted his college days at Florida State University in Tallahassee: while he was pledging for a fraternity, he was told to move in with fellow student, Charlie Jackson of Madison County. Lawson brought everything he owned to their room and Jackson was crowded and unhappy with the extra stuff. Lawson compared his own youthful exuberance with too many regulations for business owners to wade through in the past. He said that the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation has eliminated more than 2,800 unnecessary regulations since January 2011, cutting a massive amount of red tape. When Lawson was asked what he learned about Madison County, he said, Business owners and the professionals I met at the Madison County Chamber of Commerce event are passionate and enthusiastic about their community. It appeared that everyone shared the same interest in wanting to make Madison a successful place to live and grow their business, said Lawson. For business owners that were not in attendance at the Madison County Chamber Banquet, Lawsons focused on awareness: Its important to be in the know of whats happening around you in your local community, as well as statewide, he said. As the head of a regulatory agency, I see rsthand how the lack of knowledge and falling behind on current events can directly impact your business if you dont look ahead to make daring and innovative decisions, he warned. Lawson said he sees both business owners and professionals as the job creators and that they should realize that over the past ve years, Florida has warmed up to a business climate that encourages risk-taking and investment in growth and the future. Since Governor Scott took ofce, thats an example of the groundwork happening at the state level that provides opportunities to businesses throughout Florida, whether located in a rural community or metropolitan (area), commented Lawson. Looking to the future of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Lawson said, When Governor Rick Scott appointed me to head the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, he encouraged me to focus on results. I am always thinking about what we can do to help Floridians get back to work and be more successful in their businesses and jobs. That message is relayed to division directors who are empowered to make decisions that allow for change. For example, Lawson told how he worked with the Division of Hotels and Restaurants to create a Customer Bill of Rights card, and each food service licensee receives one of those cards upon inspection so they know whom to call to express any concerns they may have with a recent inspection. Interestingly enough, he said many of the calls they receive are to compliment the food safety and sanitation inspector. Were focused on results and the goal is to ensure the success of businesses in Florida while holding them accountable for following the law, said Lawson. Changes to the Department can be expected. The future of government and DBPR in particular is in the hands of technology, said Lawson. As technology becomes more affordable and innovative ideas are presented, DBPR can improve processes such as speeding up the process to approve, print and mail a new business or professional license. Most recently, Lawson said through a new online procedure that licensees seeking to do business in other states can obtain a certication from DBPR online instantly. In many cases, technology enables DBPR to cut or eliminate fees. Looking ahead, he predicts that a combination of smart policies and innovative technology will be a game changer for government in Florida. Advice from Lawson for businesses that have seen a decline in customers in rural areas is to the point: Keep an open dialogue. Talk with your employees, your customers, your neighbors and your community leaders. This insight will give you an opportunity to strategically think about the direction of your business and its future. Where is the community headed? What services are going to be needed? Lawson believes that by continuously talking with everyone around you, you will be able to assess the current status of your business and community and begin thinking ahead of what investments you should consider and implementing new ideas. A native Floridian, Lawson has spent more than 12 years serving in numerous regulatory positions. Lawson began his legal career in the United States Marine Corps, Judge Advocate Generals Division and spent seven years serving as an Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Florida. Lawson is a graduate of Florida State University and the Florida State University College of Law. The Chambers Silent Auction provided a fun perk for the annual Banquet. This year the Silent Auction included vacation packages from Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Sarasota and other venues with a blast from the past: upcoming Sarasota Medieval Fair and Hoggetowne Medieval Faire in Gainesville tickets were made available for bidding. Some of the highlights of the Silent Auction included donations from local businesses, such as Duke Energys Columbia Camo Jacket and two Costa Hats, as well as a $139 Moultrie Game Spy Digital Camera from Madison Sporting Goods; NFCC Artist Series tickets each to four shows; NFCC Colin P. Kelly Fitness Center workout certicates; and Yogi Bear Jellystone Park three-day, two night campground certicates. Also participating: Hickory Hill Auctions with a Prairie Springs art print; Antiques & Gifts Stores elegant FSU necklace and matching football bracelet; a Classic Facial from Daylight Salon & Spa; The Old Bookstore with a canoeing book; a Christmas wreath from Madison Garden Club and a natural oral arrangement by Dolly Ballard; a Curves Fitness Assessment and free classes; gift baskets from Everything Pecan of Lee and Spankys BBQ/Catering in Madison; meal certicates from ONeals and Divine Events Restaurants; quarts of Sheffer Honey from Pinetta and more. The Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce is currently celebrating the City of Madisons 175thAnniversary and can be contacted at (850) 9732788 or email chamber@madison.org. The Chamber is located at 248 SW Range Ave. in Madison. The Chamber Web site is www.madison.org to print out area maps and see business member listings. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 6A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Madison County Chamber Banquet Brings Area Businesses Together Photo submittedNov. 4 found area business owners and employees gathered together for the annual Madison County Chamber Banquet. Pictured left to right: Roy Ellis, Board Chairman of the Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce, Inc.; Secretary Ken Lawson of the Dept. of Business and Professional Regulation; and Cindy Vees, Executive Director of the Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce. Madison Boys Choir To Perform At 55 Plus Club wens Propane, IncService With A Smile Serving North FloridaMADISON, JEFFERSON, SUWANNEE& HAMILTONCOUNTIES SIMPLY EVERYDAY FAIR PRICING W e A r e H e r e T o E a r n Y o u r B u s i n e s s & K e e p Y o u r B u s i n e s s FREE TANK SETS HEATER SERVICE NEW HEATERS TANKLESS WATER HEATERS GAS LOGS PRICE COMPARISONS Madison Office137 SW Shelby Avenue Madison, Florida 32340(850) 253-3761 $3.19 PER GALLON NO DELIVERY FEES NO SEASONAL PRICES NO GIMMICKS (Ask For Becky)

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Show off your holiday spirit and creativity this year by taking part in the 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas Gingerbread House Contest sponsored by Base Street Florist and Coffee Corner in Madison. The rst place winner in each of three categories Youth (ages 12 and under), Teen (ages 13 to 19) and Adult/Family Team will receive a $25 gift certicate. For rules and information, visit mygreenville.com or contact Bali Thigpen at (850) 973-2525.By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.In her introduction of the November guest speaker for the Madison Garden Club, Mina Bloodworth mentioned that one of the drawbacks for both beginning and seasoned gardeners alike in this region, is that there are so few gardening books geared specically toward this area of Florida: its soils, its weather patterns and the variety of other conditions that affect plants here. Thats not to say that they dont exist, just that it takes some looking. Lake City author and gardening expert Martha Ann Ronsonet has written such a book, specically suited for the conditions here in North Florida. An enthusiastic gardener for many years, she has amassed a wealth of knowledge about native plants and gardening techniques that work best in this regions mild winters with the occasional frosts, followed by the almost unbearably hot, humid summers. Her friends had been telling her for years that she ought to write a book about what she knew, and she nally heeded their advice. Gardening in the Deep South and Other Hot Pursuits was a project six years in the making. More than just a compendium of gardening techniques, the book reects Ronsonets philosophy that gardening is more than just creating beautiful landscapes; it is caring for the environment and making choices that dont endanger natural habitats for native plants and animals. The choices that gardeners make as far as plants, fertilizer and pest control usage can affect everything from the native wildlife to the quality of the water they drink. The book, a little over 200 pages long, is lavishly illustrated with hundreds of photographs of plants and wildlife of every kind, discussing subjects from natural pest control, to different kinds of mulch, to scientic vs. common names for native plants, to wildlife, to irrigation, to MonthBy-Month Gardening, a 39-page chapter that describes what grows best in this region for each month of the year. When is the best month for container gardening? When is the best time to transplant? When is the best month to cut back or prune? When is the best month for planting those warm weather vegetables? When is the right time for picking the zucchini and cucumbers? What kind of colorful blooms can gardeners expect to see in April? Its all there, laid out from January to December. Like shade gardening? So does Ronsonet, because, I get to work in the shade, she says dryly. Her book discusses both sun gardening and shade gardening, and Florida gardeners are fortunate when it comes to choices for either, because Florida has more native plants to its name than any other state. Her hometown of Lake City also has an annual festival that celebrates native plants. Every year, I nd something else to bring home, she told the Madison Garden Club. There are hundreds (of native plants) to choose from...(and) native plants are used to our harsh environment. The hot, brutal summers, where the humidity runs neck-and-neck with the temperature, and the winters that can be freezing one day and balmy the next native plants can handle it. They are hardier than their imported cousins, and more resistant to the insects here, so they dont need as much spraying or watering. Of course, that doesnt completely rule out non-natives. Some of them can be okay, too. Just dont pick invasive ones. When discussing her favorite plants, the live oak tree, that icon of Deep South landscapes everywhere, tops her list and graces the cover of her book. Oak trees make me cry, she said. Especially the aged ones. Just imagine if they could talk, the things they could tell us. Then, there is trillium cuneatum, A.K.A. Sweet Betsy. Recommended for North Florida gardens, it goes dormant in the summer and pops up in January. The cornus orida, the owering dogwood, is the sweetest little tree, she says, with its abundant white owers in the spring. The chionanthus virginicus, the fringe tree, when in bloom, is a sight to behold. It is an excellent understory tree, and blooms best when it gets morning sunlight. The cercis canadensis is another familiar sight in Southern landscapes, where it is popularly known as the redbud tree, gracing yards with reddishor pinkish-purple clouds of tiny blooms in the spring. The callicarpa americana, or American beautyberry, is another familiar sight, a popular ornamental shrub with its clusters of bright purple berries. Deer love the foliage, said Ronsonet. But then, deer love everything in my yard! The magnolia macrophylla, or big-leaf (ashe) magnolia is an impressive sight, boasting the biggest single leaf (up to two feet) and the largest single ower (up to a foot across) of any native species in the entire North American continent. When it comes to groundcovers, phlox divaricata, or wild sweet william, is a native woodland phlox that does well here and doesnt get the mildew infestations that other phloxes do. It forms a dense mat of foliage, and its blossoms are known for attracting hummingbirds and butteries. Zerhyranthes atamasco, or rain lilies, grow in boggy soil and spread by bulb offsets. Their white owers appear in March or April. The native azaleas, in the rhododendron family, are another familiar Southern garden staple, as is Solomons seal, which will grow with no care whatsoever, and the saw palmetto, a Florida landscape icon if there ever was one. People think Im a good gardener, but I just have really good soil, said Ronsonet, describing the way her mother used to leave oak leaves on the ground to form natural mulch that eventually decomposed into new soil. Thats the way nature does it. Who am I to say different? Gardening is also about teaching gardeners what not to do, things that could damage Floridas rivers and springs. It is something she is passionate about, which is why she emphasizes native gardening. In the future, she said, water, not oil, is what will control the world. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Madison County Carrier 7 AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY North Florida Gardening With Native PlantsGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 7, 2013Author and gardening expert Martha Ann Ronsonet of Lake City, seen here with her book Gardening in the Deep South and Other Hot Topics, was the guest speaker at the Madison Garden Clubs November meeting, discussing native plants and gardening techniques that not only produce beautiful landscapes, but also protect Floridas rivers and springs. For more information, or to order a copy of her book, please contact Fine Images and Printing in Gainesville at the website http://www.neimages.me or email FineImagesPrinting@gmail.com. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 13, 2013The Treasures Of Madison County Museum, located in the historical W.T. Davis Building on Range Street in downtown Madison, is looking to expand its collection of old military photographs or other military memorabilia from local residents and their families. If you have any old photographs of family members who were in the armed forces, particularly of the WWII era, bring them to the Treasures Museum. They can be scanned in and immediately returned to you. If you have any old military items from your family that you would like to donate or loan to the museum, please contact Oliver Bradley at (850) 464-1191, or Teenie Cave (see William Cave in the local phone directory), or bring those by the museum as well. The Treasures of Madison County Museum wants to preserve as much of this local history as possible for future generations.Treasures Museum Seeking Old Military Photos 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas Gingerbread House Contest

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 8A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Crystal Bochnia, broker/owner for new real estate business, Madison Realty Group, ofcially opened her doors Nov. 14 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Bochnia took over the real estate business from Roy and Suzanne Milliron, who occupied the ofce for 35 years as Milliron Realty. Bochnia has three realtors working in the ofce alongside her: Ann Sapp, Beth Meggs and Ronnie Ragans. The ribbon-cutting ceremony brought out friends, colleagues and towns people, showing support for Bochnia and her venture. Roy Ellis, representing the Chamber of Commerce welcomed her to the business community with a small speech prior to the ceremonial snip. When asked how she felt about the opening, Bochnia replied, Ready. Madison Realty Group, LLC, is located at 112 SW Range Avenue. You can contact them at (850) 973-4458 or you can visit their website at madisonrealtygroupllc.com.Madison Realty Group Opens For BusinessGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 14, 2013Roy Ellis (far left) represented the Chamber of Commerce in welcoming the new real estate business to the neighborhood. Crystal Bochnia cuts the grand opening ribbon (center) as realtors from left to right, Ann Sapp, Beth Meggs and on the far right, Ronnie Ragans, watch.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 14, 2013Supporters for Crystal Bochnia and her new business wait on the ceremony to begin. From left to right are, Roy Ellis, Darlene Hagan, Bob and GiGi Auston and Danny and Marianne Graves.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 14, 2013Ed Meggs stands between Ann Campbell (left) and Marilyn Ragans (right) after the ceremony.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 14, 2013The Millirons, who are ofcially retired from the real estate business, pass it on to Broker, Crystal Bochnia and the realtors working alongside her. Standing from left to right are Ann Sapp, Suzanne and Roy Milliron, Broker, Crystal Bochnia, Beth Meggs and Ronnie Ragans.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Angela Miller, Assistant Regional Counsel for the Ofce of Criminal Conict & Civil Regional Counsel, (1st DCA), has practiced law from both the defense and the prosecution sides of the table, and has worked in several different areas of law, including real estate law and family law to name a few, but her rst love is trial work. Recently, she visited the Madison Kiwanis Club as their guest speaker to share some of her experiences and talk about the state of her profession and what it holds for the future. A Georgia native, she grew up in Georgia and went to law school in Georgia, but after practicing law both there and in Florida, she compared the Georgia experience to stepping back in time to the 1960s, where one judge there refused to address her in his courtroom, because he believed that she was in an area of law that was unsuitable for a woman. She left there to take her position with the Ofce of Criminal Conict, which handles cases where the defendants are entitled to a public defender, but their cases represent a conict of interest for the Public Defenders Ofce. I represent parents whose children have been removed by DCF, she said. Some people ask me how can I do that, and I tell them because they (the parents) are constitutionally entitled to counsel. I make sure that the law is followed, and I develop a case plan. She outlines the program the parents have to get with if they want their children back, but doesnt babysit them. If they are serious about having their children returned, she believes they will be responsible enough to keep their court appointments without phone calls to remind them. As for their behavior, they already know what they have to stop doing, whether its stop using drugs or anything else that caused the state to step in. When it comes to domestic violence, the biggest part of the problem is with the dependant children in those situations, children who either witness the victimization and violence and grow up to continue the cycle, or who are in danger of becoming victims themselves. There are no racial or gender boundaries for domestic violence. She had dealt with whites, blacks and Hispanics, with married couples, cohabitating couples and homosexual couples, with situation where the woman is the victim, and where the man is the victim. Men can be victims too, although it is not nearly as common as women (who comprise about 85 percent of victims) and their cases are much less likely to be reported because of the social stigma attached to male victims. They can be rich and successful couples, or dirt poor; one such couple was a judge and his wife in Georgia, the same judge who refused to speak to Miller in his courtroom because she was a woman. She has seen women battered and beaten by their boyfriends, and their children battered and beaten, yet the women still choose their boyfriends over their children. She has seen an old high school friend of hers go back to her military husband who was beating and abusing her. When the womans mother called and requested help from Miller, she went to see her friend, talk to her, and assess the situation. I felt that he was dangerously close to abusing their daughter as well, if he hadnt already, she said. She told her friend that and also predicted exactly what would happen: he would call and tell her that he had changed, but that would turn out to be a lie and things would go back to the way they were. Her friend said she wouldnt go back, yet when her husband called and promised that he had changed, she went back, in spite of Millers warnings. Later, he was brought up on charges of molesting their daughter. She knew of a woman whose husband controlled her by moving her out into the middle of a rural nowhere in the Midwest, and cut her off from all contact with her family and friends. The woman managed to earn a Masters degree in spite of her connement, but she remained with her husband. I dont know how to get someone past that, Miller sighed. Here in the Deep South where she grew up, she also deals with a culture that frowns upon interfering in a neighbors business, but sometimes you have to, she said, unless they are in the middle of a full-blown episode in that case, call the law. That is an extremely dangerous situation where even experienced law enforcement ofcers get injured. All you can do it try to help. She also deals with cultural forces that use religion to justify control and abuse of women. One thing she hears frequently is, the Bible says.... No, is her reply. The Bible says love and respect your wife, not control her. Control, whether economic (for example, denying access to a checkbook), emotional, or physical, is a different matter altogether, and one that is not justied by Scripture. Another area of law that she feels is important is elder law. Our society is aging. Please, for your childrens sake, have your nancials in order to make it easier for them to take care of you. Elder law is complex and difcult even for a trained attorney like herself to understand; she did not realized how complex, until a situation with a family member brought her into an area of law she was not familiar with and she realized quickly that she did not understand all the convoluted rules and regulations. Even after taking several courses to help her deal with the situation, she does not consider herself an expert. Get an elder-law certied attorney to help you. And get whatever you need in place to help those who will take care of you. Someone you trust. If it comes to giving someone power of attorney, trust is paramount. Power of attorney is a very powerful tool that, in the wrong hands, can be disastrous. Family members granted power of attorney have been known to abscond with all the elderly persons assets, and there is absolutely nothing the law can do about it. Power of attorney is not a bad thing, but it should be used wisely. The person granting it should be aware of just how powerful it is, and think long and hard about the person it will be given to; someone who is absolutely trustworthy, who has your best interests at heart. When it comes to the state of her profession, she shakes her head. I hate to sound like my parents, but its going to hell in a hand basket. She has watched the new crop of young attorneys in trial court who dont have a clue how to make an objection. They couldnt make a persuasive argument if their lives depended on it. They may have passed the bar, and they may be bright enough about legal codes, but they dont know anything about courtroom procedure. They cant think on their feet when something unexpected comes up as will always happen, no matter how well an attorney is prepared for a case. They need mentoring before they go into private practice. Perhaps in the future, the bar will have to establish something similar to the residency requirement that follows medical school, where young med school graduates are mentored under experienced physicians for several years. I didnt know everything when I rst came out of law school, she said, adding that she was fortunate to have a brilliant legal secretary to help her. And I still dont. I dont know anybody who does. She has spent her entire life learning, a process that should never stop, not for anybody. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Madison County Carrier 9AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Attorney Angela Miller Addresses KiwanisGreen Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, November 21, 2013Angela Miller (left), Assistant Regional Counsel for the Ofce of Criminal Conict, receives a Certicate of Appreciation from Madison Kiwanis Club president Diane Head (right) Miller visited the club to share her experiences as an attorney in various areas of law as well as her insights on the legal profession today as a whole. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 7, 2013With a creative streak, one can turn mundane household objects including recyclables into art objects and decorative useful pieces for the holiday season. Dolly Ballard brought in some of her creations to show the members of the Madison Garden Club how old Pringles cans, tin cans, plastic bottles and even old dishes can be repurposed with fabric, paint, trim, spangles and glue into something decorative and cheerful. Here, she used a bit of plaid fabric in holiday colors to dress up an ordinary owerpot.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, November 7, 2013A side table holds Miss Dollys demonstration projects. The large item in the foreground is a oneof-a-kind, three-tiered bird feeder, fashioned from an old vase lled with decorative glass marbles, a water goblet and three dinner plates, all cemented together. The bird feeder was later auctioned off to one of the garden club members. Spray paint, fabric and spangles turn other old cans into pencil holders and containers for kitchen items, candles and candy canes. Hats off to Miss Dolly for her creativeness and ability to see ordinary things in a totally different light. Miss Dolly's Recyclables Brighten Holidays

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 10A Madison County CarrierSPORTS By Fran HuntGreene Publishing, Inc. The Aucilla Christian Academy varsity Lady Warriors won one of the past four games to now stand 2-6 on the season. Aucilla hit the basketball court against FAMU on November 21, and the Lady Warriors were thrashed for a 93-9 loss. FAMU will probably take state again this year, said Coach Daryl Adams. Marisa Duber netted for three points, with two rebounds, and two blocked shots. Ashley Hebert scored two points, and had one steal. Kayla Knecht had two points, two rebounds, and two steals. Lauren Demott netted for two points, with four rebounds, and one assist. Kinzi Mattingly had one assist. On November 22, the Lady Warriors squared off against Franklin County, and Aucilla was bounced for a 51-28 loss. Duber had two points and two rebounds. Ramsey Sullivan scored two points. Mattingly bucketed for seven points and grabbed seven rebounds. Demott had one point, with two rebounds and four steals. Knecht targeted for 16 points, snagged eight rebounds and had a whopping 10 steals, nearly getting a tripledouble. Morgan Cline had three rebounds. Whitney Stevens had three assists. The Lady Warriors hit the hardwood against Georgia Christian on November 25, and Aucilla was tossed for a 50-20 loss. Duber scored one point. Sullivan netted for six points. Mattingly bucketed for seven points. Demott had one point. Stevens scored three points. Knecht had two points. The Lady Warriors hit the warpath against North Florida Christian on November 26 and the Lady Warriors scalped their opponent for a 57-27 victory. We played great, said Coach Adams. It was a good positive for us. Duber bucketed for 10 points, snagged nine rebounds, with two assists and two steals. Cline scored two points and had six rebounds. Sullivan scored six points and had ve rebounds. Demott had six points and seven rebounds. Stevens targeted for 16 points and had two rebounds, two assists and four steals. Knecht bucketed for 10 points, with eight rebounds, ve assists and six steals. Cali Burkett scored three points. Payal Chaudari had two points. Mattingly netted for two points and had two steals. Kelly Horne had three assists. The Lady Warriors hit the hardwood against Brookwood on December 3 and those statistics will be forthcoming. Action continues against Robert F. Munroe, December 5 at 6 p.m., home; Tallavana Christian, December 6 at 6 p.m., home; Lafayette, December 9 at 6 p.m., home; FAMU, December 10 at 6 p.m., away; Tallavana Christian, December 12 at 6 p.m., there; Madison County, December 16 at 6 p.m., home; and Lafayette, December 20 at 5:30 p.m., away.Lady Warriors Win One Of Past Four Cowgirls Clawed By Lady CougarsBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. The Madison County High School Cowgirls traveled to Tallahassee on Tuesday, Nov. 26, to play the Godby High Lady Cougars. At the end of the first quarter, the Cowgirls trailed 20-11. The Lady Cougars extended their lead to 39-23 at halftime. The Cowgirls never could get into the game and trailed 62-35 at the end of three periods. Godby won the game 83-53. Jameica Cobb scored 26 points for the Cowgirls. Josie Long has 16 points. Kevisa Moore scored one point. TraVecia Fead scored five points. Darresha White had three points. Niyah Hall scored two points. The loss was a district game for the Cowgirls. Cowgirls Lose In Overtime Basketball ActionBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Sporting a 2-0 record after impressive victories over Branford (65-45) and Aucilla (53-18), the Madison County High School Cowgirls traveled to Havana to engage in varsity basketball action against the East Gadsden Lady Jaguars. East Gadsden looked like they were going to control the entire game, leading 23-10 at the end of the rst period. The second quarter went East Gadsdens way also and they went into the locker room at halftime, leading 37-22. Down by 15 points, the Cowgirls, led by Jameca Cobb, turned on the afterburners and fought back. At the end of the third quarter, the Lady Jaguars lead had been nipped to 4439. When regulation ended, the game stood at 61-61 and headed into overtime, where the Lady Jaguars outscored the Cowgirls 13-5. Jameca Cobb scored 32 points in the game. Kevisa Moore had six points. Nacoya Williams scored two points. K. Henderson scored nine points. Adrianna Kinsey scored two points. Josie Long scored 13 points. L a d y S e m i n o l e s D o w n C o w g i r l s I n B a s k e t b a l l A c t i o n By Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. The Madison County High School Cowgirls hosted the Florida High Lady Seminoles on Thursday, Nov. 21. The play was close throughout the game. After the end of the rst period, the Cowgirls and Lady Seminoles were tied at 10 each. In the second quarter, the Cowgirls pulled ahead to a 23-18 lead. The Lady Seminoles outscored the Cowgirls 19-11 in the third quarter and at the end of that period led 37-34. Florida High pulled out a 53-44 victory in the fourth quarter. Jameca Cobb was the leading scorer for the Cowgirls with 33 points. Josie Long scored seven points. Kosha Gamble scored two points.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Madison County Carrier 11ASPORTS MCCS Broncos Off To A Fast StartSubmitted By Matt Replogle, MCCS Broncos coachThe Madison County Central Schools Broncos boys basketball team has raced off to a fast start. The team is 5-0, in part to great team defense and in part to strong rebounding. The Broncos opened the season at home on Tuesday, Nov. 12 against Wakulla. The nal score was 40-23. Travis Jay led the team with 12 points; Ken Hawkins scored 10 points; Vincenta Mitchell, six points; Devin Brinson, ve points; Zion Jones scored three points; Darryln Brooks and Darius Johnson, added two points each. Next the Broncos traveled to Quitman to play Brooks County. The team started off hot and nished strong, winning 57-21. Mitchell led the team with 20 points; Jay added 10; Hawkins, seven; Miller, six; Brooks, four and Teryon Henderson, Brinson, Tyrique Burton, Jones and Dylan Cole each added two points. The Broncos then traveled to Perry to take on Taylor County in a conference game. The Broncos came out on top of the heated contest, 40-33. Darryln Brooks led the way with 17 points with Mitchell adding nine; Jay, eight and Henderson, Hawkins and Miller each adding two. Lake City Richardson came to Madison for a game on Nov. 21. The Broncos came out on top of a young Richardson team with a score of 46-15. Travis Jay led the way with 19 points; Mitchell and Hawkins, nine each; Miller, ve and Cole and D Johnson added two each. The Broncos were at home for the nal game before Thanksgiving break in a rematch against Brooks county. The game was a battle but the Broncos held off the Trojans, 50-27. Travis Jay again led all scorers with 27 points; Mitchell, eight; Miller, six; Brooks, ve and Hawkins and Henderson each scored four points to wrap up the scoring. The Broncos want to invite everyone to come out and support the team next week as they play a tough conference game at home. You can support the team on Thursday, Dec. 5, against Hamilton in the MCCS gym. The girls start at 5 p.m. and the boys at 6 p.m.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 25, 2013The MCCS Broncos boys basketball team is off to a good start this season. Standing in the front row, from left to right are: Mike Gibson, Zion Jones, Devin Brinson, Teryon Henderson, Dylan Cole, Travis Jay and Tyrique Burton. In the back row, standing left to right are: Coach Matt Replogle, Kedrique Knowles (manager), Keyshawn Johnson, Vincenta Mitchell, Ken Hawkins, Darryln Brooks, James Miller and Coach A.D. Kinsey. Not pictured are Chalon Howard, Darius Johnson and Howard Robinson (manager). HEY! WERE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]Its never been easier to share your local news with friends and family!

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 12A Madison County Carrier SCHOOLBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. SkillsUSA, a club at Madison County High School, which focuses on technical programs, is holding a fundraiser. The club is selling Christmas ornaments which cost $10 each or $12.50 if they are wrapped in a box. A $5 down payment is required for each personalized ornament. Examples of the ornaments are available on the SkillsUSA Facebook page and Etsy page, as well as at the high school in the room of Paige Thomas, who is the SkillsUSA sponsor. Order forms are also available by emailing Paige Thomas at paige.thomas@madisonmail.us or by speaking to any SkillsUSA club member. SkillsUSA Club At High School Selling Christmas OrnamentsBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.The Greater Community Nurturing Childcare Center provided more than just physical care to their children this Thanksgiving; they also provided a lesson in the spirit of giving, says Daycare Director, Merelda Alexander. The daycare constructed a box to resemble a turkey and they stuffed it with non-perishable food items that they gave to the ARC, a community-based organization that serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The childcare center is a ministry offshoot of Greater Community Baptist Church, where Alexanders husband, Jerry, is the pastor. The daycare was started in 2007 and was originally located across from the Central School in Madison, but now operates at the corner of Range and Dinkins. The center cares for children six weeks through ve years and also has an after school program. This was the second year the daycare has taken part in a community food drive. Last year they participated with Madisons Chamber of Commerce. Alexander feels it is important to instill in the kids a spirit of giving and that sometimes it is better to give than to receive. She says a lot of people go without because they dont share their need, so we need to give just in case.D a y c a r e P r o v i d e s K i d s A L e s s o n I n G i v i n g Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 21, 2013The Greater Community Nurturing Childcare Center teachers and students pose with their giving box that they gave this Thanksgiving to help the recipients of ARC. Sitting in the front row, from left to right, are: Kyshon Cherry, Zeimyon Heirs, Anyrae Miller, Keshanti Reaves, Christian Robinson, Kenardre Williams, Emoni McKnight, Kaden Ruth and DeMarion West. Standing in the second row is: Breasia Johnson, Jordann Bussey, Oniya Isom, Kymani Davis, Malik Davis, Brian Hill, Jayden McDonald, Jonviere Washington, Jaylin Norwood, Essence Mitchell and Jemaine Randolph. Standing in the third row is: Diamond Bruton, Jameirium Bussey, Dakota Washington, Jeremy Webb, Sean Woodard, Nyliyah Oliver, Jameiya Bussey and Calvin Bruton. Standing in the back row, from left to right are: Merelda Alexander, Director, holding Jaiden Shannon; Susan Neely, preschool teacher, holding Anthony Robinson; Myra Wilson, Infant Room, holding Cortez Weatherspoon; Krystal Green, Toddler Room, holding Moses Morris and Jabaris Thointon, parent, holding his son, Jabaris Thointon Jr. Make 2013 the year you change your life CLASSES IN MADISON STARTJANUARY 6Bachelors Degree Programs Business Administration with specialization in Management Computer Information Systems Criminal Justice Elementary Education Health Care Management Human Services Psychology Full-time students may be eligible for the Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Approved for VA Benets/GI Bill Classes now forming in Madison(850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu What you need for where youre going Now offering The Doctorate of Business Administration (Online and On Campus) ou need for wher What y e y ou need for wher e going r ou ee egr re s D achelor B dministration A usiness B Classes ograms r r ee P dministration Classes dministration A usiness B with specialization in anagement M nformation Computer I ystems S ustice riminal J C ducation lementary E E anagement e M ealth Car H dministrationanuarJ in M with specialization in nformation ducation anagement N The D ing ttarS y 6anuar adisonin M fer w of o N octorate of The D ervices uman S H chology sy P ull-time students may F be eligible for the esident ida R lor F G) rant (FRA G ervices ull-time students may be eligible for the ccess A esident The D usiness B nline and O (O octorate of The D dministration A usiness ampus) n C nline and O V ed for v o ppr ro A ill enets/GI B B w for Classes no adison in Mwww A VA ming w for (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp www (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Madison County Carrier 13A HEALTHAtherosclerosis, also known as "hardening of the arteries," is a condition in which cholesterol-rich plaque builds up along arterial walls. It is a type of Arteriosclerosis and sometimes the names are used interchangeably. R esearch suggests that this process probably begins as a result of an injury to the endothelial (inside) lining of an artery wall. The injury may be the result of high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, chronic system-wide inammation, smoking and numerous other factors. In response to the injury, white blood cells, along with lipids (fats), begin to accumulate along the inner layer of the artery. The muscle layer of the artery may also grow, forming the basis of a plaque, which many grow large enough to block the artery. If the plaque is disturbed, blood platelets (cells that play a key role in blood clotting) may begin to accumulate at the site and form a clot, which can continue to grow until it completely blocks an artery and cuts off the oxygen supply to a vital organ. Alternatively, a clot can break free from the vessel wall and become lodged somewhere else further downstream. If the clot completely blocks the blood and oxygen supply to a major artery leading to the heart, the result is a heart attack. If an artery to the brain is blocked (as seen, for example, with carotid artery disease), the result is a stroke. Atherosclerosis that affects the arteries in the arms, legs or pelvis is called peripheral artery disease. Atherosclerosis doesn't cause any symptoms until blood ow through the affected artery slows or becomes blocked. However, when arteries to the heart are affected, symptoms can include chest pain (angina) following a drop in the blood supply to the heart muscle, an increased demand for oxygen by the heart, a combination of both and, sometimes, emotional stress. Angina may feel like pressure or squeezing in the chest, or as pain in the shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back. It may even feel like indigestion. To complicate matters further, symptoms are often very different in women than in men. Angina typically worsens with activity and subsides with rest. Other symptoms often present with coronary artery disease include shortness of breath and arrhythmias (abnormal changes in the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat slower or faster than usual, or irregular). A narrowing or blockage of an artery leading to the brain can result in a stroke. Symptoms include sudden weakness; paralysis or numbness of the face, arms, or legs, especially on one side of the body; confusion; problems speaking or understanding speech; trouble seeing in one or both eyes; breathing problems; dizziness; trouble walking; loss of balance or coordination and unexplained falls; loss of consciousness; sudden, severe headache. The symptoms of peripheral artery disease include numbness, tingling, pain, and, sometimes, the development of dangerous infections. The risk of atherosclerosis increases progressively with age. Recent studies have indicated that you are more likely to develop atherosclerosis if one or both of your parents have had heart disease before age 60. Other risk factors include high cholesterol, smoking, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, diabetes, high triglycerides, being overweight or obese, a sedentary lifestyle and the use of birth control pills or estrogen replacement therapy. Sleep apnea, stress and excessive consumption of alcohol can also raise the risk of atherosclerosis. In addition, high blood levels of a protein called C-reactive protein indicate inammation in the body, stemming from injury or infection. Inammation is now viewed as a major risk factor for heart attack, atherosclerosis and other serious diseases. It isn't yet known whether reducing CRP levels will lower the risk of atherosclerosis. When a health care provider listens to your neck with a stethoscope, he or she may hear a whooshing or blowing sound (the medical term is "bruit") that may be present if atherosclerosis has developed in the carotid arteries. High cholesterol levels that show up on blood tests suggest an increased risk for atherosclerosis. The following tests can also help diagnose atherosclerosis: Electrocardiogram (EKG): A test to record the heart's electrical activity. It shows how fast the heart is beating, its rhythm, and can reveal signs of heart damage caused by coronary artery disease and signs of a past or present heart attack. Echocardiogram: This test uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. It also yields information about the size and shape of the heart and how well the heart's chambers and valves are working. Echocardiography can also reveal areas of poor blood ow to the heart, areas of the heart that aren't contracting normally and previous injury to the heart muscle caused by poor blood ow. Computed Tomography (CT Scan): With this test you get computer-generated pictures of the heart, brain or other areas of the body. In the case of the heart, it can show narrowing of large arteries and reveal calcium build-ups in coronary artery walls. Stress Test: This is a test to show how long you can continue to walk on a treadmill as the speed increases and how fast your heart rate returns to normal after 30 minutes or less of exercise. A stress test can also reveal abnormal changes in heart rate or blood pressure, shortness of breath or chest pains and abnormal changes in your heart's rhythm or electrical activity. Angiography: With this test, a thin, exible tube (catheter) is put in a blood vessel of the arm, groin or neck and dye that can be seen on an xray is injected through the catheter to the arteries. Then x-rays are taken which show whether plaque or a clot is blocking any arteries, how severe the blockage is and the blood ow through the arteries. Ankle/Brachial Index: This test for peripheral artery disease compares blood pressure in the ankle with blood pressure in the arm to reect how well blood is owing. D i d Y o u K n o w . Frank NathanFormer Executive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness Tips Take The Time To Protect YourselfWashing our hands is a lesson we all learned as children, but when were busy or in a hurry, we tend to rush or forget to do it. We think our hands are clean, but theyre not if we havent done it right. Just rinsing your hands isnt washing them and a quick rub, even with soap, wont get your hands clean. Follow the steps below to make sure you are washing your hands correctly because the few seconds that you think your saving could cost you days if you get sick later. Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold) and apply soap Rub your hands together to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of your hands, between your ngers, and under your nails Continue rubbing your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the "Happy Birthday" song from beginning to end twice OR run through your grocery list in your head. Make it a habit. Rinse your hands well under running water Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them As you touch people, surfaces and objects throughout the day, you accumulate germs on your hands. In turn, you can infect yourself with these germs by touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Although it's impossible to keep your hands germ-free, following the four Principles of Hand Awareness listed below can help limit the transfer of bacteria, viruses and other microbes. Wash your hands when they are dirty and BEFORE eating DO NOT cough into your hands, if possible DO NOT sneeze into your hand, if possible Above all, DO NOT put your ngers into your eyes, nose or mouth Handwashing is the SINGLE MOST EFFECTIVE METHOD of preventing the spread of germs. Do yourself a favor and wash yours often and teach your family to do the same. Andrew Creel Receives Delores De Ingraham Spiritual Care Giver Recognition AwardAlbert Einstein said try not to become a man of success but a man of value. Andrew Andy Creel, Chaplain for Big Bend Hospice, has denitely brought value to his community. That is why Andy was honored by his peers and presented with the Delores De Ingraham Spiritual Caregiver Award as part of Clergy Appreciation Month. Andys constant pursuit to alleviate the suffering of others makes him ideal for his role as Chaplain on the Big Bend Hospice Team for Jefferson, Madison, and Taylor County. When his co-workers were asked what one word best describes Andy, they responded with compassionate, empathetic, tolerant and steadfast. Andy is one of the most caring, loving men you will ever meet, says Carol Katz, Team Leader for the JMT Team. His excellence in helping others is not just an act but is his habit. Andy does not strive for recognition but focuses on the value of contributing to human kind without expecting anything in return. Andy is not only caring of the patients but also the staff. Kathy Bass, Professional Liaison for Big Bend Hospice, explains Andy will wait in his car to see that we are safe in our surroundings. He is supportive and present when we have dying patients. He is always tirelessly doing whatever needs to be done. The Delores De Ingraham Award recognizes a Chaplain who has made a signicant contribution to Big Bend Hospices spiritual care and counseling each year. Just to have been nominated by your peers is an honor in itself. Nominees must have demonstrated sensitivity, dedication, commitment, and openness to diversity, and a passion for encouraging patients, families and staff to discover and afrm their spiritual well being. Andy is an avid reader and is always quoting things he has read. So to use the words from Aristotle, We are what we repeatedly do, we congratulate Andy for what he is someone who uses his efforts, skills, and knowledge to improve ones life and the lives of others each and every day. Andrew Creel

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE YARD SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED WANTED TO BUY Buy, Sell or Trade In The Classieds Call 973-4141 Call 973-4141O n e M a n s J u n k I s A n o t h e r M a n s T r e a s u r e www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 14A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Check us out on-line www.greenepublishing.com FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 12/2/2013 THROUGH 12/8/2013I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age18 yr. Day and evening classes. Next class November 11. 386-362-1065.11/6 11/27, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cWasher And Dryer For Sale! Kenmore series 70 washer, top load. Series 80 dryer, front load (door opens from top down). White in color and both are in perfect working order. $400 rm. Call (229) 460-529610/30 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.One Person Cabin On Farm $395/month. Background check required. Call (850) 673-1117.10/16 rtn, cCASH FOR FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES! $1000 for Madison Co enamel Tags dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL tags starting with #35 for years 1938, 39, 40, 43, 49, and 54. Jeff Francis gobucs13@aol.com or 727 424 1576.www.oridalicenseplates.com10/23 -12/25, pd Maintenance Equipment Specialist. Part time curriculum developer wanted. Coord. of Institutional Research; Allied Health Clinical Coord; Registered Nurse. See www.nfcc.edu for details.11/20, 11/27, cNew and Repo Homes 25 to pick from. Come to Lake City the dual makers at Freedom Homes. Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cNov and Dec special 4/2 28x80 home only $49,900 cash deal only. Call Magic Mike at Freedom Homes (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cBeen turned down? Have 10k to 15k? Call me I can make a deal. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cLand home package with 10k down in Lake City Florida. We do the deals. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cIn house nancing with 10k down on used or repo houses. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cTriple wide $29,900 as is. Wholesale price, hardwood oors, ceramic tile. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cReduced $10,000 Lot Model 4/2, new 2014. 2,016 square feet. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cCASH special up to $5,000. Reduced price on new or used qualied models. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cUltimate home 2,027 square feet 3/2 $69,900. Beautiful new home with replace. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cLive Oak or Merit Homes. Low prices. Freedom Mobile Homes. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, c Ad Builder/Graphic Artist needed for the Madison County Carrier and the Madison EnterpriseRecorder. Must be a team player and able to handle multiple tasks. Experience with Adobe Photoshop a must, experience with Quark Express a plus. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.11/20 rtn, n/c Receptionist: When was the last time YOU had FUN at WORK? Its a great time to join our team of super dedicated staff. Not only do we take pride in what we do, WE HAVE FUN! Are you the type of person that never meets a stranger and has a GENUINE love of people? Are your physical appearance and cosmetics important to you? Do you already have great computer skills? How well do you adapt to learning new things, do you embrace it or resist it? This growing dental ofce needs more helpers, and if you answered yes to these questions, then call 888-486-2408 to hear more about this position on our amazing team and how to apply.11/22 rtn, c House For Rent 2 bedroom 1 bath. Located in Lee. $350 deposit/$400 monthly. No pets. (850) 971-5809. 11/29, 12/4, pd Auctions MOECKER AUCTIONS Public Auction, Road Runner Highway Signs, Inc. (Road striping division only) December 10th @ 10am 4421 12th St. Court East, Bradenton, Fl 34203 Specialized highway marking/striping equipment and vehicles that meets DOT safety. Special preview: 12/09 10 a.m.4 p.m. www.moeckerauctions.com (800) 840-BIDS 15%18%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to conrm. Receivership case #2013 CA 002342 Circuit Court of Manatee County, Fl AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin. Condos for Sale FLORIDA WATERFRONT CONDO LIQUIDATION SALE! Brand new 2BR/2BA 1,690sf luxury condo only $149,900 Originally under contract for $365,000. Near downtown Orlando & all theme parks/attractions. Must see. Call now 877-333-0272, x 173. Help Wanted DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certications. GI Bill Benets Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage Tennessee Log Cabin on 6 acres with FREE Boat Slip! Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excellent nancing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453. New Log Home* on 8+ acres in Florida just $87,900. Sale! Saturday, Dec 14th. 3BR, 2BA, 1700sf cabin on spectacular lake access setting in beautiful upscale community with all infrastructure/amenities completed. Excellent nancing. Call now 877-525-3033, x 983. *constructed weather tight log home shell. 10 ACRE MOUNTAIN TOP ESTATE! Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent nancing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 92. Yard/Estate Sale December 7th starting at 7 a.m. China cabinet, queen bed, sofa set, more furniture. Kitchen and household items. 378 SW Macon Street, Madison.12/4, c Drivers: Home EVERY Weekend, Dedicated Southern Lanes & OTR! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Or Walk Away Lease: No Money Down, No Credit Check. 1-888-880-5916.12/4, pd Elder Day Companion along with some housekeeping, cooking and carrying them back and forth to appointments. Call (850) 971-5789.12/4, pd

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Madison County Carrier 15A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com L e g a l s 11/27, 12/4 11/27, 12/4 11/27, 12/4

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 16A Madison County Carrier

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M a d i s o n C o u n t y C a r r i e r D e c e m b e r 4 2 0 1 3 First Baptist Church To Present Cantata By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The First Baptist Church of Madison will present their cantata, entitled Come Messiah King, on Sunday evening, Dec. 8. Written and arranged by Randy Vader, Jay Rouse and Rose Aspinall, the cantata will be performed by the Worship Choir of the First Baptist Church. Dave Deckard and Debbi Roderick will narrate the cantata and Pastor Jim Carey will direct it. The cantata will be held at 6 p.m. at the church, located at 134 SW Meeting Street (across Base Street (US 90) from Wells Fargo Bank).

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Path of Faith 2B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 4, 2013

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Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 4, 2013 3B Path of Faith We three kings of Orient are. So begins a favorite carol of the Advent season about the Wise Men who visit the newborn Jesus. And so begins a tale that takes inaccuracy and historical revisionism to a whole new level. Reverend John Henry Hopkins, Jr., who wrote the carol a century and a half ago, should have known better. First, we dont know exactly how many kings there were. There could have been as few as two and up to almost any number. Tradition says that there were three (though some traditions mention twelve), and over time they were even given names: Caspar, Melchior, and Balthasar. But these are apocryphal stories. Second, they were not kings from the Orient. They were Wise Men, or put more accurately, Magi. The Magi were astronomers primitive by todays standards who were on the cutting edge of scientific and philosophical knowledge in their day. So it may be best to view these Magi as the uncanny combination of scientists, philosophers, and theologians but not kings. And such men called Persia home (modern day Iran), not the Far East. Third, these men did not find the Christ child while following yonder star. They saw the star in the East or at the rising of the sun, but then proceeded west to Palestine. The star did not reappear until they were already in Bethlehem. And finally, the Magi, technically, do not belong in the Nativity scene at all. They were latecomers to the Christmas party, maybe as late as Jesus second birthday. The quaking shepherds, singing angels, and lowing cattle had returned to life as normal long ago. On and on I could go ripping the veracity of this Christmas Carol apart, but that is not my intent. We Three Kings remains one of my favorite Holiday hymns to bellow out this time of year. My critique of it is to simply point out that apart from the accumulations of questionable tradition, we know little about these mysterious men from the East. And these traditions prevent us from embracing what we can learn from them for the journey of the Magi is a fascinating exercise in unexpected faith. They came seeking the child who had been born king of the Jews, based almost entirely on the appearance of an enigmatic star. While history is rampant with explanations for this phenomena, one conclusion is certain: The Magi interpreted this unusual sign in the heavens as a clear communication that something extraordinary had taken place in the world. And even more extraordinary, these Persian sages applied their interpretation to the emergence of Jesus, the Jewish Messiah. Why so astonishing? Not many people would launch out on a dangerous journey through the Middle East based solely on a spiritual hunch. Not many people would put their life on hold to prove their mystical intuitions to be true. And the most shocking of all, not many Persians (todays Iranians) would worship at the feet (or manger) of a Jew. And not many Jews could abide by such a thing, either! Yet, in Gods way, these all belonged together. Divisions of race, religion, nationality or ethnicity did not factor into the equation. This is a foreshadowing of what the Apostle Paul would say later. In Christ, he said, there is no difference between Jew and Greek, slave and free person, male and female. You are all the same in Christ Jesus (See Galatians 3). And all does mean all. All are welcome into the presence of the One who will reconcile everything all things in heaven and on earth to himself. So here is where the Magi teach us the wisest of their lessons: There are many barriers to overcome and great distances to cover in our journey of faith field and fountain, moor and mountain to quote Reverend Hopkins but when we get to where we are going, we will be welcomed in with open arms. There we will find the King forever, ceasing never, over us all to reign. And all surely means all. Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, pastor, and author of multiple books. You can read more and receive regular e-columns in your inbox at www.ronniemcbrayer.me. A l l M e a n s A l l Cal U Toda! Call us today to chat with one of our Metal Roof Specialists and nd out how a Premium Metal Roof will not only add incredible curb appeal to your project, but will also help you save BIG on your next energy bill! 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4B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Path of Faith Matthew 6:33 says, Seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you. There is so much going on in the church today that some Christians wonder, Whom are we following? I believe we are trying to do it on our own. That is why we have backbiting people, talking bad about one another, stealing, failure to pay tithes and even murder in the church. The list of bad things goes on, but I think you get my message. Many of us go to church almost every Sunday, but fail to put Gods Word into action. Why? We are not seeking God first! If we dont seek Him first, we are lost in the world in the church. Some think just because we go to church on Sundays we should expect to make it into Gods Kingdom. James 1:22 says, Be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves. When we come to church on Sundays, we are worshipping and praising the Lord. That is how we put Gods Word into action and become doers of His Word. Brother Pastor, how can I serve the Lord during the week when I need to go to work? When you go to work, let your actions be an example of Jesus Christ. Proverbs 3:6 says, In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths. When you go to work, at your home, driving along in your vehicles, in the church and everywhere, acknowledge Him. Anything that we ask in His name, he promises to give to us. Matthew 7:7 and 8 says, Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you. For everyone that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened. In conclusion, if any Christian wants to put Gods Word into action, he or she can. All we have to do is ask in the name of Jesus. If we ask in his name, then we will want to serve him day and night. We will want to do good things, such as come to Bible study and Sunday School (and bring our kids), come to conference and not fight over Gods business, do our duties as a pastor, deacon, deaconess, clerk, etc. President Obama said, Yes, we can and look where he is today. This pastor believes that we can do all things through Jesus Christ who strengthens us. Remember, no sermon is complete until it is put into action. Together, we can put Gods Word into action. T h e P u l p i t By Rev. Robert Holmes, Pastor, Architillery Missionary Baptist Church P u t G o d s W o r d I n t o A c t i o n

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Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 4, 2013 5B Path of Faith Salvation Army Celebrating Christmas Sharing Angel Tree Submitted by George Blevins, Salvation Army We are looking at the biggest Christmas toy drive challenge to date! We are seeing more and more families, which means, of course, more children. Please help by becoming a childs Angel! How can you help? Well, three ways: A direct gift of toy/toys. Please help us by gathering toys; if it becomes a large volume call for arrangements at 232-4981 or 948-2119. If not you can drop it off at the Clerk of the Courts office at the courthouse. Angel Tree. Pick a childs name at the Court house from the Angel tree which will have a girl or boys name, age, clothing sizes and a gift which they have asked their special Angel for. After buying the gift/gifts return the ticket with the childs name attached to the gifts to the Courthouse Clerks office. Financially. You can send a check to the Salvation Army, P. O. Box 728, Madison, Fl. 32341. Your monetary contributions help close the gap between gifts received and the number of children in need of an Angel. Time line Deadlines Selecting a Child from the Angel Tree ___________________Dec. 6 Returning Angel presents to the Court House ____________Dec. 17

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Path of Faith 6B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 4, 2013

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Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 4, 2013 7B Path of Faith Church Calendar December 7 Get in the spirit of Christmas with Cherry Lake United Methodist Churchs Legends of Christmas Adventure Day on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9-11 a.m. Children, ages five and up, will enjoy learning about the Legends of Christmas and make Christmas crafts while glorifying the true meaning of Christmas. Festive refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome. December 8 The First United Methodist Church of Madison will present the cantata I Hear a Prophet Calling on Sunday, Dec. 8, during the 11 a.m. service. Lynn Corbin is the director. December 22 Midway Baptist Church will present their Christmas cantata, Glory to the Newborn King, on Sunday, Dec. 22, at 6 p.m. Midway Baptist Church is located at 338 SE Midway Church Road. December 22 Midway Church of God will present their childrens Christmas play on Sunday, Dec. 22, at 6 p.m. Everyone is invited. Midway Church of God is located at 2849 SE Midway Church Road in Lee.

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Path of Faith 8B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 4, 2013



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Wed. December 4, 2013VOL. 50 NO. 16 www.greenepublishing.com 50 cents Index 2 Sections, 24 Pages Local Weather Viewpoints 2A Around Madison4-9A Sports 10-11A School 12A Health 13A Classieds 14A Legals 15A Path of Faith Section B Wed12/4 79/62 Intervalsofcloudsandsunshine. High79F.WindsSat5to10mph. Sat12/7 78/58 Fewshowers.Highsintheupper 70sandlowsintheupper50s. Fri12/6 79/62 Partlycloudy.Highsintheupper 70sandlowsinthelow60s. Thu12/5 79/58 Partlycloudy.Highsintheupper 70sandlowsintheupper50s. Man Arrested For Manufacturing MethMadison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports that on Saturday, Nov. 30, at approximately 2:30 a.m., deputies with the Madison County Sheriff's Ofce went to 2314 NE Cattail Drive in Madison in an attempt to locate and arrest a fugitive identied as Mark Bareld, 28 years old. Deputies possessed an active warrant on Bareld for violation of probation. Upon arrival, deputies strategically positioned themselves to prevent Bareld from escaping. Deputies attempted contact with Bareld at the front door and observed him through a window running through the residence toward the back door carrying a backpack. As Bareld attempted to escape out the back door he was greeted by a deputy and ordered to stop and get down on the ground. Bareld failed to comply and ed back inside the residence as deputies gave chase. Bareld was apprehended when he tripped and fell on the living room oor. Bareld was then taken into custody without further incident. A functional meth lab was located in the backpack that Bareld was carrying. Deputies also discovered several other items commonly used to manufacture methamphetamine, along with a pipe that Mark Bar“eld See Meth Arrest On Page 3AMysterious Sounds Heard At New Hospital SiteBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Madison Police Department ofcers and the Madison County Sheriff's Ofce responded to the new hospital construction site on Sunday evening, Dec. 1. According to the MPD, Ofcer Anthony Land responded to a suspicious incident at 8:45 p.m. A North Florida Community College security ofcer told Land that he had heard a loud banging coming from inside the fence at the site. Land walked around but did not see anyone. Later, he was Log Truck Turns And BurnsAlog truck turned over on County Road 255 in Lee on Monday afternoon, Dec. 2. Driver Jose Castro Arriola, 62, of Live Oak, noticed smoke and bailed out of the cab before the truck caught on re. The truck became totally engulfed in ames. Photos by RUSSELL, December 2, 2013 See Mysterious Sounds On Page 3A Light Up Madison Set For This Weekend By Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. The Kiwanis Club of Madison helps the community kick off the Christmas season with Light Up Madison, scheduled for Dec. 6 and 7. Things get rolling on Friday evening, Dec. 6, at 7 p.m., as the RATT Pact presents Dickens in the theater building on SW Range Avenue. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children, ages 5-12. The Rotary and Kiwanis Clubs will host the Light Up Madison Golf Tournament to support Madison Cares' Projects on Saturday morning, Dec. 7, at the Madison Country Club. Registration begins at 8 a.m. At 8:30 a.m., registration will begin for a 5K Diaper Dash. The race will begin at 9:30 a.m. along the College Route. An Antique Car Show and Cook-off will be held beginning at 9 a.m. at Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park. The Junior Auxiliary Jingle Jog will be held with check-in set at 4 p.m. This is a onemile fun run. Costumes are encouraged, but not required. Prizes will be awarded for the best costume. Becky's Dance Steps Studio will present Jump, Jive & Jingle beginning at 4:45 p.m. in downtown Madison. The Christmas Parade will wind its way through downtown, beginning at 6 p.m. Lake Park of Madison will sponsor the parade. There will be a Winter Wonderland inSee Light Up Madison On Page 3A Santa's making a list and he's checking it twice. It's that time of year to show Santa who the good girls and boys have been and for them to write letters to Santa Claus. Greene Publishing, Inc. can save children the cost of postage to send letters to the North Pole. Children can instead send their letters to Greene Publishing, which will publish the letters in the newspaper. Santa will get a copy, so he can read it and check what each child wants. The deadline for entries is Dec. 18 at 5 p.m. and they will be published in the Dec. 20 Madison Enterprise-Recorder. Letters must be written in black ink to Santa in care of Greene Publishing, Inc. P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32340 or dropped off at Greene Publishing, on Highway 53 South in Madison. Teachers will also be collecting letters for publication so Santa can see them. Its Time For Santa LettersChristmas In The ParkBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.It's that time of year again, when Four Freedoms Park in downtown Madison becomes Winter Wonderland, and the members of the Madison Garden Club are getting an early start with their part of the decorating. On a cool, overcast December morning, Garden Club president Laura Coleman and Garden Club members Lura Fine, Jean Fiori, Louanna Forness, Nell Ring and Thelma Dehart gathered at theGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 2, 2013Angels with angels: (Left to right) Jean Fiori, Lura Fine and Thelma Dehart hold up three of the handmade angels that will adorn the south side of the park.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 2, 2013Joining in the reindeer games this year are these two big guys, pulling the little red sleigh. Lura Fines husband, John, made the deer and sleigh.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 2, 2013Nell Ring puts the “nal touches on Minnie Mouse while Snoopy supervises. See Christmas On Page 3A Daycare Provides Kids A Lesson In Giving See Page 12A

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Iget hundreds of emails a day. Most are business related, some are trash/spam, and then a few are from family or friends. I don’t have time to sit and read a lot of non-business email. In fact, I don’t read them at all just about. I either hit delete or save them for “another day.” From time to time, I try to remember to go back through a lot of those old emails. Last week, I was doing a search through my emails for something particular and I came across an email I hadn’t read in a long time. It was an email I had received from a friend. I loved it then (thus the reason I had saved it) and I still love it now so much I thought I’d share it with all of you. We’ll call this a parable because there IS a lesson to be learned from this. A chemistry professor in a large college had some exchange students in the class. One day while the class was in the lab, the Professor noticed one young man (exchange student) who kept rubbing his back and stretching as if his back hurt. The professor asked the young man what was the matter. The student told him he had a bullet lodged in his back. He had been shot while “ghting Communists in his native country who were trying to overthrow his country's government and install a new Communist government. In the midst of his story, he looked at the professor and asked a strange question. He asked, Do you know how to catch wild pigs?Ž The professor thought it was a joke and asked for the punch line. The young man said this was no joke. You catch wild pigs by “nding a suitable place in the woods and putting corn on the ground. The pigs “nd it and begin to come every day to eat the free corn. When they are used to coming every day, you put a fence down one side of the place where they are used to coming. When they get used to the fence, they begin to eat the corn again and you put up another side of the fence. They get used to that and start to eat again. You continue until you have all four sides of the fence up with a gate in the last side. The pigs, which are used to the free corn, start to come through the gate to eat; you slam the gate on them and catch the whole herd. Suddenly, the wild pigs have lost their freedom. They run around and around inside the fence, but they are caught. Soon they go back to eating the free corn. They are so used to it that they have forgotten how to forage in the woods for themselves, so they accept their captivity.Ž The young man then told the professor that is exactly what he sees happening to America. The government keeps pushing us toward socialism and keeps spreading the free corn out in the form of programs such as supplemental income, tax credit for unearned income, tobacco subsidies, dairy subsidies, payments not to plant crops (CRP), welfare, medicine, drugs, etc. While we continually lose our freedoms -just a little at a time. One should always remember: There is no such thing as a free lunch! Also, a politician will never provide a service for you cheaper than you can do it yourself. Also, if you see that all of this wonderful government 'help' is a problem confronting the future of democracy in America; you might want to send this story on to your friends. If you think the free ride is essential to your way of life then you will probably be offended by this story, but God help you when the gate slams shut! "A government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take away everything you have" Thomas Jefferson Please, please keep this in mind each and every time you go to vote! Stop turning a blind eye to the problems in our country and start standing up and voicing your opinion. We have all been too quiet, for far too long. Until then….see you around the town. Irecently returned from my second trip to Cumberland, Ga.'s southernmost barrier island. This trip was different than the first four years ago because now, the National Park Service (NPS) offers a Land and Legacy Tour. In a 15-passenger van, a guide takes visitors northward along the 17 mile Grand Avenue (it’s actually a single lane dirt trail) to spots that are generally beyond the reach of day visitors. For example, we visited Plum Orchard, one of the surviving Carnegie mansions from the late Victorian era; Stafford with its haunting slavery quarters; and the Settlement where dozens of post-slavery AfricanAmericans lived for the better part of a century. We also saw, from a distance, many of the retained rights homes grandfathered-in when the island was largely acquired by the NPS forty years ago. The weather was a little raw. In fact, during the afternoon at Terrapin Point, it seemed like we were experiencing the Georgia equivalent of a Nor’easter. I was prepared for insects and sun, but these were no problem during our visit. The visit to Plum Orchard was certainly a highlight. Lucy, the Carnegie matriarch, had this huge mansion built for one of her sons as a wedding present. I was struck by how difficult and expensive it was to build. Since there is no bridge to the island, all of the materials and workers had to be shipped (literally) from the mainland. This is an enormous logistical problem and very expensive to overcome. And, as the Carnegie heirs found, equally expensive to maintain. As a result, much of the infrastructure has disintegrated. To me, the most beautiful and haunting experience is the maritime forest. The trees, especially the oaks, shaped by wind and storm, are truly magnificent and protected by wilderness designation over a quarter of the island. We saw quite a bit of wildlife during our day-long tour including raccoons, pigs, horses, and a variety of birds. The wild horses are quite a draw for the tourists visiting Cumberland. Another important wildlife feature of the island is a nesting place for sea turtles. The secret to Cumberland is that there is no bridge to the island and likely, will never be. That limits visitors riding the two daily 45 minute ferry runs from St. Mary’s to 300, not a heavy population count. Accordingly, the island has never been a money-making affair as the Carnegie heirs discovered. It is simply too costly to ship people and goods to and from the island. A lesson about stewardship I learned from my father was to never take more from the land than nature intends or permits. In my opinion, this is the mistake that was made by the Carnegies. When they realized that they could no longer care for their home, they invited the federal government to take over stewardship. That was pr obably a wise decision although even the feds have encountered difficulty in keeping the property in good repair. Over time, nature will continue to reclaim its right.www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 2A € Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist Wild CumberlandIused to be a “saver.” I saved almost everything. For example, I used to have furniture that belonged to my parents, quilts from my grandmother, Easter hats and gloves from my childhood, books from my elementaryaged years, band medals and football ribbons from middle school and jeans I was wearing only a few years after high school. Over the years with several relocations later, some of these items I relinquished to my sister and some were sold when I felt it was time to “downsize” my life. What I have discovered is that material items, even though unnecessary in our lives, can still have enough memories attached to them, that they can evoke feelings of loss when they are gone. One way I’ve found to recover this loss is by exploring ea markets and antique stores. Rows and rows of old, dusty items for sale can bring comments such as, “Oh my gosh, we used to have one of those when I was a kid!” On occasion, I have bought a “treasure” to help me reconnect with my past, such as the beautiful old percolating coffee pot my Papa used to make his morning cup of java with. As a child, I used to watch and listen, mesmerized by the coffee perking away as I tried to wake from the previous night’s sleep. After getting my treasure home and giving it a thorough cleaning, I brewed myself a cup of coffee, sat back and remembered the times I was given my own small cup of “coffee” (lots of milk and sugar with just enough coffee to color the milk). Today, I can’t remember how much I paid for the antique coffee maker, but the memories I’ve received every time I see the pot are worth, to me, whatever was on that price tag the day I purchased the pot and brought it home. Browsing through ea markets, junk stores and estate sales is one of the many things my mother and I have in common. This past weekend, while we were out exploring we came upon a few really great markets. What makes them “great” is they did not contain the polished, orderly rows of antiques that have prices for collectors, but dusty shelves and boxes sitting on the oor, containing hidden treasures priced for xer-uppers and “junkers,” such as us. And, treasures were denitely found. One treasure in particular, my mother found, and gave to me as a gift, a wafe iron. Years ago, the death of my stepfather caused my mother to have a necessary downsizing of her own and one of the things my mom parted with was her wafe maker. I wasn’t able to be at the sale and when I found out, I was devastated. The wafes she made me from that wafe iron were super crispy on the outside and wonderfully chewy on the inside and something you can’t achieve with the Teon-coated wafe makers of today. My disappointment wasn’t just for the loss of the wafes, but for the wafe iron itself, because it was hers and it was gone. So, for years we have both searched. I’ve searched so that I could have those wonderful wafes again as well as the memories my mother gave me when eating them. My mother has searched to please, and appease, her whiny daughter. The “replacement” wafe iron she bought for me had been well cared for and is in perfect condition. It is a classic old-timer with heavy, removable metal plates and a stainless steel covering that shined up beautifully. I can’t wait to have her over for breakfast.Waffles And Buried Treasure Rose Klein Columnist Searching For Ambrosia Emerald's Gem Box Catching Wild PigsEmerald Greene Publisher Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, December 1, 2013My beautiful newŽ waf”e iron, found on a junking spree by my mother.

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Photos submitted by Pat LightcapWith a morning low of 27 degrees and enough moisture in the air the City of Madison saw frost on windshields and rooftops to start Thanksgiving Day a little colder than expected in downtown Madison. Cleaning the windshield with a putty knife helped. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013Madison County Carrier € 3AWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Man Ordered To Dig Up Wife From Front Yard In Stevenson, Ala., a man lost his battle to keep his wife buried in the front yard of the home the couple shared for years. The remains of Patsy Davis, who died in 2009, was removed after Jim Davis lost his legal battle with the Stevenson City Council, who has been battling with the 74-year-old Davis for over a year. An attorney for the city said in rural Stevenson, drainage or runoff from the grave could have seeped in to nearby wells or into the system of a nearby restaurant. After the court ruling, Davis had his wife’s remains cremated at a local funeral home. Wedding Celebration Turns Deadly On Dance Floor In Yemen, a dance at a wedding resulted in injuries and three deaths of attendees. As the Korean pop star Psy’s “Gangnam Style” played, a man with an AK-47 joined the dance oor and as the song reached its chorus, began spraying bullets from the assault rie in an attempt to celebrate. A video from a cell phone showed dancers around the man, falling to the ground, injured or dead. Although it is illegal to carry weapons to weddings in Yemen, gunre during celebrations are reported to be quite common. Designer Produces Picture Frames Made From Placenta In Brighton, England, a recent graduate of Brighton University and now designer for a company in London, produces picture frames for newborns made from the mother’s placenta. Amanda Cotton adds dried and crushed pieces of the placenta to molds with clear casting resin to create marble-effect frames. Cotton uses the entire placenta, that is preserved for her in a “cool box” after the birth, by rst boiling and cooking it, then grinding it into small pieces before placing it in the molds. She says, “I have had lots of positive feedback from mothers and fathers to be, and I already have clients.” Cotton developed the picture frame technique before graduating at the Faculty of Arts. She says, “I chose the placenta because during my time at Brighton, I lived with a midwife and it became apparent through her studies that there was little importance placed on the placenta, even though it is the link between the mother and baby throughout the entire pregnancy. It is quite common for people to keep their baby’s by-products such as the umbilical cord, rst tooth or hair clippings….the placenta is one of the rst creations the mother and baby make together, why not celebrate that with a keepsake.” AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Of“ce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersTori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn, Shanna SwopeBookkeeping Brooke Kinsley Classified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classi“eds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252 patrolling Marion Street and noticed the fence had been bent as if someone had stepped on it to climb over. Footprints were found on the other side of the fence. Land, MPD Sgt. Chris Cooks and MCSO Sgt. Mike Maurice searched the scene but no one was located. Mysterious Sounds Cont. From 1A had been previously used to smoke methamphetamine lying out in plain sight. A small plastic bag that contained methamphetamine was recovered from Bareld’s pants pocket and a second small plastic bag containing more methamphetamine was recovered from his wallet. Bareld was charged with violation of probation, manufacturing and possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Meth Arrest Cont. From 1Athe Four Freedoms Park, sponsored by the Madison Woman’s Club, AKA, Garden Club, Johnson & Johnson, Lions Club, the Madison Genealogy Association, Madison Trail Riders, MCAODP, Madison County Community Bank, Rotary Club, Sons of the Confederacy and the Treasures of Madison County. Tentbuilders will present movies on the Courthouse Green. There will be downtown Christmas trees, sponsored by MCCB. Tudor Rose Photography and AccountAbility will sponsor pictures with Santa. Brightwell DJ will present Kid Karaoke. A hayride will be sponsored by Kenny McLeod and Gordon Tractor. Studstill Lumber & Hardware and Madison Sporting Goods will hold a giveaway for a Power Wheels. There will be food booths, an entertainment stage and other great activities for the whole family. For more information, contact Diann Head at (850) 253-5451 or Deena Hames at (850) 973-8277. Light Up Madison Cont. From 1Apark with boxes of angels, trees, snowmen and tree ornaments to set up across the south side of the park facing Base Street. “We thought we’d better get going while we had transportation,” said Coleman. Lura Fine’s husband, John, had provided the truck for transporting all the goodies, and had also made some new reindeer and a sleigh to add to the decorations. When it’s time to Light Up Madison at the end of the week (Saturday, Dec. 7 from 5 to 9 p.m.), about half a dozen other civic clubs in Madison will have their park sections all dressed up and ready to glow as well. Downtown businesses will also participate in the festive annual event. Christmas Cont. From 1A Woman Arrested For ShopliftingMadison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports that on Thursday, Nov. 28, at approximately 12:48 p.m., Madison County Sheriff’s Ofce deputies were dispatched to the Dollar General Store located in Greenville, in reference to a possible theft. Upon arrival, deputies made contact with the store employee who reported an unidentied female entered the store carrying what appeared to be an empty purse. The unidentied female walked around to several different areas of the store then departed without purchasing any items. The employee further stated that when the unidentied female departed her purse now appeared to be full. A second employee overheard the female tell a second unidentied female that they would return later as they walked out. Deputies informed the store employee that they would remain in the area and to call back as soon as the two females returned. At approximately 1:50 p.m., the two females returned again to the Dollar General Store and deputies were called to return. Deputies waited until the two females exited the store and made contact with them. While questioning Romane Breanna Morris, 20, of Greenville, the female with the purse, it was discovered that the purse did contain items from the store that were stolen. Morris was arrested for retail theft.Romane Morris Frosty Thanksgiving Morning In Madison Businesses Help Collect Toys For ChristmasBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Toys can be dropped off Monday-Friday, from 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at Wallace Automotive, located at 1182 East US 90, in Madison. Toys may also be dropped off during business hours at Becky’s Dance Steps Studio, located at 438 East Base Street in Madison. The last day for drop-off will be Tuesday, Dec. 10. Toys will be collected by the US Marines Reserve Ofce in Tallahassee for distribution. All toys must be new and unwrapped.

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Pastor Larry D. Law, 68, of Mayo, passed away Saturday, November 30, 2013 at Haven Hospice of Lake City. Bro. Larry was born January 12, 1945 in Live Oak, to Norman and Grace (Ellis) Law. Brother Larry was a successful restaurant entrepreneur for many years, owning and operating seven Western Sizzlin Steak Houses, a Pizza Inn, and founded his own franchise in Ocala called Sea Corral. When the Lord called him to ministry, he sold it all, and moved his family to Marianna, where he could attend the Florida Baptist Theological College, receiving his bachelors degree in Theology at the age of 40. He was chosen by his class to lead in the preaching at his class graduation, and continued his ministry for the next 28 years. Brother Larry rst pastored at Piney Grove Baptist Church in Cottondale, for two years, he then pastored at Mayo Baptist Church for four years, next he went to First Baptist Waldo for eight years, he then came back to Lafayette County and pastored Airline Baptist Church for eight years. He was then asked by Brother Eddie Blalock to come and serve as Associate Pastor and be the church administrator at the First Baptist Church of Perry, which he did for four years. Brother Larry served in numerous interims for several local churches, fullling his ministry at the First Baptist Church of Madison. During his ministry, he noticed the need for an assisted living home, and set out to achieve this. With the help of some friends, they started Oak Ridge in Mayo, in which Brother Larry was the administrator and operator for the rst ve years. Pastor Larry's ministry was just not limited here in north Florida, but also around the world. He made four visits to the Ukraine where he help create the rst Bible college in that country's history called the Vinizta Bible Institute. He also made several trips to Israel, and helped situate and start the International House of Prayer in Jerusalem. Brother Law was preceded in death by his parents, Norman and Grace Law; his sisters: Joe Betenbaugh, Melba Carter and Frances Lavonia Law; and a brother, Gerome Law. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Diane Law of Day; two sons: Larry D. Law, Jr. of Day and Phillip Law and his wife, Melissa, of Mayo; a daughter, Connie Lynn Hodges, and her husband, Mike, of Marianna; a brother, James Law, of the Villages; three sisters: Jeanette Hatch of Wellborn, Erin Blasingame of Hiwassee, Ga., and Hilma Rain of Live Oak; six grandchildren; and a host of nieces and nephews also survive him. Memorial services will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, December 7, 2013, at Airline Baptist Church in Mayo with Pastor Rusty Bryan ofciating. A private family burial will take place at Mt. Olive Baptist Church Cemetery in Wellborn. Memorial contributions can be made to Haven Hospice of Lake City at 6037 W US Highway 90, Lake City, Fl 32055. All arrangements are under the care of Joe P. Burns Funeral Home. You may send condolences to the family at www.joepburnsfuneralhomes.com. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 4A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Obituaries December 4 The Tall Pines Club will meet on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at noon in the Mill Conference Room in Clyattville, Ga. Ham, turkey and dressing will be furnished. Please bring a side dish. December 7 Get in the spirit of Christmas with Cherry Lake United Methodist Church's Legends of Christmas Adventure Day on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9-11 a.m. Children, ages ve and up, will enjoy learning about the Legends of Christmas and make Christmas crafts while glorifying the true meaning of Christmas. Festive refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome. December 8 The First United Methodist Church of Madison will present the cantata I Hear a Prophet Calling on Sunday, December 8, during the 11 a.m. service at the church in Madison. Lynn Corbin is the director. December 8 Ribbon cutting for the new Sumpter James Park, located at the intersection of SW Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive and SW Bunker Street, 3 p.m. December 8 The community is invited to attend the Christmas Cantata at Grace Presbyterian Church on Sunday, December 8, at 6 p.m. This presentation of Christ Was Born for This will be presented by the combined choirs of Grace and Community Presbyterian of Live Oak. Following the presentation, a light supper will be served in the Fellowship Hall. Please join us as we celebrate the birth of our Savior. The church is located at 1200 N. Washington Street (Highway 53 North). December 8 The First Baptist Church of Madison will present their Christmas cantata, Come Messiah King on Sunday, December 8, at 6 p.m. at the church in Madison. December 11 The 55 Plus Club has a special treat in store for its December meeting: a performance by the Madison Boys Choir, under the direction of Rev. Marcus Hawkins. The club meets at 12 noon on the second Wednesday of every month at the UMCM Center, 135 NW Dill Ave., on the corner of Dill and Colin Kelly Hwy (Highway 145) near Hanson, about ve miles north of town, for a free lunch provided by one of the member churches, and a guest speaker or musical performance. Come on out Wednesday, Dec. 11 at noon, and bring some friends to enjoy food, fellowship and some ne Christmas singing. For more information on the Club, or for directions to the UMCM Center contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929-4938. December 13 SkillsUSA will hold a fundraiser on Friday, Dec. 13, from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on the Courthouse Lawn. Funds will be used to help MCHS SkillsUSA compete in Regional and State Competitions. A grilled chicken plate will be available for $6 in advance or $7 at the lawn. It will include potato salad, green beans, roll and dessert. Sweet tea will be available for $1. For tickets or questions, contact Paige Thomas at (386) 965-6771. December 14 Greenville Country Christmas at Haffye Hays Park in Greenville, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Join in for fun, food, a parade, live entertainment and arts and crafts. December 18 The First Baptist Church of Madison will go caroling at 6 p.m. Prayer meeting for those not caroling at 6:30 p.m. at the church. December 21 Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church, 407 NE Mt. Zion Church Avenue in Cherry Lake, will hold a Hanson, Pinetta and Cherry Lake Community Christmas Outreach Dinner on Saturday, Dec. 21, from 12:303:30 p.m. Meals will be delivered to community residents beginning at 9:30 a.m. Anyone interested in helping with the event is welcome to go serve with them. Anyone needing transported to the church or who is sick or shut-in can call Brother Johnnie Woods at (850) 9294141. For more information, please call Savilla Murphy at (850) 929-4386. December 21 Live Nativity from 5-7 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of Madison. Please join them in the church parking lot as they go back in time to the village of Bethlehem and what the rst Christmas might have looked like. Community Calendar William "SkiŽ LescrynskiWilliam "Ski" Lescrynski, age 79, passed away, Tuesday, November 26, 2013, in Madison. The funeral service was held Saturday, November 30, 2013, at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison. Burial was at Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends from 5-8 p.m. on Friday, November 29, 2013 at the funeral home. He was born September 10, 1934 to Alexander and Jenny Lescrynski, in Sherman, Conn. He was the youngest of 13 children and raised on a dairy farm. He is rst generation American as his parents emigrated from Poland in the early 1900's. He served in the US Air Force during the Korean War, also served in England and North Africa. After he was discharged from the military at Avon Park, Fl, he moved to Orlando. While in Orlando he worked in construction, often supervising building projects that involved hundreds of employees. He got tired of the rat race and moved to Madison about 30 years ago, where he was owner and operator of Ski's Concrete LLC. He was a workaholic and nothing pleased him more than getting the mud' on the ground. He was a non-practicing Catholic, but attended Hopewell Baptist church. His favorite saying was "I tell it like it is." He is survived by his wife: Estelle Ragans Lescrynski of Madison; one daughter: Marie Lescrynski Boyd and husband Hershell of Ray City, Ga.; sons: Roger Lescrynski and wife Diane of Port Charlotte, Mike Pippin and Cathy of Madison and Nathan Pippin of Texas; one step-son, Jimmy O'Quinn (Melissa) of Madison; his special sister-inlaw: Margaret Bailey of Madison; nine grandchildren: Travis, Emily, David, Valarie, Jimmy, Carol, Michael, Christopher and Tina; and three great-grandchildren: Caleb, Anissa, and Amber. His rst wife and mother of his children, Della Lescrynski, and two daughters, June Marie Lescrynski and Janice Lawrence, predeceased him. Beggs Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements (850) 973-2258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website www.beggsfuneral.com. Mary Waldrep OlsenMary Waldrep Olsen, age 96 died Saturday, November 30, 2013 in Madison. Graveside funeral services were held on Monday, December 2, 2013 at 2 p.m. at Harmony Cemetery near Cherry Lake with Rev. Steve McHargue ofciating. Mike McHargue played "Amazing Grace" on the trumpet. The family received friends Sunday evening from 6-8 p.m. at T. J. Beggs, Jr. & Sons Funeral Home in Madison. She was born in Lovett and was a lifelong resident of Madison County. In her early years, she was a schoolteacher. She taught in Sirmans and also a short time in Pensacola. She also was a sales clerk for Kramer's Department Store in Madison. She was a previous member of Harmony Baptist Church before becoming a member of Cherry Lake Baptist Church. Her daughter, Betty Jean McHargue, preceded her in death. Survivors include two step-sons: Richard L. Olsen, Jr. and Harold Olsen; two grandchildren: Carye Rebecca McHargue of Monticello and Sherri Lynn Cheng (Steven) of Baytown, Texas; six greatgrandchildren: Amy Crider (Dock) of Jennings, Susan Gillean (Oscar) of Chester, Va., Chad Gillean (Amanda) of Greenville, Pamela Moore (Jimmy) of Monticello, Troy Rewis of Destin and Joshua Moore of Greenville; and eight great great-grandchildren: Darren, Kaden, Karter, Gabriel, Samuel, Juliet, Mason, and Presley. T. J. Beggs, Jr. & Sons Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements (850) 973-2258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website www. beggsfuneral.com. Larry D. Law

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.In 2004, a few days shy of the 60thanniversary of DDay and two days before Memorial Day, President George W. Bush dedicated the U.S. National World War II Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Consisting of 56 large granite pillars with bas-relief sculptures, arranged in two semi-circles around an enormous oval plaza and fountain, with a pair of massive triumphal arches at each end, the memorial lies at the end of the reecting pool on the National Mall, halfway between the Washington and Lincoln Memorials. As many as four-anda-half million people visit the WWII Memorial each year. How many of those are WWII veterans, the very ones being honored? At the time of the dedication in 2004, 60 years had passed since the war ended; simple math meant that the youngest veterans would have been, at the very least, in their very, very late 70s, if they were teenagers when the war ended. After 60 years, the WWII veterans were elderly men, some dealing with disabilities, or mostly on xed incomes. It's a big country, and plane tickets are expensive. In North Carolina, retired Air Force captain/physician's assistant Earl Morse and small business owner Jeff Miller realized that many of the WWII veterans in their region would never get a chance to see their new monument without someone to help them. Together, Morse and Miller began looking for volunteers and organizing a network that would send the rst ight of veterans and volunteer escorts to Washington D.C. in May of 2005. This is Honor Flight. Today, the youngest surviving WWII veterans are now in their mid-80s, and Honor Flight has grown rapidly in the intervening decade to an umbrella organization with chapters throughout the country. Recent statistics show that America's population of WWII veterans is dwindling at the rate of 900 a day. Honor Flight's mission is make sure that as many of those veterans as possible get a chance to see their monument in Washington, at no expense to them or their families. Honor Flight volunteers include personally assigned guardians to push wheelchairs and assist those who need help getting around, and a team of volunteer medics for veterans with medical conditions those, for example, who need regularly scheduled medication during the trip or need help with oxygen bottles. Honor Flight Tallahassee was established in 2012 to bring this service to North Florida and South Georgia veterans. Its inaugural ight left Tallahassee for Washington, D.C. with 80 veterans aboard in April 2013. The youngest veteran on that ight was 85; the oldest was 96. Among the veterans on that ight was Madison County resident Willis Moore, Sgt. First Class and Bronze Star recipient, U.S. Army. Moore, former chair of the board for United Methodist Cooperative Ministries, was also a founder of the 55 Plus Club, along with co-chair Margaret Throgmorton, in September of 2003. Moore's wife spoke briey about that very special ight during the recent Veterans Day ceremony at Madison County Community Bank, and again two days later at the Veterans Day-themed November meeting of the 55 Plus Club. "It was a wonderful trip," she said. The veterans were well taken care of and treated like celebrities both in Washington, D.C. and again when they returned home to Tallahassee. As they were brought off the plane one by one, a band at the airport played patriotic music, and each man was given a gift bag that included an Honor Flight medallion. The medic who had escorted Moore throughout the trip even loaned Moore his camera, since Moore had forgotten to bring his own. Mrs. Moore wanted to spread the word about the program for other veterans and their families in the Madison County area who might not be aware of it. Honor Flight Tallahassee is preparing another charter ight for April of 2014 and they are accepting applications for it. For questions or more information about the Honor Flight program, call 1-888-881-1566, or visit the website http://honorighttallahassee.org/faq/. To ll out an application for an Honor Flight, go to http://honorighttallahassee.org/applications/ and ll out the form. For questions about other veterans services available in Madison Contact Veterans Services Ofce Oliver Bradley at (850) 464-1191, or visit him in the Veterans Services Ofce on the rst oor of the Courthouse Annex, just past Tax Collector Lisa Tuten's ofce. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013Madison County Carrier € 5AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.There will be a memorial blood drive in memory of Misti Mae (Mimi) Wyno at Clyattville, Ga., United Methodist Church on Saturday, Dec. 7. The blood drive will take place in the church's fellowship hall from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. For those who may not know, Misti Mae lost her life from loss of blood and injuries she sustained from a dog attack on December 2011. Misti Mae had been in an accident in September of that year and left unable to walk. She had just begun recovery with the use of a walker and on Dec. 8, walked to a neighbor's house to visit. On her way home, she was in the driveway of another neighbor's house when she was attacked by a neighborhood dog and was not found until the neighbor returned home later that day. Misti Mae was taken to South Georgia Medical Center, where she succumbed to her injuries and blood loss. In memory of Misti Mae, her parents, Irvin and Sandy Casey of Valdosta, Ga., and her in-laws, Frank and Emogene Wyno from Cherry Lake, ask you to join them to celebrate the life and to honor the memory of Misti Mae, by donating blood to the Red Cross. At the church, there will also be a gift drive for The Haven, a battered women's shelter, where you can donate unwrapped gifts for women and toys for children that will be taken to the shelter for Christmas. Clyattville United Methodist Church is located at 5311 Railroad Street in Valdosta, Ga.Misti Mae Wyno Memorial Blood Drive Set For Saturday This Is Honor FlightGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 13, 2013At the November 55 Plus Club Meeting Mrs. Moore talks about her husband Williss Honor Flight trip to the WWII Monument in Washington D.C.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Christmas music has a special place in the hearts of many people. A favorite Christmas carol we grew up singing with friends and family or a yuletide hymn that brings back memories of church services or choir specials, or a Christmas song we like ...just because. Choir specials and Christmas music abound during the season, and the 55 Plus Club has a special treat in store for its December meeting: a performance by the Madison Boys Choir, under the direction of Daniel Graham. The 55 Plus Club is an outreach of United Methodist Cooperative Ministries, and is free and open to anyone 55 years of age or older. The club meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every month at the UMCM Center, 135 NW Dill Ave., on the corner of Dill and Colin Kelly Hwy (Highway 145) near Hanson, about five miles north of town, for a free lunch provided by one of the member churches, and a guest speaker or musical performance. There are no fees, dues, registrations or even reservations required. Just come on out Wednesday, Dec. 11 at noon, bring some friends along with you, and be prepared to enjoy food, fellowship and some fine Christmas singing. For more information on the Club, or for directions to the UMCM Center contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929 4938.The Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism’s 2013 Annual Banquet brought area businesses together on Nov. 4 for a faceto-face meeting with the Tallahassee agency and business leader who regulates them. Secretary Ken Lawson of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation served as keynote speaker. The Banquet was made possible by the generous support of Duke Energy and many local and regional businesses that provided items for the Chamber’s annual Silent Auction. Lawson recounted his college days at Florida State University in Tallahassee: while he was pledging for a fraternity, he was told to move in with fellow student, Charlie Jackson of Madison County. Lawson brought everything he owned to their room and Jackson was crowded and unhappy with the extra stuff. Lawson compared his own youthful exuberance with too many regulations for business owners to wade through in the past. He said that the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation has eliminated more than 2,800 unnecessary regulations since January 2011, cutting a massive amount of “red tape.” When Lawson was asked what he learned about Madison County, he said, “Business owners and the professionals I met at the Madison County Chamber of Commerce event are passionate and enthusiastic about their community. It appeared that everyone shared the same interest in wanting to make Madison a successful place to live and grow their business,” said Lawson. For business owners that were not in attendance at the Madison County Chamber Banquet, Lawson’s focused on awareness: “It’s important to be in the know of what’s happening around you in your local community, as well as statewide,” he said. “As the head of a regulatory agency, I see rsthand how the lack of knowledge and falling behind on current events can directly impact your business if you don’t look ahead to make daring and innovative decisions,” he warned. Lawson said he sees both business owners and professionals as the job creators and that they should realize that over the past ve years, Florida has warmed up to a business climate that encourages risk-taking and investment in growth and the future. “Since Governor Scott took ofce, that’s an example of the groundwork happening at the state level that provides opportunities to businesses throughout Florida, whether located in a rural community or metropolitan (area),” commented Lawson. Looking to the future of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Lawson said, “When Governor Rick Scott appointed me to head the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, he encouraged me to focus on results. I am always thinking about what we can do to help Floridians get back to work and be more successful in their businesses and jobs. That message is relayed to division directors who are empowered to make decisions that allow for change.” For example, Lawson told how he worked with the Division of Hotels and Restaurants to create a Customer Bill of Rights card, and each food service licensee receives one of those cards upon inspection so they know whom to call to express any concerns they may have with a recent inspection. Interestingly enough, he said many of the calls they receive are to compliment the food safety and sanitation inspector. “We’re focused on results and the goal is to ensure the success of businesses in Florida while holding them accountable for following the law,” said Lawson. Changes to the Department can be expected. “The future of government and DBPR in particular is in the hands of technology,” said Lawson. “As technology becomes more affordable and innovative ideas are presented, DBPR can improve processes such as speeding up the process to approve, print and mail a new business or professional license.” Most recently, Lawson said through a new online procedure that licensees seeking to do business in other states can obtain a certication from DBPR online instantly. In many cases, technology enables DBPR to cut or eliminate fees. Looking ahead, he predicts that a combination of smart policies and innovative technology will be a game changer for government in Florida. Advice from Lawson for businesses that have seen a decline in customers in rural areas is to the point: “Keep an open dialogue. Talk with your employees, your customers, your neighbors and your community leaders. This insight will give you an opportunity to strategically think about the direction of your business and its future. Where is the community headed? What services are going to be needed?” Lawson believes that “by continuously talking with everyone around you, you will be able to assess the current status of your business and community and begin thinking ahead of what investments you should consider and implementing new ideas.” A native Floridian, Lawson has spent more than 12 years serving in numerous regulatory positions. Lawson began his legal career in the United States Marine Corps, Judge Advocate General’s Division and spent seven years serving as an Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Florida. Lawson is a graduate of Florida State University and the Florida State University College of Law. The Chamber’s Silent Auction provided a fun perk for the annual Banquet. This year the Silent Auction included vacation packages from Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Sarasota and other venues with a blast from the past: upcoming Sarasota Medieval Fair and Hoggetowne Medieval Faire in Gainesville tickets were made available for bidding. Some of the highlights of the Silent Auction included donations from local businesses, such as Duke Energy’s Columbia Camo Jacket and two Costa Hats, as well as a $139 Moultrie Game Spy Digital Camera from Madison Sporting Goods; NFCC Artist Series tickets each to four shows; NFCC Colin P. Kelly Fitness Center workout certicates; and Yogi Bear Jellystone Park three-day, two night campground certicates. Also participating: Hickory Hill Auctions with a Prairie Springs art print; Antiques & Gifts Store’s elegant FSU necklace and matching football bracelet; a Classic Facial from Daylight Salon & Spa; The Old Bookstore with a canoeing book; a Christmas wreath from Madison Garden Club and a natural oral arrangement by Dolly Ballard; a Curves’ Fitness Assessment and free classes; gift baskets from Everything Pecan of Lee and Spanky’s BBQ/Catering in Madison; meal certicates from O’Neal’s and Divine Events Restaurants; quarts of Sheffer Honey from Pinetta and more. The Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce is currently celebrating the City of Madison’s 175thAnniversary and can be contacted at (850) 9732788 or email chamber@madison.org. The Chamber is located at 248 SW Range Ave. in Madison. The Chamber Web site is www.madison.org to print out area maps and see business member listings. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 6A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Madison County Chamber Banquet Brings Area Businesses Together Photo submittedNov. 4 found area business owners and employees gathered together for the annual Madison County Chamber Banquet. Pictured left to right: Roy Ellis, Board Chairman of the Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce, Inc.; Secretary Ken Lawson of the Dept. of Business and Professional Regulation; and Cindy Vees, Executive Director of the Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce. Madison Boys Choir To Perform At 55 Plus Club wens Propane, IncService With A SmileŽ Serving North FloridaMADISON, JEFFERSON, SUWANNEE& HAMILTONCOUNTIES SIMPLY EVERYDAY FAIR PRICING We Are Here To Earn Your Business&K ee p Your Business€FREE TANK SETS € HEATER SERVICE € € NEW HEATERS € TANKLESS WATER HEATERS €€ GAS LOGS € PRICE COMPARISONS € Madison Office137 SW Shelby Avenue  Madison, Florida 32340(850) 253-3761 $3.19 PER GALLON  NO DELIVERY FEES   NO SEASONAL PRICES  NO GIMMICKS  (Ask For Becky)

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Show off your holiday spirit and creativity this year by taking part in the 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas Gingerbread House Contest sponsored by Base Street Florist and Coffee Corner in Madison. The rst place winner in each of three categories Youth (ages 12 and under), Teen (ages 13 to 19) and Adult/Family Team will receive a $25 gift certicate. For rules and information, visit mygreenville.com or contact Bali Thigpen at (850) 973-2525.By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.In her introduction of the November guest speaker for the Madison Garden Club, Mina Bloodworth mentioned that one of the drawbacks for both beginning and seasoned gardeners alike in this region, is that there are so few gardening books geared specically toward this area of Florida: its soils, its weather patterns and the variety of other conditions that affect plants here. That's not to say that they don't exist, just that it takes some looking. Lake City author and gardening expert Martha Ann Ronsonet has written such a book, specically suited for the conditions here in North Florida. An enthusiastic gardener for many years, she has amassed a wealth of knowledge about native plants and gardening techniques that work best in this region's mild winters with the occasional frosts, followed by the almost unbear ably hot, humid summers. Her friends had been telling her for years that she ought to write a book about what she knew, and she nally heeded their advice. Gardening in the Deep South and Other Hot Pursuits was a project six years in the making. More than just a compendium of gardening techniques, the book reects Ronsonet's philosophy that gardening is more than just creating beautiful landscapes; it is caring for the environment and making choices that don't endanger natural habitats for native plants and animals. The choices that gardeners make as far as plants, fertilizer and pest control usage can affect everything from the native wildlife to the quality of the water they drink. The book, a little over 200 pages long, is lavishly illustrated with hundreds of photographs of plants and wildlife of every kind, discussing subjects from natural pest control, to different kinds of mulch, to scientic vs. common names for native plants, to wildlife, to irrigation, to "MonthBy-Month Gardening," a 39-page chapter that describes what grows best in this region for each month of the year. When is the best month for container gardening? When is the best time to transplant? When is the best month to cut back or prune? When is the best month for planting those warm weather vegetables? When is the right time for picking the zucchini and cucumbers? What kind of colorful blooms can gardeners expect to see in April? It's all there, laid out from January to December. Like shade gardening? So does Ronsonet, because, "I get to work in the shade," she says dryly. Her book discusses both sun gardening and shade gardening, and Florida gardeners are fortunate when it comes to choices for either, because Florida has more native plants to its name than any other state. Her hometown of Lake City also has an annual festival that celebrates native plants. "Every year, I nd something else to bring home," she told the Madison Garden Club. "There are hundreds (of native plants) to choose from...(and) native plants are used to our harsh environment." The hot, brutal summers, where the humidity runs neck-and-neck with the temperature, and the winters that can be freezing one day and balmy the next native plants can handle it. They are hardier than their imported cousins, and more resistant to the insects here, so they don't need as much spraying or watering. Of course, that doesn't completely rule out non-natives. "Some of them can be okay, too. Just don't pick invasive ones." When discussing her favorite plants, the live oak tree, that icon of Deep South landscapes everywhere, tops her list and graces the cover of her book. "Oak trees make me cry," she said. "Especially the aged ones. Just imagine if they could talk, the things they could tell us." Then, there is trillium cuneatum A.K.A. "Sweet Betsy." Recommended for North Florida gardens, it goes dormant in the summer and pops up in January. The cornus orida, the owering dogwood, is "the sweetest little tree," she says, with its abundant white owers in the spring. The chionanthus virginicus, the fringe tree, when in bloom, is "a sight to behold." It is an excellent understory tree, and blooms best when it gets morning sunlight. The cercis canadensis is another familiar sight in Southern landscapes, where it is popularly known as the redbud tree, gracing yards with reddishor pinkish-purple clouds of tiny blooms in the spring. The callicarpa americana or American beautyberry, is another familiar sight, a popular ornamental shrub with its clusters of bright purple berries. "Deer love the foliage," said Ronsonet. "But then, deer love everything in my yard!" The magnolia macrophylla, or big-leaf (ashe) magnolia is an impressive sight, boasting the biggest single leaf (up to two feet) and the largest single ower (up to a foot across) of any native species in the entire North American continent. When it comes to groundcovers, phlox divaricata, or wild sweet william, is a native woodland phlox that does well here and doesn't get the mildew infestations that other phloxes do. It forms a dense mat of foliage, and its blossoms are known for attracting hummingbirds and butteries. Zerhyranthes atamasco, or rain lilies, grow in boggy soil and spread by bulb offsets. Their white owers appear in March or April. The native azaleas, in the rhododendron family, are another familiar Southern garden staple, as is Solomon's seal, which will grow with no care whatsoever, and the saw palmetto, a Florida landscape icon if there ever was one. "People think I'm a good gardener, but I just have really good soil," said Ronsonet, describing the way her mother used to leave oak leaves on the ground to form natural mulch that eventually decomposed into new soil. "That's the way nature does it. Who am I to say different?" Gardening is also about teaching gardeners what not to do, things that could damage Florida's rivers and springs. It is something she is passionate about, which is why she emphasizes native gardening. "In the future," she said, "water, not oil, is what will control the world." www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013Madison County Carrier € 7 AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY North Florida Gardening With Native PlantsGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 7, 2013Author and gardening expert Martha Ann Ronsonet of Lake City, seen here with her book Gardening in the Deep South and Other Hot Topics,Ž was the guest speaker at the Madison Garden Clubs November meeting, discussing native plants and gardening techniques that not only produce beautiful landscapes, but also protect Floridas rivers and springs. For more information, or to order a copy of her book, please contact Fine Images and Printing in Gainesville at the website http://www.“neimages.me or email FineImagesPrinting@gmail.com. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 13, 2013The Treasures Of Madison County Museum, located in the historical W.T. Davis Building on Range Street in downtown Madison, is looking to expand its collection of old military photographs or other military memorabilia from local residents and their families. If you have any old photographs of family members who were in the armed forces, particularly of the WWII era, bring them to the Treasures Museum. They can be scanned in and immediately returned to you. If you have any old military items from your family that you would like to donate or loan to the museum, please contact Oliver Bradley at (850) 464-1191, or Teenie Cave (see William Cave in the local phone directory), or bring those by the museum as well. The Treasures of Madison County Museum wants to preserve as much of this local history as possible for future generations.Treasures Museum Seeking Old Military Photos 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas Gingerbread House Contest

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 8A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Crystal Bochnia, broker/owner for new real estate business, Madison Realty Group, ofcially opened her doors Nov. 14 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Bochnia took over the real estate business from Roy and Suzanne Milliron, who occupied the ofce for 35 years as Milliron Realty. Bochnia has three realtors working in the ofce alongside her: Ann Sapp, Beth Meggs and Ronnie Ragans. The ribbon-cutting ceremony brought out friends, colleagues and towns people, showing support for Bochnia and her venture. Roy Ellis, representing the Chamber of Commerce welcomed her to the business community with a small speech prior to the ceremonial snip. When asked how she felt about the opening, Bochnia replied, "Ready." Madison Realty Group, LLC, is located at 112 SW Range Avenue. You can contact them at (850) 973-4458 or you can visit their website at madisonrealtygroupllc.com.Madison Realty Group Opens For BusinessGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 14, 2013Roy Ellis (far left) represented the Chamber of Commerce in welcoming the new real estate business to the neighborhood. Crystal Bochnia cuts the grand opening ribbon (center) as realtors from left to right, Ann Sapp, Beth Meggs and on the far right, Ronnie Ragans, watch.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 14, 2013Supporters for Crystal Bochnia and her new business wait on the ceremony to begin. From left to right are, Roy Ellis, Darlene H agan, Bob and GiGi Auston and Danny and Marianne Graves.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 14, 2013Ed Meggs stands between Ann Campbell (left) and Marilyn Ragans (right) after the ceremony.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 14, 2013The Millirons, who are of“ciallyŽ retired from the real estate business, pass it on to Broker, Crystal Bochnia and the realtors working alongside her. Standing from left to right are Ann Sapp, Suzanne and Roy Milliron, Broker, Crystal Bochnia, Beth Meggs and Ronnie Ragans.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Angela Miller, Assistant Regional Counsel for the Ofce of Criminal Conict & Civil Regional Counsel, (1st DCA), has practiced law from both the defense and the prosecution sides of the table, and has worked in several different areas of law, including real estate law and family law to name a few, but her rst love is trial work. Recently, she visited the Madison Kiwanis Club as their guest speaker to share some of her experiences and talk about the state of her profession and what it holds for the future. A Georgia native, she grew up in Georgia and went to law school in Georgia, but after practicing law both there and in Florida, she compared the Georgia experience to “stepping back in time to the 1960’s,” where one judge there refused to address her in his courtroom, because he believed that she was in an area of law that was “unsuitable for a woman.” She left there to take her position with the Ofce of Criminal Conict, which handles cases where the defendants are entitled to a public defender, but their cases represent a conict of interest for the Public Defender’s Ofce. “I represent parents whose children have been removed by DCF,” she said. “Some people ask me how can I do that, and I tell them because they (the parents) are constitutionally entitled to counsel. I make sure that the law is followed, and I develop a case plan.” She outlines the program the parents have to get with if they want their children back, but doesn’t “babysit” them. If they are serious about having their children returned, she believes they will be responsible enough to keep their court appointments without phone calls to remind them. As for their behavior, they already know what they have to stop doing, whether it’s stop using drugs or anything else that caused the state to step in. When it comes to domestic violence, the biggest part of the problem is with the dependant children in those situations, children who either witness the victimization and violence and grow up to continue the cycle, or who are in danger of becoming victims themselves. There are no racial or gender boundaries for domestic violence. She had dealt with whites, blacks and Hispanics, with married couples, cohabitating couples and homosexual couples, with situation where the woman is the victim, and where the man is the victim. Men can be victims too, although it is not nearly as common as women (who comprise about 85 percent of victims) and their cases are much less likely to be reported because of the social stigma attached to male victims. They can be rich and successful couples, or dirt poor; one such couple was a judge and his wife in Georgia, the same judge who refused to speak to Miller in his courtroom because she was a woman. She has seen women battered and beaten by their boyfriends, and their children battered and beaten, yet the women still choose their boyfriends over their children. She has seen an old high school friend of hers go back to her military husband who was beating and abusing her. When the woman’s mother called and requested help from Miller, she went to see her friend, talk to her, and assess the situation. “I felt that he was dangerously close to abusing their daughter as well, if he hadn’t already,” she said. She told her friend that and also predicted exactly what would happen: he would call and tell her that he had changed, but that would turn out to be a lie and things would go back to the way they were. Her friend said she wouldn’t go back, yet when her husband called and promised that he had changed, she went back, in spite of Miller’s warnings. Later, he was brought up on charges of molesting their daughter. She knew of a woman whose husband controlled her by moving her out into the middle of a rural nowhere in the Midwest, and cut her off from all contact with her family and friends. The woman managed to earn a Master’s degree in spite of her connement, but she remained with her husband. “I don’t know how to get someone past that,” Miller sighed. Here in the Deep South where she grew up, she also deals with a culture that frowns upon interfering in a neighbor’s business, “but sometimes you have to,” she said, unless they are in the middle of a full-blown episode – in that case, call the law. That is an extremely dangerous situation where even experienced law enforcement ofcers get injured. “All you can do it try to help.” She also deals with cultural forces that use religion to justify control and abuse of women. One thing she hears frequently is, “the Bible says....” “No,” is her reply. “The Bible says love and respect your wife, not control her.” Control, whether economic (for example, denying access to a checkbook), emotional, or physical, is a different matter altogether, and one that is not justied by Scripture. Another area of law that she feels is important is elder law. “Our society is aging. Please, for your children’s sake, have your nancials in order to make it easier for them to take care of you.” Elder law is complex and difcult even for a trained attorney like herself to understand; she did not realized how complex, until a situation with a family member brought her into an area of law she was not familiar with and she realized quickly that she did not understand all the convoluted rules and regulations. Even after taking several courses to help her deal with the situation, she does not consider herself an expert. “Get an elder-law certied attorney to help you. And get whatever you need in place to help those who will take care of you. Someone you trust.” If it comes to giving someone power of attorney, trust is paramount. Power of attorney is a very powerful tool that, in the wrong hands, can be disastrous. Family members granted power of attorney have been known to abscond with all the elderly person’s assets, and there is absolutely nothing the law can do about it. Power of attorney is not a bad thing, but it should be used wisely. The person granting it should be aware of just how powerful it is, and think long and hard about the person it will be given to; someone who is absolutely trustworthy, who has your best interests at heart. When it comes to the state of her profession, she shakes her head. “I hate to sound like my parents, but it’s going to hell in a hand basket.” She has watched the new crop of young attorneys in trial court who don’t have a clue how to make an objection. They couldn’t make a persuasive argument if their lives depended on it. They may have passed the bar, and they may be bright enough about legal codes, but they don’t know anything about courtroom procedure. They can’t think on their feet when something unexpected comes up as will always happen, no matter how well an attorney is prepared for a case. They need mentoring before they go into private practice. Perhaps in the future, the bar will have to establish something similar to the “residency” requirement that follows medical school, where young med school graduates are mentored under experienced physicians for several years. “I didn’t know everything when I rst came out of law school,” she said, adding that she was fortunate to have a brilliant legal secretary to help her. “And I still don’t. I don’t know anybody who does.” She has spent her entire life learning, a process that should never stop, not for anybody. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013Madison County Carrier € 9AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Attorney Angela Miller Addresses KiwanisGreen Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, November 21, 2013Angela Miller (left), Assistant Regional Counsel for the Of“ce of Criminal Con”ict, receives a Certi“cate of Appreciation from Madison Kiwanis Club president Diane Head (right) Miller visited the club to share her experiences as an attorney in various areas of law as well as her insights on the legal profession today as a whole. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 7, 2013With a creative streak, one can turn mundane household objects … including recyclables … into art objects and decorative useful pieces for the holiday season. Dolly Ballard brought in some of her creations to show the members of the Madison Garden Club how old Pringles cans, tin cans, plastic bottles and even old dishes can be repurposed with fabric, paint, trim, spangles and glue into something decorative and cheerful. Here, she used a bit of plaid fabric in holiday colors to dress up an ordinary ”owerpot.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, November 7, 2013A side table holds Miss Dollys demonstration projects. The large item in the foreground is a oneof-a-kind, three-tiered bird feeder, fashioned from an old vase “lled with decorative glass marbles, a water goblet and three dinner plates, all cemented together. The bird feeder was later auctioned off to one of the garden club members. Spray paint, fabric and spangles turn other old cans into pencil holders and containers for kitchen items, candles and candy canes. Hats off to Miss Dolly for her creativeness and ability to see ordinary things in a totally different light. Miss Dolly's Recyclables Brighten Holidays

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 10A € Madison County CarrierSPORTS By Fran HuntGreene Publishing, Inc. The Aucilla Christian Academy varsity Lady Warriors won one of the past four games to now stand 2-6 on the season. Aucilla hit the basketball court against FAMU on November 21, and the Lady Warriors were thrashed for a 93-9 loss. “FAMU will probably take state again this year,” said Coach Daryl Adams. Marisa Duber netted for three points, with two rebounds, and two blocked shots. Ashley Hebert scored two points, and had one steal. Kayla Knecht had two points, two rebounds, and two steals. Lauren Demott netted for two points, with four rebounds, and one assist. Kinzi Mattingly had one assist. On November 22, the Lady Warriors squared off against Franklin County, and Aucilla was bounced for a 51-28 loss. Duber had two points and two rebounds. Ramsey Sullivan scored two points. Mattingly bucketed for seven points and grabbed seven rebounds. Demott had one point, with two rebounds and four steals. Knecht targeted for 16 points, sn agged eight rebounds and had a whopping 10 steals, nearly getting a tripledouble. Morgan Cline had three rebounds. Whitney Stevens had three assists. The Lady Warriors hit the hardwood against Georgia Christian on November 25, and Aucilla was tossed for a 50-20 loss. Duber scored one point. Sullivan netted for six points. Mattingly bucketed for seven points. Demott had one point. Stevens scored three points. Knecht had two points. The Lady Warriors hit the warpath against North Florida Christian on November 26 and the Lady Warriors scalped their opponent for a 57-27 victory. “We played great,” said Coach Adams. “It was a good positive for us.” Duber bucketed for 10 points, sn agged nine rebounds, with two assists and two steals. Cline scored two points and had six rebounds. Sullivan scored six points and had ve rebounds. Demott had six points and seven rebounds. Stevens targeted for 16 points and had two rebounds, two assists and four steals. Knecht bucketed for 10 points, with eight rebounds, ve assists and six steals. Cali Burkett scored three points. Payal Chaudari had two points. Mattingly netted for two points and had two steals. Kelly Horne had three assists. The Lady Warriors hit the hardwood against Brookwood on December 3 and those statistics will be forthcoming. Action continues against Robert F. Munroe, December 5 at 6 p.m., home; Tallavana Christian, December 6 at 6 p.m., home; Lafayette, December 9 at 6 p.m., home; FAMU, December 10 at 6 p.m., away; Tallavana Christian, December 12 at 6 p.m., there; Madison County, December 16 at 6 p.m., home; and Lafayette, December 20 at 5:30 p.m., away.Lady Warriors Win One Of Past Four Cowgirls Clawed By Lady CougarsBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. The Madison County High School Cowgirls traveled to Tallahassee on Tuesday, Nov. 26, to play the Godby High Lady Cougars. At the end of the first quarter, the Cowgirls trailed 20-11. The Lady Cougars extended their lead to 39-23 at halftime. The Cowgirls never could get into the game and trailed 62-35 at the end of three periods. Godby won the game 83-53. Jameica Cobb scored 26 points for the Cowgirls. Josie Long has 16 points. Kevisa Moore scored one point. Tra’Vecia Fead scored five points. Darresha White had three points. Niyah Hall scored two points. The loss was a district game for the Cowgirls. Cowgirls Lose In Overtime Basketball ActionBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Sporting a 2-0 record after impressive victories over Branford (65-45) and Aucilla (53-18), the Madison County High School Cowgirls traveled to Havana to engage in varsity basketball action against the East Gadsden Lady Jaguars. East Gadsden looked like they were going to control the entire game, leading 23-10 at the end of the rst period. The second quarter went East Gadsden’s way also and they went into the locker room at halftime, leading 37-22. Down by 15 points, the Cowgirls, led by Jameca Cobb, turned on the afterburners and fought back. At the end of the third quarter, the Lady Jaguars lead had been nipped to 4439. When regulation ended, the game stood at 61-61 and headed into overtime, where the Lady Jaguars outscored the Cowgirls 13-5. Jameca Cobb scored 32 points in the game. Kevisa Moore had six points. Nacoya Williams scored two points. K. Henderson scored nine points. Adrianna Kinsey scored two points. Josie Long scored 13 points. Lady Seminoles Down Cowgirls In Basketball ActionBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. The Madison County High School Cowgirls hosted the Florida High Lady Seminoles on Thursday, Nov. 21. The play was close throughout the game. After the end of the rst period, the Cowgirls and Lady Seminoles were tied at 10 each. In the second quarter, the Cowgirls pulled ahead to a 23-18 lead. The Lady Seminoles outscored the Cowgirls 19-11 in the third quarter and at the end of that period led 37-34. Florida High pulled out a 53-44 victory in the fourth quarter. Jameca Cobb was the leading scorer for the Cowgirls with 33 points. Josie Long scored seven points. Kosha Gamble scored two points.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013Madison County Carrier € 11ASPORTS MCCS Broncos Off To A Fast StartSubmitted By Matt Replogle, MCCS Broncos coachThe Madison County Central School’s Broncos boy’s basketball team has raced off to a fast start. The team is 5-0, in part to great team defense and in part to strong rebounding. The Broncos opened the season at home on Tuesday, Nov. 12 against Wakulla. The nal score was 40-23. Travis Jay led the team with 12 points; Ken Hawkins scored 10 points; Vincenta Mitchell, six points; Devin Brinson, ve points; Zion Jones scored three points; Darryln Brooks and Darius Johnson, added two points each. Next the Broncos traveled to Quitman to play Brooks County. The team started off hot and nished strong, winning 57-21. Mitchell led the team with 20 points; Jay added 10; Hawkins, seven; Miller, six; Brooks, four and Teryon Henderson, Brinson, Tyrique Burton, Jones and Dylan Cole each added two points. The Broncos then traveled to Perry to take on Taylor County in a conference game. The Broncos came out on top of the heated contest, 40-33. Darryln Brooks led the way with 17 points with Mitchell adding nine; Jay, eight and Henderson, Hawkins and Miller each adding two. Lake City Richardson came to Madison for a game on Nov. 21. The Broncos came out on top of a young Richardson team with a score of 46-15. Travis Jay led the way with 19 points; Mitchell and Hawkins, nine each; Miller, ve and Cole and D Johnson added two each. The Broncos were at home for the nal game before Thanksgiving break in a rematch against Brooks county. The game was a battle but the Broncos held off the Trojans, 50-27. Travis Jay again led all scorers with 27 points; Mitchell, eight; Miller, six; Brooks, ve and Hawkins and Henderson each scored four points to wrap up the scoring. The Broncos want to invite everyone to come out and support the team next week as they play a tough conference game at home. You can support the team on Thursday, Dec. 5, against Hamilton in the MCCS gym. The girls start at 5 p.m. and the boys at 6 p.m.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 25, 2013The MCCS Broncos boys basketball team is off to a good start this season. Standing in the front row, from left to right are: M ike Gibson, Zion Jones, Devin Brinson, Teryon Henderson, Dylan Cole, Travis Jay and Tyrique Burton. In the back row, standing left to right are: Coach Matt R eplogle, Kedrique Knowles (manager), Keyshawn Johnson, Vincenta Mitchell, Ken Hawkins, Darryln Brooks, James Miller and Coach A.D. Kinsey. Not pictured are C halon Howard, Darius Johnson and Howard Robinson (manager). HEY! WE’RE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]It’s never been easier to share your local news with friends and family!

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 12A € Madison County Carrier SCHOOLBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. SkillsUSA, a club at Madison County High School, which focuses on technical programs, is holding a fundraiser. The club is selling Christmas ornaments which cost $10 each or $12.50 if they are wrapped in a box. A $5 down payment is required for each personalized ornament. Examples of the ornaments are available on the SkillsUSA Facebook page and Etsy page, as well as at the high school in the room of Paige Thomas, who is the SkillsUSA sponsor. Order forms are also available by emailing Paige Thomas at paige.thomas@madisonmail.us or by speaking to any SkillsUSA club member. SkillsUSA Club At High School Selling Christmas OrnamentsBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.The Greater Community Nurturing Childcare Center provided more than just physical care to their children this Thanksgiving; they also provided a lesson in the spirit of giving, says Daycare Director, Merelda Alexander. The daycare constructed a box to resemble a turkey and they stuffed it with non-perishable food items that they gave to the ARC, a community-based organization that serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The childcare center is a ministry offshoot of Greater Community Baptist Church, where Alexander’s husband, Jerry, is the pastor. The daycare was started in 2007 and was originally located across from the Central School in Madison, but now operates at the corner of Range and Dinkins. The center cares for children six weeks through ve years and also has an after school program. This was the second year the daycare has taken part in a community food drive. Last year they participated with Madison’s Chamber of Commerce. Alexander feels it is important to instill in the kids a spirit of giving and that sometimes it is better to give than to receive. She says a lot of people go without because they don’t share their need, so we need to give “just in case.”Daycare Provides Kids A Lesson In GivingGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 21, 2013The Greater Community Nurturing Childcare Center teachers and students pose with their giving boxŽ that they gave this Thanksg iving to help the recipients of ARC. Sitting in the front row, from left to right, are: Kyshon Cherry, Zeimyon Heirs, Anyrae Miller, Keshanti Reaves, Christ ian Robinson, Kenardre Williams, Emoni McKnight, Kaden Ruth and DeMarion West. Standing in the second row is: Breasia Johnson, Jordann Bussey, Oniya Isom, Kymani Da vis, Malik Davis, Brian Hill, Jayden McDonald, Jonviere Washington, Jaylin Norwood, Essence Mitchell and Jemaine Randolph. Standing in the third row is: Dia mond Bruton, Jameirium Bussey, Dakota Washington, Jeremy Webb, Sean Woodard, Nyliyah Oliver, Jameiya Bussey and Calvin Bruton. Standing in the back r ow, from left to right are: Merelda Alexander, Director, holding Jaiden Shannon; Susan Neely, preschool teacher, holding Anthony Robinson; Myra Wilson, Inf ant Room, holding Cortez Weatherspoon; Krystal Green, Toddler Room, holding Moses Morris and Jabaris Thointon, parent, holding his son, Jabaris Thointon Jr. Make 2013 the year you change your life CLASSES IN MADISON STARTJANUARY 6Bachelors Degree Programs € Business Administration with specialization in Management € Computer Information Systems € Criminal Justice € Elementary Education € Health Care Management € Human Services € Psychology Full-time students may be eligible for the Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Approved for VA Bene“ts/GI Bill Classes now forming in Madison(850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu What you need for where youre going Now offering The Doctorate of Business Administration (Online and On Campus) ou need for wher What y e y ou need for wher e going r  ou ee egr re s D  achelor B dministration A usiness € B Classes ograms r r ee P dministration Classes dministration A usiness € B with specialization in anagement M nformation € Computer I ystems S ustice riminal J € C ducation lementary E € E anagement e M ealth Car € H dministrationanuar J in M with specialization in nformation ducation anagement N The D ing t tar S y 6 anuar adison in M fer w of o N octorate of The D ervices uman S € H chology sy € P ull-time students may F be eligible for the esident ida R lor F G) rant (FRA G ervices ull-time students may be eligible for the ccess A esident The D usiness B nline and O (O octorate of The D dministration A usiness ampus) n C nline and O V ed for v o ppr ro A ill ene“ts/GI B B w for Classes no adison in Mwww A VA ming w for (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp www (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013Madison County Carrier € 13A HEALTHAtherosclerosis, also known as "hardening of the arteries," is a condition in which cholesterol-rich plaque builds up along arterial walls. It is a type of Arteriosclerosis and sometimes the names are used interchangeably. R esearch suggests that this process probably begins as a result of an injury to the endothelial (inside) lining of an artery wall. The injury may be the result of high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, chronic system-wide inammation, smoking and numerous other factors. In response to the injury, white blood cells, along with lipids (fats), begin to accumulate along the inner layer of the artery. The muscle layer of the artery may also grow, forming the basis of a plaque, which many grow large enough to block the artery. If the plaque is disturbed, blood platelets (cells that play a key role in blood clotting) may begin to accumulate at the site and form a clot, which can continue to grow until it completely blocks an artery and cuts off the oxygen supply to a vital organ. Alternatively, a clot can break free from the vessel wall and become lodged somewhere else further downstream. If the clot completely blocks the blood and oxygen supply to a major artery leading to the heart, the result is a heart attack. If an artery to the brain is blocked (as seen, for example, with carotid artery disease), the result is a stroke. Atherosclerosis that affects the arteries in the arms, legs or pelvis is called peripheral artery disease. Atherosclerosis doesn't cause any symptoms until blood ow through the affected artery slows or becomes blocked. However, when arteries to the heart are affected, symptoms can include chest pain (angina) following a drop in the blood supply to the heart muscle, an increased demand for oxygen by the heart, a combination of both and, sometimes, emotional stress. Angina may feel like pressure or squeezing in the chest, or as pain in the shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back. It may even feel like indigestion. To complicate matters further, symptoms are often very different in women than in men. Angina typically worsens with activity and subsides with rest. Other symptoms often present with coronary artery disease include shortness of breath and arrhythmias (abnormal changes in the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat slower or faster than usual, or irregular). A narrowing or blockage of an artery leading to the brain can result in a stroke. Symptoms include sudden weakness; paralysis or numbness of the face, arms, or legs, especially on one side of the body; confusion; problems speaking or understanding speech; trouble seeing in one or both eyes; breathing problems; dizziness; trouble walking; loss of balance or coordination and unexplained falls; loss of consciousness; sudden, severe headache. The symptoms of peripheral artery disease include numbness, tingling, pain, and, sometimes, the development of dangerous infections. The risk of atherosclerosis increases progressively with age. Recent studies have indicated that you are more likely to develop atherosclerosis if one or both of your parents have had heart disease before age 60. Other risk factors include high cholesterol, smoking, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, diabetes, high triglycerides, being overweight or obese, a sedentary lifestyle and the use of birth control pills or estrogen replacement therapy. Sleep apnea, stress and excessive consumption of alcohol can also raise the risk of atherosclerosis. In addition, high blood levels of a protein called C-reactive protein indicate inammation in the body, stemming from injury or infection. Inammation is now viewed as a major risk factor for heart attack, atherosclerosis and other serious diseases. It isn't yet known whether reducing CRP levels will lower the risk of atherosclerosis. When a health care provider listens to your neck with a stethoscope, he or she may hear a whooshing or blowing sound (the medical term is "bruit") that may be present if atherosclerosis has developed in the carotid arteries. High cholesterol levels that show up on blood tests suggest an increased risk for atherosclerosis. The following tests can also help diagnose atherosclerosis: Electrocardiogram (EKG) : A test to record the heart's electrical activity. It shows how fast the heart is beating, its rhythm, and can reveal signs of heart damage caused by coronary artery disease and signs of a past or present heart attack. Echocardiogram: This test uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. It also yields information about the size and shape of the heart and how well the heart's chambers and valves are working. Echocardiography can also reveal areas of poor blood ow to the heart, areas of the heart that aren't contracting normally and previous injury to the heart muscle caused by poor blood ow. Computed Tomography (CT Scan): With this test you get computer-generated pictures of the heart, brain or other areas of the body. In the case of the heart, it can show narrowing of large arteries and reveal calcium build-ups in coronary artery walls. Stress Test: This is a test to show how long you can continue to walk on a treadmill as the speed increases and how fast your heart rate returns to normal after 30 minutes or less of exercise. A stress test can also reveal abnormal changes in heart rate or blood pressure, shortness of breath or chest pains and abnormal changes in your heart's rhythm or electrical activity. Angiography: With this test, a thin, exible tube (catheter) is put in a blood vessel of the arm, groin or neck and dye that can be seen on an xray is injected through the catheter to the arteries. Then x-rays are taken which show whether plaque or a clot is blocking any arteries, how severe the blockage is and the blood ow through the arteries. Ankle/Brachial Index: This test for peripheral artery disease compares blood pressure in the ankle with blood pressure in the arm to reect how well blood is owing. Did You Know...Frank NathanFormer Executive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness Tips Take The Time To Protect YourselfWashing our hands is a lesson we all learned as children, but when we're busy or in a hurry, we tend to rush or forget to do it. We think our hands are clean, but they're not if we haven't done it right. Just rinsing your hands isn't washing them and a quick rub, even with soap, won't get your hands clean. Follow the steps below to make sure you are washing your hands correctly because the few seconds that you think your saving could cost you days if you get sick later. Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold) and apply soap Rub your hands to gether to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of your hands, between your ngers, and under your nails Continue rubbing your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the "Happy Birthday" song from beginning to end twice OR run through your grocery list in your head. Make it a habit. Rinse your hands well under running water Dry your hands us ing a clean towel or air dry them As you touch peo ple, surfaces and objects throughout the day, you accumulate germs on your hands. In turn, you can infect yourself with these germs by touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Although it's impossible to keep your hands germ-free, following the four Principles of Hand Awareness listed below can help limit the transfer of bacteria, viruses and other microbes. Wash your hands when they are dirty and BEFORE eating DO NOT cough into your hands, if possible DO NOT sneeze into your hand, if possible Above all, DO NOT put your ngers into your eyes, nose or mouth Handwashing is the SINGLE MOST EFFECTIVE METHOD of preventing the spread of germs. Do yourself a favor and wash yours often and teach your family to do the same. Andrew Creel Receives Delores “De” Ingraham Spiritual Care Giver Recognition AwardAlbert Einstein said "try not to become a man of success but a man of value." Andrew "Andy" Creel, Chaplain for Big Bend Hospice, has denitely brought value to his community. That is why Andy was honored by his peers and presented with the Delores "De" Ingraham Spiritual Caregiver Award as part of Clergy Appreciation Month. Andy's constant pursuit to alleviate the suffering of others makes him ideal for his role as Chaplain on the Big Bend Hospice Team for Jefferson, Madison, and Taylor County. When his co-workers were asked what one word best describes Andy, they responded with compassionate, empathetic, tolerant and steadfast. "Andy is one of the most caring, loving men you will ever meet," says Carol Katz, Team Leader for the JMT Team. "His excellence in helping others is not just an act but is his habit. Andy does not strive for recognition but focuses on the value of contributing to human kind without expecting anything in return." Andy is not only caring of the patients but also the staff. Kathy Bass, Professional Liaison for Big Bend Hospice, explains "Andy will wait in his car to see that we are safe in our surroundings. He is supportive and present when we have dying patients. He is always tirelessly doing whatever needs to be done." The Delores "De" Ingraham Award recognizes a Chaplain who has made a signicant contribution to Big Bend Hospice's spiritual care and counseling each year. Just to have been nominated by your peers is an honor in itself. Nominees must have demonstrated sensitivity, dedication, commitment, and openness to diversity, and a passion for encouraging patients, families and staff to discover and afrm their spiritual well being. Andy is an avid reader and is always quoting things he has read. So to use the words from Aristotle, "We are what we repeatedly do," we congratulate Andy for what he is someone who uses his efforts, skills, and knowledge to improve one's life and the lives of others each and every day. Andrew Creel

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE YARD SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED WANTED TO BUY Buy, Sell or Trade In The Classi“eds Call 973-4141 Call 973-4141One Man’s Junk Is Another Man’s Treasure www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 14A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Check us out on-line www.greenepublishing.com FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 12/2/2013 THROUGH 12/8/2013 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Of“ce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age18 yr. Day and evening classes. Next class November 11 386-362-1065.11/6 11/27, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cWasher And Dryer For Sale! Kenmore series 70 washer, top load. Series 80 dryer, front load (door opens from top down). White in color and both are in perfect working order. $400 “rm. Call (229) 460-529610/30 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.One Person Cabin On Farm $395/month. Background check required. Call (850) 673-1117.10/16 rtn, cCASH FOR FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES! $1000 for Madison Co enamel Tags dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL tags starting with #35 for years 1938, 39, 40, 43, 49, and 54. Jeff Francis gobucs13@aol.com or 727 424 1576.www.”oridalicenseplates.com10/23 -12/25, pd€ Maintenance Equipment Specialist. € Part time curriculum developer wanted. € Coord. of Institutional Research; Allied Health Clinical Coord; Registered Nurse. See www.nfcc.edu for details.11/20, 11/27, cNew and Repo Homes 25 to pick from. Come to Lake City the dual makers at Freedom Homes. Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cNov and Dec special 4/2 28x80 home only $49,900 cash deal only. Call Magic Mike at Freedom Homes (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cBeen turned down? Have 10k to 15k? Call me I can make a deal. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cLand home package with 10k down in Lake City Florida. We do the deals. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cIn house “nancing with 10k down on used or repo houses. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cTriple wide $29,900 as is. Wholesale price, hardwood ”oors, ceramic tile. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cReduced $10,000 Lot Model 4/2, new 2014. 2,016 square feet. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cCASH special up to $5,000. Reduced price on new or used quali“ed models. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cUltimate home 2,027 square feet 3/2 $69,900. Beautiful new home with “replace. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cLive Oak or Merit Homes. Low prices. Freedom Mobile Homes. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, c Ad Builder/Graphic Artist needed for the Madison County Carrier and the Madison EnterpriseRecorder. Must be a team player and able to handle multiple tasks. Experience with Adobe Photoshop a must, experience with Quark Express a plus. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.11/20 rtn, n/c Receptionist: When was the last time YOU had FUN at WORK? Its a great time to join our team of super dedicated staff. Not only do we take pride in what we do, WE HAVE FUN! Are you the type of person that never meets a stranger and has a GENUINE love of people? Are your physical appearance and cosmetics important to you? Do you already have great computer skills? How well do you adapt to learning new things, do you embrace it or resist it? This growing dental of“ce needs more helpers, and if you answered yes to these questions, then call 888-486-2408 to hear more about this position on our amazing team and how to apply.11/22 rtn, c House For Rent 2 bedroom 1 bath. Located in Lee. $350 deposit/$400 monthly. No pets. (850) 971-5809. 11/29, 12/4, pd Auctions MOECKER AUCTIONS Public Auction, Road Runner Highway Signs, Inc. (Road striping division only) December 10th @ 10am 4421 12th St. Court East, Bradenton, Fl 34203 Specialized highway marking/striping equipment and vehicles that meets DOT safety. Special preview: 12/09 10 a.m.4 p.m. www.moeckerauctions.com (800) 840-BIDS 15%18%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to con“rm. Receivership case #2013 CA 002342 Circuit Court of Manatee County, Fl AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin. Condos for Sale FLORIDA WATERFRONT CONDO LIQUIDATION SALE! Brand new 2BR/2BA 1,690sf luxury condo only $149,900 Originally under contract for $365,000. Near downtown Orlando & all theme parks/attractions. Must see. Call now 877-333-0272, x 173. Help Wanted DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certi“cations. GI Bill Bene“ts Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here … Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage Tennessee Log Cabin on 6 acres with FREE Boat Slip! Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excellent “nancing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453. New Log Home* on 8+ acres in Florida just $87,900. Sale! Saturday, Dec 14th. 3BR, 2BA, 1700sf cabin on spectacular lake access setting in beautiful upscale community with all infrastructure/amenities completed. Excellent “nancing. Call now 877-525-3033, x 983. *constructed weather tight log home shell. 10 ACRE MOUNTAIN TOP ESTATE! Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent “nancing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 92. Yard/Estate Sale December 7th starting at 7 a.m. China cabinet, queen bed, sofa set, more furniture. Kitchen and household items. 378 SW Macon Street, Madison.12/4, c Drivers: Home EVERY Weekend, Dedicated Southern Lanes & OTR! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Or Walk Away Lease: No Money Down, No Credit Check. 1-888-880-5916.12/4, pd Elder Day Companion along with some housekeeping, cooking and carrying them back and forth to appointments. Call (850) 971-5789.12/4, pd

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013Madison County Carrier 15A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com ----Legals ---11/27, 12/4 11/27, 12/4 11/27, 12/4

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 4, 2013 16A € Madison County Carrier

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Madison County Carrier December 4, 2013 First Baptist Church To Present Cantata By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The First Baptist Church of Madison will present their cantata, entitled Come Messiah King, on Sunday evening, Dec. 8. Written and arranged by Randy Vader, Jay Rouse and Rose Aspinall, the cantata will be performed by the Worship Choir of the First Baptist Church. Dave Deckard and Debbi Roderick will narrate the cantata and Pastor Jim Carey will direct it. The cantata will be held at 6 p.m. at the church, located at 134 SW Meeting Street (across Base Street (US 90) from Wells Fargo Bank).

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Path of Faith 2B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, December 4, 2013

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Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, December 4, 2013 € 3B Path of Faith “We three kings of Orient are.” So begins a favorite carol of the Advent season about the “Wise Men” who visit the newborn Jesus. And so begins a tale that takes inaccuracy and historical revisionism to a whole new level. Reverend John Henry Hopkins, Jr., who wrote the carol a century and a half ago, should have known better. First, we don’t know exactly how many kings there were. There could have been as few as two and up to almost any number. Tradition says that there were three (though some traditions mention twelve), and over time they were even given names: Caspar, Melchior, and Balthasar. But these are apocryphal stories. Second, they were not “kings” from the Orient. They were Wise Men, or put more accurately, Magi. The Magi were astronomers – primitive by today’s standards – who were on the cutting edge of scientific and philosophical knowledge in their day. So it may be best to view these Magi as the uncanny combination of scientists, philosophers, and theologians – but not kings. And such men called Persia home (modern day Iran), not the Far East. Third, these men did not find the Christ child while “following yonder star.” They saw the star “in the East” or “at the rising of the sun,” but then proceeded west to Palestine. The star did not reappear until they were already in Bethlehem. And finally, the Magi, technically, do not belong in the Nativity scene at all. They were latecomers to the Christmas party, maybe as late as Jesus’ second birthday. The quaking shepherds, singing angels, and lowing cattle had returned to life as normal long ago. On and on I could go ripping the veracity of this Christmas Carol apart, but that is not my intent. “We Three Kings” remains one of my favorite Holiday hymns to bellow out this time of year. My critique of it is to simply point out that apart from the accumulations of questionable tradition, we know little about these mysterious men from the East. And these traditions prevent us from embracing what we can learn from them – for the journey of the Magi is a fascinating exercise in unexpected faith. They came seeking the child who had been born king of the Jews, based almost entirely on the appearance of an enigmatic star. While history is rampant with explanations for this phenomena, one conclusion is certain: The Magi interpreted this unusual sign in the heavens as a clear communication that something extraordinary had taken place in the world. And even more extraordinary, these Persian sages applied their interpretation to the emergence of Jesus, the Jewish Messiah. Why so astonishing? Not many people would launch out on a dangerous journey through the Middle East based solely on a spiritual hunch. Not many people would put their life on hold to prove their mystical intuitions to be true. And the most shocking of all, not many Persians (today’s Iranians) would worship at the feet (or manger) of a Jew. And not many Jews could abide by such a thing, either! Yet, in God’s way, these all belonged together. Divisions of race, religion, nationality or ethnicity did not factor into the equation. This is a foreshadowing of what the Apostle Paul would say later. “In Christ,” he said, “there is no difference between Jew and Greek, slave and free person, male and female. You are all the same in Christ Jesus” (See Galatians 3). And “all” does mean “all.” All are welcome into the presence of the One who will “reconcile everything – all things in heaven and on earth to himself.” So here is where the Magi teach us the wisest of their lessons: There are many barriers to overcome and great distances to cover in our journey of faith – “field and fountain, moor and mountain” to quote Reverend Hopkins – but when we get to where we are going, we will be welcomed in with open arms. There we will find the “King forever, ceasing never, over us all to reign.” And “all” surely means “all.” Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, pastor, and author of multiple books. You can read more and receive regular e-columns in your inbox at www.ronniemcbrayer.me. All Means All Cal U Toda! Call us today to chat with one of our Metal Roof Specialists and “nd out how a Premium Metal Roof will not only add incredible curb appeal to your project, but will also help you save BIG on your next energy bill! 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4B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, December 4, 2013 Path of Faith Matthew 6:33 says, “Seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you.” There is so much going on in the church today that some Christians wonder, “Whom are we following?” I believe we are trying to do it on our own. That is why we have backbiting people, talking bad about one another, stealing, failure to pay tithes and even murder in the church. The list of bad things goes on, but I think you get my message. Many of us go to church almost every Sunday, but fail to put God’s Word into action. Why? We are not seeking God first! If we don’t seek Him first, we are lost in the world in the church. Some think just because we go to church on Sundays we should expect to make it into God’s Kingdom. James 1:22 says, “Be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves.” When we come to church on Sundays, we are worshipping and praising the Lord. That is how we put God’s Word into action and become doers of His Word. Brother Pastor, how can I serve the Lord during the week when I need to go to work? When you go to work, let your actions be an example of Jesus Christ. Proverbs 3:6 says, “In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths.” When you go to work, at your home, driving along in your vehicles, in the church and everywhere, acknowledge Him. Anything that we ask in His name, he promises to give to us. Matthew 7:7 and 8 says, “Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you. For everyone that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.” In conclusion, if any Christian wants to put God’s Word into action, he or she can. All we have to do is ask in the name of Jesus. If we ask in his name, then we will want to serve him day and night. We will want to do good things, such as come to Bible study and Sunday School (and bring our kids), come to conference and not fight over God’s business, do our duties as a pastor, deacon, deaconess, clerk, etc. President Obama said, “Yes, we can” and look where he is today. This pastor believes that we can do all things through Jesus Christ who strengthens us. Remember, no sermon is complete until it is put into action. Together, we can put God’s Word into action. The PulpitBy Rev. Robert Holmes, Pastor, Architillery Missionary Baptist Church Put God's Word Into Action

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Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, December 4, 2013 € 5B Path of Faith Salvation Army Celebrating Christmas SharingŽ Angel Tree Submitted by George Blevins, Salvation Army We are looking at the biggest Christmas toy drive challenge to date! We are seeing more and more families, which means, of course, more children. Please help by becoming a child’s Angel! How can you help? Well, three ways: A direct gift of toy/toys. Please help us by gathering toys; if it becomes a  large volume call for arrangements at 232-4981 or 948-2119. If not you can drop it off at the Clerk of the Courts office at the courthouse. Angel Tree. Pick a child’s name at the Court house from the Angel tree  which will have a girl or boy’s name, age, clothing sizes and a gift which they have asked their special Angel for. After buying the gift/gifts return the ticket with the child’s name attached to the gifts to the Courthouse Clerks office. Financially. You can send a check to the Salvation Army, P. O. Box 728,  Madison, Fl. 32341. Your monetary contributions help close the gap between gifts received and the number of children in need of an Angel. Time lineDeadlines Selecting a Child from the Angel Tree ___________________Dec. 6 Returning Angel presents to the Court House ____________Dec. 17

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Path of Faith 6B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, December 4, 2013

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Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, December 4, 2013 € 7B Path of Faith Church Calendar December 7 Get in the spirit of Christmas with Cherry Lake United Methodist Church’s Legends of Christmas Adventure Day on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9-11 a.m. Children, ages five and up, will enjoy learning about the Legends of Christmas and make Christmas crafts while glorifying the true meaning of Christmas. Festive refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome. December 8 The First United Methodist Church of Madison will present the cantata I Hear a Prophet Calling on Sunday, Dec. 8, during the 11 a.m. service. Lynn Corbin is the director. December 22 Midway Baptist Church will present their Christmas cantata, Glory to the Newborn King on Sunday, Dec. 22, at 6 p.m. Midway Baptist Church is located at 338 SE Midway Church Road. December 22 Midway Church of God will present their children’s Christmas play on Sunday, Dec. 22, at 6 p.m. Everyone is invited. Midway Church of God is located at 2849 SE Midway Church Road in Lee.

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Path of Faith 8B € Madison County Carrier € Wednesday, December 4, 2013