Madison County carrier

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00411


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Wed. November 27, 2013VOL. 50 NO. 15 www.greenepublishing.com 50 cents Index 2 Sections, 24 Pages Local Weather Viewpoints 2A Around Madison3-7, 14A Health 8A Black Friday 9A School 10-11A Classieds 12A Legals 13A Path of Faith Section B Arrest Made For Yellow Pine BurglaryMadison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports that back in January, deputies responded to a burglary alarm of the Yellow Pine Truck Stop located at 1407 East Base Street. Deputies discovered the business had been burglarized and the suspect had fled the scene. Deputies collected several items of evidentiary value to be submitted to a Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) crime lab in an attempt to identify the suspect. In May, the Tallahassee Regional Department of Law Enforcement crime lab confirmed a standard of evidence for a suspect from the evidentiary items submitted. On June 4, a warrant to search the person of one Michael Deangelo Fiffia was executed for final standard comparisons. On Aug. 26, the final comparisons were confirmed as the suspect, Michael Deangelo Fiffia. A capias for the arrest of Michel Deangelo Fiffia was requested from the Third Circuit State Attorney's Office. On Thursday, Nov. 21, a warrant for the arrest of Michael Deangelo Fiffia was executed while he was incarcerated at the Madison County Jail on other unrelated charges. The arrest warrant was for the following: 1.Burglary of structure 2.Grand theft 3.Criminal Mischief 4.Circuit Violation of Probation Michael Fif“a Man Arrested For Trespass After WarningBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. AMadison man was arrested shortly after midnight on Friday, Nov. 22, and charged with trespass after warning. According to a Madison Police Department report, Sgt. Chris Cooks made contact with Benjamin Wertz at an apartment building. Cooks ran information on Wertz and discovered that a trespass warning for the entire complex had been issued to him. Wertz was placed under arrest and transported to the Madison County Jail. Benjamin Wertz Fire Engulfs HomeBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Ablaze engulfed a home Sunday evening, Nov. 24, causing the loss of the home and heat damage to a home next to it. According to Madison Fire & Rescue Chief Bruce Jordan, the department was dispatched to a re at the home of Agnes Brown on Gillislee Street. A combined total of $50,000 in damage was done to the Brown house and to the vacant house next door. Jordan said it is undetermined at this time how the re started, but that it is possibly from an electrical problem in the home. The Pinetta Volunteer Fire Department, the Lee Volunteer Fire Department and the New Home Volunteer Fire Department assisted MFR at the scene. Photos submitted by Pat Lightcap, November 24, 2013 Community Thanksgiving Dinner SetBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc.Acommunity Thanksgiving dinner will be served at the Madison County Senior Citizens Center located at the intersection of Harvey Greene Drive and SR 14 South, in Madison, on Thursday, Nov. 28. For more information, please call Timmy Dyke at (850) 464-8107. Proposed Parking Project On Range StreetBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Ablock along the west side of SW Range Avenue, between Dade Street and Macon Streets, could see some improvement in both parking and pedestrian safety, according to a proposed sidewalk project submitted to the City Commission by Community Planning Director Chuck Hitchcock.In a memo to the city commission, Hitchcock stated that both he and Madison Police Chief Gary Calhoun have safety concerns about there being no established sidewalk along this stretch of Range Street, and that there is no structured, clearly marked parking in the area. All of the merchants located in that area had been contacted and had indicated that they were in favor of something being done. The proposed drawings submitted show 11 new angled parking spaces created, along with a five-foot-wide sidewalk, with a notation not to make the sidewalk curb so high because it could damage the front ends of automobiles. It also indicates two new proposed streetlights. Hitchcock believes that the proposal will make the area look a lot better as well as promote business and enhance pedestrian safety. The project would cost between $16,000 and $19,000, depending on obstacles encountered underground, and would be funded through the Tax Increment Fund (TIF).Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 20, 2013This area of SW Range Street, between Dade and Macon Streets, has no clearly marked off parking spaces, and currently, cars park any which way they can. The proposed improvement will provide clearly marked parking spots along the side of Range Street, and a “ve-foot-wide sidewalk with a curb for pedestrian safety. The proposed design will also preserve the giant oak tree seen here. This schematic shows the area as it currently is in the small drawing at the top; below it, the larger drawing shows the proposed improvements, including where parking spaces and the new sidewalk would be placed. Range Street is at the bottom, Dade Street is on the right and Macon Street is on the left.

PAGE 2

Today (November 27) marks the 21stbirthday of my oldest daughter, Cheltsie Elizabeth Kinsley. To say the least, my life changed dramatically 21 years ago today. At the age of 23, I became a rst-time mother. Everything about her was so exciting and yet so scary. I was so afraid of doing something wrong and hurting her. As all parents know, those fears never really leave us. As our children grow, we too have to learn new things and cross new obstacles, with them. The fears of doing things wrong are still present in so many aspects of our lives with them. I sometimes watch Cheltsie now and truly cannot believe that it has been 21 years. It seems like just yesterday. I could not be more proud of the young lady that Cheltsie has become. Her moral values, her Christian standards, her work ethics and her dedication to her family and friends are all so astounding. So on this very special day, I would like to say, "Happy Birthday, Cheltsie! I Love You and I Am So Very Proud Of You!" I'm so glad God gave you to me 21 years ago!!! Until then .see you around the town. Ithought it might be interesting and informative to print the rst president's Thanksgiving Proclamation rendered in his rst year of ofce. In the wake of political correctness and revisionist history, it is important to understand how this holiday was viewed, literally by the father of our nation. The writing style is 18thCentury, but you can discern the meaning. Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benets, and humbly to implore his protection and favor-and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness. Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26thday of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the benecent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be-That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks--for his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation--for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war-for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed--for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted--for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us. And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions-to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually--to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed-to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shown kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord--To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the increase of science among them and us-and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best. Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789. George Washingtonwww.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 2A € Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist Thanksgiving ProclamationEvery year at Thanksgiving, there are always things that come to mind when giving thanks, but this season I have found myself grumbling instead of being thankful. The closer it gets to the actual day when I ceremonially voice what I am thankful for, I decided I needed to think about the many blessings I really do have instead of all the negative things I've been focusing on. When I began this list of thankfulness, the thought of one blessing seemed to immediately bring to mind several more, and before I knew it, my list of complaints looked very small. My list is not written out like a "top 10" in any particular order, and denitely not inclusive, but more like random musings to readjust my thinking. Inevit ably the "grumblies" will strike again but when they do, maybe I can pull my list out so that I can refocus and consider how thankful I should be a little more often. Grace and forgiveness, love, generosity, chocolate, friends who cook for me, warm fuzzy boots and gloves on a cold day, a husband who tries, cell phones and computers to help me stay connected, friends and family who will drive long distances to see me, a job, a house with heat and air, my health, freedom, woods full of trees where I can walk my dogs, memories (even if they are sad), the ability to walk-speak-smellsing-hear-dance-use my hands and feet-and taste, dogs who don't mind snuggling, my Mom living close, sugar (even if it is "bad"), my mind, fresh eggs, recipes that are handed down and come with a great story, coffee with lots of cream, my new camera, perfume, good music, movies, gardening, clean sheets, my Jeep (even if gas is too high!), water to drink, a hot shower, rain, snow (even if I don't see it here), home-grown tomatoes, sweet watermelon, summer blackberries, laughter, gentle prodding, the long-awaited healthy pregnancy of a close friend, electricity, people in service positions to keep me and my home safe, toilet paper, answered prayer, strangers who remind me they are just people I haven't gotten to know YET, butteries and dragonies, any animal that lets me photograph them without hurting me, cheese, the scent and beauty of owers, vacations, Raisin Bran and soymilk, google, medicine, good dreams, books that I can still read without a screen, really good vacuum cleaners that picks up dog hair the size of tumble weeds, peanut butter, waking up this morning and a maximum word count on this column that forces me to stop writing, because without it, I could go on and on, and on. I hope each and every one of you have a great holiday, friends and family to help you celebrate, plenty of good food (no matter what that food is) and a list of blessings of your own that you can be thankful for. Happy Thanksgiving!ThanksgivingAn Inventory Of Blessings Rose Klein Columnist Searching For Ambrosia Emerald's Gem Box Happy 21stBirthday, CheltsieEmerald Greene Publisher

PAGE 3

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013Madison County Carrier € 3AWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Kangaroo Meat May Soon Hop Into China In Australia, Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce and the Chinese are discussing the growth of China’s booming middle class and rising appetite for red meat. Joyce is encouraging the Chinese to export kangaroo meat as a solution. Wang Jun owns a small restaurant in Beijing and says he would be willing to try the meat. “Why not? As long as it is delicious,” Wang said. Chinese meat staples are beef, pork and chicken, but they will also eat cat, rat and dog meat, believing the meat to have medicinal qualities. Not everyone, however, is as adventurous. Liu Xinxin, a 21-year-old student from Beijing said, “How could we lay our chopsticks on such cute animals?” Kangaroo meat sells in Australia for about $8.50 per pound, less than beef, but would be promoted in China as a high protein, low-fat exclusive food item with health benets. Macro Meats, Australia’s largest processor of kangaroo, has partnered with New Hope Group Ltd., one of China’s largest agribusiness operators, to woo customers and project exclusivity by limiting supply. Ray Borda, the founder and managing director of Macro Meats said, “Our strategy will see us place kangaroo only in high-end butchers, not in supermarkets.” Home Toilets Now Required For Indian Politicians In Patna, India, the government announced politicians would not be allowed to run for ofce unless they have toilets in their homes. Ofcials said the rules were made to promote healthy sanitation habits and would help Bihar reach it’s goal of becoming an “opendefecation free” state by 2022. Chief Minister Nitish Kumar made the announcement on “World Toilet Day” that each household in the state would be given $160 for home toilet installation and that government ofcials would be supervising the process. Kumar stated, “Open defecation is the source of nearly 90 percent of ailments. Its elimination would be a great service for the generation to come.” Bunny Hunt Consumes London’s Social Media In London, social media users by the thousands are searching for a stuffed rabbit belonging to threeyear-old Ruby Stewart, who lost her stuffed companion on a weekend trip to London. Zoe Stewart, mother of Ruby, created “Find Mr. Rabbit” pages on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and posted the family’s footsteps during the evening the beloved bunny disappeared. Stewart said her initial tweet about the missing rabbit has been retweeted more than 1,100 times and her Facebook post was shared nearly 3,000 times. “I think the whole of the U.K. is looking for him,” Stewart said. AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Of“ce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersTori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn Shanna SwopeBookkeeping Brooke Kinsley Classified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classi“eds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) R Look for our insert in todays paper! Everything SALEis onBlack Friday ONLY 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas Bake-Off ContestOnce again, it’s time to show off your baking skills! The Greenville Country Christmas Committee invites you to enter the 28thAnnual Bake-Off Contest. A total of 15 cash prizes will be awarded. First place, second place and third place will be awarded in ve different categories: Cakes, Cookies, Candies, Breads and Pies. First Place winners will receive a ribbon and $15; Second Prize winners will receive a ribbon and $10; and Third Prize winners will receive a ribbon and $5. All participants must have a Greenville address and entries must be marked with name, phone number and the title of their entry. Please submit your entry at the Greenville Madison MultiPurpose Center on SW Grand Street in Greenville between 4-5 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 13. Judging will begin at 5 p.m. For more information, please contact Elesta Pritchett at (850) 948-7501 or Frances Norris at (850) 948-4900. The Greenville Country Christmas Committee would appreciate it if participants will leave their entries so that they may be enjoyed during refreshment time at 7 p.m.

PAGE 4

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 4A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Obituaries November 28 A community Thanksgiving dinner will be served at the Madison County Senior Citizens Center, located at the intersection of Harvey Greene Drive and SR 14 South, in Madison, on Thursday, Nov. 28. For more information, please call Timmy Dyke at (850) 464-8107. December 4 The Tall Pines Club will meet on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at noon in the Mill Conference Room in Clyattville, Ga. Ham, turkey and dressing will be furnished. Please bring a side dish. December 7 Get in the spirit of Christmas with Cherry Lake United Methodist Church’s Legends of Christmas Adventure Day on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9-11 a.m. Children, ages five and up, will enjoy learning about the Legends of Christmas and make Christmas crafts while glorifying the true meaning of Christmas. Festive refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome. December 8 The First United Methodist Church of Madison will present the cantata “I Hear a Prophet Calling” during the 11:00 a.m. service at the church in Madison. Lynn Corbin is the director. December 8 The First Baptist Church of Madison will present their Christmas cantata, “Come Messiah King,” on Sunday, December 8, at 6 p.m. at the church in Madison. December 11 The 55 Plus Club has a special treat in store for its December meeting: a performance by the Madison Boys Choir, under the direction of Rev. Marcus Hawkins. The club meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every month at the UMCM Center, 135 NW Dill Ave., on the corner of Dill and Colin Kelly Hwy. (Highway 145) near Hanson, about five miles north of town, for a free lunch provided by one of the member churches, and a guest speaker or musical performance. Come on out Wednesday, Dec. 11 at noon, and bring some friends to enjoy food, fellowship and some fine Christmas singing. For more information on the Club, or for directions to the UMCM Center contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929-4938. December 13 SkillsUSA will hold a fundraiser on Friday, Dec. 13, from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on the Courthouse Lawn. Funds will be used to help MCHS SkillsUSA compete in Regional and State Competitions. A grilled chicken plate will be available for $6 in advance or $7 at the lawn. It will include potato salad, green beans, roll and dessert. Sweet tea will be available for $1. For tickets or questions, contact Paige Thomas at (386) 965-6771. December 14 Greenville Country Christmas at Haffye Hays Park in Greenville, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Join in for fun, food, a parade, live entertainment and arts and crafts. December 21 Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church, 407 NE Mt. Zion Church Avenue in Cherry Lake, will hold a Hanson, Pinetta and Cherry Lake Community Christmas Outreach Dinner on Saturday, Dec. 21, from 12:303:30 p.m. Meals will be delivered to community residents beginning at 9:30 a.m. Anyone interested in helping with the event is welcome to go serve with them. Anyone needing transported to the church or who is sick or shut-in can call Brother Johnnie Woods at (850) 929-4141. For more information, please call Savilla Murphy at (850) 929-4386. December 22 Midway Baptist Church will present their Christmas cantata, “Glory to the Newborn King,” on Sunday, Dec. 22, at 6 p.m. Midway Baptist Church is located at 338 SE Midway Church Road. December 22 Midway Church of God will present their children’s Christmas play on Sunday, Dec. 22, at 6 p.m. Everyone is invited. Midway Church of God is located at 2849 SE Midway Church Road in Lee. Community Calendar Thelma Holden TutenThelma Holden Tuten, age 82, died Friday, November 22, 2013, at Madison Health and Rehab. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Sunday, November 24, 2013, at New Home Baptist Church with burial at San Pedro Cemetery. Visitation was one hour prior to the service from 2-3 p.m. at the Church. She was born in Sirmans and lived all her life in Madison. She was a homemaker and was a member of Madison Church of Christ. She is survived by one son, Darrell Tuten (Sue) of Madison and one daughter, Jan Brannen of Titusville; three sisters: Virginia Earthman of Ponte Vedra, Nadine Cossar of Leesburg and Syble Bryant of Mississippi; six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website www.beggsfuneral.com. James Edwin HendryJames Edwin Hendry, 80, of Madison, passed away Friday, November 22, 2013, at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Funeral Services were held at 1 p.m. Monday, November 25, 2013, at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel, with burial at Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends from 5-7 p.m. Sunday, November 24, 2013 at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison. He was born in Taylor County on May 3, 1933 to the late Roosevelt and Mae Hendry. He graduated Madison High School in 1951. He served as a Paratrooper in the U. S. Army in the Korean conict. He was Self-Employed most of his life as owner of Hendry IGA Grocery Store and Lake Front Grocery. He and his wife owned and operated The Rosary Florist for 25 years. After retirement in 1999, he worked part time with T. J. Beggs Jr. & sons Funeral Home until his death. He was a charter and active member of Unity Baptist Church where he served as treasurer and Sunday School teacher for many years. He is survived by his wife: Norma Jean Townsend Hendry of 57 years; two sons: Troy Hendry (Jenny) of Madison, and Todd Hendry of St. Augustine, Fl; two grandchildren: Sara Whitaker (Kyle) of Madison, and Andrew Hendry (anc, Magan Taylor) of Valdosta, Ga.; one sister: Genalee Huggins; brother-in-law: Herman Cherry, both of Madison; sister-in-law: Carolyn Hendry of Bryan, Texas; and many nieces and nephews. He was loved and will be missed by his family and many friends, especially his best friend Lucky. Two brothers, Earl Hendry and Curtis Hendry, and a sister, Myrtle Cherry, predeceased him. Beggs Funeral home is in charge of arrangements: 850-9732258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website www.beggsfuneral.com. Providers from the TMH Family Medicine Residency program see patients in your health department on a regular basis. Our experienced physicians and nurse-midwives provide personalized healthcare to women before, during and after pregnancy. We proudly deliver babies at the TMH Womens Pavilion, the only hospital in the region with a Newborn ICU. To learn more about our services or to schedule an appointment, call us at (850) 973-5000. Florida Department of Health Madison County 218 S.W. Third Avenue Madison, FL 32340 Harold F. Mickel, Sr.Harold F. Mickel, Sr., age 80, of Vienna, Georgia died Saturday, November 23, 2013, at his residence. Born in Valdosta, Ga, he was the son of the late Hal Henry Mickel and Leo Hughes Mickel. He was a United States Navy veteran and retired from Bell South. He was preceded in death by his siblings, Edward Mickel, Marion Bush and Bobby Mickel. He is survived by his wife, Lillian Carlo Mickel of Nashville, Ga; his sons, Donald Mickel of Vienna, Ga., Joe Mickel of Cochran, Ga. and Harold Mickel, Jr. of Valdosta, Ga; his sister, Frankie Jean Bush of Greenville, Fl; 10 grandchildren; 16 great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, November 27, 2013, at St. John Baptist Church in Greenville, Florida. Interment with military honors will follow at Concord Baptist Church Cemetery in Greenville. The family greeted friends 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, November 26 at Brannen-NeSmith Funeral Home in Vienna, Ga. Friends may sign the online guestbook at www.brannen-nesmith.com. Brannen-NeSmith Funeral Home of Vienna, Ga has charge of arrangements.

PAGE 5

By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.When New York University student George Aigen was drafted into the Army, he wasn’t even old enough to drive. The Brooklyn, N.Y. native was only 18, and in New York, the driving age was 21. His father drove him to a large building where other young draftees were gathering, and hugged him goodbye. “I still remember that day,” says Aigen. “I didn’t know if I’d ever see him again.” It was 1943, and half a world away, World War II was raging in Europe. In America, young men had to register for the draft at age 17, and carry their draft cards with them at all times. Being caught without it was cause for being arrested. After bidding farewell to his father, Aigen found himself inside the huge building with several hundred other teenagers and young men. They were herded into a line for a cursory medical exam, consisting of a man with a stethoscope going down the line and checking heartbeats. He remembers going through other lines for blankets, shoes, dungarees and shirts, and then finally standing in another line as an officer went down the row assigning the young men to a branch of the military in a perfunctory onetwo-three, count-off pattern. Their place in line determined whether the young men went into the Army, Navy or Marines, and that was how Aigen ended up in the Army. For the Jewish teenager from Brooklyn, that was the beginning of a journey that would take him into the dark heart of the Nazi Third Reich, one that would leave him with powerful, haunting images of the two days he spent in the liberation of Dachau – images that he did not speak of publicly for over 60 years after he returned home. During training at Ft. Smith, Ark., he learned the technical side of bridge-building, land mines and booby-traps, and on Nov. 6, 1944, with the U.S. Army 1269th Combat Engineers, Company B, 19-year-old Corporal Aigen landed just east of Marseilles, France. His first night there, he slept in a tank track, because it was deep enough to offer protection from the bullets flying overhead. Later, he remembers being in the foothills of the German Alps and the sound of mortar shells flying through the air. Within a week, he learned to tell just by listening where those shells were going and where they would land. Once, he recalls a shell landing only 14 paces from where he had been standing moments earlier. The main assignment for the 1269th Combat Engineers was guarding other troops as they marched and fought their way toward Germany. At night, they would rig up a ring of protection around the camp with hand grenades and black trip wire; the grenades were removed from their cans, the pins were pulled, and the grenades were carefully reloaded in the cans which were taped to stakes driven into the ground all around the camp. The trip wire wound from the stake and looped through the grenade handles. At one point, the 1269thwas assigned to a group of Army scientists and engineers, who had bent sent to scavenge for any German technology left behind by retreating Nazi forces. Just across the Rhine River, they entered an abandoned factory, only to find it emptied of everything except the payroll. Not knowing what else to do with the cache of German marks, they rolled it up in a copy of the Stars & Stripes and took it with them. At a later stop, they took refuge in what appeared to be an abandoned house and lit a fire in the stove, only to be accosted by a woman shrieking at them in German. One of the men who spoke German translated for them – all the money she had in the world had been hidden in that stove. The German marks rolled up in the Stars & Stripes came to the rescue for the distraught woman. As they pushed on, they often had no idea where they were. They had maps, but the retreating Germans had removed road signs or turned them around to confuse the approaching Allies. In one town, Aigen recalls walking into a cathedral and seeing all the chairs pushed against the walls. On the floor, he saw scratchings that turned out to be memorials for the cathedral’s clergy, and in the middle of the sanctuary, machinery and equipment set up for making ammunition. On April 28, 1945, the 1269thentered Munich, arriving at night to an eerie scene. The streetlights were on, but the streets themselves were deserted. They met no opposition whatsoever, spending the night in an empty museum. The next day, they headed for Dachau, some eight or nine miles away, one of over 200 concentration camps throughout Germany, as back up to the Third Infantry, which would go in first. The 1269thwould watch their backs, making sure they weren’t ambushed from behind after entering the camp. “We didn’t know what to expect,” said Aigen. There was absolutely no cover as they approached the front gate of Dachau; just a huge, treacherously wide-open grassy area sloping upward toward the gate, with nowhere to hide if the enemy suddenly opened fire. They would be like sitting ducks. There were two large posts on either side of the gate, framing the single railroad track leading inside. Above it, the now-famous words, “Arbeit Macht Frei” (Work will make you free). As they passed through the gate, Aigen recalls seeing an open area to the left of the tracks and a line of trees on the right...and that first group of battled-hardened Third Infantry soldiers who had arrived ahead of them, now seated on the ground, crying. This was bad. There had been whispers and vague rumors of concentration camps floating around before, but nothing prepared them for what they were seeing. An emaciated woman’s head and shoulders hanging out of a boxcar, dead, one of thousands of bodies piled up in boxcars. A group of half a dozen bodies on the ground. Groups of dead, emaciated people everywhere. Others, still barely alive, sitting with their backs against the barracks walls, staring at nothing. Aigen remembers opening the door to one of the barracks and seeing hundreds of cots stacked four deep from floor to ceiling. In that beam of light from the door, a gaunt, skullfaced man about 10 feet away lifted himself up on his elbow to see who was there, stared into the light for a few seconds, then sank down again, utterly exhausted. Altogether, 2,310 bodies were piled in the boxcars alone: men, women and children who had starved to death. There were structures that looked like oversized children’s swing-sets, where prison guards would suspend their victims from chains and then bat them around with large wooden sticks. When they tired of that sport, they hanged the victims from those same structures. Photographs of this and other horrors were left behind, along side the crematory ovens and the laboratories where medical experiments were carried out on prisoners. It wasn’t just Jewish people. Of the 34, 432 people at Dachau, only 2,539 were Jews. The rest made up a list of some 20-25 nationalities. The Nazis had a long list of “undesirables” who had no place in the narrow Aryan society of the Third Reich. Aigen still has some of those photos from Dachau. “These were the kind of people we were dealing with,” he says quietly. People who delighted in torture and killing. People who were the embodiment of the evil that has come to be associated with names like Dachau, Auschwitz and Buchenwald. After two days at Dachau, the 1269 th had to move on because of the war. Aigen’s next assignment was to pick up troop supplies from a warehouse, but because he was too young to drive, he had to be assigned a driver. Days later, in May of 1945, he was in a small town in France, walking down a street that could have been any street in smalltown America, when church bells suddenly began ringing. Everywhere, all at once, ringing loudly. A man leaned out a window and shouted “La guerre est finie” (the war is over). A little girl ran out of one of the houses, took his hand and said “merci.” That was how he learned the war had ended. He went back home, met Joyce, his wife of 62 years, in New York City, built a career and raised a family that includes three children, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. They eventually moved to Valdosta in order to be closer to family. After decades of carrying around the memories of Dachau in silence, he has begun, with encouragement from Joyce and other close friends, to speak publicly about what he saw those two days in April of 1945. To date, he has given over 40 presentations, at high schools, churches, civic clubs, colleges and other organizations. He believes he has a responsibility to tell others what he witnessed, in the hopes that it will never be allowed to happen again. The face of evil cannot remain hidden away and forgotten. People must know it for what it is, and recognize it when they see it, if they are to prevent a repeat of one of the darkest eras in recent history. And that is why George Aigen speaks. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013Madison County Carrier € 5AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY WWII Veteran Remembers DachauGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, November 6, 2013WWII veteran George Aigen of Valdosta, and his wife Joyce, visited the Rotary Club of Madison, where George shared his memories of the liberation of Dachau. wens Propane, IncService With A SmileŽ Serving North FloridaMADISON, JEFFERSON, SUWANNEE& HAMILTONCOUNTIES SIMPLY EVERYDAY FAIR PRICING We Are Here To Earn Your Business&K ee p Your Business€FREE TANK SETS € HEATER SERVICE € € NEW HEATERS € TANKLESS WATER HEATERS €€ GAS LOGS € PRICE COMPARISONS € Madison Office137 SW Shelby Avenue  Madison, Florida 32340(850) 253-3761 $3.19 PER GALLON  NO DELIVERY FEES   NO SEASONAL PRICES  NO GIMMICKS  (Ask For Becky) R Look for our insert in todays paper! Everything SALEis onBlack Friday ONLY BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252

PAGE 6

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 6A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Flatscreen TV Drawing At Light Up MadisonBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.The Kiwanis and Rotary Clubs of Madison are holding a joint fundraiser with a drawing for an LED 46inch atscreen TV. With special thanks to Aaron's of Madison for making it possible, Rotary and Kiwanis members are selling tickets for $5 each, and you can buy as many chances as you wish. The proceeds will benet the charitable and community service projects supported by each club. The drawing will be Saturday, Dec. 7, under the Kiwanis tent at Light Up Madison. You do not have to be present to win...but you can't win if you don't buy a ticket. See any member of the Rotary or Kiwanis clubs for your chance to win. Kiwanis Holding Annual Citrus Sale By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Eating healthy during the holidays has never been easier. The Kiwanis Club of Madison is beginning its annual Christmas Citrus Sale, one of its major fundraisers for the year. The club is preselling boxes of Hamlin Oranges, Tangelos, and Ruby Red Grapefruit for $25 a box or $15 for half a box. They will also have Naval Oranges for $30 a box or $20 for half a box (one box equals 4/5 bushel). All the proceeds will be reinvested in Madison County through the Kiwanis Club's many charitable and community service projects, including, the Key Club at Madison County High School, Healthy Start, Mentors in the Take Stock in Children Program, the Brain Bowl at the Central School, Books For Children, Blankets for Migrant Workers, Project Graduation, The Senior Citizens Council, and the Terric Kids Program of Madison County, just to name some of them. To order your box of citrus, please contact: Oliver Bradley 973-3208 Lucile Day 948-4891 Jerome Wyche 464-0196 Roy Ellis 971-5864 George Willis 973-8583 Cindy Vees 464-7611Greene Publishing, Inc. photo by Lynette Norris, November 19, 2013Near the hospital and downtown Madison, Clarence BuddyŽ Blalock lives in the house that has been in his family since 1941. Recently, he has had a lot of work done on his yard, earning him the Madison Garden Clubs Most Improved YardŽ award, which pleased him enormously. On a sunny November afternoon, Buddy and his cat posed in the front yard beside the sign the Garden Club presented to him.Buddy Blalock Has “Most Improved Yard” United Way Holding A Community Conversation EventBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.United Way of the Big Bend is undergoing a strategic planning process to ensure that the agency delivers the greatest possible return for the monies invested by organizations and citizens across the Big Bend. United Way feels it is important to undertake this process, so they can engage stakeholders about their aspirations and concerns. The agency will be hosting a series of conversations with a variety of stakeholder groups to discuss and identify local issues that can then be addressed as a community. If you are interested in joining the conversation in Madison County, the event will be held at the Madison Senior Center located at 1161 SW Harvey Greene Drive on Tuesday, Dec. 3 at 6 7 p.m. To conrm your attendance, please email Megan Picht at megan@uwbb.org. For questions or more information, contact Heather Mitchell at (850) 414-0855. If you would like to be involved, but are unable to attend, please consider sending a representative from your organization or contact either Megan or Heather to stay informed about future Community Conversation events. Ashley Beggs Returns To Madison Rotary ClubGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 6, 2013Madison Rotary Club President Wayne Conger (right) and founding member Jargo Clark (left) welcome returning member Ashley Beggs, after an absence of several years. 836732 Mon. Fri. 8am 6pm Sat 9am 12pm Sun 1pm 4pm1600 S. Patterson St. inside State Framers Mkt 229-242-7929 NOW OPEN WE BUY PECANS!! @ Visit our Gift Shop 7 days a week Chocolate €Praline € Inhull-Shelled Cinnamon Candies

PAGE 7

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013Madison County Carrier € 7AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Reeves, Jinks, Rutherford Win 4-H Tropicana Speech ContestBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Students from public and private schools, in grades fourth through sixth, competed in the Madison County 4-H Tropicana Speech Contest on Wednesday, Nov. 20. At stake was a chance for all rst place winners to win a scholarship to 4-H Camp Cherry Lake or another 4-H event of their choosing (which did not surpass the cost of attending camp) and for all rst and second place county winners to compete at the District IV events competition on May 3, 2014. The District Events will be held in Gilchrist County. Kayla Reeves, a student at Madison Academy, won rst place for the sixth grade for her speech on “Bullying.” Sadie Underwood, from Madison County Central School, garnered second place for her speech on “FCA.” Caitlyn Jordan, from New Testament Christian School, nished third for the sixth grade presenters. Tabytha Jinks, of Greenville Elementary School, won rst place for fth grade for her speech on “The Beach.” Dawson Herring, from Pinetta Elementary School, nished second for his speech on “The Last Frontier.” Kennedy Fogle, from Madison County Central School, nished third with a speech on “Why I’m So Mad.” Savannah Pitts, of Lee Elementary School, won an honorable mention for her speech on “Honey Bees.” Elias Starling, from New Testament Christian School, and Savannah Curtis, from Madison Academy, were recognized for participating. Rhett Rutherford, from Madison Academy, was the fourth grade winner for his speech, “For the Love of the Game.” Yanett Serrano, from Lee Elementary School, was second place with the speech, “My Day at the Beach.” Whitney Raines, from Pinetta Elementary School, won third place for her speech on “The Mountains.” Zakira Howard won honorable mention for the speech, “The Importance.” Eli Bull, from the Madison County Central School, was recognized for participation.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, November 20, 2013The sixth grade division was a very tough division as they all had interesting speeches. Pictured left to right: Caitlyn Jordan with New Testament Christian School, third place; Sadie Underwood with Madison County Central School, FCA,Ž second place; and Kayla Reeves with Madison Academy, Bullying,Ž “rst place.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, November 20, 2013The “fth grade division was the biggest division at the Tropicana Public Speaking Contest. Pictured left to right: Savannah Curtis with Madison Academy, My Summers at the Beach,Ž participation; Elias Starling with New Testament Christian School, participation; Savannah Pitts with Lee Elementary School, Honey Bees,Ž honorable mention; Kennedy Fogle with Madison County Central School, Why Im So Mad,Ž third place; Dawson Herring with Pinetta Elementary School, The Last Frontier,Ž second place; and Tabytha Jinks with Greenville Elementary School, The Beach,Ž “rst place.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, November 20, 2013Nerves were high considering this was the fourth graders “rst time competing in the speech contest. But nervousness did not stop these students from doing an excellent job. Shown left to right: Eli Bull with Madison County Central School, The Imagination Can Do Many Things,Ž participation; Zakira Howard with Greenville Elementary School, The Importance,Ž honorable mention; Whitney Raines with Pinetta Elementary School, The Mountains,Ž third place; Yanet Serrano with Lee Elementary School, My Day at the Beach,Ž second place; and Rhett Rutherford with Madison Academy, For the Love of the Game,Ž “rst place. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, November 20, 2013All students received an award for doing an outstanding job in the 2013 Tropicana Public Speaking Contest. Back row, left to right: Kayla Reeves, Sadie Underwood, Savannah Pitts, Elias Starling, Dawson Herring, Kennedy Fogle and Savannah Curtis. Front row, left to right: Caitlyn Jordan, Tabytha Jinks, Yanet Serrano, Zakira Howard, Whitney Raines, Eli Bull and Rhett Rutherford.

PAGE 8

Since 1993, Big Bend Hospice’s Tree of Remembrance has been a special holiday tradition which allows people in the community to honor their loved ones and help Big Bend Hospice raise money for patient care. A gift to the Tree of Remembrance provides a wonderful alternative to traditional holiday gifts. The Tree provides a time to remember and celebrate the lives of those we love. It also helps Big Bend Hospice provide care, comfort and hope to those who are dying. This year, in addition to the traditional three levels of giving; angels ($50), bells ($25) and bows ($10); patrons who make a donation of $250 or more will receive a limited edition Wedgewood ornament, along with a beautiful ornament of their choosing placed on a Tree of Remembrance in the county and location they specify. Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassionate end of life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Leon, Jefferson, Taylor, Madison, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin or Wakulla County. If you would like additional information about services, please call 850878-5310 or visit www.bigbendhospice.org. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 8A € Madison County Carrier HEALTHThere are countless physical activities out there, but walking is the simplest positive change you can make to effectively improve your health. Walking is simple, free and one of the easiest ways to get more active, lose weight and become healthier. It's underrated as a form of exercise but walking is ideal for people of all ages and fitness levels who want to be more active. Regular walking has been shown to reduce the risk of chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma, stroke and some types of cancers. Your heart is the single most important muscle in your body, but keeping it in shape doesn't require a gym membership or hours of workouts. Adding a few brisk walks into your week is all it takes. Exercise, such as walking, strengthens the muscles of your heart and makes it pump more efficiently, delivering more oxygen and nutrients to the other organs. There's no question that walking is great for everyone: It dramatically boosts energy levels, fights fat, and protects your heart. But if you have high blood sugar, or if you have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes, walking can be a lifesaver. There is a strong association between abdominal fat and risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular issues. Walking shrinks this dangerous abdominal fat and thus cuts down the risk of these grave conditions. The key is to walk briskly -three to fourmiles per hour -and for 30-60 minutes at least five days a week. This can cut your risk of heart disease by 40 percent. Walking can also benefit those with a history of heart problems. However, it is important to check with your doctor first before beginning any kind of exercise program. The easiest way to walk more is to make walking a habit. Think of ways to include walking into your daily routine: If you drive to work, park at the farthest point of the parking lot and walk the difference; If you take the bus, get off one or two stops earlier than normal; Take a 10-minute walk during your lunch break and another during your coffee break; Fit in another 10 minutes after dinner. Get a check up before starting any new exercise program. If you already have heart problems, your doctor may want to perform tests to find out how much exercise you can safely do. Get a good pair of walking shoes. Start out slowly and increase gradually. At first, set a pace of about three miles per hour and walk for just 10 minutes. After you have ramped up, do at least 2.5 hours of walking a week. One way to do this is to walk for 30 minutes a day five times a week. But the total number of hours can be reached in any increments convenient for you. For motivation, walk with friends or pets. Use a pedometer to count your steps. Wear it throughout the day and try to reach at least 2,000 steps (approximately one mile) at first. Gradually increase your number of steps by 500 per week. Ways to do this include taking the stairs instead of an elevator, or parking farther away from your destination than you normally would. If you're regularly active, you'll burn more calories, which helps you manage your weight and other cardiovascular risk factors. Plus, physically active people nearly always report better moods, less stress, more energy and a better outlook on life. Did You Know...Frank NathanFormer Executive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness Tips Big Bend Hospices Tree Of Remembrance Family Health Center Family Health Center & New hours: 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Closed on Tuesdays. Walk-ins accepted Say Aaaah -Tips To Protect Yourself From The Flu It's that time of year. It starts as a tickle in your throat, a sneeze, a cough, until soon you're mouth feels stuffed with cotton, and you're going through tissues in Costco-size quantities. Welcome to the cold and u season ofcially December through March -and there is still no cure. There are, however, things you can do to avoid infection, while protecting friends and family from these pesky viruses. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following tips: Get a shot. It's best to be proactive, not reactive, when ghting the u, say experts, so getting a u shot is the rst step in doing battle -and the sooner the better. "The u shot doesn't work right away," says Nathan Limb, pharmacy supervisor for Walgreens in Chicago's central district. "It takes about two weeks to boost the immune system once you've received it." Wash your hands. Soap and water are your best friends during this season. Washing your hands, both front and back, for 15seconds plus (the time it takes to sing "Happy Birthday" three times, or the ABCs will do it) is key. This is especially important when working in common areas such as copy rooms or front ofces. Drink plenty of liquids. It's important to, and while certain juices have been shown to prevent fewer cold symptoms, drinking water every day, all day, is a better option, say experts. Without water, no living thing can survive, which means it is crucial to maintaining optimal health. While water has a myriad of health benets, research has shown that not all waters are created equal, and that some waters have more health benets than others. This, say experts, is why drinking alkaline ionized water, such as Alkame Water, should be an essential part of anyone's health plan. Doctors recommend the mild alkalinity because it allows for more effective hydration, which supports an optimal pH-balanced body and is a powerful source of antioxidants, which boost the immune system, while also enhancing energy levels and overall health. Keep your distance. If you do get sick, it's important to stay home so you can get better quickly and not spread germs to others. The rule of thumb is to stay home for at least 24 hours after a fever is gone without use of medicine that lowers the fever. This will ensure you are past the point where you are likely to spread the virus to others. For more information on Alkame and its benets, visit www.alkamewater.com

PAGE 9

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013Madison County Carrier € 9A

PAGE 10

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 10A € Madison County CarrierSCHOOL T h a n k s g i v i n g S a l e T h a n k s g i v i n g S a l e Thanksgiving Sale! T h o u s a n d s O f P a i r s R e d u c e d Thousands Of Pairs Reduced F r o m O u r R e g u l a r S t o c k O f From Our Regular Stock Of M e n  s a n d W o m e n  s F a s h i o n Mens and Womens Fashion F o o t w e a r Footwear 1737 Gornto Rd. € Valdosta € (229) 242-1430 (Next to Publix-Outside the Mall) Follow us on Facebook G r e a t S e l e c t i o n G reat Selection o f L a d i e s F a s h i o n B o o t s of Ladies Fashion Boots 2 0 % 6 0 % 20 % -60 % O f f R e g u l a r R e t a i l Off Regular Retail H U G E S E L E C T I O N HUGE SELECTION C o l e H a a n C ole Haan M e r r e l l € C l a r k s Merrell € Clarks F e r g i e s Fergies V a n E l i € J R e n e e Van Eli € J. Renee B C B G e n e r a t i o n s BCBGenerations a n d m a n y m o r e and many more 2 0 % 8 0 % 20 % -80 % O f f R e g u l a r R e t a i l Off Regular Retail E n t i r e S e l e c t i o n M e n s & W o m e n s Entire Selection Mens & Womens C l o t h i n g A n d J a c k s e t s Clothing And Jacksets F r o m M o u n t a i n H a r d w e a r A n d L o l e From Mountain Hardwear And Lole 6 0 % 8 0 % 60 % -80 % O f f R e g u l a r R e t a i l Off Regular Retail H U G E HUGE S E L E C T I O N SELECTION M E N  S S H O E S MENS SHOES 1 0 % 8 0 % 10 % -80 % O f f R e g u l a r R e t a i l Off Regular Retail 840334 SWAT: Students Working Against TobaccoSubmitted By Leila C. Rykard Human Services Program Specialist Tobacco Prevention Program Madison County Health DepartmentSWAT is Florida’s statewide youth organization working to mobilize, educate and equip Florida youth to revolt against and de-glamorize “Big Tobacco.” SWAT is not just a peer education organization. Although the long-term goal is to improve the health of all Floridians, SWAT’s message is aimed at the tobacco industry. SWAT is not only a youth advocacy group; they also promote leadership and community involvement while focusing primarily on policy change. SWAT uses these avenues among teens to increase awareness and shift tobacco related social norms. On a local level, SWAT members work with each county tobacco free partnership to advocate for policy change that prevent youth initiation, reduce exposure to secondhand smoke and promote cessation. The goal of each policy is to change social norms so that tobacco is not accessible, not acceptable and not desirable. SWAT members are working in three main policy areas: Implement comprehensive tobacco free campus policy within their school districts. Restricting the sale of avored tobacco products not covered by the FDA. Educate their peers and community about the inuence of tobacco marketing in retail outlets on tobacco use. To accomplish these policy objectives, SWAT members conduct surveillance, educate and mobilize their peers and community members about tobacco issues, participate in media advocacy and present to decision makers. Locally, Madison County has two SWAT groups and advisors: Matt Replogle with the Madison County Central School and AD Kinsey, who heads up a faith-based SWAT group. For more information, contact Leila Rykard at the Madison County Department of Health, (850) 973-5000 ext. 118.Photo Submitted Madison County Central School students join in the SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) team.Photo SubmittedCiggy Butts attends Downtown Halloween, accompanied by Esther Oro (left) and Ginger Oro (right) passing out materials in hopes of encouraging people to stop smoking.

PAGE 11

K4 (Bass) All EAnnabelle Acutt, Cadie Agner, Beau Beshears, Henry Cooksey, Case Curry, Bubba Davis, Matthew Hughes, Kade McLeod, Kendall Perdue, Bo Rutledge, Lilly Sears, Brigham Sparkman, Jacob Vickers, Addison Walker, Maggie Walker, J.R. Watson.K-5 (Stephens) All EKanny Andrews, Caine Demott, Benjamin Faglie, Leighton Faglie, MadiLynn Hughes, Brandon Key, J.T. Kinard, Jaret Kinsey, Georgia Lindsey, Morgan McNeill, Skyler Pearson, Heaven-Leigh Purvis, Natalie Register, Emma Rogers, London Smith. First Grade (Roberts)All A Hayden Ashworth, Nash Beshears, Natalie Clark, Bryson Clore, Lauren Davis, Dalton Demott, Kristina Everly, Joshua Forehand, Emma Green, Kyle Hamrick, Logan Riedle, Raegan Walker.All A and BDanica Baggett, Ethan Bass, Suzanne Beshears, Bryson Clore, Charles Hughs, Feren Rosas, Caleb Walker, Jason Wheeler. Second Grade (Love)All ATyson Clark, Bradynn Johnson, Walker Sparkman, Emma Vickers.All A and BIvy Armstrong, Riley Beggs, Joshua Boland, Harper Davis, Adam Day, Wyman Demott, Lauchlin Faglie, Leigha Hunt, Jadyn Kinsey, Chase Oester, Josh Payne, Madison Roland, Zach Sears, Aisley Smith, Emilee Walker. Third Grade (Aman)All ABrewster Bass, Axel Day, Anna Drawdy, Jace Grant, Daisy Kinard, Haylie McLeod, Caroline Taylor, Ali Townsend.All A and BRyan Adams, Joleane Alexandrou, Joseph Boland, Destiny Clore, Aiden Day, Sammi Drawdy, Daniel Harrington, Samuel Kennedy, Macy Reagan, Riley Rutledge, Lillie Schwier, Emma Tharpe, Kaitlin Tharpe, Paxton Williams. Fourth Grade (Whiddon)All ATurner Beshears, Kasey Chmura, Jacob Green, Jenna Lindsey, Ben Whiddon, Tag Williams.All A and BCaitlin Bates, Oliver Hutsell, Addison Shiver, Megan Vann. Fifth Grade (Falk) All AKeira Evans, Riley Rowe, Olivia Walton.All A and BJeb Beshears, Selina Drawdy, James Hightower, Jarrett Roland, Taylor Roland, MaryRose Schwier, Will Sullivan. Fifth Grade (Hughey)All AJoey Davis, Lindsey Davis, Kolton Grambling.All A and BNatalie Andrews, Dean Forehand, Jared Grant, Riley Hamrick, Sarah Plain, Tyler Slaughter, Wyatt Stafford, Anna Lee Trest, Travis Wheeler. Sixth GradeAll ACarl Hall, Dennis Jiang, Bailey McLeod, Abby Reams.All A and BJamieson Dalzell, Nathan Dukes, Ansley English, Nathan Green, Brandon Hannon, Andy Jiang, Julianna Linsey, Marley Restrepo, Albree Shiver, Austin Wheeler. Seventh GradeAll AEmily BrockAll A and BBrandon Bates, Grace Beshears, Ian Hutsell, Ryan Jackson, Megan Scholl, Levi Stafford, Taylor Walker. Eighth GradeAll ATimothy Finlayson, Camryn Grant.All A and BStewart Dalzell, Summer Dee, Skylar Dickey, Jacob Dukes, Jessica Giddens, Elizabeth Hightower, Evan Hocking, Carly Joiner, Haley Jones, Kurt Lane, Abigail Morgan, Hannah Searcy, Brandon Slaughter, Joe Walton, Ria Wheeler, Mickaela Whiddon. Ninth GradeAll ANick Arceneaux, Faith Demott, Joshua Greene, Sarah Hall, Kelly Horne, Brittany Hughes, Kirsten Reagan, Natalie Vasquez, Kate Whiddon.All A and BTraynor Barker, Dena Bishop, Cali Burkett, Cassie Davis, Daisy Dee, Darren Ellis, Stephanie English, Chaz Hamilton, Joe Hannon, Jenny Jackson, Heather James, Hannah Lewis, Gatlin Nennstiel, Alex Parker, Ramsey Sullivan. Tenth GradeAll ADorian Alberti, Corey Brandies, Taylor Copeland, Abigail Hettinger, Savannah Jenkins, Zackery Peterson, Sarah Tharpe, Emma Witmer.All A and BChristopher Fitch, Dalton Gramling, Sam Hogg, Taylor McKnight, T.J. Swords. Eleventh GradeAll AMorgan Cline, Sarah James, Winston Lee, Monique Restrepo, Seth Wiles.All A and BZach Arceneaux, Austin Bishop, Ty Chancy, Maddie Everett, Ricky Finlayson, Kinzi Mattingly, Carson Nennstiel, Nick Roberts, Stormie Roberts, Cole Schwab, Steven Trest, Caroline Yaun, Tyler Zimmerly. Twelfth GradeAll ACole Davis, Lauren Demott, Brandon Holm, Hunter Horne, Aimee Love, Ashlyn Mills, Sara Peeler, Whitney Stevens.All A and BVictoria Brock, Devan Courtney, Braden Mattingly. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013Madison County Carrier € 11ASCHOOL Aucilla Christian Academy Honor Roll 2ndSix Weeks -Yearbook Club Creates MemoriesBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Will you sign my yearbook?" Come May of next year, that question will be heard all over Madison County Central School as students present their books to friends, teachers and staff who will, in return, create memories with their printed messages and signatures. Long before this happens, yearbook sponsors and their students will be working hard, getting stories, pictures and advertising to ensure the book is published and ready to sell. Heather Welch, the media specialist in the school library and Jeff Veilleux, eighth grade Language Arts teacher, work with about 24 students, who were selected to be in the club by writing an essay, holding a mandatory grade point average and having no discipline referrals. The club is made up of seventh and eighth graders, who meet after school one to two times a week to work on the book. Welch said, "The students have already taken a field trip downtown to sell ads to local businesses in order to help fund the yearbook, which she says takes about $11,000 to create. Welch also wanted to express her appreciation to all the businesses who have supported the club by purchasing ads for the book." Welch and Veilleux assist the students in creating the book online, where students are in charge of laying out the individual pages, choosing pictures, colors and creating captions. The students are also responsible for taking the pictures for the yearbook, such as pictures around campus and football games. MCCS yearbooks will be on sale in May 2014 and will cost $35. You can order a book up until January with a $20 deposit. Previous year's books can also be purchased. If you interested in placing an ad, there is still about one more week. To purchase an ad or yearbook, contact Heather Welch at www.Heather.Welch@ madisonmail.us. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein November 15, 2013Jeff Veilleux (left) and Heather Welch (far right), work with students in the yearbook club on next years annual. Sitting from left to right: Denetra Lee, JaBryan Butler and Kristen Jackson.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein November 15, 2013Yearbook club members working in the library, from left to right, are: Alyssa Odom, Jayla Hall, Kiera Brown and Bradley Sexton. SRWMD Invites High Schools To Implement Water Quality And Quantity ProjectsThe Suwannee River Water Management District (District) invites high schools within its 15-county District boundary, including Madison, to join their efforts in protecting water resources by implementing water conservation, water quality improvement, or efcient irrigation management projects. The District Governing Board is designating $20,000 to assist STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), agricultural, and other high school classes to fund the projects. The program is currently open to high schools only, and interested schools may apply for funding consideration, not to exceed $2,000, for the following type projects: Retrotting irriga tion systems to drip irrigation or to micro-irrigation. Incorporating ferti gation into irrigation systems. Building a rain garden, which utilizes stormwater for irrigation. Other water quali ty or quantity projects. "The District is pleased to support high school students in their efforts to implement projects that save water and improve water quality. An added benet of the program is that it provides students with hands-on educational experiences involving the protection and restoration of our water resources," said District Executive Director Ann Shortelle. While there is no formal application to complete, interested parties may submit project proposals and descriptions of their projects to Kevin Wright at klw@srwmd.org The deadline to submit proposals is Friday, Dec. 6. For more information, please call (386) 362-1001 or (800) 2261066 (Fla only).

PAGE 12

CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK $199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED WANTED TO BUY Buy, Sell or Trade In The Classi“eds Call 973-4141 Call 973-4141www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 12A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Check us out on-line www.greenepublishing.com AUCTION FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 11/25/2013 THROUGH 12/1/2013 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497. Of“ce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age18 yr. Day and evening classes. Next class November 11 386-362-1065.11/6 11/27, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cWasher And Dryer For Sale! Kenmore series 70 washer, top load. Series 80 dryer, front load (door opens from top down). White in color and both are in perfect working order. $400 “rm. Call (229) 460-529610/30 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.Small Cabin For Rent $400 month, security deposit. Includes laundry and water. Direct TV available.1 person. $35 application fee. Call (850) 673-1117.10/16 rtn, cCASH FOR FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES! $1000 for Madison Co enamel Tags dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL tags starting with #35 for years 1938, 39, 40, 43, 49, and 54. Jeff Francis gobucs13@aol.com or 727 424 1576.www.”oridalicenseplates.com10/23 -12/25, pd€ Maintenance Equipment Specialist. € Part time curriculum developer wanted. € Coord. of Institutional Research; Allied Health Clinical Coord; Registered Nurse. See www.nfcc.edu for details.11/20, 11/27, cHiring for All Positions Youth Services International is now accepting applications for its new facility in Jasper, FL. Applications can be picked up from Joann Bridges Academy in Greenville, FL. Resumes can be faxed to 850-948-4227 to Kimberly Glee or Tuwollar Mobley. For additional information please call 850-948-4220.11/8 11/27, cMaintenance Person Needed Apartment experience helpful. Full time position with bene“ts. Apply in person at the Arbours in Madison, 134 SW Arbour Circle in Madison or e-mail resume to kristen@arboursatmadison.com .11/13 11/27, c New and Repo Homes 25 to pick from. Come to Lake City the dual makers at Freedom Homes. Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cNov and Dec special 4/2 28x80 home only $49,900 cash deal only. Call Magic Mike at Freedom Homes (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cBeen turned down? Have 10k to 15k? Call me I can make a deal. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cLand home package with 10k down in Lake City Florida. We do the deals. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cIn house “nancing with 10k down on used or repo houses. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cTriple wide $29,900 as is. Wholesale price, hardwood ”oors, ceramic tile. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cReduced $10,000 Lot Model 4/2, new 2014. 2,016 square feet. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cCASH special up to $5,000. Reduced price on new or used quali“ed models. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cUltimate home 2,027 square feet 3/2 $69,900. Beautiful new home with “replace. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cLive Oak or Merit Homes. Low prices. Freedom Mobile Homes. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, c Ad Builder/Graphic Artist needed for the Madison County Carrier and the Madison EnterpriseRecorder. Must be a team player and able to handle multiple tasks. Experience with Adobe Photoshop a must, experience with Quark Express a plus. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.11/20 rtn, n/c AUCTION-OUR ANNUAL CHRISTMAS AUCTION SATURDAY November 30 at 5:30 p.m. Madison Auction House. 1693 SW Moseley Hall Rd (CR360) 850 973-1444 AGAIN THIS YEAR WE ARE PARTNERING WITH THE SALVATION ARMY AND SOME OF THE LOCAL VFD TO COLLECT TOYS FOR THOSE CHILDREN THAT WOULD NOT OTHERWISE RECEIVE ONE. BRING ONE OR BUY ONE AT THE AUCTION AND HELP THESE KIDS OUT! WE ARE ALSO HAVING OUR ANNUAL FREE DINNER BETWEEN 4:30 AND 5:30 P.M. FOR OUR AUCTION ATTENDEES. COME JOIN THE FUN, EAT AND DONATE A TOY TO HELP A CHILD OUT. 10% Buyers Premium. MC, Visa, Discover, Debit Cards, Checks and Cash Accepted. AU691 Ron Cox, AB2490.11/20, 11/27, pd Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ”ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497. Gray Logging LLC is looking for a full time shop/“eld mechanic Excellent pay/bene“ts Must apply in person Call of“ce for appointment 850-973-3863.11/22, 11/27, c Receptionist: When was the last time YOU had FUN at WORK? Its a great time to join our team of super dedicated staff. Not only do we take pride in what we do, WE HAVE FUN! Are you the type of person that never meets a stranger and has a GENUINE love of people? Are your physical appearance and cosmetics important to you? Do you already have great computer skills? How well do you adapt to learning new things, do you embrace it or resist it? This growing dental of“ce needs more helpers, and if you answered yes to these questions, then call 888-486-2408 to hear more about this position on our amazing team and how to apply.11/22 rtn, c Ho Ho Ho Guess Whos Coming To Town. Santa and Ms. ClauseŽ Dec. 3rd from 4 8 p.m. Located at 7952 E. hwy 90 in Lee, red building, cant miss it. There will be gift bags for the children and refreshments will be served. Hope to see you there.11/27, pd Condos for Sale FLORIDA WATERFRONT CONDO LIQUIDATION SALE! Brand new 2BR/2BA 1,690sf luxury condo only $149,900 Originally under contract for $365,000. Near downtown Orlando & all theme parks/attractions. Must see. Call now 877-333-0272, x 173. Help Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certi“cations. GI Bill Bene“ts Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. Real Estate/ Land for Sale BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAIN BARGAIN! 25 acres only $84,900. Beautifully wooded rolling mountaintop terrain, backs up to national forest. Enjoy stream, abundant wildlife, spectacular views, trails throughout. Paved rd frontage municipal water, utilities all completed. Excellent “nancing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 83. Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage TENN. LAND BARGAIN WITH FREE BOAT SLIP! 1.70 acres meadows overlooks 140 acre Nature Preserve, streams & ponds. Only $19,900. 6.1 acre hardwoods Only $27,900. FREE boat slips. Excellent “nancing, little down. Call now 1-877-888-0267, x446.

PAGE 13

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013Madison County Carrier 13A ----Legals ---11/27, 12/4 NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA The School Board of Madison County, Florida announces that the School Board will hold its regular public meetings, to which all persons are invited to attend, as follows: Dates:Dec. 10, 2013 Jan. 21, 2014Feb. 4, 2014 Feb. 18, 2014Mar. 4, 2014Mar. 18, 2014 April 15, 2014May 6, 2014May 20, 2014 June 3, 2014June 17, 2014July 1, 2014 July 15, 2014Aug. 5, 2014Aug. 19, 2014 Sept. 2, 2014Sept. 16, 2014Oct. 7, 2014 Oct. 21, 2014Nov. 18, 2014 Time:6:00 p.m. Place:The School Board Meeting Room 210 North East Duval Avenue Madison, Florida 32340 Purpose:To consider and act upon the business of the School Board. A copy of each agenda may be obtained no earlier than 7 days prior to each meeting by writing to the School Board at 210 North East Duval Avenue, Madison, Florida 32340 or by calling Ms. Jane Dickey at (850) 973-5022. Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodations to participate in any of the above meetings is asked to advise the School Board at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Ms. Jane Dickey at (850) 973-5022. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the School Board by calling 711. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the School Board with respect to any matter considered at such meetings he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. School Board of Madison County, Florida By: /s/ Doug Brown Doug Brown Superintendent of Schools11/27 11/27, 12/4 11/27, 12/4 For Sale 2006 Expedition; Eddie Bauer; White Very nice family car in very good condition. $8,000 OBO. Call (850) 464-1230 for more information.

PAGE 14

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 14A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Oliver Bradley Tells 55 Plus About Veterans ServicesBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Oliver Bradley grew up in Valdosta, Ga. He was drafted into the military in 1968, serving in the Signal Corps in Vietnam, and then in the infantry, where he was injured. Shortly afterwards, he returned to the U.S., eventually moving to Madison. Since 1992, he has been active in local churches, starting out as a Methodist, but eventually gravitating towards the Baptist denomination, serving at Damascus Baptist with David DeLaughter, then at Morning Star Baptist and currently at Genesis Baptist across from Fellowship on Hwy 145. For the last 20 years, he has been the Veteran’s Service Officer, serving both Jefferson and Madison Counties, working in the Jefferson office Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and the Madison office Thursdays and Fridays, from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. The Madison office is on the first floor of the Courthouse Annex, just past Tax Collector Lisa Tuten’s Office. “Knowing the plight of veterans has made my job easy,” he told the 55 Plus Club at their November meeting two days after Veterans Day. “I love helping veterans, their families, and their widows. It is a blessing to serve the veterans and widows of Madison County.” For the purposes of eligibility for veterans’ services, “veteran” is defined as anyone who served a tour of duty of at least 120 consecutive days in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines or Coast Guard, and received any discharge other than “dishonorable;” if the veteran received an honorable discharge, there is no distinction between “volunteer” and “draftee.” When he asked the audience for a show of hands for those who had served, almost every man in the room raised his hand. The Veterans Service Office in Madison has a contract with Big Bend Transportation that offers transportation services to and from V.A. Medical Centers in Lake City or Gainesville for veterans who need it. In Jefferson County, he has a car for transporting veterans to Tallahassee. He also helps veterans with filing for education, vocational rehabilitation and retirement benefits they are entitled to, and help with filing claims for service-connected disabilities (defined as any injury received or any ongoing illness that first occurred while they were on active duty.) In his work, he meets a lot of veterans who are qualified for V.A. services and benefits they never knew about and never applied for. Other benefits include emergency and long-term health care. If an elderly veteran needs placement in a nursing facility, the V.A. has a contract with the state and several nursing facilities to make sure the veteran is placed as close to home as possible. There are also services available for homebound veterans, but they need to be qualified in the V.A. system, preferably before they get to that point. The Veterans Services Office can help with that. In the years since his own service in the military, he has become a pacifist. “I do not advocate war,” he said firmly. “However, if our country had kept the draft in place, and all our young men had served two years, they would be better for it. They would see that no matter how much you cried, you had to do it.” Not to go to war, but to serve and to learn discipline and self-control in their lives. “If we put them in the military, maybe our jails wouldn’t be so full,” he said. In closing, he avowed his love of his country. Like his favorite Lee Greenwood song says, “I’m proud to be an American.” For more information about veterans services and benefits, contact Bradley at (850) 464-1191, or visit the Veterans Services Office in the Courthouse Annex.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 13, 2013Rev. Oliver Bradley of the Veterans Services Of“ce of Madison County talks to the 55 Plus Club about services and bene“ts available to veterans.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 13, 2013Setting the stage for guest speaker Oliver Bradley, and in keeping with the patriotic theme for the 55 Plus Clubs meeting, Ginger Jarvis sings the National Anthem.



PAGE 1

Wed. November 27, 2013VOL. 50 NO. 15 www.greenepublishing.com 50 cents Index2 Sections, 24 Pages Local Weather Viewpoints 2A Around Madison3-7, 14A Health 8A Black Friday 9A School 10-11A Classieds 12A Legals 13A Path of Faith Section B Arrest Made For Yellow Pine BurglaryMadison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports that back in January, deputies responded to a burglary alarm of the Yellow Pine Truck Stop located at 1407 East Base Street. Deputies discovered the business had been burglarized and the suspect had fled the scene. Deputies collected several items of evidentiary value to be submitted to a Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) crime lab in an attempt to identify the suspect. In May, the Tallahassee Regional Department of Law Enforcement crime lab confirmed a standard of evidence for a suspect from the evidentiary items submitted. On June 4, a warrant to search the person of one Michael Deangelo Fiffia was executed for final standard comparisons. On Aug. 26, the final comparisons were confirmed as the suspect, Michael Deangelo Fiffia. A capias for the arrest of Michel Deangelo Fiffia was requested from the Third Circuit State Attorneys Office. On Thursday, Nov. 21, a warrant for the arrest of Michael Deangelo Fiffia was executed while he was incarcerated at the Madison County Jail on other unrelated charges. The arrest warrant was for the following: 1.Burglary of structure 2.Grand theft 3.Criminal Mischief 4.Circuit Violation of Probation Michael Fifa Man Arrested For Trespass After WarningBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. AMadison man was arrested shortly after midnight on Friday, Nov. 22, and charged with trespass after warning. According to a Madison Police Department report, Sgt. Chris Cooks made contact with Benjamin Wertz at an apartment building. Cooks ran information on Wertz and discovered that a trespass warning for the entire complex had been issued to him. Wertz was placed under arrest and transported to the Madison County Jail. Benjamin Wertz Fire Engulfs HomeBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Ablaze engulfed a home Sunday evening, Nov. 24, causing the loss of the home and heat damage to a home next to it. According to Madison Fire & Rescue Chief Bruce Jordan, the department was dispatched to a re at the home of Agnes Brown on Gillislee Street. A combined total of $50,000 in damage was done to the Brown house and to the vacant house next door. Jordan said it is undetermined at this time how the re started, but that it is possibly from an electrical problem in the home. The Pinetta Volunteer Fire Department, the Lee Volunteer Fire Department and the New Home Volunteer Fire Department assisted MFR at the scene. Photos submitted by Pat Lightcap, November 24, 2013 Community Thanksgiving Dinner SetBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc.Acommunity Thanksgiving dinner will be served at the Madison County Senior Citizens Center located at the intersection of Harvey Greene Drive and SR 14 South, in Madison, on Thursday, Nov. 28. For more information, please call Timmy Dyke at (850) 464-8107. Proposed Parking Project On Range StreetBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Ablock along the west side of SW Range Avenue, between Dade Street and Macon Streets, could see some improvement in both parking and pedestrian safety, according to a proposed sidewalk project submitted to the City Commission by Community Planning Director Chuck Hitchcock.In a memo to the city commission, Hitchcock stated that both he and Madison Police Chief Gary Calhoun have safety concerns about there being no established sidewalk along this stretch of Range Street, and that there is no structured, clearly marked parking in the area. All of the merchants located in that area had been contacted and had indicated that they were in favor of something being done. The proposed drawings submitted show 11 new angled parking spaces created, along with a five-foot-wide sidewalk, with a notation not to make the sidewalk curb so high because it could damage the front ends of automobiles. It also indicates two new proposed streetlights. Hitchcock believes that the proposal will make the area look a lot better as well as promote business and enhance pedestrian safety. The project would cost between $16,000 and $19,000, depending on obstacles encountered underground, and would be funded through the Tax Increment Fund (TIF).Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 20, 2013This area of SW Range Street, between Dade and Macon Streets, has no clearly marked off parking spaces, and currently, cars park any which way they can. The proposed improvement will provide clearly marked parking spots along the side of Range Street, and a ve-foot-wide sidewalk with a curb for pedestrian safety. The proposed design will also preserve the giant oak tree seen here. This schematic shows the area as it currently is in the small drawing at the top; below it, the larger drawing shows the proposed improvements, including where parking spaces and the new sidewalk would be placed. Range Street is at the bottom, Dade Street is on the right and Macon Street is on the left.

PAGE 2

Today (November 27) marks the 21stbirthday of my oldest daughter, Cheltsie Elizabeth Kinsley. To say the least, my life changed dramatically 21 years ago today. At the age of 23, I became a rst-time mother. Everything about her was so exciting and yet so scary. I was so afraid of doing something wrong and hurting her. As all parents know, those fears never really leave us. As our children grow, we too have to learn new things and cross new obstacles, with them. The fears of doing things wrong are still present in so many aspects of our lives with them. I sometimes watch Cheltsie now and truly cannot believe that it has been 21 years. It seems like just yesterday. I could not be more proud of the young lady that Cheltsie has become. Her moral values, her Christian standards, her work ethics and her dedication to her family and friends are all so astounding. So on this very special day, I would like to say, Happy Birthday, Cheltsie! I Love You and I Am So Very Proud Of You! Im so glad God gave you to me 21 years ago!!! Until then .see you around the town. Ithought it might be interesting and informative to print the rst presidents Thanksgiving Proclamation rendered in his rst year of ofce. In the wake of political correctness and revisionist history, it is important to understand how this holiday was viewed, literally by the father of our nation. The writing style is 18thCentury, but you can discern the meaning. Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benets, and humbly to implore his protection and favor-and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness. Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26thday of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the benecent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be-That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks--for his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation--for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war-for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed--for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted--for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us. And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions-to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually--to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed-to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shown kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord--To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the increase of science among them and us-and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best. Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789. George Washingtonwww.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 2A Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist Thanksgiving ProclamationEvery year at Thanksgiving, there are always things that come to mind when giving thanks, but this season I have found myself grumbling instead of being thankful. The closer it gets to the actual day when I ceremonially voice what I am thankful for, I decided I needed to think about the many blessings I really do have instead of all the negative things Ive been focusing on. When I began this list of thankfulness, the thought of one blessing seemed to immediately bring to mind several more, and before I knew it, my list of complaints looked very small. My list is not written out like a top 10 in any particular order, and denitely not inclusive, but more like random musings to readjust my thinking. Inevitably the grumblies will strike again but when they do, maybe I can pull my list out so that I can refocus and consider how thankful I should be a little more often. Grace and forgiveness, love, generosity, chocolate, friends who cook for me, warm fuzzy boots and gloves on a cold day, a husband who tries, cell phones and computers to help me stay connected, friends and family who will drive long distances to see me, a job, a house with heat and air, my health, freedom, woods full of trees where I can walk my dogs, memories (even if they are sad), the ability to walk-speak-smellsing-hear-dance-use my hands and feet-and taste, dogs who dont mind snuggling, my Mom living close, sugar (even if it is bad), my mind, fresh eggs, recipes that are handed down and come with a great story, coffee with lots of cream, my new camera, perfume, good music, movies, gardening, clean sheets, my Jeep (even if gas is too high!), water to drink, a hot shower, rain, snow (even if I dont see it here), home-grown tomatoes, sweet watermelon, summer blackberries, laughter, gentle prodding, the long-awaited healthy pregnancy of a close friend, electricity, people in service positions to keep me and my home safe, toilet paper, answered prayer, strangers who remind me they are just people I havent gotten to know YET, butteries and dragonies, any animal that lets me photograph them without hurting me, cheese, the scent and beauty of owers, vacations, Raisin Bran and soymilk, google, medicine, good dreams, books that I can still read without a screen, really good vacuum cleaners that picks up dog hair the size of tumble weeds, peanut butter, waking up this morning and a maximum word count on this column that forces me to stop writing, because without it, I could go on and on, and on. I hope each and every one of you have a great holiday, friends and family to help you celebrate, plenty of good food (no matter what that food is) and a list of blessings of your own that you can be thankful for. Happy Thanksgiving!ThanksgivingAn Inventory Of Blessings Rose Klein Columnist Searching For Ambrosia Emerald's Gem BoxHappy 21stBirthday, CheltsieEmerald Greene Publisher

PAGE 3

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Madison County Carrier 3AWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Kangaroo Meat May Soon Hop Into China In Australia, Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce and the Chinese are discussing the growth of Chinas booming middle class and rising appetite for red meat. Joyce is encouraging the Chinese to export kangaroo meat as a solution. Wang Jun owns a small restaurant in Beijing and says he would be willing to try the meat. Why not? As long as it is delicious, Wang said. Chinese meat staples are beef, pork and chicken, but they will also eat cat, rat and dog meat, believing the meat to have medicinal qualities. Not everyone, however, is as adventurous. Liu Xinxin, a 21-year-old student from Beijing said, How could we lay our chopsticks on such cute animals? Kangaroo meat sells in Australia for about $8.50 per pound, less than beef, but would be promoted in China as a high protein, low-fat exclusive food item with health benets. Macro Meats, Australias largest processor of kangaroo, has partnered with New Hope Group Ltd., one of Chinas largest agribusiness operators, to woo customers and project exclusivity by limiting supply. Ray Borda, the founder and managing director of Macro Meats said, Our strategy will see us place kangaroo only in high-end butchers, not in supermarkets. Home Toilets Now Required For Indian Politicians In Patna, India, the government announced politicians would not be allowed to run for ofce unless they have toilets in their homes. Ofcials said the rules were made to promote healthy sanitation habits and would help Bihar reach its goal of becoming an opendefecation free state by 2022. Chief Minister Nitish Kumar made the announcement on World Toilet Day that each household in the state would be given $160 for home toilet installation and that government ofcials would be supervising the process. Kumar stated, Open defecation is the source of nearly 90 percent of ailments. Its elimination would be a great service for the generation to come. Bunny Hunt Consumes Londons Social Media In London, social media users by the thousands are searching for a stuffed rabbit belonging to threeyear-old Ruby Stewart, who lost her stuffed companion on a weekend trip to London. Zoe Stewart, mother of Ruby, created Find Mr. Rabbit pages on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and posted the familys footsteps during the evening the beloved bunny disappeared. Stewart said her initial tweet about the missing rabbit has been retweeted more than 1,100 times and her Facebook post was shared nearly 3,000 times. I think the whole of the U.K. is looking for him, Stewart said. AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Ofce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersTori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn Shanna SwopeBookkeeping Brooke Kinsley Classified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) R Look for our insert in todays paper!Everything SALEis onBlack Friday ONLY 28thAnnual Greenville Country Christmas Bake-Off ContestOnce again, its time to show off your baking skills! The Greenville Country Christmas Committee invites you to enter the 28thAnnual Bake-Off Contest. A total of 15 cash prizes will be awarded. First place, second place and third place will be awarded in ve different categories: Cakes, Cookies, Candies, Breads and Pies. First Place winners will receive a ribbon and $15; Second Prize winners will receive a ribbon and $10; and Third Prize winners will receive a ribbon and $5. All participants must have a Greenville address and entries must be marked with name, phone number and the title of their entry. Please submit your entry at the Greenville Madison MultiPurpose Center on SW Grand Street in Greenville between 4-5 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 13. Judging will begin at 5 p.m. For more information, please contact Elesta Pritchett at (850) 948-7501 or Frances Norris at (850) 948-4900. The Greenville Country Christmas Committee would appreciate it if participants will leave their entries so that they may be enjoyed during refreshment time at 7 p.m.

PAGE 4

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 4A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Obituaries November 28 A community Thanksgiving dinner will be served at the Madison County Senior Citizens Center, located at the intersection of Harvey Greene Drive and SR 14 South, in Madison, on Thursday, Nov. 28. For more information, please call Timmy Dyke at (850) 464-8107. December 4 The Tall Pines Club will meet on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at noon in the Mill Conference Room in Clyattville, Ga. Ham, turkey and dressing will be furnished. Please bring a side dish. December 7 Get in the spirit of Christmas with Cherry Lake United Methodist Churchs Legends of Christmas Adventure Day on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9-11 a.m. Children, ages five and up, will enjoy learning about the Legends of Christmas and make Christmas crafts while glorifying the true meaning of Christmas. Festive refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome. December 8 The First United Methodist Church of Madison will present the cantata I Hear a Prophet Calling during the 11:00 a.m. service at the church in Madison. Lynn Corbin is the director. December 8 The First Baptist Church of Madison will present their Christmas cantata, Come Messiah King, on Sunday, December 8, at 6 p.m. at the church in Madison. December 11 The 55 Plus Club has a special treat in store for its December meeting: a performance by the Madison Boys Choir, under the direction of Rev. Marcus Hawkins. The club meets at noon on the second Wednesday of every month at the UMCM Center, 135 NW Dill Ave., on the corner of Dill and Colin Kelly Hwy. (Highway 145) near Hanson, about five miles north of town, for a free lunch provided by one of the member churches, and a guest speaker or musical performance. Come on out Wednesday, Dec. 11 at noon, and bring some friends to enjoy food, fellowship and some fine Christmas singing. For more information on the Club, or for directions to the UMCM Center contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929-4938. December 13 SkillsUSA will hold a fundraiser on Friday, Dec. 13, from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on the Courthouse Lawn. Funds will be used to help MCHS SkillsUSA compete in Regional and State Competitions. A grilled chicken plate will be available for $6 in advance or $7 at the lawn. It will include potato salad, green beans, roll and dessert. Sweet tea will be available for $1. For tickets or questions, contact Paige Thomas at (386) 965-6771. December 14 Greenville Country Christmas at Haffye Hays Park in Greenville, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Join in for fun, food, a parade, live entertainment and arts and crafts. December 21 Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church, 407 NE Mt. Zion Church Avenue in Cherry Lake, will hold a Hanson, Pinetta and Cherry Lake Community Christmas Outreach Dinner on Saturday, Dec. 21, from 12:303:30 p.m. Meals will be delivered to community residents beginning at 9:30 a.m. Anyone interested in helping with the event is welcome to go serve with them. Anyone needing transported to the church or who is sick or shut-in can call Brother Johnnie Woods at (850) 929-4141. For more information, please call Savilla Murphy at (850) 929-4386. December 22 Midway Baptist Church will present their Christmas cantata, Glory to the Newborn King, on Sunday, Dec. 22, at 6 p.m. Midway Baptist Church is located at 338 SE Midway Church Road. December 22 Midway Church of God will present their childrens Christmas play on Sunday, Dec. 22, at 6 p.m. Everyone is invited. Midway Church of God is located at 2849 SE Midway Church Road in Lee. Community Calendar Thelma Holden TutenThelma Holden Tuten, age 82, died Friday, November 22, 2013, at Madison Health and Rehab. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Sunday, November 24, 2013, at New Home Baptist Church with burial at San Pedro Cemetery. Visitation was one hour prior to the service from 2-3 p.m. at the Church. She was born in Sirmans and lived all her life in Madison. She was a homemaker and was a member of Madison Church of Christ. She is survived by one son, Darrell Tuten (Sue) of Madison and one daughter, Jan Brannen of Titusville; three sisters: Virginia Earthman of Ponte Vedra, Nadine Cossar of Leesburg and Syble Bryant of Mississippi; six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website www.beggsfuneral.com. James Edwin HendryJames Edwin Hendry, 80, of Madison, passed away Friday, November 22, 2013, at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Funeral Services were held at 1 p.m. Monday, November 25, 2013, at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel, with burial at Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends from 5-7 p.m. Sunday, November 24, 2013 at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison. He was born in Taylor County on May 3, 1933 to the late Roosevelt and Mae Hendry. He graduated Madison High School in 1951. He served as a Paratrooper in the U. S. Army in the Korean conict. He was Self-Employed most of his life as owner of Hendry IGA Grocery Store and Lake Front Grocery. He and his wife owned and operated The Rosary Florist for 25 years. After retirement in 1999, he worked part time with T. J. Beggs Jr. & sons Funeral Home until his death. He was a charter and active member of Unity Baptist Church where he served as treasurer and Sunday School teacher for many years. He is survived by his wife: Norma Jean Townsend Hendry of 57 years; two sons: Troy Hendry (Jenny) of Madison, and Todd Hendry of St. Augustine, Fl; two grandchildren: Sara Whitaker (Kyle) of Madison, and Andrew Hendry (anc, Magan Taylor) of Valdosta, Ga.; one sister: Genalee Huggins; brother-in-law: Herman Cherry, both of Madison; sister-in-law: Carolyn Hendry of Bryan, Texas; and many nieces and nephews. He was loved and will be missed by his family and many friends, especially his best friend Lucky. Two brothers, Earl Hendry and Curtis Hendry, and a sister, Myrtle Cherry, predeceased him. Beggs Funeral home is in charge of arrangements: 850-9732258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website www.beggsfuneral.com. Providers from the TMH Family Medicine Residency program see patients in your health department on a regular basis. Our experienced physicians and nurse-midwives provide personalized healthcare to women before, during and after pregnancy. We proudly deliver babies at the TMH Womens Pavilion, the only hospital in the region with a Newborn ICU. To learn more about our services or to schedule an appointment, call us at (850) 973-5000. Florida Department of Health Madison County 218 S.W. Third Avenue Madison, FL 32340 Harold F. Mickel, Sr.Harold F. Mickel, Sr., age 80, of Vienna, Georgia died Saturday, November 23, 2013, at his residence. Born in Valdosta, Ga, he was the son of the late Hal Henry Mickel and Leo Hughes Mickel. He was a United States Navy veteran and retired from Bell South. He was preceded in death by his siblings, Edward Mickel, Marion Bush and Bobby Mickel. He is survived by his wife, Lillian Carlo Mickel of Nashville, Ga; his sons, Donald Mickel of Vienna, Ga., Joe Mickel of Cochran, Ga. and Harold Mickel, Jr. of Valdosta, Ga; his sister, Frankie Jean Bush of Greenville, Fl; 10 grandchildren; 16 great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, November 27, 2013, at St. John Baptist Church in Greenville, Florida. Interment with military honors will follow at Concord Baptist Church Cemetery in Greenville. The family greeted friends 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, November 26 at Brannen-NeSmith Funeral Home in Vienna, Ga. Friends may sign the online guestbook at www.brannen-nesmith.com. Brannen-NeSmith Funeral Home of Vienna, Ga has charge of arrangements.

PAGE 5

By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.When New York University student George Aigen was drafted into the Army, he wasnt even old enough to drive. The Brooklyn, N.Y. native was only 18, and in New York, the driving age was 21. His father drove him to a large building where other young draftees were gathering, and hugged him goodbye. I still remember that day, says Aigen. I didnt know if Id ever see him again. It was 1943, and half a world away, World War II was raging in Europe. In America, young men had to register for the draft at age 17, and carry their draft cards with them at all times. Being caught without it was cause for being arrested. After bidding farewell to his father, Aigen found himself inside the huge building with several hundred other teenagers and young men. They were herded into a line for a cursory medical exam, consisting of a man with a stethoscope going down the line and checking heartbeats. He remembers going through other lines for blankets, shoes, dungarees and shirts, and then finally standing in another line as an officer went down the row assigning the young men to a branch of the military in a perfunctory onetwo-three, count-off pattern. Their place in line determined whether the young men went into the Army, Navy or Marines, and that was how Aigen ended up in the Army. For the Jewish teenager from Brooklyn, that was the beginning of a journey that would take him into the dark heart of the Nazi Third Reich, one that would leave him with powerful, haunting images of the two days he spent in the liberation of Dachau images that he did not speak of publicly for over 60 years after he returned home. During training at Ft. Smith, Ark., he learned the technical side of bridge-building, land mines and booby-traps, and on Nov. 6, 1944, with the U.S. Army 1269th Combat Engineers, Company B, 19-year-old Corporal Aigen landed just east of Marseilles, France. His first night there, he slept in a tank track, because it was deep enough to offer protection from the bullets flying overhead. Later, he remembers being in the foothills of the German Alps and the sound of mortar shells flying through the air. Within a week, he learned to tell just by listening where those shells were going and where they would land. Once, he recalls a shell landing only 14 paces from where he had been standing moments earlier. The main assignment for the 1269th Combat Engineers was guarding other troops as they marched and fought their way toward Germany. At night, they would rig up a ring of protection around the camp with hand grenades and black trip wire; the grenades were removed from their cans, the pins were pulled, and the grenades were carefully reloaded in the cans which were taped to stakes driven into the ground all around the camp. The trip wire wound from the stake and looped through the grenade handles. At one point, the 1269thwas assigned to a group of Army scientists and engineers, who had bent sent to scavenge for any German technology left behind by retreating Nazi forces. Just across the Rhine River, they entered an abandoned factory, only to find it emptied of everything except the payroll. Not knowing what else to do with the cache of German marks, they rolled it up in a copy of the Stars & Stripes and took it with them. At a later stop, they took refuge in what appeared to be an abandoned house and lit a fire in the stove, only to be accosted by a woman shrieking at them in German. One of the men who spoke German translated for them all the money she had in the world had been hidden in that stove. The German marks rolled up in the Stars & Stripes came to the rescue for the distraught woman. As they pushed on, they often had no idea where they were. They had maps, but the retreating Germans had removed road signs or turned them around to confuse the approaching Allies. In one town, Aigen recalls walking into a cathedral and seeing all the chairs pushed against the walls. On the floor, he saw scratchings that turned out to be memorials for the cathedrals clergy, and in the middle of the sanctuary, machinery and equipment set up for making ammunition. On April 28, 1945, the 1269thentered Munich, arriving at night to an eerie scene. The streetlights were on, but the streets themselves were deserted. They met no opposition whatsoever, spending the night in an empty museum. The next day, they headed for Dachau, some eight or nine miles away, one of over 200 concentration camps throughout Germany, as back up to the Third Infantry, which would go in first. The 1269thwould watch their backs, making sure they werent ambushed from behind after entering the camp. We didnt know what to expect, said Aigen. There was absolutely no cover as they approached the front gate of Dachau; just a huge, treacherously wide-open grassy area sloping upward toward the gate, with nowhere to hide if the enemy suddenly opened fire. They would be like sitting ducks. There were two large posts on either side of the gate, framing the single railroad track leading inside. Above it, the now-famous words, Arbeit Macht Frei (Work will make you free). As they passed through the gate, Aigen recalls seeing an open area to the left of the tracks and a line of trees on the right...and that first group of battled-hardened Third Infantry soldiers who had arrived ahead of them, now seated on the ground, crying. This was bad. There had been whispers and vague rumors of concentration camps floating around before, but nothing prepared them for what they were seeing. An emaciated womans head and shoulders hanging out of a boxcar, dead, one of thousands of bodies piled up in boxcars. A group of half a dozen bodies on the ground. Groups of dead, emaciated people everywhere. Others, still barely alive, sitting with their backs against the barracks walls, staring at nothing. Aigen remembers opening the door to one of the barracks and seeing hundreds of cots stacked four deep from floor to ceiling. In that beam of light from the door, a gaunt, skullfaced man about 10 feet away lifted himself up on his elbow to see who was there, stared into the light for a few seconds, then sank down again, utterly exhausted. Altogether, 2,310 bodies were piled in the boxcars alone: men, women and children who had starved to death. There were structures that looked like oversized childrens swing-sets, where prison guards would suspend their victims from chains and then bat them around with large wooden sticks. When they tired of that sport, they hanged the victims from those same structures. Photographs of this and other horrors were left behind, along side the crematory ovens and the laboratories where medical experiments were carried out on prisoners. It wasnt just Jewish people. Of the 34, 432 people at Dachau, only 2,539 were Jews. The rest made up a list of some 20-25 nationalities. The Nazis had a long list of undesirables who had no place in the narrow Aryan society of the Third Reich. Aigen still has some of those photos from Dachau. These were the kind of people we were dealing with, he says quietly. People who delighted in torture and killing. People who were the embodiment of the evil that has come to be associated with names like Dachau, Auschwitz and Buchenwald. After two days at Dachau, the 1269th had to move on because of the war. Aigens next assignment was to pick up troop supplies from a warehouse, but because he was too young to drive, he had to be assigned a driver. Days later, in May of 1945, he was in a small town in France, walking down a street that could have been any street in smalltown America, when church bells suddenly began ringing. Everywhere, all at once, ringing loudly. A man leaned out a window and shouted La guerre est finie (the war is over). A little girl ran out of one of the houses, took his hand and said merci. That was how he learned the war had e nded. He went back home, met Joyce, his wife of 62 years, in New York City, built a career and raised a family that includes three children, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. They eventually moved to Valdosta in order to be closer to family. After decades of carrying around the memories of Dachau in silence, he has begun, with encouragement from Joyce and other close friends, to speak publicly about what he saw those two days in April of 1945. To date, he has given over 40 presentations, at high schools, churches, civic clubs, colleges and other organizations. He believes he has a responsibility to tell others what he witnessed, in the hopes that it will never be allowed to happen again. The face of evil cannot remain hidden away and forgotten. People must know it for what it is, and recognize it when they see it, if they are to prevent a repeat of one of the darkest eras in recent history. And that is why George Aigen speaks. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Madison County Carrier 5AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY WWII Veteran Remembers DachauGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, November 6, 2013WWII veteran George Aigen of Valdosta, and his wife Joyce, visited the Rotary Club of Madison, where George shared his memories of the liberation of Dachau. wens Propane, IncService With A Smile Serving North FloridaMADISON, JEFFERSON, SUWANNEE& HAMILTONCOUNTIES SIMPLY EVERYDAY FAIR PRICING W e A r e H e r e T o E a r n Y o u r B u s i n e s s & K e e p Y o u r B u s i n e s s FREE TANK SETS HEATER SERVICE NEW HEATERS TANKLESS WATER HEATERS GAS LOGS PRICE COMPARISONS Madison Office137 SW Shelby Avenue Madison, Florida 32340(850) 253-3761 $3.19 PER GALLON NO DELIVERY FEES NO SEASONAL PRICES NO GIMMICKS (Ask For Becky) R Look for our insert in todays paper!Everything SALEis onBlack Friday ONLY BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252

PAGE 6

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 6A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Flatscreen TV Drawing At Light Up MadisonBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.The Kiwanis and Rotary Clubs of Madison are holding a joint fundraiser with a drawing for an LED 46inch atscreen TV. With special thanks to Aarons of Madison for making it possible, Rotary and Kiwanis members are selling tickets for $5 each, and you can buy as many chances as you wish. The proceeds will benet the charitable and community service projects supported by each club. The drawing will be Saturday, Dec. 7, under the Kiwanis tent at Light Up Madison. You do not have to be present to win...but you cant win if you dont buy a ticket. See any member of the Rotary or Kiwanis clubs for your chance to win. Kiwanis Holding Annual Citrus Sale By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Eating healthy during the holidays has never been easier. The Kiwanis Club of Madison is beginning its annual Christmas Citrus Sale, one of its major fundraisers for the year. The club is preselling boxes of Hamlin Oranges, Tangelos, and Ruby Red Grapefruit for $25 a box or $15 for half a box. They will also have Naval Oranges for $30 a box or $20 for half a box (one box equals 4/5 bushel). All the proceeds will be reinvested in Madison County through the Kiwanis Clubs many charitable and community service projects, including, the Key Club at Madison County High School, Healthy Start, Mentors in the Take Stock in Children Program, the Brain Bowl at the Central School, Books For Children, Blankets for Migrant Workers, Project Graduation, The Senior Citizens Council, and the Terric Kids Program of Madison County, just to name some of them. To order your box of citrus, please contact: Oliver Bradley 973-3208 Lucile Day 948-4891 Jerome Wyche 464-0196 Roy Ellis 971-5864 George Willis 973-8583 Cindy Vees 464-7611Greene Publishing, Inc. photo by Lynette Norris, November 19, 2013Near the hospital and downtown Madison, Clarence Buddy Blalock lives in the house that has been in his family since 1941. Recently, he has had a lot of work done on his yard, earning him the Madison Garden Clubs Most Improved Yard award, which pleased him enormously. On a sunny November afternoon, Buddy and his cat posed in the front yard beside the sign the Garden Club presented to him.Buddy Blalock Has Most Improved Yard United Way Holding A Community Conversation EventBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.United Way of the Big Bend is undergoing a strategic planning process to ensure that the agency delivers the greatest possible return for the monies invested by organizations and citizens across the Big Bend. United Way feels it is important to undertake this process, so they can engage stakeholders about their aspirations and concerns. The agency will be hosting a series of conversations with a variety of stakeholder groups to discuss and identify local issues that can then be addressed as a community. If you are interested in joining the conversation in Madison County, the event will be held at the Madison Senior Center located at 1161 SW Harvey Greene Drive on Tuesday, Dec. 3 at 6 7 p.m. To conrm your attendance, please email Megan Picht at megan@uwbb.org. For questions or more information, contact Heather Mitchell at (850) 414-0855. If you would like to be involved, but are unable to attend, please consider sending a representative from your organization or contact either Megan or Heather to stay informed about future Community Conversation events. Ashley Beggs Returns To Madison Rotary ClubGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 6, 2013Madison Rotary Club President Wayne Conger (right) and founding member Jargo Clark (left) welcome returning member Ashley Beggs, after an absence of several years. 836732 Mon. Fri. 8am 6pm Sat 9am 12pm Sun 1pm 4pm1600 S. Patterson St. inside State Framers Mkt229-242-7929 NOW OPEN WE BUY PECANS!!btnt@ fffrtrbVisit our Gift Shop 7 days a week Chocolate Praline Inhull-Shelled Cinnamon Candies

PAGE 7

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Madison County Carrier 7AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Reeves, Jinks, Rutherford Win 4-H Tropicana Speech ContestBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. Students from public and private schools, in grades fourth through sixth, competed in the Madison County 4-H Tropicana Speech Contest on Wednesday, Nov. 20. At stake was a chance for all rst place winners to win a scholarship to 4-H Camp Cherry Lake or another 4-H event of their choosing (which did not surpass the cost of attending camp) and for all rst and second place county winners to compete at the District IV events competition on May 3, 2014. The District Events will be held in Gilchrist County. Kayla Reeves, a student at Madison Academy, won rst place for the sixth grade for her speech on Bullying. Sadie Underwood, from Madison County Central School, garnered second place for her speech on FCA. Caitlyn Jordan, from New Testament Christian School, nished third for the sixth grade presenters. Tabytha Jinks, of Greenville Elementary School, won rst place for fth grade for her speech on The Beach. Dawson Herring, from Pinetta Elementary School, nished second for his speech on The Last Frontier. Kennedy Fogle, from Madison County Central School, nished third with a speech on Why Im So Mad. Savannah Pitts, of Lee Elementary School, won an honorable mention for her speech on Honey Bees. Elias Starling, from New Testament Christian School, and Savannah Curtis, from Madison Academy, were recognized for participating. Rhett Rutherford, from Madison Academy, was the fourth grade winner for his speech, For the Love of the Game. Yanett Serrano, from Lee Elementary School, was second place with the speech, My Day at the Beach. Whitney Raines, from Pinetta Elementary School, won third place for her speech on The Mountains. Zakira Howard won honorable mention for the speech, The Importance. Eli Bull, from the Madison County Central School, was recognized for participation.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, November 20, 2013The sixth grade division was a very tough division as they all had interesting speeches. Pictured left to right: Caitlyn Jordan with New Testament Christian School, third place; Sadie Underwood with Madison County Central School, FCA, second place; and Kayla Reeves with Madison Academy, Bullying, rst place.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, November 20, 2013The fth grade division was the biggest division at the Tropicana Public Speaking Contest. Pictured left to right: Savannah Curtis with Madison Academy, My Summers at the Beach, participation; Elias Starling with New Testament Christian School, participation; Savannah Pitts with Lee Elementary School, Honey Bees, honorable mention; Kennedy Fogle with Madison County Central School, Why Im So Mad, third place; Dawson Herring with Pinetta Elementary School, The Last Frontier, second place; and Tabytha Jinks with Greenville Elementary School, The Beach, rst place.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, November 20, 2013Nerves were high considering this was the fourth graders rst time competing in the speech contest. But nervousness did not stop these students from doing an excellent job. Shown left to right: Eli Bull with Madison County Central School, The Imagination Can Do Many Things, participation; Zakira Howard with Greenville Elementary School, The Importance, honorable mention; Whitney Raines with Pinetta Elementary School, The Mountains, third place; Yanet Serrano with Lee Elementary School, My Day at the Beach, second place; and Rhett Rutherford with Madison Academy, For the Love of the Game, rst place. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, November 20, 2013All students received an award for doing an outstanding job in the 2013 Tropicana Public Speaking Contest. Back row, left to right: Kayla Reeves, Sadie Underwood, Savannah Pitts, Elias Starling, Dawson Herring, Kennedy Fogle and Savannah Curtis. Front row, left to right: Caitlyn Jordan, Tabytha Jinks, Yanet Serrano, Zakira Howard, Whitney Raines, Eli Bull and Rhett Rutherford.

PAGE 8

Since 1993, Big Bend Hospices Tree of Remembrance has been a special holiday tradition which allows people in the community to honor their loved ones and help Big Bend Hospice raise money for patient care. A gift to the Tree of Remembrance provides a wonderful alternative to traditional holiday gifts. The Tree provides a time to remember and celebrate the lives of those we love. It also helps Big Bend Hospice provide care, comfort and hope to those who are dying. This year, in addition to the traditional three levels of giving; angels ($50), bells ($25) and bows ($10); patrons who make a donation of $250 or more will receive a limited edition Wedgewood ornament, along with a beautiful ornament of their choosing placed on a Tree of Remembrance in the county and location they specify. Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassionate end of life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Leon, Jefferson, Taylor, Madison, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin or Wakulla County. If you would like additional information about services, please call 850878-5310 or visit www.bigbendhospice.org. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 8A Madison County Carrier HEALTHThere are countless physical activities out there, but walking is the simplest positive change you can make to effectively improve your health. Walking is simple, free and one of the easiest ways to get more active, lose weight and become healthier. It's underrated as a form of exercise but walking is ideal for people of all ages and fitness levels who want to be more active. Regular walking has been shown to reduce the risk of chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma, stroke and some types of cancers. Your heart is the single most important muscle in your body, but keeping it in shape doesn't require a gym membership or hours of workouts. Adding a few brisk walks into your week is all it takes. Exercise, such as walking, strengthens the muscles of your heart and makes it pump more efficiently, delivering more oxygen and nutrients to the other organs. There's no question that walking is great for everyone: It dramatically boosts energy levels, fights fat, and protects your heart. But if you have high blood sugar, or if you have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes, walking can be a lifesaver. There is a strong association between abdominal fat and risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular issues. Walking shrinks this dangerous abdominal fat and thus cuts down the risk of these grave conditions. The key is to walk briskly -three to fourmiles per hour -and for 30-60 minutes at least five days a week. This can cut your risk of heart disease by 40 percent. Walking can also benefit those with a history of heart problems. However, it is important to check with your doctor first before beginning any kind of exercise program. The easiest way to walk more is to make walking a habit. Think of ways to include walking into your daily routine: If you drive to work, park at the farthest point of the parking lot and walk the difference; If you take the bus, get off one or two stops earlier than normal; Take a 10-minute walk during your lunch break and another during your coffee break; Fit in another 10 minutes after dinner. Get a check up before starting any new exercise program. If you already have heart problems, your doctor may want to perform tests to find out how much exercise you can safely do. Get a good pair of walking shoes. Start out slowly and increase gradually. At first, set a pace of about three miles per hour and walk for just 10 minutes. After you have ramped up, do at least 2.5 hours of walking a week. One way to do this is to walk for 30 minutes a day five times a week. But the total number of hours can be reached in any increments convenient for you. For motivation, walk with friends or pets. Use a pedometer to count your steps. Wear it throughout the day and try to reach at least 2,000 steps (approximately one mile) at first. Gradually increase your number of steps by 500 per week. Ways to do this include taking the stairs instead of an elevator, or parking farther away from your destination than you normally would. If you're regularly active, you'll burn more calories, which helps you manage your weight and other cardiovascular risk factors. Plus, physically active people nearly always report better moods, less stress, more energy and a better outlook on life. D i d Y o u K n o w . Frank NathanFormer Executive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness TipsBig Bend Hospices Tree Of Remembrance btnbtfrrtrrtrtrtnbtnfrbnbfnb tnfrrrrrnn Family Health Center Family Health Center &New hours: 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Closed on Tuesdays. Walk-ins accepted Say Aaaah -Tips To Protect Yourself From The Flu It's that time of year. It starts as a tickle in your throat, a sneeze, a cough, until soon you're mouth feels stuffed with cotton, and you're going through tissues in Costco-size quantities. Welcome to the cold and u season ofcially December through March -and there is still no cure. There are, however, things you can do to avoid infection, while protecting friends and family from these pesky viruses. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following tips: Get a shot. It's best to be proactive, not reactive, when ghting the u, say experts, so getting a u shot is the rst step in doing battle -and the sooner the better. "The u shot doesn't work right away," says Nathan Limb, pharmacy supervisor for Walgreens in Chicago's central district. "It takes about two weeks to boost the immune system once you've received it." Wash your hands. Soap and water are your best friends during this season. Washing your hands, both front and back, for 15seconds plus (the time it takes to sing "Happy Birthday" three times, or the ABCs will do it) is key. This is especially important when working in common areas such as copy rooms or front ofces. Drink plenty of liquids. It's important to, and while certain juices have been shown to prevent fewer cold symptoms, drinking water every day, all day, is a better option, say experts. Without water, no living thing can survive, which means it is crucial to maintaining optimal health. While water has a myriad of health benets, research has shown that not all waters are created equal, and that some waters have more health benets than others. This, say experts, is why drinking alkaline ionized water, such as Alkame Water, should be an essential part of anyone's health plan. Doctors recommend the mild alkalinity because it allows for more effective hydration, which supports an optimal pH-balanced body and is a powerful source of antioxidants, which boost the immune system, while also enhancing energy levels and overall health. Keep your distance. If you do get sick, it's important to stay home so you can get better quickly and not spread germs to others. The rule of thumb is to stay home for at least 24 hours after a fever is gone without use of medicine that lowers the fever. This will ensure you are past the point where you are likely to spread the virus to others. For more information on Alkame and its benets, visit .www.alkamewater.com

PAGE 9

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Madison County Carrier 9A

PAGE 10

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 10A Madison County CarrierSCHOOL T h a n k s g i v i n g S a l e T h a n k s g i v i n g S a l e Thanksgiving Sale! T h o u s a n d s O f P a i r s R e d u c e d Thousands Of Pairs Reduced F r o m O u r R e g u l a r S t o c k O f From Our Regular Stock Of M e n s a n d W o m e n s F a s h i o n Mens and Womens Fashion F o o t w e a r Footwear 1737 Gornto Rd. Valdosta (229) 242-1430 (Next to Publix-Outside the Mall) Follow us on Facebook G r e a t S e l e c t i o n G reat Selection o f L a d i e s F a s h i o n B o o t s of Ladies Fashion Boots 2 0 % 6 0 % 20 % -60 % O f f R e g u l a r R e t a i l Off Regular Retail H U G E S E L E C T I O N HUGE SELECTION C o l e H a a n C ole Haan M e r r e l l C l a r k s Merrell Clarks F e r g i e s Fergies V a n E l i J R e n e e Van Eli J. Renee B C B G e n e r a t i o n s BCBGenerations a n d m a n y m o r e and many more 2 0 % 8 0 % 20 % -80 % O f f R e g u l a r R e t a i l Off Regular Retail E n t i r e S e l e c t i o n M e n s & W o m e n s Entire Selection Mens & Womens C l o t h i n g A n d J a c k s e t s Clothing And Jacksets F r o m M o u n t a i n H a r d w e a r A n d L o l e From Mountain Hardwear And Lole 6 0 % 8 0 % 60 % -80 % O f f R e g u l a r R e t a i l Off Regular Retail H U G E HUGE S E L E C T I O N SELECTION M E N S S H O E S MENS SHOES 1 0 % 8 0 % 10 % -80 % O f f R e g u l a r R e t a i l Off Regular Retail 840334 SWAT: Students Working Against TobaccoSubmitted By Leila C. Rykard Human Services Program Specialist Tobacco Prevention Program Madison County Health DepartmentSWAT is Floridas statewide youth organization working to mobilize, educate and equip Florida youth to revolt against and de-glamorize Big Tobacco. SWAT is not just a peer education organization. Although the long-term goal is to improve the health of all Floridians, SWATs message is aimed at the tobacco industry. SWAT is not only a youth advocacy group; they also promote leadership and community involvement while focusing primarily on policy change. SWAT uses these avenues among teens to increase awareness and shift tobacco related social norms. On a local level, SWAT members work with each county tobacco free partnership to advocate for policy change that prevent youth initiation, reduce exposure to secondhand smoke and promote cessation. The goal of each policy is to change social norms so that tobacco is not accessible, not acceptable and not desirable. SWAT members are working in three main policy areas: Implement comprehensive tobacco free campus policy within their school districts. Restricting the sale of avored tobacco products not covered by the FDA. Educate their peers and community about the inuence of tobacco marketing in retail outlets on tobacco use. To accomplish these policy objectives, SWAT members conduct surveillance, educate and mobilize their peers and community members about tobacco issues, participate in media advocacy and present to decision makers. Locally, Madison County has two SWAT groups and advisors: Matt Replogle with the Madison County Central School and AD Kinsey, who heads up a faith-based SWAT group. For more information, contact Leila Rykard at the Madison County Department of Health, (850) 973-5000 ext. 118.Photo Submitted Madison County Central School students join in the SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) team.Photo SubmittedCiggy Butts attends Downtown Halloween, accompanied by Esther Oro (left) and Ginger Oro (right) passing out materials in hopes of encouraging people to stop smoking.

PAGE 11

K4 (Bass) All EAnnabelle Acutt, Cadie Agner, Beau Beshears, Henry Cooksey, Case Curry, Bubba Davis, Matthew Hughes, Kade McLeod, Kendall Perdue, Bo Rutledge, Lilly Sears, Brigham Sparkman, Jacob Vickers, Addison Walker, Maggie Walker, J.R. Watson.K-5 (Stephens) All EKanny Andrews, Caine Demott, Benjamin Faglie, Leighton Faglie, MadiLynn Hughes, Brandon Key, J.T. Kinard, Jaret Kinsey, Georgia Lindsey, Morgan McNeill, Skyler Pearson, Heaven-Leigh Purvis, Natalie Register, Emma Rogers, London Smith. First Grade (Roberts)All A Hayden Ashworth, Nash Beshears, Natalie Clark, Bryson Clore, Lauren Davis, Dalton Demott, Kristina Everly, Joshua Forehand, Emma Green, Kyle Hamrick, Logan Riedle, Raegan Walker.All A and BDanica Baggett, Ethan Bass, Suzanne Beshears, Bryson Clore, Charles Hughs, Feren Rosas, Caleb Walker, Jason Wheeler. Second Grade (Love)All ATyson Clark, Bradynn Johnson, Walker Sparkman, Emma Vickers.All A and BIvy Armstrong, Riley Beggs, Joshua Boland, Harper Davis, Adam Day, Wyman Demott, Lauchlin Faglie, Leigha Hunt, Jadyn Kinsey, Chase Oester, Josh Payne, Madison Roland, Zach Sears, Aisley Smith, Emilee Walker. Third Grade (Aman)All ABrewster Bass, Axel Day, Anna Drawdy, Jace Grant, Daisy Kinard, Haylie McLeod, Caroline Taylor, Ali Townsend.All A and BRyan Adams, Joleane Alexandrou, Joseph Boland, Destiny Clore, Aiden Day, Sammi Drawdy, Daniel Harrington, Samuel Kennedy, Macy Reagan, Riley Rutledge, Lillie Schwier, Emma Tharpe, Kaitlin Tharpe, Paxton Williams. Fourth Grade (Whiddon)All ATurner Beshears, Kasey Chmura, Jacob Green, Jenna Lindsey, Ben Whiddon, Tag Williams.All A and BCaitlin Bates, Oliver Hutsell, Addison Shiver, Megan Vann. Fifth Grade (Falk) All AKeira Evans, Riley Rowe, Olivia Walton.All A and BJeb Beshears, Selina Drawdy, James Hightower, Jarrett Roland, Taylor Roland, MaryRose Schwier, Will Sullivan. Fifth Grade (Hughey)All AJoey Davis, Lindsey Davis, Kolton Grambling.All A and BNatalie Andrews, Dean Forehand, Jared Grant, Riley Hamrick, Sarah Plain, Tyler Slaughter, Wyatt Stafford, Anna Lee Trest, Travis Wheeler. Sixth GradeAll ACarl Hall, Dennis Jiang, Bailey McLeod, Abby Reams.All A and BJamieson Dalzell, Nathan Dukes, Ansley English, Nathan Green, Brandon Hannon, Andy Jiang, Julianna Linsey, Marley Restrepo, Albree Shiver, Austin Wheeler. Seventh GradeAll AEmily BrockAll A and BBrandon Bates, Grace Beshears, Ian Hutsell, Ryan Jackson, Megan Scholl, Levi Stafford, Taylor Walker. Eighth GradeAll ATimothy Finlayson, Camryn Grant.All A and BStewart Dalzell, Summer Dee, Skylar Dickey, Jacob Dukes, Jessica Giddens, Elizabeth Hightower, Evan Hocking, Carly Joiner, Haley Jones, Kurt Lane, Abigail Morgan, Hannah Searcy, Brandon Slaughter, Joe Walton, Ria Wheeler, Mickaela Whiddon. Ninth GradeAll ANick Arceneaux, Faith Demott, Joshua Greene, Sarah Hall, Kelly Horne, Brittany Hughes, Kirsten Reagan, Natalie Vasquez, Kate Whiddon.All A and BTraynor Barker, Dena Bishop, Cali Burkett, Cassie Davis, Daisy Dee, Darren Ellis, Stephanie English, Chaz Hamilton, Joe Hannon, Jenny Jackson, Heather James, Hannah Lewis, Gatlin Nennstiel, Alex Parker, Ramsey Sullivan. Tenth GradeAll ADorian Alberti, Corey Brandies, Taylor Copeland, Abigail Hettinger, Savannah Jenkins, Zackery Peterson, Sarah Tharpe, Emma Witmer.All A and BChristopher Fitch, Dalton Gramling, Sam Hogg, Taylor McKnight, T.J. Swords. Eleventh GradeAll AMorgan Cline, Sarah James, Winston Lee, Monique Restrepo, Seth Wiles.All A and BZach Arceneaux, Austin Bishop, Ty Chancy, Maddie Everett, Ricky Finlayson, Kinzi Mattingly, Carson Nennstiel, Nick Roberts, Stormie Roberts, Cole Schwab, Steven Trest, Caroline Yaun, Tyler Zimmerly. Twelfth GradeAll ACole Davis, Lauren Demott, Brandon Holm, Hunter Horne, Aimee Love, Ashlyn Mills, Sara Peeler, Whitney Stevens.All A and BVictoria Brock, Devan Courtney, Braden Mattingly. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Madison County Carrier 11ASCHOOL Aucilla Christian Academy Honor Roll 2ndSix Weeks -Yearbook Club Creates MemoriesBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Will you sign my yearbook? Come May of next year, that question will be heard all over Madison County Central School as students present their books to friends, teachers and staff who will, in return, create memories with their printed messages and signatures. Long before this happens, yearbook sponsors and their students will be working hard, getting stories, pictures and advertising to ensure the book is published and ready to sell. Heather Welch, the media specialist in the school library and Jeff Veilleux, eighth grade Language Arts teacher, work with about 24 students, who were selected to be in the club by writing an essay, holding a mandatory grade point average and having no discipline referrals. The club is made up of seventh and eighth graders, who meet after school one to two times a week to work on the book. Welch said, The students have already taken a field trip downtown to sell ads to local businesses in order to help fund the yearbook, which she says takes about $11,000 to create. Welch also wanted to express her appreciation to all the businesses who have supported the club by purchasing ads for the book. Welch and Veilleux assist the students in creating the book online, where students are in charge of laying out the individual pages, choosing pictures, colors and creating captions. The students are also responsible for taking the pictures for the yearbook, such as pictures around campus and football games. MCCS yearbooks will be on sale in May 2014 and will cost $35. You can order a book up until January with a $20 deposit. Previous years books can also be purchased. If you interested in placing an ad, there is still about one more week. To purchase an ad or yearbook, contact Heather Welch at www.Heather.Welch@ madisonmail.us. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein November 15, 2013Jeff Veilleux (left) and Heather Welch (far right), work with students in the yearbook club on next years annual. Sitting from left to right: Denetra Lee, JaBryan Butler and Kristen Jackson.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein November 15, 2013Yearbook club members working in the library, from left to right, are: Alyssa Odom, Jayla Hall, Kiera Brown and Bradley Sexton. SRWMD Invites High Schools To Implement Water Quality And Quantity ProjectsThe Suwannee River Water Management District (District) invites high schools within its 15-county District boundary, including Madison, to join their efforts in protecting water resources by implementing water conservation, water quality improvement, or efcient irrigation management projects. The District Governing Board is designating $20,000 to assist STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), agricultural, and other high school classes to fund the projects. The program is currently open to high schools only, and interested schools may apply for funding consideration, not to exceed $2,000, for the following type projects: Retrotting irrigation systems to drip irrigation or to micro-irrigation. Incorporating fertigation into irrigation systems. Building a rain garden, which utilizes stormwater for irrigation. Other water quality or quantity projects. The District is pleased to support high school students in their efforts to implement projects that save water and improve water quality. An added benet of the program is that it provides students with hands-on educational experiences involving the protection and restoration of our water resources, said District Executive Director Ann Shortelle. While there is no formal application to complete, interested parties may submit project proposals and descriptions of their projects to Kevin Wright at klw@srwmd.org. The deadline to submit proposals is Friday, Dec. 6. For more information, please call (386) 362-1001 or (800) 2261066 (Fla only).

PAGE 12

CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK $199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED WANTED TO BUY Buy, Sell or Trade In The Classieds Call 973-4141 Call 973-4141www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 12A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Check us out on-line www.greenepublishing.com AUCTION FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 11/25/2013 THROUGH 12/1/2013I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497. Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age18 yr. Day and evening classes. Next class November 11. 386-362-1065.11/6 11/27, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cWasher And Dryer For Sale! Kenmore series 70 washer, top load. Series 80 dryer, front load (door opens from top down). White in color and both are in perfect working order. $400 rm. Call (229) 460-529610/30 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.Small Cabin For Rent $400 month, security deposit. Includes laundry and water. Direct TV available.1 person. $35 application fee. Call (850) 673-1117.10/16 rtn, cCASH FOR FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES! $1000 for Madison Co enamel Tags dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL tags starting with #35 for years 1938, 39, 40, 43, 49, and 54. Jeff Francis gobucs13@aol.com or 727 424 1576.www.oridalicenseplates.com10/23 -12/25, pd Maintenance Equipment Specialist. Part time curriculum developer wanted. Coord. of Institutional Research; Allied Health Clinical Coord; Registered Nurse. See www.nfcc.edu for details.11/20, 11/27, cHiring for All Positions Youth Services International is now accepting applications for its new facility in Jasper, FL. Applications can be picked up from Joann Bridges Academy in Greenville, FL. Resumes can be faxed to 850-948-4227 to Kimberly Glee or Tuwollar Mobley. For additional information please call 850-948-4220.11/8 11/27, cMaintenance Person Needed Apartment experience helpful. Full time position with benets. Apply in person at the Arbours in Madison, 134 SW Arbour Circle in Madison or e-mail resume to kristen@arboursatmadison.com.11/13 11/27, c New and Repo Homes 25 to pick from. Come to Lake City the dual makers at Freedom Homes. Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cNov and Dec special 4/2 28x80 home only $49,900 cash deal only. Call Magic Mike at Freedom Homes (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cBeen turned down? Have 10k to 15k? Call me I can make a deal. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cLand home package with 10k down in Lake City Florida. We do the deals. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cIn house nancing with 10k down on used or repo houses. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cTriple wide $29,900 as is. Wholesale price, hardwood oors, ceramic tile. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cReduced $10,000 Lot Model 4/2, new 2014. 2,016 square feet. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cCASH special up to $5,000. Reduced price on new or used qualied models. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cUltimate home 2,027 square feet 3/2 $69,900. Beautiful new home with replace. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cLive Oak or Merit Homes. Low prices. Freedom Mobile Homes. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, c Ad Builder/Graphic Artist needed for the Madison County Carrier and the Madison EnterpriseRecorder. Must be a team player and able to handle multiple tasks. Experience with Adobe Photoshop a must, experience with Quark Express a plus. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.11/20 rtn, n/c AUCTION-OUR ANNUAL CHRISTMAS AUCTION SATURDAY November 30 at 5:30 p.m. Madison Auction House. 1693 SW Moseley Hall Rd (CR360) 850 973-1444 AGAIN THIS YEAR WE ARE PARTNERING WITH THE SALVATION ARMY AND SOME OF THE LOCAL VFD TO COLLECT TOYS FOR THOSE CHILDREN THAT WOULD NOT OTHERWISE RECEIVE ONE. BRING ONE OR BUY ONE AT THE AUCTION AND HELP THESE KIDS OUT! WE ARE ALSO HAVING OUR ANNUAL FREE DINNER BETWEEN 4:30 AND 5:30 P.M. FOR OUR AUCTION ATTENDEES. COME JOIN THE FUN, EAT AND DONATE A TOY TO HELP A CHILD OUT. 10% Buyers Premium. MC, Visa, Discover, Debit Cards, Checks and Cash Accepted. AU691 Ron Cox, AB2490.11/20, 11/27, pd Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497. Gray Logging LLC is looking for a full time shop/eld mechanic. Excellent pay/benets Must apply in person Call ofce for appointment 850-973-3863.11/22, 11/27, c Receptionist: When was the last time YOU had FUN at WORK? Its a great time to join our team of super dedicated staff. Not only do we take pride in what we do, WE HAVE FUN! Are you the type of person that never meets a stranger and has a GENUINE love of people? Are your physical appearance and cosmetics important to you? Do you already have great computer skills? How well do you adapt to learning new things, do you embrace it or resist it? This growing dental ofce needs more helpers, and if you answered yes to these questions, then call 888-486-2408 to hear more about this position on our amazing team and how to apply.11/22 rtn, c Ho Ho Ho Guess Whos Coming To Town. Santa and Ms. Clause Dec. 3rd from 4 8 p.m. Located at 7952 E. hwy 90 in Lee, red building, cant miss it. There will be gift bags for the children and refreshments will be served. Hope to see you there.11/27, pd Condos for Sale FLORIDA WATERFRONT CONDO LIQUIDATION SALE! Brand new 2BR/2BA 1,690sf luxury condo only $149,900 Originally under contract for $365,000. Near downtown Orlando & all theme parks/attractions. Must see. Call now 877-333-0272, x 173. Help Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certications. GI Bill Benets Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. Real Estate/ Land for Sale BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAIN BARGAIN! 25 acres only $84,900. Beautifully wooded rolling mountaintop terrain, backs up to national forest. Enjoy stream, abundant wildlife, spectacular views, trails throughout. Paved rd frontage municipal water, utilities all completed. Excellent nancing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 83. Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage TENN. LAND BARGAIN WITH FREE BOAT SLIP! 1.70 acres meadows overlooks 140 acre Nature Preserve, streams & ponds. Only $19,900. 6.1 acre hardwoods Only $27,900. FREE boat slips. Excellent nancing, little down. Call now 1-877-888-0267, x446.

PAGE 13

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Madison County Carrier 13A L e g a l s 11/27, 12/4 NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA The School Board of Madison County, Florida announces that the School Board will hold its regular public meetings, to which all persons are invited to attend, as follows: Dates:Dec. 10, 2013 Jan. 21, 2014 Feb. 4, 2014 Feb. 18, 2014Mar. 4, 2014 Mar. 18, 2014 April 15, 2014May 6, 2014 May 20, 2014 June 3, 2014 June 17, 2014July 1, 2014 July 15, 2014 Aug. 5, 2014 Aug. 19, 2014 Sept. 2, 2014 Sept. 16, 2014Oct. 7, 2014 Oct. 21, 2014 Nov. 18, 2014 Time:6:00 p.m. Place:The School Board Meeting Room 210 North East Duval Avenue Madison, Florida 32340 Purpose:To consider and act upon the business of the School Board. A copy of each agenda may be obtained no earlier than 7 days prior to each meeting by writing to the School Board at 210 North East Duval Avenue, Madison, Florida 32340 or by calling Ms. Jane Dickey at (850) 973-5022. Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodations to participate in any of the above meetings is asked to advise the School Board at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Ms. Jane Dickey at (850) 973-5022. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the School Board by calling 711. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the School Board with respect to any matter considered at such meetings he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. School Board of Madison County, Florida By: /s/ Doug Brown Doug Brown Superintendent of Schools11/27 11/27, 12/4 11/27, 12/4 For Sale 2006 Expedition; Eddie Bauer; White Very nice family car in very good condition. $8,000 OBO. Call (850) 464-1230 for more information.

PAGE 14

www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 27, 2013 14A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Oliver Bradley Tells 55 Plus About Veterans ServicesBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Oliver Bradley grew up in Valdosta, Ga. He was drafted into the military in 1968, serving in the Signal Corps in Vietnam, and then in the infantry, where he was injured. Shortly afterwards, he returned to the U.S., eventually moving to Madison. Since 1992, he has been active in local churches, starting out as a Methodist, but eventually gravitating towards the Baptist denomination, serving at Damascus Baptist with David DeLaughter, then at Morning Star Baptist and currently at Genesis Baptist across from Fellowship on Hwy 145. For the last 20 years, he has been the Veterans Service Officer, serving both Jefferson and Madison Counties, working in the Jefferson office Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and the Madison office Thursdays and Fridays, from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. The Madison office is on the first floor of the Courthouse Annex, just past Tax Collector Lisa Tutens Office. Knowing the plight of veterans has made my job easy, he told the 55 Plus Club at their November meeting two days after Veterans Day. I love helping veterans, their families, and their widows. It is a blessing to serve the veterans and widows of Madison County. For the purposes of eligibility for veterans services, veteran is defined as anyone who served a tour of duty of at least 120 consecutive days in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines or Coast Guard, and received any discharge other than dishonorable; if the veteran received an honorable discharge, there is no distinction between volunteer and draftee. When he asked the audience for a show of hands for those who had served, almost every man in the room raised his hand. The Veterans Service Office in Madison has a contract with Big Bend Transportation that offers transportation services to and from V.A. Medical Centers in Lake City or Gainesville for veterans who need it. In Jefferson County, he has a car for transporting veterans to Tallahassee. He also helps veterans with filing for education, vocational rehabilitation and retirement benefits they are entitled to, and help with filing claims for service-connected disabilities (defined as any injury received or any ongoing illness that first occurred while they were on active duty.) In his work, he meets a lot of veterans who are qualified for V.A. services and benefits they never knew about and never applied for. Other benefits include emergency and long-term health care. If an elderly veteran needs placement in a nursing facility, the V.A. has a contract with the state and several nursing facilities to make sure the veteran is placed as close to home as possible. There are also services available for homebound veterans, but they need to be qualified in the V.A. system, preferably before they get to that point. The Veterans Services Office can help with that. In the years since his own service in the military, he has become a pacifist. I do not advocate war, he said firmly. However, if our country had kept the draft in place, and all our young men had served two years, they would be better for it. They would see that no matter how much you cried, you had to do it. Not to go to war, but to serve and to learn discipline and self-control in their lives. If we put them in the military, maybe our jails wouldnt be so full, he said. In closing, he avowed his love of his country. Like his favorite Lee Greenwood song says, Im proud to be an American. For more information about veterans services and benefits, contact Bradley at (850) 464-1191, or visit the Veterans Services Office in the Courthouse Annex.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 13, 2013Rev. Oliver Bradley of the Veterans Services Ofce of Madison County talks to the 55 Plus Club about services and bene- ts available to veterans.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, November 13, 2013Setting the stage for guest speaker Oliver Bradley, and in keeping with the patriotic theme for the 55 Plus Clubs meeting, Ginger Jarvis sings the National Anthem.