Madison County carrier

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Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00398


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On Monday, Aug. 26, Washington Monthlyranked North Florida Community College (NFCC) second among national community colleges in its ninth annual college rankings survey. Four other Florida College System (FCS) institutions made the list: Chipola College, Miami Dade College, Valencia College and South Florida State College.North Florida Community College is honored to be among the top community colleges in the nation, said NFCC President John Grosskopf. Our strong commitment to educating students from all walks of life is reflected in these rankings. I could not be more proud of our college and its dedicated faculty and staff. This honor recognizes the Florida College Systems commitment to both access and high-quality education, said FCS Chancellor Randy Hanna. I commend our colleges for their ongoing efforts to serve the needs of our state. Using data from the Community College Survey of Student Engagement and U.S. Department of Education, Washington Monthlyrates community colleges in a number of areas, including collaborative learning, student effort, academic rigor, student-faculty interaction and support for learning. Retention, graduation and completion rates are also factored into the rankings. According to Washington Monthlyseditors, We designed the Washington Monthlycollege rankings to embody the American higher education compact at the institutional level. Instead of lauding colleges for closing their doors to all but an elite few, we give high marks to institutions that enroll low-income students, help them graduate and dont charge them an arm and a leg to attend. These rankings are especially important because they highlight the systems mission of providing access to low-cost, high-quality education and job training, said Chancellor Hanna. I am extremely proud of all of our colleges for helping prepare Floridians for high-skill, high-wage jobs. Wed. August 28, 2013VOL. 50 NO. 4 www.greenepublishing.com 50 cents Index2 Sections, 24 Pages Local Weather Viewpoints 2A From Page One3A Obituaries 4A Around Madison5,12A Sports 6-7A School 8-9A Classied/Legals10-11A Path of Faith Section B Spotlight On: Alan Androski See Page 8A North Florida Community College Ranks Second Best In NationJohn GrosskopfBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Madison County ofcials met with ofcials from the City of Valdosta, Ga., recently to discuss spills at the Withlacoochee Treatment Plant. Concerns were expressed about raw sewage owing downstream from Valdosta. Valdosta City Manager Larry Hanson assured County Coordinator Allen Cherry, County Commissioner Wayne Vickers and County Attorney Tom Reeves that the City of Valdosta is working on preventing the spills (a recent one was caused by heavy rains) and that construction will soon begin on a plant that is farther away from the river. The Suwannee River Water Management District said that there are no advisories against swimming on the Withlacoochee in Madison or Hamilton County, nor are there any advisories against shing on the river. County Ofcials Meet With Valdosta Ofcials To Discuss Treatment Plant SpillWayne Vickers, County Commissioner Tom Reeves, County Attorney Allen Cherry, County CoordinatorThe following is a press release issued by the City of Valdosta, Ga., regarding its recent spill at the Withlacooche Wastewater Treatment Plant:Due to continued heavy rains in Valdosta and surrounding areas in recent days, moderate ooding of the Little and Withlacoochee Rivers caused a hydraulic overload at the Withlacoochee Wastewater Treatment Plant. As a result of a peak hourly ow of 15.58 million gallons, the incident led to a discharge of total suspended solids in excess of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit limit. The total suspended solids result for the efuent sample collected August 22 was 203 milligrams per liter. This is greater than 1.5 times the weekly average of 45 milligrams per liter allowed by the NPDES permit, which constitutes a major spill. The volume of the major spill into the Withlacoochee River is the total ow for August 22, which is 12.1 million gallons. The discharge was not raw sewage but rather a combination of large volumes of storm water and substantially treated wastewater, some of which did not fully complete the nal treatment process.Spill At Valdosta Wastewater Treatment PlantAcase of pertussis, better known as whooping cough, has been reported in Madison County and health ofcials are encouraging residents to ensure they have been vaccinated against the disease. This is the rst conrmed case reported this year. Pertussis, or whooping cough is a bacterial infection of the respiratory tract. Initial symptoms are like those of a cold, including runny nose, sneezing, low-grade fever, and a mild cough. Within two weeks, the cough can become much worse. Pertussis can infect persons of all ages, yet is most serious in infants and young children. Transmission of the infection may come through direct contact with droplets from an infected persons cough. The most common complication is bacterial pneumonia. Pertussis can be treated with antibiotics. It is recommended children receive four doses of Dtap vaccine (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis) by the age of four and a booster dose in seventh grade. Parents are advised to make sure their childs immunizations are up to date and to see a pediatrician if their child develops symptoms, including those listed and a persistent cough lasting more than seven days. Florida law requires that kindergartners and all seventh graders be up to date on their pertussis vaccination before going to school, said Acting Administrator Kimberly Allbritton. Now is a great opportunity for parents to check on immunizations for the whole family. Adults, grandparents or older siblings, especially those who will be around newborns, should be vaccinated against pertussis. For more information on vaccines or an appointment, contact the Florida Department of Health in Madison County at (850) 973-5000. Additional information about pertussis is available atwww.cdc.gov/pertussis/. Pertussis Case Reported In Madison County Please See Pertussis FAQs On Page 3ARegistration for the 2013 Dave Galbraith Football season will be held this Saturday Aug. 31 and Saturday, Sept. 7, from 9 a.m.noon inside the Madison County Courthouse. Dave Galbraith Football is for players. ages 6-13. The League offers teams in three different age categories 6-7 year old age group; 8-10 year old age group (with a 10 year old not weighing more then 120 pounds. If they do exceed the 120 pound weight limit, they will be moved to the next age division); and 11-13 year old age group (13-year-old players cannot exceed a weight of 130 pounds). Sept. 1 is the age control date. A copy of birth certicate and proof of insurance is required at registration, even if participants have played in previous years. Effective this year, Dave Galbraith Football League will not issue any sports equipment (helmets and shoulder pads). Players will be required to supply their own equipment. In order to help with this change, the league will be selling their used Dave Galbraith Registration Set For Next Two SaturdaysSubmitted by Leigh B. Bareld, Madison County Property AppraiserMadison County Board of County Commissioners has mailed the proposed tax notices. On Monday, Aug. 19, approximately 15,675 Real Property and 1,820 tangible property notices were mailed and should have hit your mail boxes by the end of the week. The Property Appraisers ofce, Leigh B. Bareld & staff are prepared to answer your questions concerning values and/or any exemptions pertaining to your property. Property values have pretty much maintained over the past two years. So unless you have homestead and still have some SOH (Save our Homes) cap you should remain close to the same value as last year. Improvements to your property would be one reason for increase, such as additions to your home, barns, additional property added to existing parcel, etc. Most property owners with a local address should receive their notices by the weekend, if you do not receive it by next week please call the ofce to verify that your address is correct. Our ofce uses the address that you record on your deed at the Clerks ofce unless you notify us otherwise in writing. The mailers, required by state law are sent requiring local governments to disclose the maximum tax rates proposed by various taxing authorities. It will tell the property owner what their tax would be for the upcoming scal year if taxing authorities do not change their budget proposals after required public hearings next month. These authorities cannot increase the tax rate before the scal year October 1, but they can decrease it. In most normal circumstances, higher millage rates create call volume for this ofce. The property appraisers ofces only have authority to addressTruth In Millage Notices Are In The MailPlease See Registration On Page 3A Please See Plant Spill On Page 3A Please See Millage Notices On Page 3A

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Heart disease may be the leading killer of men and women, but that doesnt mean you cant protect yourself. In addition to exercise, being careful about what you eatand what you dont eatcan help you lower cholesterol, control blood pressure and blood sugar levels, and maintain a healthy weight. If youve already been diagnosed with heart disease or have high cholesterol or blood pressure, a heart-smart diet can help you better manage these conditions, lowering your risk for heart attack. Improving your diet is an important step toward preventing heart disease, but you may feel unsure where to begin. Take a look at the big picture: your overall eating patterns are more important than obsessing over individual foods. No single food can make you magically healthy, so your goal can be to incorporate a variety of healthy foods cooked in healthy ways into your diet, and make these habits your new lifestyle. Eat More Healthy fats: raw nuts, olive oil, sh oils, ax seeds, or avocados Nutrients: colorful fruits and vegetables fresh or frozen, prepared without butter Fiber: cereals, breads, and pasta made from whole grains or legumes Omega 3 and protein: sh and shellsh, poultry Calcium and protein: Egg whites, egg substitutes, skim or 1% milk, low-fat or nonfat cheeses or yogurt Eat Less Trans fats from partially hydrogenated or deep-fried foods; saturated fats from whole-fat dairy or red meat Packaged foods of any kind, especially those high in sodium White or egg breads, granola-type cereals, rened pastas or rice Red meat, bacon, sausage, fried chicken Egg yolks, whole or two percent milk, whole milk products like cheese or yogurt Of all the possible improvements you can make to your diet, limiting saturated fats and cutting out trans fats entirely is perhaps the most important. Both types of fat raise your LDL, or bad cholesterol level, which can increase your risk for heart attack and stroke. Luckily, there are many ways to control how much saturated and trans fats you take in. Keep these culprits in mind as you cook and make food choicesand learn how to avoid them. Limit solid fat. Reduce the amount of solid fats like butter, margarine, or shortening you add to food when cooking or serving. Instead of cooking with butter, for example, avor your dishes with herbs or lemon juice. You can also limit solid fat by trimming fat off your meat or choosing leaner proteins. Substitute. Swap out high-fat foods for their lower-fat counterparts. Top your baked potato, for example, with salsa or low-fat yogurt rather than butter, or use lowsugar fruit spread on your toast instead of margarine. When cooking, use liquid oils like canola, olive, safower, or sunower, and substitute two egg whites for one whole egg in a recipe. Be label-savvy. Check food labels on any prepared foods. Many snacks, even those labeled "reduced fat, may be made with oils containing trans fats. One clue that a food has some trans fat is the phrase "partially hydrogenated. And look for hidden fat; refried beans may contain lard, or breakfast cereals may have signicant amounts of fat. Change your habits. The best way to avoid saturated or trans fats is to change your lifestyle practices. Instead of chips, snack on fruit or vegetables. Challenge yourself to cook with a limited amount of butter. At restaurants, ask that sauces or dressings be put on the sideor left off altogether. While saturated and trans fats are roadblocks to a healthy heart, unsaturated fats are essential for good health. You just have to know the difference. Good fats include: Omega three Fatty Acids. Fatty sh like salmon, trout, or herring and axseed, canola oil, and walnuts all contain polyunsaturated fats that are vital for the body. Omega six Fatty Acids. Vegetable oils, soy nuts, and many types of seeds all contain healthy fats. Monounsaturated fats. Almonds, cashews, peanuts, pecans, and butters made from these nuts, as well as avocadoes, are all great sources of good fat. The last time I wrote about the business of chemical weapons, it concerned the search for these munitions in Iraq ten years ago. So a refresher is appropriate given that the issue of this class of weapons in drawing the United States into Syrias civil war. We are more familiar with conventional weapons that use explosives to create the effects of shock and fire to destroy things and kill. Less understood are nonconventional nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. In my military career, I was very familiar with nuclear weapons an important part of the mission of the units I was assigned to in the 1970s and 80s was nuclear alert. By the time I was commissioned, biological weapons had been outlawed and I never had any encounter with bugs. I did have some experience with chemical warfare. Later in my career, I studied this issue when I worked for the Air Force Inspector General. Chemical weapons were first used a century ago during World War I. These were chlorine and mustard blister agents. When the agent was inhaled, they formed blisters within the lungs which often led to fatal respiratory injuries. For those that recovered the initial attack, there were long term debilitating effects for the rest of their lives. The horror from WW I was a deterrent from using these weapons a generation later in WW II. Modern chemical agents are commonly referred to as nerve gas. In the United States arsenal, there were two types of agents, GB and VX. GB is an aerosol where VX is a gel. VX is much more persistent than GB. Russia produced an agent similar to GB known as sarin and is the cause for concern in Syria. Nerve agent attacks the nerve endings that connect the muscles in humans and animals. Known as synapses, these endings fire and release, causing our muscles to contract and relax. A victim of a nerve agent like sarin will be seen shaking violently and uncontroll ably. This is because his synapses are constantly firing with no opportunity to relax and recover. The killing mechanism is when the agent enters the lungs and causes the diaphragm to contract and not release the victim dies of suffocation because hes prevented from exhaling. Not a pretty sight. These are particularly cruel weapons and are certainly weapons of mass destruction (WMD). They do not discriminate as to their victim. Whereas the military may be wearing protective masks and suits, the civilian victims and children in particular are often caught unprepared and suffer disproportionately. In Syria, there are confirmed reports of hundreds and even thousands of casualties, many fatal, from at least two gas attacks. Chemical weapons (like biological) have been outlawed by international convention. When I studied this program for the Air Force in 1990, the weapons were at just a handful of arsenals in Utah, Oregon, and Johnston Atoll in the Pacific Ocean. We were constructing prototype demilitarization plants that would destroy the agents and their delivery mechanisms safely. The technicians at these arsenals had to constantly deal with leakers where their detection equipment would detect traces of chemical agents escaping from the munitions which housed them. A chemical agent like sarin is usually delivered by a bomb, artillery shell or rocket. I would imagine the sarin that has been delivered by the Syrian army into rebel strongholds has been released from rocket warheads. Should the United States (and possibly France and Britain) attack, it will be a short duration air campaign. The target will most likely be chemical weapon stockpiles, deliver units, and airfields. Hezbolloh forces in southern Syria that threaten Israel may also come under attack. The attacks will most likely be led by cruise missiles and followed by stealth bombers. Already, four U.S. Navy destroyers have taken position in the eastern Mediterranean off the Syrian coast and are capable of launching Tomahawk cruise missiles against inland targets. Then, it is just a question of how good our intelligence is. Ten years ago before we attacked Iraq, our intelligence wasnt too good. We never located the chemical weapons our intelligence said that Saddam Hussein had stockpiled. Many suspect that in late 2002 before our invasion, he had sent these weapons westward into Syria. Are these same weapons being used today against opposition forces in Syria? www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 28, 2013 2A Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist Did You Know...Syrian ChemsFootball season is upon us! There seems to be two crowds of people when it comes to football. There are those who wait for the arrival of the season with baited breath and who begins pulling out school jerseys and clearing their schedules of anything that would conflict with watching their team play, and there are those who could care less or even dread the football season if they happen to live with the afore mentioned fan but are not a fan themselves. Whichever group you fall into, it is a fact that its coming. Middle school and High school ball players are already on the practice field and if youre into college football, the Seminoles, Gators, Rattlers and Bulldogs will all kick-off around the first of the upcoming month. My friend, Ginny Murphy who lives and works in Madison, is a fellow transplant. We both moved to Florida at the same time due to our spouses who transferred here for their jobs. Ginny came from Ohio and is a die-hard Buckeye fan, and I came from Arkansas and remain loyal to my Razorbacks. We may not share love for each others team, but we do share love of food. There have been several potlucks together and one thing that she always brought (because it was expected after the first time everyone tasted it) was a sweet and creamy dish that uses fresh grapes. I think its the perfect dish to have alongside the meats and barbecues that usually accompany tailgating because its cool, creamy and has a lightness that offsets the heaviness of the meats. Its an unusual dish but always remains a crowd pleaser and with a covered 9 x 13 pan, will fit nicely in a cooler. If youre not a football fan and have no plans of attending a tailgating party, Labor Day is coming up and it would also fit in well with a backyard barbecue or picnic. I myself will most likely not be tailgating this year, but still enjoy sitting on my couch, eating this salad and cheering on my Arkansas Hogs..Woo Pig Sooiee! Ginnys Grape Salad 3 cups green seedless grapes, cut in half 3 cups red seedless grapes, cut in half 8 oz. cream cheese, softened cup sugar 8 oz. sour cream 4 Butterfinger candy bars cup brown sugar Place both green and red grapes in the bottom of a 9 x 13 pan. In a medium bowl, mix cream cheese and sugar until creamy, about three minutes; stir in sour cream. Spread cream cheese mixture over grapes. Crush candy bars (I use a large zip top bag and rolling pin), and mix with brown sugar; sprinkle mixture on top. Chill at least 2 hours or overnight. Note: The picture you see is an experiment of mine. I pressed a roll of sugar cookie dough into the bottom of the pan, baked it until golden, and let it cool. I spread the creamy mixture over the cookie, and sprinkled all but half the cup of the candy mixture over the cream cheese mixture. I pressed in the grapes, and sprinkled the reserved half the cup candy mixture on the top. It changed the salad into a grape cookie bar that was sweet and a dessert instead of a possible side. It was very good and made a gooey caramel type sauce that pooled in the bottom of the pan. If you would like to submit a recipe or need help in finding one, you can contact me at rose@greenepublishing.comIts Time For Football Season ...And Tailgating! Rose Klein ColumnistFrank NathanExecutive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness TipsSearching For Ambrosia Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein August 25, 2013Grape cookie bar.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 28, 2013 Madison County Carrier 3AWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Alberta Dentist Trying To Clone John LennonIn Alberta, Canada, Michael Zuk, a dentist in Red Deer, purchased a tooth from the collection of record executive, Alan McGee. The tooth came from Jarlett Dorothy, the former housekeeper for ex-Beatle, John Lennon, who Lennon reportedly gave the tooth to as a gift, after he had it pulled. Zuk paid $30,000 for the tooth and has sent it to Penn State University in PA where scientists are considering ways to extract the genetic code from the specimen in order to try and create a clone of Lennon. Zuk says, I am nervous and excited at the possibility that we will be able to fully sequence John Lennons DNA. With researchers working on ways to clone mammoths, the same technology certainly could make human cloning a reality.Australian Man Over The Limit For Foreign WivesIn Canberra, Australia, a man was informed his current ance couldnt have a visa because he had already sponsored too many foreign wives. Rex Petersons rst wife was Australian, his second was from the Seychelles and his third wife, whom he is currently in divorce proceedings with, is from the Philippines. He is already engaged to Maria Canales, another Filipina woman he met online 18 months ago. Peterson said, The immigration ofcer told me that because I already had two spouses from overseas, I wouldnt be able to have another wife unless one dies. What sort of dictator brought that in? Peterson also stated that none of his marriages had been immigration scams. His rst lasted 18 years, his second lasted 15. His last marriage, only lasting ve years, he said was bad luck because his wife, being the same age as his children, did not get along with them.Switzerland Opens Drive-Thru Sex BoxesIn Zurich, Switzerland, drive-thru sex boxes recently opened to accommodate prostitutes and to try to reduce organized crime in the Sihgai district, Swiss ofcials say. Each garage-sized box will accommodate one car at a time and is equipped with alarm buttons and a security guard. Michael Herzig, a Zurich social services director says, Prostitution is a business. We cannot prohibit it, so we want to control it in favor of the sex workers and the population. If we do not control it, organized crime and the pimps will take over. The sex boxes were approved by 52 percent of Zurich voters, but Switzerlands rightwing Swiss Peoples Party opposed the boxes. Party politician, Sven Dogwiler said, It will not work, either because the clients will not come or because the boxes will not be used by prostitutes. It puts them in a cleaner environment, but one which is subsidized by taxpayers. In Germany, sex boxes have operated since 2001 and have reported a considerable drop in violence against prostitutes.Bangkok Police Not Laughing At Gas Filled BalloonsIn Bangkok, one of the latest trends on the streets is balloons lled with nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, and have been selling for around four dollars a piece. Authorities say the trend started on the beaches of Koh Samui and Pattaya, as well as Koh Pagnan, an island known for its heavy use of drugs and all-night parties. So far, eight vendors have been arrested. Police state that those arrested can face up to ve years in prison and be served a ne of $300 for selling medicine without authorization. FROMPAGEONE Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Ofce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersSteven Godfrey, Tori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette DunnBookeeping Brooke Kinsley Classified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) Frequently Asked Questions About PertussisPertussis can be treated with antibiotics. Infected persons can still spread the disease until ve days after treatment begins. How common is pertussis? Before the availability of pertussis vaccine, pertussis was one of the most common childhood diseases and a major cause of death in children in the United States. Since widespread use of the vaccine began, cases have decreased by 99 percent, but about 5,000 to 7,000 cases per year are still reported. In unimmunized populations in the world, pertussis remains a major health problem in children and causes an estimated 300,000 deaths per year. Is pertussis a re-emerging infectious disease? Yes. Despite the availability of an effective vaccine, pertussis continues to cause serious illness and death. Pertussis cases have been increasing since the 1980s, and some major outbreaks have occurred. Most cases are in unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated infants, but cases have increased in adolescents and adults, many of whom have been immunized. This suggests that protection from pertussis vaccine may be decreasing over time. How can pertussis be prevented? The most important way to prevent pertussis is through complete immunization. A vaccine against pertussis has been available for many years. It is usually given to children combined with diphtheria and tetanus vaccines in a shot called DTP or DTaP. A child needs ve DTP or DTaP shots, given at specied intervals, for complete protection. Protection from the DTaP vaccine decreases over time. A one-time booster vaccine, Tdap for preteens and adults, helps people stay protected against the disease. Pre-teens should get the Tdap vaccine at 11 or 12 years of age. Adults and teens who did not get the Tdap vaccine as pre-teens should also get it. This is very important for families and caregivers of babies. Pregnant women should get the vaccine right after delivery, before they leave the hospital. As is the case with all immunizations, there are important exceptions and special circumstances. Health care providers should have the most current information on recommendations about pertussis vaccination. Treating infected persons with antibiotics can shorten the contagious period and prevent further spread. People who have or may have pertussis should also stay away from infants and young children until properly treated. Pertussis FAQs Cont. From Page 1A Registration Cont. From Page 1Aequipment at a reduced price on a rst come, rst serve basis. Used equipment will be available at both registration dates. Due to this change, registration will be lowered to $25.00. If you have any questions or are interested in coaching this year, please feel free to give Billy Tolar a call at (850) 673-7979. Plant Spill Cont. From Page 1AThe Environmental Protection Division (EPD) classies these permit violations as spills, leading most to believe it is raw sewage. However, a spill, as in this case and in the overwhelming majority of the incidences at the treatment plant, is a result of higher-than-usual volumes of storm water entering the sewer collection system. This combination of normal sewer ow and substantial storm water inow during major rain events hydraulically overwhelms and short circuits some of the wastewater treatment process capabilities causing some solids to be washed from the nal treatment processes. The city is required by EPD permit regulations to report this as a spill, even though the water discharged into the local waterways is not raw sewage but a combination of mostly storm water and almost completely treated sewage. The city continues to work closely with the design consultant and contractor who are on site at the plant implementing seven projects over the next several months that, once in place, will help keep the WWTP in compliance with the NPDES permit until the relocation of the plant is complete. City ofcials are hopeful that the short-term projects will provide the relief needed to minimize and avoid any further permit violations until the relocation of the WWTP is accomplished. The city is also preparing to issue a design/build RFP for the relocation of the plant, which is expected to cost $20 million and be completed by November 2015. Warning signs have been placed downstream, and stream sampling of the Withlacoochee River has been initiated as required. For more information, contact Environmental Manager John Waite at (229) 259-3592 or at jwaite@valdostacity.com. Millage Notices Cont. From Page 1Aconcerns about property values, not tax rates. If you are concerned about the tax rate you should contact the taxing authority and/or attend the special meetings. Countywide property values increased less than a half of a percent county wide. Overall county millage rate is proposed to decrease .1364 per thousand. Board of County Commissioners propose to increase .3036, School Board decrease of .4400, City of Madison increase of .9516, Town of Lee increase .1170, Town of Greenville no change. We encourage each tax payer to attend the special meetings on your proposed notice if you have questions concerning your taxes. Please visit our websitewww.madisonpa.comfor additional information about your property in Madison County. You may also display/print your TRIM notice from our website which is a new feature from the parcel details tab. If you feel you did not receive an exemption that you applied for or are entitled to; and meet all requirements please visit the Property Appraisers ofce located on the second oor of the Courthouse Annex just south of the Courthouse, Room 201. To contact by phone please call (850) 973-6133 or email us at info@madisonpa.com. By Lynette Norris Green Publishing, Inc. At the rst school board meeting (Aug, 20) after school began (Aug. 19), Superintendent Doug Brown released the rst ofcial enrollment numbers for schools in Madison County. Pinetta Elementary School215 Lee Elementary School240 Greenville Elementary School146 Madison County Central School142 Madison County High School547 Madison County Excel School46 James Madison Preparatory H.S.42 New Millennium School32 The Florida Department of Education has issued a memorandum regarding Guidelines and Certication Regarding Constitutionally Protected Prayer in All Public Elementary and Secondary Schools. The gist of the memo is that FDOE is requiring all school sign neutrality agreements concerning prayer in public schools, i.e., that it will be allowed, as long as it is not led by a teacher or any other adult. To see the full memorandum, go to:http://info.doe.org/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-6789/dps-2013-84.pdf.For questions or more information about it, contact: Felicia.Williams@doe.org.First Day Of School: By The NumbersFlorida Department Of Education Issues Memo Regarding PrayerThe pastor and congregation of New Home Baptist Church invites the community to hear Southern-gospel singer Archie Watkins and African Pastor from Kenya, Pastor Agreed, this Sunday morning, Sept. 1, at 11 a.m. Brother Archie Watkins is a former member of the Inspirations gospel group. Pastor Agreed is from Kenya, Africa where he serves as a missionary and pastor to his homeland. He is a gifted speaker with a powerful anointed message of Jesus Christ. You will not want to miss out hearing this great man of God pour his heart out in his spirit lled sermon. A love offering will be taken for the mission work that Pastor Agreed conducts in Kenya, Africa. Come and hear two ne men of God during our morning worship service at 11 a.m. this Sunday, Aug. 25. New Home Baptist Church is located at 1100 SW Moseley Hall Road in Madison. For more information, please call the church at 973-4965.Archie Watkins and African Pastor To Be At New Home Baptist Church

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August 28 Tobacco Free Madison Partnership Meeting Wednesday, Aug. 28, at 3:30 p.m. at Madison County Central School Media Center. For more information, call (850) 973-5000, ext. 120. August 28 Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. will be at the Madison County Senior Center to distribute amplied phones, at no cost, to qualied Florida residents from 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at 1161 Harvey Greene Drive in Madison. If you already have an FTRI phone and it isnt working properly or your hearing has changed, call FTRI at 888-554-1151 for assistance. September 1 The pastor and congregation of New Home Baptist Church invites the community to hear Southern-gospel singer Archie Watkins and Africa Pastor from Kenya, Pastor Agreed, this Sunday morning, Sept. 1, at 11 a.m. New Home Baptist Church is located at 1100 SW Moseley Hall Road in Madison. For more information, please call the church at 973-4965 September 7 The Florida National Guard 868th Engineering Company will host an open house on Saturday, Sept. 7, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the National Guard Armory, located at 1416 SW 11th Street in Live Oak. Meet WWE Superstar Ted DiBiase from 1-3 p.m. Anyone who is between the ages of 17-34 and is in need of a part-time job is invited to attend the open house and see what the National Guard has to offer. For more information, contact local recruiter, SSG Amana NesSmith at (386) 438-3968. October 20 Midway Church of God will hold its homecoming service beginning at 10 a.m. Bishop Ivester will be the guest speaker and LifeSong will be the musical guests. Everyone is invited to attend. November 1 Members of the Madison High School Class of 1973 are planning a class reunion to be held December 27-29, 2013. The committee is asking that all class members please contact one of the persons listed below to express your interest in participating in the reunion and receive further information. The registration deadline is November 1, 2013. To register, or for more information, please contact: Mary Frances Mauldin, mauldinm73@gmail. com; Sharon James Postell, goldenlife59@gmail.com, (850) 973-6200; Renetta Warren Parrish, renetta.parrish@yahoo.com, (850) 4640610; or Fagarie Wormack,fwormack@yahoo.com. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 28, 2013 4A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Community Calendar David CurtisRed Reams, Sr.David Curtis Red Reams, Sr., 86, went home to be with the Lord on Friday, August 23, 2013, following a prolonged illness. As he entered Heaven, he was surrounded by his loving family and friends. Born on June 26, 1927, he was a native of Greenville. A veteran of World War II, Mr. Reams was a member of the Navys Seabees, receiving his honorable discharge on August 17, 1946. Following his service, he worked in various businesses, retiring from Standard Feed Co. and The American Freight Co., both in Jacksonville. In the 1950-1960s he was the chaplain for the Madison Elks Lodge and a member of the Madison Masonic Lodge. Preceding Mr. Reams in death are his parents, Albert Porter Reams and Nonie Belle Woodard Reams, Madison; his sister, Mary Louise Horne; and a brother, Robert Austin Reams. Mr. Reams is survived by his wife of 61 years and caregiver, Corrine Brooks Reams; two daughters, Lynn Marie Bridges (Charlie) of Dalton, Ga., and Mary Gayle Acorn (John) of Waynesville, N.C.; two sons, David Reams, Jr. of Jacksonville, and James Reams of Waynesville, N.C.; four grandchildren, JB Acorn, Waynesville, N.C., Kalyn and Justin Bridges, Dalton, Ga., and Edward Curtis Reams, Phoenix, Ariz.; and one brother, James Fred Reams, 92, of Crescent City, as well as many loving nieces and nephews. Mr. Reams was a faithful Christian. He was a faithful member of First Baptist Church, Waynesville, N.C. At First Baptist, Waynesville, he was an active participant in the Senior Adult one Mens Sunday School Class until illness prevented his attendance. He served as an ordained deacon and years of service at Terry Parker Baptist Church, Jacksonville. A memorial service to celebrate his life will be held at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, August 27, 2013, in Chapel of First Baptist Church of Waynesville with the Reverend Dr. Robert Prince and the Reverend Dr. Charlie Bridges ofciating. A private inurnment will be held at a later date in GarrettHillcrest Memorial Park. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the church. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions can be made to the Building Fund of First Baptist Church of Waynesville, at 100 South Main Street, Waynesville, NC 28786 or Medwest Hospice at 127 Sunset Ridge Road, Clyde NC 28721. A message of comfort may be left to the family and a guest registry may be signed at www.garrettfuneralsandcremations.com Did You Know?In every episode of Seinfeld there is a reference to Superman. Obituary Justin ForehandCapital City Bank welcomes Justin Forehand as our new president for Jefferson and Madison counties.With more than 21 years of banking experience, Justin will lead the team of local bankers youve come to know and trust. Your bankers continue to be dedicated to meeting your nancial needs and helping you reach your nancial goals.850.342.2500 www.ccbg.com Farmhouse ChowderBy Jean Kressy Relish ContributorBefore deciding that summer is not the right time for a pot of hot soup, forget for a moment the business of sauteing and simmering and read what Jasper White has to say about corn chowder. White is the chef and owner of the Summer Shack, a popular restaurant in Cambridge, Mass., specializing in New England seafood. Not surprisingly, there is always sh chowder on the menu, but when fresh corn is in season, corn chowder is a special. Its the king of farmhouse chowders, writes White. The avor of corn combines so naturally and beautifully with other chowder ingredients. Although we think of chowders as soups, early chowders were more like puddings. They were thick and stewy concoctions of mostly sh and vegetables. Indeed, there is not even a hint of the word soup in the history of the word chowder. Chowder comes from the English jowter, or shmonger and has been linked to the French chaudron, or large pot. Whites corn chowder is a version of a Shaker recipe and could almost be called summer in a bowl. It has ample amounts of fresh corn and potatoes, so that with each spoonful, you get a mouthful of vegetables. For a tad more thickening, White adds a cornstarch slurry; for brighter color, he stirs in a small amount of turmeric; and for interesting avor he uses a little ground cumin. With sliced tomatoes and hunks of whole-grain bread, the chowder makes a perfect meal. Pay no attention to the thermometer! Corn Chowder 3 medium ears fresh corn 1 (4-ounce) piece unsliced bacon, rind discarded and bacon diced 2 tablespoons butter 1 medium onion, diced 1/2 large red bell pepper, diced 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/8 teaspoon turmeric 1 pound all-purpose potatoes, peeled and diced 3 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 teaspoons cornstarch, dissolved in 2 tablespoons water Minced fresh chives or thinly sliced green onions, for garnish 1. Cut kernels off cobs and scrape off milky bits. You should have about 2 cups corn. 2. Cook bacon until crisp in a large pot. Pour off all but 1 tablespoon fat. Add butter, onion, bell pepper, thyme, cumin and turmeric; cook over medium heat until vegetables are tender, stirring occasionally. Add corn, potatoes, broth, salt and pepper. 3. Cover and bring to a boil. Adjust heat and boil 10 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Stir in cornstarch mixture and cook until chowder is lightly thickened. Stir in cream. Garnish with chives or green onions. Serves 4.

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l 0 16.704 l 0 20.481 l 0 23.449 1.918 26.174 6.339 26.174 c 8.128 26.174 9.452 26.003 y 9.347 21.874 l 7.998 21.887 6.525 21.887 v 4.931 21.887 4.676 21.152 4.676 19.933 c 4.676 16.704 l 9.474 16.704 l 9.265 12.282 l 4.676 12.282 l 4.676 0 l f Q q 571.558 134.358 256.442 286.257 re W n q 257.0999146 0 0 286.7999878 571.1799011 134.3583069 cm /Im6 Do Q Q q 571.558 99.218 256.442 35.741 re W n q 257.0999146 0 0 36.3000031 571.1799011 98.658493 cm /Im7 Do Q Q q 571.558 96.616 256.442 2.602 re W n q 256.7999878 0 0 3.1199951 571.2378998 96.4552002 cm /Im8 Do Q Q q 571.558 96.616 256.442 2.602 re W n q /GS2 gs 256.7999878 0 0 3.1199951 571.2378998 96.4552002 cm /Im9 Do Q Q BT 0 g /T1_7 1 Tf 20 0 0 20 625.368 310.749 Tm [(September 5, 2013 6 7:30pmPearlman Cancer Center*For men who meet the American Cancer Society screening criteria.To register, call 229.333.1074FREEProstate Cancer Screening*Exams provided by Mike S. 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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 28, 2013 6A Madison County CarrierSPORTS Cowboys Nip Bulldogs In Kickoff ClassicBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The Madison County High School Cowboys won the Kickoff Classic against the Suwannee High Bulldogs on Friday evening, Aug. 23, by a score of 20-14. The Cowboys amassed 274 yards on offense as quarterback Akevious Williams aired the ball out 12 times for seven completions and 90 yards and two touchdowns. Williams also rushed nine times for 91 yards and a touchdown for a total of 181 all-purpose yards. Eric Bright rushed 19 times for 80 yards and caught a pass for 10 yards. Deontaye Oliver rushed six times for 15 yards and caught four passes for 43 yards. Ladarius Robinson caught one pass for 32 yards and a touchdown. Jamond Bruton caught one pass for five yards. The Cowboys travel to Tampa Catholic on Friday, where they will play against the Crusaders, who lost on Friday night to Sickles High School in Tampa by a score of 27-14. The Bulldogs host the Bradford County Tornadoes in Live Oak this Friday. Bradford lost to Gainesville Buchholz 7-0 on Friday evening. Go, Cowboys!MCCS CheerleadersBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Danyel Rucker is the new cheer sponsor for Madison County Central Schools cheerleaders. She is a second year teacher and so being fairly new to the teaching game, has a lot of energy and enthusiasm for the seventh and eighth grade group of girls she will be mentoring, and that is a good thing because there are a total of 18 cheerleaders for her to sponsor. Some of the duties that Rucker is responsible for will be to make sure the girls have their uniforms and pom-poms after she collects the rental fees of those uniforms. She will attend cheer practice twice a week and of course be at the weekly game. If it is an away game, she will ride the bus with the girls and after the games, make sure all of them are safely on their way home. Rucker has some ideas she would like to see realized during her time as a cheer sponsor. Her goal for the year is to make it as memorable as possible for the girls, while easing the burden of cost that some parents may experience. Cheerleaders have the required responsibility of their own warm ups and shoes but there are also extras that make the sport fun, but more costly. Not necessary, but part of the experience are: making signs for the football players to burst through at the games, making goodie bags for the players, away game dinners and award banquets. Rucker also would like to supply the girls with group tee shirts and iced coolers for the games lled with water and Gatorade. Rucker will work the concession stand through all the games to pay for the bus driver and fuel when they have away games and she says there will be at least one fundraiser in the works. Shes hoping to enlist help from local businesses to cover some of these costs. This would allow her to meet her goals for the girls and their parents along with her nal goal, which is to be the best positive role model that she can be. Photo SubmittedMCCS Cheerleaders Directions From MCHSTo Tampa Catholic Photo SubmittedDanyel Rucker

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 28, 2013 Madison County Carrier 7A

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.There are a lot of new things in Bill Gemmills life right now including a new career in a brand new charter school and in a new city. Bill Gemmill is James Madison Preparatory High Schools principal. He moved here from Nashville, Tenn., where he has held positions as a public school teacher, assistant principal, a computer aided designer, and has helped educate legislators when working as a teacher advocate for an independent teachers association. He graduated from the University of Tennessee and began working at I.T.T. where he taught computer-aided design, previously called drafting. He then went to work in the public school system, where he taught in the classroom for 12 years before going into administration as an assistant principal for two years and then as a principal for six. After retiring from the public school system he went to work for P.E.T., Professional Educators of Tennessee, where he was still an educator, but instead of children, educated legislators in trying to pass laws serving as an advocate for teachers. When asked why he came to Madison to be at JMPHS, Gemmill said he missed being with kids and felt like it is his calling. He said being a military brat helped in his decision to move, because he was used to moving and starting over and he wanted this challenge. His current goal is to assist this 9th grade class, and each new grade added, in reaching their goal towards a college degree. His ultimate goal would be for the inaugural class of 9th graders to all graduate from JMPHS so that the school has a 100 percent graduation rate in 2017. Being the principal at JMPHS is not his only function at the school. Gemmill is also teaching two periods of Character Development and Leadership for 18 weeks this year where notable leaders of the past are used as examples in the classroom. Role models such as Nancy Reagan, Christopher Reeve, Booker T. Washington and Amelia Earhart are a few of the people on the curriculum. An interesting side note is that Gemmills grandfather went to school with Earhart, was friends with her and even talked to her the week before she departed on her infamous flight around the world. Along with curriculum, the thing that Gemmill says he really wants the kids to learn is, Time is priceless and you cant get it back. I like to live life to the fullest and that is what I try to teach my kids. When talking about some of his favorite memories as an educator, working with his own children ranked high. Gemmill was able to teach three of his four children in the classroom and he said that was special for him as well as to his children. Soccer games were also a great memory because Gemmill learned to play soccer in Germany and was able to watch all his kids play in school. Between the classes and soccer games, school was a real family affair for him. William B. Gemmill III and wife, Judy has two sons; William the IV (Billy) and Eric who lives in Denver, two daughters; Allison, who lives in Tennessee, and Ashley, who passed away in 2008 from bone cancer. He admits Ashley passing was a tough time, but that her life had an amazing impact on him and all the family can now talk about memories shared with her and smile. Gemmill says he has had a great life. He has his family, his long and diverse career in education that is still on going, he has met six American Presidents, due to his Father being a Military Officer on the Republican National Committee and has even sang on stage at the Grand Ol Opry. Gemmill says, I love what I do and I feel Ive had a full life and I want to share all my experiences with these kids. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 28, 2013 8A Madison County CarrierSCHOOL ACA: Teaching Children To Honor God And CountrySubmitted by ACAAt Aucilla Christian Academy, the focus is Christ first. Teachers begin each school day with a devotion, prayer and the pledge of allegiance. And, during the first week of school, fifth graders learn how to care for the colors from Principal Richard Finlayson. "You have a very big responsibility," said Finlayson to the students. "We are honored to have you do this for our school every day." Enrollment increased by seven families at ACA this year, giving the school a total of 328 students. The majority of students take buses to ACA from Madison, Jefferson and Taylor counties. Brandi Hughes, who serves as Perry's bus driver, also cooks hot meals for students daily. "I have a passion to cook!" said Hughes. "I love cooking for the children and staff each day. I look forward to it." Debbie Love, ACA's second grade teacher and ACA's Elementary Faculty Chair, is the teacher behind ACA's theme Bible verse that students memorize. This year's theme verse is Psalm 119:11: "I have hidden your word in my heart that I might not sin against you." At Friday's chapel, both she and Assistant Principal Kevin Harvin spoke on the importance of memorizing scripture. "When you know the Word of God, you'll be able to recall it when you face difficult decisions in life," said Harvin to the secondary students. Summer Reading and Math Awards were also presented to students during the elementary chapel by Love. The mission of Aucilla Christian Academy is to provide educational opportunities and experiences within a Christian environment to help children develop spiritually, mentally and physically. ACA is dedicated to providing a "Christian Environment of Academic Excellence" and providing students with a high-quality, college preparatory education, ultimately producing future leaders and responsible citizens. "It's going to be a wonderful school year," said Finlayson. "God has laid out great role models for us. Jesus is our perfect role model. We strive to become like Him." For more information on ACA, visit http://www.aucilla.org/ or call 850-997-3597.Photo SubmittedCARING FOR THE COLORS AT ACA: Fifth graders in Mrs. Wanda Hughey & Mrs. Jennifer Falk's classes were excited to learn about their new ag raising and lowering responsibilities at school this year from Mr. Richard Finlayson, ACA's principal. New Teacher & New School Is A Perfect FitBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Alan Androski is such a perfect fit for the new James Madison Preparatory High School (JMPHS) that you would think the position was made specifically for him. JMPHS will be a STEM school, meaning that the focus on teaching will be Science, Technology, Engineering and Math and Androski has experience in all of them. Androski is certified to teach Physics at the High School level, obviously covering the necessary science qualification. He labels technology as a selftaught hobby, but has ample experience in using technology in a school setting as he incorporated student testing onto computers at his previous school and has Smart Board experience. He also reports that his previous fellow employees depended on him for technological help when the school IT person was absent. Engineering experience came with his first degree and first job after graduating from the Naval Academy with a Naval Architecture Degree. His assignment was on a Naval Ship in the Engineering Department. It was here that his interest in education formed when he began training new recruits in damage control for the ship. After five years of active duty on a Naval Ship, he went into the reserves and back to school, where he earned his Masters in Math Education; thus completing the final step in his experience and knowledge of STEM subjects. It was during his time in school, that Alan Androski met, and married, Christy Davis of Madison County. Both were able to find teaching positions in Madison. Christy was initially hired at Madison Primary School where JMPHS now resides. Androski found work at Madison County High School, where he has now taught for the past 18 years. His last four years at Madison County was teaching, but not students. He was assigned as a Math Coach where he acted as a resource for other math teachers and the school principal, by assisting with curriculum and teaching methods in the classroom. Alan Androski says he is excited about his current upcoming positions of science, math and computer teacher at JMPHS and describes it as, a great opportunity. He goes on to say that leaving Madison County High School was a very tough decision but felt the STEM school setting will be a good match for him and that he is ready for the challenge.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein August 12, 2013Alan Androski in his classroom, ready for a new challenge. JMPHS Welcomes Bill Gemmill Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein August 28, 2013Bill Gemmill is pictured in his ofce at JMPHS.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 28, 2013 Madison County Carrier 9ASCHOOL MCCS Holds Open HouseBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.It was standing room only in the gym at Madison County Central School when the school principal, Dr. Willie Miles stepped to the podium to address the crowd. In front of the stage, the faculty and staff of MCCS, all dressed in white shirts and khaki pants, sat in a horseshoe-shaped row of chairs. As their team leaders introduced them one by one, they stood and waved. Miles touched on the unity represented by the white and khaki attire, and talked about the excitement of the upcoming school year for the MCCS Broncos, welcoming the new students from Greenville Elementary, Pinetta Elementary and Lee Elementary. For the coming school year, he related the four goals he has set out for MCCS: a standard-based school, adopting and meeting the Common Core Standards; a safe, orderly and positive school; parents will be involved, with Parents Nights scheduled throughout the school year; and technology will be more integrated with the classroom, with teachers using it to enhance their teaching. Many of the classrooms are now equipped with smart boards, and each teacher now has his or her own web site that parents can visit to stay updated on what is going on with the class. If the gym was crowded, then the cafeteria, where parents and students adjourned to pick up their schedule of classes was even more so, as crowds of kids and parents gradually sorted themselves out into lines before large signs on the wall, separating everyone out alphabetically. Hundreds poured into the cafeteria every minute and gradually ltered themselves through the lines. A few of the students took note of the new murals on the cafeteria walls, but the majority seemed absorbed with nding out where they had to be the following Monday morning. I dont think it (the mural wall) has really registered with them yet, said Mimi Riplogle, adding that they would probably be able to take it all in once they were settled in their classes. Her husband Matt teaches seventh grade math at MCCS, and their daughter Tris is a fourth grader this year. Were trying to make a difference, Dr. Willie Miles had said a few days earlier at a Kiwanis Club meeting. And enjoy these young folks. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 15, 2013A crowded, packed gym awaited Dr. Willie Miles and the faculty/staff of MCCS.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 15, 2013In the cafeteria, hundreds of students sort themselves into queues to pick up their schedules.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 15, 2013Cordae Weatherspoon, rst grade, chooses his favorite mural.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 15, 2013Fourth grader Tris Riplogle, whose father Matt teaches seventh grade math, chose this mural for her picture. SGMC Outpatient Center and Admissions Now Located in the New Patient TowerAs of Thursday, August 29, 2013, at 5am, all admissions and non-emergency outpatient registration will be located in the new Patient Tower on the south side of campus. For your convenience, parking is adjacent to the Patient Tower at the intersection of Cowart and Slater Streets. Thank you for your patience. For more information, call SGMC Community Relations at 229.259.4421. www.sgmc.org

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Buy, Sell or Trade In The Classieds Call 973-4141 Call 973-4141www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . .10A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, August 28, 2013 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 8/26/2013 THROUGH 9/1/2013I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell) run, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves, buttons around neck with circular cut-out on back, beautiful gown $100. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250. Size 10 Teen Dress bright baby blue dress, halter top bodice with sequins stitched throughout; built-in crinoline with sequin appliques on lace overlay. Cinderella looking beautiful dress! $200.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 and leave a message.3/3, run, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-41417/18 rtn n/c New ve bedroom three bath doublewide home must go now. Make offer. Selling below cost! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cYes we take trades! Replace your old home with a more efcient and much stronger safer home now. Call 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNow is the best time to buy a new mobile home! Low rates means new homes under $400 month! 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cStop throwing money away! Our new homes cost less than $100 month to heat and cool! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNice triplewide, replace, glamour bath, sliding glass doors, new metal roof. Must sell now. Reduced to only $22,900 cash. 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cBlow out pricing on all 2012 mobile homes. Making room for new 2013 homes. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2013 Homes of Merit tape and texture starting at $375 per month. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cUsed single wide 16x80 3 bedroom 2 bath home ready to go at $15,900. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2006 Fleetwood home. Super clean and looks brand new. Call Mike at 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cNew and used homes starting as low as $6,500 on doublewides. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age 18yr. Day and evening classes. 386-362-10658/7 8/28, pdAdvertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper ofce is seeking an outstanding individual to join or sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-do-attitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Inc s newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.8/2 rtn, n/c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cMan of many trades and talents available for hire. Honest, reliable, creative, and reasonable/fair pricing. Specializes in custom deck building, sheds, fencing, special projects. Can also do pressure washing, and gardening (tree trimmings, ower beds, grooming seasonal shrubs and trees etc.) If interested, please Call John at 850-673-9192. References available.5/1 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com7/10 rtn, cGift Shop Close Out Sale Sparks Tractor Company All John Deere merchandise 50% off starting July 1st August 30th. Layaway available. Regular business hours are Monday Friday from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. (850) 973-3355.7/17 8/28, c3 BD 2 BA Mobile Home for Sale Completely re-modeled. New roof, wall, air conditioner, plus many others. Located off of Hwy 53. Will nance up to 20 years. $59,500.00 Call for appointment. (386) 792-2532 or (850) 929-4707. Palmetto Holdings. 8/7 8/28, cFor Sale 5 Acres of Land in Lee, Fl. Lots of Beautiful Trees, Excellent Drainage. Property Located On a Dead End Rd. Very Secure Lot. Driveway with Culvert. Property Located Next to 178 NE Carnation Way, Lee, Fl. 32059. Asking $45,000. Call (941) 629-3675.8/7 8/28, pdAsphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.8/14 rtn, n/c Mechanic Utility equipment eld service tech. (Bucket truck and diggers etc). Must have drivers license, CDL a plus. Must be able to work overtime and pass a drug test. Pay is by experience. (904) 751-6020.8/21, 8/28, pd Diesel Shop Mechanic Needed Must have at least 3 years experience, welding is a plus. Contact M.C. LOGGING (850) 973-4410 or (850) 672-0108.8/21, 8/28, pd Adoption ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)986-1520 or text (347)406-1924; www.davidandregisadopt.com -Adam B. Sklar FL# 0150789. Education MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Ofce Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-374-7294. Help Wanted Drivers HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com .EOE Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Real Estate/ Land for Sale HUNTER'S PARADISE WITH POND $3375 PER ACRE! 45 minutes from Nashville. Tracts from 41 to 560 acres with timber, food plots, and views. Call 931-629-0595. Real Estate/ Mobile Homes Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473 LandHomesExpress.com.2 BD 1 BA Trailer (850) 869-0916.8/21 rtn, cSuwannee Valley Nursing Center Director of Dietary Services 5 Star Facility looking for a Dietary Director for a 60 bed skilled nursing facility Current CDM certication or higher required. Competitve salary and excellent benets. We are a Drug Free Workplace Contact: Danny Williamson, Adm. 386-792-7161 Or Shrea McCoy, HR 386-792-7158.8/28, cClinical DirectorMental Health Services for a 27 bed female Juvenile Justice program in Greenville, FL. A Masters degree and State of Florida licensure in a mental health related eld, as well as two years experience in direct mental health service delivery required. Also applicant must have supervisory skills. Candidates must pass a DJJ background screen, drug screening and physical in order to be considered. Contact Ms. Mobley at 850-948-4220 or Fax resumes to 850-948-4227. Email: kimberly.glee@youthservices.com.8/28, 9/4, c Drivers: Guaranteed Home EVERY Weekend! Company: All Miles PAID (Loaded or Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money Down, NO Credit Check! Call: 1-888-880-5916.8/28, pd 1 Sales Associate This is not an entry level sales position so individuals without any prior sales experience will not be considered. Applicant will have to occasionally travel. This is a performance based position with an emphasis on continued growth. No previous employees. Minimum Qualications Education: High school graduation required. Associate of Arts or Science degree is required. A preference will be given for an applicant with a 4 year college degree or ranking ofcer of the US Military. Apply in Person at Big Top Manufacturing. Accepting the qualied applicants, Starting Wednesday the 8/28/13 at 8:00 a.m. It is the policy of Big Top Manufacturing to provide equal employment opportunity without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, physical or mental disability, or status as a special disabled veteran or other protected veteran. This is a drug free workplace and a negative results drug test will be required.8/28, c2 BD Apartment For Rent LARGE attached garage. No pets. (850) 971-5587.8/28 rtn, c For Sale 2006 Expedition; Eddie Bauer; White Very nice family car in very good condition. $8,500 OBO. Call (850) 464-1230 for more information. Marketing Coordinator Part-time Our hospital is searching for a professional with extensive marketing or publicist experience to help the residents in our county make the transition to a new replacement hospital building, opening in mid-2014. If you have a great personality, plenty of public speaking and writing experience, can organize events, and develop a brand, we want to talk to you. Contact Human Resources at 850-973-2271 ext 1906 or submit resume to 850-973-8158.8/28, c Got newsStraight from the horses mouth?We Do.The Madison County Carrier& Madison Enterprise Recorder 2009 Hometown ContentSudoku Puzzle #2992-MMedium1 2 23415 67384 94 9831 27 42 186 98542 37

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 28, 2013 Madison County Carrier 11A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com and www.oridapublicnotices.com ----Legals---The following is a list of unclaimed bond money held by the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce. Persons having or claiming any interest in said funds or any portion of them shall le their written claim with the Sheriff or Clerk of Court and shall make sufcient proof to said Sheriff or Clerk of his ownership and upon so doing shall be entitled to received any part of the money so claimed. Unless such bond money is claimed on or before the rst day of September, 2012, same shall be declared forfeited and all claims in reference thereto are forever barred. DEFENDANT DATE POSTED AMOUNT POSTED KAREN HARRELSON 9/7/99 30.00 ADRIAN CANDELARIO RODRIGUEZ 12/31/04 1146.00 MARIO PEREZ A/K/A MIGUEL ROBLERO 4/18/05 790.00 LANA ARTHUR 9/26/05 540.00 TELLAS DETRAIL BARNUM 1/13/09 390.00 WALLACE MCARTHUR 10/20/09 390.00 LOUIS RODRIGUEZ 3/2/11 540.008/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28 MADISON COUNTY ENTERPRISE ZONE #4001 BOUNDARY AMENDMENT REQUEST NOTICE A resolution will be considered for a change in the boundary of the Madison County Enterprise Zone #4001 (EZ). The boundary amendment is a request to add an additional 3 square miles to the current Enterprise Zone. A public hearing will be held on the following day and time, by the below named entity: November 6, 2013 at 9:00 a.m., Regular Meeting of the Madison County Board of County Commissioners, Room 107, rst oor of the Courthouse Annex. If adopted, this will result in a change to the boundary of the EZ for Madison County. If you have any questions regarding this boundary amendment request, or wish to view maps showing the proposed additions, please contact Sherilyn Pickels at 850-973-3179.7/31, 8/28, 9/25, 10/23 Public Notice Madison County will submit the Annual Report required by the State Housing Initiatives Partnership Program for scal years 2010/2011, 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 by September 15, 2013. Copies of the reports are available for public inspection and comment at the Ofce of the Chairman of the Madison County Board of Commissioners, Madison, Florida.8/28 Notice of Sale Certied Towing, Inc., 208 NE Rocky Ford Road, Madison, FL 32340, 850-973-4999, gives Notice of Lien & Intent to Sale the following pursuant to FL Statutes 713.78 on September 9, 2013 at 10:00 am at 6514 N SR 53, Madison, FL 32340: 2001 Silver Dodge Caravan VIN# 2B8GP44G71R1278568/28 The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. will hold an election for a Madison County Representative of the poor. The representative need not be poor, but must be chosen in a manner to insure that they represent the poor. To be elected, an individual must be at least 18 years of age and a resident of Madison County. Individuals interested in having their names placed on the ballot should contact Barbara Pepin at 386-362-4115, ext. 223 no later than September 4, 2013 The election will be held on September 9th -13th, 2013, in the Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc.s (SREC) ofce located at: 146 SE Bunker Street, Madison, Florida 32341. Listed below are the general duties of SREC, Inc. Board Members: 1. Sets major organizational, personnel, scal and program policies. 2. Determines overall program plans and priorities and evaluation of performance. 3. Final approval of all program proposals. 4. Enforcement of compliance with all conditions of State, Federal, and Local grants. The terms of ofce as a SREC, Inc. Board member will be ve (5) years (20132018). The SREC, Inc. Board of Directors meet quarterly in Live Oak, Florida.8/28 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE OF WALTER STEPHEN BUCKELS, Deceased.FILE NO.: 2013-CP-66 DIVISION: PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of WALTER STEPHEN BUCKELS, deceased, whose date of death was April 25, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW Range Avenue, Room 106, Madison, Florida 32340, File No. 2013-CP-66. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must le their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must le their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the rst publication of this Notice is August 28 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative: JOSEPH L. VAUGHN, JR., P.A. Kimberly Leggett Joseph L. Vaughn, Jr. 9086 Berens Street Florida Bar No. 827479Jacksonville, Florida 32210 2468 Atlantic Boulevard Jacksonville, Florida 32207 Telephone: (904) 346-00138/28, 9/4

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AROUNDMADISONCOUNTYBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Jay Lee, proprietor of Pest Patrol, a local family-owned-and-operated business, has been helping folks in Madison battle those little black ants and other annoying household pests for years, and has some advice on some steps people can take themselves to help keep these pests at bay. By understanding some of the ways these pests operate and how they get into your home in the first place, you can probably take some steps to cut down on their numbers and reduce the problem. Part One looks at the little black ants that get into everything in the house, as well as fire ants which generally stay outside, but can pose problems with their painful bites.Insects need heat and humidity to thrive, and summer is more ideal for their populations to flourish. The influx of pests this year are partly due to the excess rain which may disturb some of their outdoor shelters and send them hunting for shelter indoors, but the far more important factor is the extremely mild winter we had this year, with very few days of freezing temperatures. If we have very cold winters with several good hard freezes, it kills back the populations and makes managing pests a little easier. Without this cold winter kill-off, spring brings on ideal conditions for burgeoning populations. What about those little black ants that get into everything? The ants have gotten into the sugar again, and found that bit of spilled juice under the table, and that bit of spaghetti sauce on the backsplash above the stove, and maybe even the water dripping from the rims of faucets in kitchens and bathrooms, but why do those same little black ants invade your laundry hamper? And what is it about the clothes hanging in your closet that sometimes attracts them as well? About 95 percent of the ants you find in your house come in from outside; they nest outside and only come in for food, water and shelter. When one randomly foraging ant happens onto a food source inside a dwelling, it lays down a scent trail from the food source back to the nest and in short order there will be a line of the critters following the scent trail back to the food or water source. Most people have probably heard the nursery rhyme song, The Ants Go Marching One By One, and this is an apt description for what youre likely to see when you come across the critters. Moving almost single file, heads down, waving their antennae back and forth, they follow the scented path to the food or water source. Rub your finger across the line and watch them scurry about in confusion youve just erased part of the scent trail. Until one of them makes it across the void and picks up the trail on the other side, theyll be lost. This explains their presence in the kitchen and the bathroom, but why do they turn up in laundry hampers and sometimes even our closets? Kitchen spills, splatters and crumbs arent the only food source. We shed tiny flakes of skin all the time and these are all over our dirty clothes. We cant see these microscopic dead skin cells, but when a foraging ant wandering through the house happens across this mother-lode of high protein food, it beats a scent-path back to nest and alerts the others. Another thing on our clothes that we cant see is particles of dried sweat. These ants love it. As for why they go for clean clothes hanging in the closet, its because not even the most intense laundering can get rid of all the skin cells ground into our clothes. A few will still stick around, and all it takes is one randomly foraging ant to come across those remaining particles, and that ant will soon be back with friends. Another fact about these ants is that only about one third of the anthill population ever leaves the colony to forage and fetch the food; there is another class of ants, known as tendering ants, who take the solid food brought into the colony and turn it into liquid form an important task, since ants cannot digest solid food. But once these liquid protein meals are ready, its time to ring the dinner bell for the colony. The main key to the ant problem is finding out where they are getting into your house. Follow the ant trail backwards to find their entry point. This could be through cracks in the sidewall or through the floor. If there is wall-to-wall carpet in the house, look between the carpeting and the baseboard, or look at where the baseboard joins the floor, and dont forget the closet; there is a reason baseboards are known as the ant highway. Look at where your plumbing pipes, phone, cable and electrical lines come into the house. There could be tiny or not-sotiny gaps there. Look for tiny cracks around windows and doors. Outside, do the same thing around the outer wall of your house. Look closely at any place where the electrical, phone or cable lines and plumbing pipes enter your house. Check all around windows and doorjambs for tiny cracks and crevices. Then, caulk up all the holes and cracks you find. Studstill Lumber sells different kinds of caulking for indoor and outdoor use and can help you find the right kind you need. What about fire ants? Fire ants are imported pests that seldom enter the house, but they have very painful bites; also, some people and children are allergic to their venom in varying degrees of severity, so its important to get rid of an infestation if you can, or keep one from becoming a serious problem. One peculiar thing about fire ants is that they are polymorphic meaning that they have multiple queens. Its an unusual arrangement, but it explains why the critters are so difficult to get rid of. One mound can contain 300,000 500,000 ants, and once that mound is disturbed, the ants will simply split up and bud out, with each queen taking a group of ants with her to form new mounds and each of these mounds can go down five or six feet into the ground. In these new mounds, they will multiply until they reach the 300,000 500,000 population mark. As with other ants, only about one-third of the anthill population ever leaves the mound, and with so much of the colony deep underground, topical solutions wont get them all. A much more effective strategy is baiting. The forager ants will take the poisoned bait down into the colony. However, fire ants have a couple of peculiar traits; anything left on the mound will be considered a foreign object and thrown away; not only that, but the ants will recognize any similar substances they find near the mound as foreign objects and ignore these as well. Instead, scatter the bait about 12 24 inches from the mound, taking care not to disturb the mound itself. If the ants have to go out and forage for it, theyll believe its food and take it down into the colony where it will be eaten. Another thing to remember is that the poisoned bait can be easily contaminated with foreign substances, which will cause the ants to reject it. Its important to reseal the bait bag after each use. Also, any bait left out in the yard will spoil after a while, which is why treating individual mounds works much better than scattering the bait all over the yard. For more severe infestations, or if the above steps dont alleviate the ant problem, Pest Patrol can help; call 973-9910, or check out their website or Facebook page. Next: Part Two And Then There Are Fleas. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12A Madison County Carrier BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252 DivorceCare Comes to MadisonAt a time in our nation when 32% of marriages end in divorce, more and more people are going through the trauma and upheaval associated with this lifealtering tragedy. Beginning at 6 p.m. on Sunday evening September 8, 2013, First Baptist of Madison will offer the first meeting of its DivorceCare Ministry. DivorceCare is a network of more than 13,000 churches worldwide who are equipped to offer divorce support groups. The program is nondenominational and features biblical teaching for recovering from divorce or separation. The weekly meetings on Sunday evenings will provide a warm and caring oasis for those suffering through the trauma of divorce or separation. The first half of the two hour meeting time will offer a video seminar featuring information-packed videos and some of the nations top Christian divorce recovery experts. After a short break the meeting will divide into a Ladies Support Group and a Mens Support Group to discuss the weeks topic and offer encouragement and support as the group navigates together this most difficult time in life. During the week, journaling and workbook exercises will help members reinforce the lessons of the previous session. Class participants will also have access to the DivorceCare website as well as daily email updates and encouraging messages. The class is open to anyone, and the only cost is $15 to cover the price of the workbook. Childcare is provided free of charge. Register with the church by Friday, September 6th to ensure materials are available at the first session. The groups fall schedule can be found at www.divorcecare.org. Simply type in your zip code and click on First Baptist Madison Fall 2013 to see more details on the schedule. If you have any questions please dont hesitate to call the church at 850-973-2547 or email the church secretary at shannonsandi@yahoo.com. First Time Home Buyers Class Interested in becoming a homeowner? Now is the time to take the Home Buyers class beginning Monday, Sept. 16, at 6 p.m. at the Madison County Extension Service. The series will run four evenings beginning on the 16th and continuing on the 18th, 23rd and 25th. Lesson topics include credit, home selection, securing a home mortgage, home insurance and home maintenance. Funding for the State Housing Initiative Program (SHIP) has been restored and money is available to assist income eligible individuals and families with down payment and closing cost on the purchase of an existing home. This is a great opportunity for working people of low and moderate income to achieve home ownership. Upon completion of the class, participants receive a certificate that is required for SHIP assistants and rural development loans. If you are interested in attending the class to learn about the homeownership process, complete a SHIP application, available at Suwannee River Economic Council on Bunker Street, then register by calling the Madison County Extension Service at 9734138. Jay Lee Of Pest Patrol, Part One: Those Little Black Ants