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Madison County carrier ( 08-21-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00397

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00397


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Wed. August 21, 2013VOL. 50 NO. 3 www.greenepublishing.com 50 cents Index 2 Sections, 24 Pages Local Weather Veiwpoints2A From Page One3A Obituaries4A Around Madison5-6,12A Sports7A School8-9A Classied/Legals10-11A Path of Faith Section B Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports, that for the past several months, the Sheriff's Ofce has received complaints from customers and staff at the Pinetta Post Ofce of an older white male exposing himself to customers and staff as they left the Pinetta Post Ofce. The Sheriff's Ofce Criminal Investigative Unit invested numerous hours conducting covert surveillance in attempt to identify the individual and possibly catch him in the act. On Monday, Aug. 12, Doy Goss Thomas, 65, of 286 NE Pansy Way in Pinetta was arrested and charged with ve counts of lewdness and indecent exposure after Madison County Sheriff's Ofce investigators observed Thomas standing next to his truck in the Pinetta Post Ofce parking area, exposing himself to Pinetta Post Ofce customers as they left the building. Thomas was later identied as the same suspect who exposed himself to ve other victims on ve different dates and times. Doy Goss ThomasFlasher Exposed By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.It's almost time to hit the stadium bleachers to cheer on your favorite team. We have the entire season schedules for Madison County Central School, Madison County JV and Varsity High School, and Aucilla Christian Academy JV and Varsity so you won't miss out on any of the games. Go Broncos, Cowboys and Warriors!Football Season Is HereBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Aman was killed near the 265-milepost on Interstate 10 in an automobile accident early Saturday morning, Aug. 17, According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Kejuan J. Haywood, 20, of Jacksonville, was traveling westbound on I-10 in the right travel lane when he lost control of the 2006 Chevrolet Impala he was driving. The Impala left the roadway and onto the north shoulder while rotating clockwise. The car struck several trees with its driver's side before coming to a nal rest against a tree facing southwest on the north shoulder of I-10. Madison County EMS pronounced Haywood dead at the scene. FHP Cpl. E. Hunt was the crash investigator. PHOTOS BY RUSSELLMan Killed In Crash PHOTOS BY RUSSELLBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Awoman struck a re truck that had stopped for another wreck on Saturday morning, Aug. 17. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, the accident occurred on Interstate 10, one mile west of US 221. FHP reported that Lillie Adkins, 20, of Wausau, was eastbound in the left travel lane of the road and that the 2011 Freightliner re truck was facing east with its emergency lights and equipment operation. Madison reghter Brandon Fleming, 26, of Madison, had stopped the re truck in the left travel lane due to another crash in the median thatWoman Strikes Fire Truck With Car "We're moving forward with the Community Eligibility Option," said Jan McHargue of the Madison County School Board Administration. The USDA approved the nal inclusion Madison County Excel School in the number of district schools eligible for universal free breakfasts and lunches, based on a percentage of students in that school who are already eligible for free orFree Universal Breakfasts /Lunches ApprovedFor All Except High SchoolBy Lynette Norris Green Publishing, Inc.At their August meeting, the City Commission approved allowing city staff to apply for a $50,000 grant from the Florida Recreation Development Association to build children's tennis courts at Lanier Field. The City of Madison has no other public tennis court facility for several years; unless those inclined to play tennis were either members of the Madison Country Club, or high school students at Madison County High School, they would be pretty much out of luck. City Commission Approves Grant Application, First Reading Of City OrdinancesAn agreement to allow Lafayette County to dump trash in the Aucilla Area Regional Landfill, as well as a resolution honoring a local pastor and pursuing a grant for a recreation complex at the Methodist Children's Home are on the agenda for the Wednesday, Aug. 21, Madison County Commission meeting. The agenda, which can be amended is shown below: CONSENT AGENDA Approval of the Preliminary Estimate of the Permanent Population for Madison County to Determine State Revenue Sharing Funds. Approval of Resolution 201308-21 and Agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation for New Road Construction of Genoa Road from SR 53 to Balboa Drive. Approval of Resolution 201308-21A and Agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation for Resurfacing or Reconstruction of CR 146 (NW Little Cat) from SR 53 to CR 150/NW Lovett Road. Budget Amendment Request for Fines and Forfeitures/State Court Facility to Amend for Additional FY 2013 Court Services Personnel. Approval of Sheriff's Department Confiscated Currency Expenditure in the Amount of $6,180.00. Approval of Letter to the Honorable Sheriff Benjamin J. Stewart Regarding Budget. PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 1. UNFINISHED BUSINESS 1. NEW BUSINESS 1. Presentation of the Payment in Lieu of Taxes Check and Presentation on the Minimum Flows and Levels for the Lower Santa Fe and Ichetucknee Rivers and Springs Mr. Jon Dinges, SRWMD. 2. Presentation by Kiwanis Club Concerning Efforts to Seek Grant for Recreation Complex for Methodist Children's Home Mr. Jim Wylie and Mr. Jerome Wyche. 3. Resolution in Honor of Charles W. Evans, Pastor of Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church Mr. Jerome Wyche. 4. Approval of Name and Lettering for EMS and Dispatch Center County Coordinator. 5. Consideration of Contract Between Aucilla Landfill and Lafayette County to Allow Lafayette County to Dispose of Solid Waste in the Aucilla Landfill County Coordinator and County Attorney.Madison County Commission To Discuss Land“ll Agreement With Lafayette By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Miraculously, no one was injured as a 2001 Toyota Camry slammed into a tree on Interstate 10 on Saturday night, Aug. 17. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Jeremiah Dade McKinstry, 33, of Gainesville, was westbound on I-10 in the inside lane. McKinstry said that the blue SUV was driving slower in the outside lane and, as he was attempting to pass by the SUV, it changed lanes and applied brakes. When the driver of the SUV applied the brakes, it caused McKinstry to apply his brakes and when he did, he lost control of the vehicle. The Toyota ran off the roadway onto the north shoulder while it rotated clockwise. The car entered the tree line and struck a pine tree, before it came to a nal rest. N o On e Inju red A s C ar St r ik es T reePlease See Fire Truck On Page 3A Please See Car Vs. Tree On Page 3A Please See Free Lunch On Page 3A Please See Commission On Page 3A See Page 12A

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Unhealthy cholesterol levels increase your risk for heart disease, so keeping yours low is key to a healthier heart. Your diet is central to controlling your cholesterol. Some foods can actually lower your cholesterol, while others only make matters worse. Avoid saturated or  trans fats. Foods containing high levels of saturated fats or trans fats—such as potato chips and packaged cookies—can increase your cholesterol levels much more signicantly than cholesterolcontaining foods such as eggs. Saturated fat and trans fat both increase LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. Trans fat lowers your levels of HDL (“good”) cholesterol, which can put you at increased cardiovascular risk. Make smart choices.  Choose foods rich in unsaturated fats, ber, and protein. Fruits, vegetables, sh, beans, nuts, and seeds are all great cholesterol regulators. The best foods for lowering cholesterol are oatmeal, sh, walnuts (and other nuts), olive oil, and foods fortied with sterols or stanols—substances found in plants that help block the absorption of cholesterol. Remember that la bels can be deceiving. Navigating food labels can often be complicated since packaged foods with labels like “cholesterol free” or “low cholesterol” aren’t necessarily hearthealthy; they might even contain cholesterol that’s heart-risky. Stick to basics whenever possible: fruit, veggies, nuts, and lean proteins. Lowering your cho lesterol with sh or sh oil supplements  By adding sh like salmon or herring to your diet twice a week, you can signicantly lower your cholesterol, and thus your risk for heart attack. Fish contain omega-3 fatty acids, which work like superheroes, doing good deeds for your heart—and your whole body. Way back yonder, when I was 20 years old, I went ta’ visit aunt Lilly May ‘n uncle Ar lie. They told me that aunt Lilly’s sister, Lou’s, husband, Roy, had passed away with ‘uh heart attack. Aunt Lou never had ‘uh drive’n license. Lilly said Lou needed some drive’n lessons ‘n ask’t if I would teach her. I knew that Lou grew up on ‘uh farm so I gured she already had drove. Lou lived in thuh’ big city. Roy had just bought ‘uh new Buick before he passed. Lilly ‘n Arlie took me ta’ Lou’s house ta’ ride with Lou to the country where she could practice. When Lou took off, she lurched ‘uh few times but I didn’t think much of it. When she pulled onto thuh’ Interstate, instead of merg’n she pulled in thuh’ middle of thuh’ interstate ‘n stopped. Cars was screech’n to ‘uh stop. I thought we was gonna die. I hollered, “GO, GO, GO, GO, GO!” When we got in thuh’ country, we came up on ‘uh railroad. I said, “ Lou yer’ ‘sposed ta’ stop at ‘uh railroad.” She did, right on top of thuh’ railroad. I said, “ Lou, I meant at, not on, so you could see if ‘uh train is come’n, which there might be, so GO,GO GO! We pulled up ta’ main street in thuh’ little town ‘n I said, “ Turn left.” She did, not in thuh’ left lane, in thuh’ park’n lane on thuh’ left side of thuh’ street. I got ‘er ta’ get in thuh’ drive’n lane ‘n we headed out’a town. I wanted ta’ teach her how ta’ pass so when thuh’ road was clear I said, “ Stomp thuh’ throttle ‘n go in thuh’ left lane like yer’ pass’n another car.” She did ‘uh purty’ good job of that so we went on ta’ Lilly ‘n Arlie’s place. It never felt so good ta’ get out’a ‘uh car. Later on in thuh’ day, Arlie offered ta’ go with Lou fer’ ‘uh drive. They came back in ‘uh few minutes ‘n Arlie was shake’n ‘n pail. He said, “ We was ride’n in thuh’ country ‘n all thuh’ sudden Lou oored it ‘n went in thuh’ other lane. I thought she had ‘uh death wish.” We all lived through it ‘n Lou nally got her drive’n license ‘n became ‘uh purty’ good driver. Next time I taught somebody ta’ drive, I started ‘um out in ‘uh pasture in rst gear. Sincerely Yourn’ Cracola O’Lustee ( Cracker fer’ short ) Iwas looking through some old papers in my workshop the other day when I ran across a certificate recognizing my flight in a “Zero G” trainer. It was July 1967. I was just 19 years old, having finished my first year as an Air Force Academy cadet. I was in southern Ohio at Wright-Patterson AFB with about half my class. We were learning about the research and development activities headquartered at that base. Late in the afternoon, we were offered an opportunity to fly the Zero G aircraft used by the astronauts to train in a weightless environment. I jumped at the chance along with about half a dozen of my classmates. Our aircraft was a modified turboprop C-131, the first Zero G aircraft. It had been superseded by the better performing C-135 turbojet but that wasn’t available to us. The difference between the two was the time you were weightless: the C131 period was 15-20 seconds per cycle while the C-135 was double that amount. I say “cycle” because the pilots flew a parabolic arc through our restricted airspace. As the aircraft gained speed, the pilots pulled back on the flight controls, causing the aircraft to climb. Once we increased speed and began to climb, they pushed the controls forward until we reached Zero G. They held that attitude until we coasted over the top and began to descend. Then they’d pull back on the controls, the “G” (gravitational pull) would increase, and we would repeat the cycle. Across the sky we’d fly, up and down like a sine wave. The cabin of the aircraft was empty and completely padded. When the aircraft went to Zero G, we free-floated. It took a couple of cycles to get used to the effect, and then we started to have fun -like being against the rear bulkhead and pushing off to mimic Superman. Literally you could fly for nearly 40 feet before coming to the other end. One of my fellow testers grabbed me by the wrist and gave it a twist; the result was that I started to spin like a top. One thing you had to get used to was the timing of the period of weightlessness. You didn’t want to be at the ceiling when the weightless period ended and the G began to load up. That mistake would send you plummeting to the floor. It may have been padded, but you were still in for a jolt. I made that mistake once and learned how to time the weightless period better. The aircraft had the nickname “vomit comet” for the tendency of the weightless subjects to get airsick. For whatever reason (probably because I was having the time of my life), that didn’t affect me. At about 6 p.m. and after 1520 cycles, the pilots called it off and we headed home to land. Flying a fighter like the F-4, we always had to deal with gravitational pull -positive, negative, and zero. It was really important to strap in very securely to prevent getting thrown around. I was secured to my ejection seat by nine straps and fittings and another three for environmental systems. I strapped in before starting the engines and then once airborne, cinched them down again before beginning heavy maneuvering. We always had to deal with gravitational (G) forces, but the most extreme was during air combat maneuvering (ACM), sometimes referred to as dogfighting. Here, it was also important to make sure all of your equipment (checklists, maps, etc,) were properly stowed away. Getting slapped in the face with a bulky checklist can be disconcerting; trying to find where it went can be difficult – there are a lot of nooks and crannies in the confined space of a cockpit for things to hide. Zero G also brought a lot of dust and dirt from the floor of the cockpit; not much you can do about that. Positive G was a common occurrence. The F-4 could comfortably pull 5-6 G’s without bleeding off too much airspeed. In the correct configuration, the airframe was rated up to 8.5 G’s but pulling that hard would really bleed off the airspeed quickly. Modern fighters like the F-16 and F-18 can pull 9 G’s but that takes a lot of practice and stamina on the part of the pilot because that is almost the limit that the human body can withstand. While Zero G is fun, negative G (when you’re pushing forward and blood is rushing to your head) is very uncomfortable. You wouldn’t want to do that for very long. Here on earth, we are used to one G. Flying introduces additional forces that you simply have to get accustomed to. The weightlessness of space travel is still another complication.www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 14, 2013 2A € Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist Jim Dietrich Guest Columnist Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. Did You Know...Zero G The family of Doris Alderman would like to express their appreciation for the prayers, visits, cards, owers and phone calls during her recent illness and the loss of our loved one. We would especially like to thank the staff of Madison County Memorial Hospital and the Family 1st Wellness Center for the wonderful care they provided.Thank You Letters To The Editor If you read my column (and I certainly hope that you do), I normally write about foods I have prepared and then share a recipe with you. Today I am asking you for your expertise and recipes. On occasion, I eat out and will experience a food so tasty that I want to go home and recreate it. This morning, running late and not having time for a proper breakfast, I remembered one of those times. I was visiting all my friends back home in Arkansas and on one particular day had traveled several hours to a small town in the country with my friend Karen, who had a speaking engagement. After the meeting, the group was kind enough to feed us lunch and the only item I remember is the hot water cornbread. I’m ashamed to say that I have always lived in the South and until then, had only heard of this old time delicacy. I remember biting into the crunchy golden outside of the two-inch patty and then experiencing the almost velvety texture of the center. The avor of the cornbread was simple, but amazing. It was a perfect bite. I had to know what I was eating and when I was told it was cornbread, I was amazed. After doing some research, I was even more amazed, because the ingredients were so few and so basic. There were, however, some variations. Almost all recipes included cornmeal, the backbone of the recipe; some had an addition of our, some added baking powder and all had hot or boiling water. One recipe used only self-rising our and hot water. A few of the recipes used shortening or bacon drippings mixed into the dough. When shaping the cornbread, instructions included two to ve inch patties, oblong patties and long sticks. One website presented possible additions such as onions, garlic, corn, cheese, jalapeno, spices and fresh herbs. All recipes for the cornbread involved frying; oil, shortening and bacon drippings were suggested. Two recipes I looked at suggested a resting period for the dough; one said to “allow the dough to cool” and the other instructed you to cover the dough so that it could “steam.” Unfortunately, this research is as close as I’ve come to making hot water cornbread. The remainder of my time in Arkansas was spent visiting with other friends and after I returned home, my mind and momentum went elsewhere; the typical “out of sight, out of mind” condition. So, here is where I need your expertise and help. If you are a master of hot water cornbread and would be willing to share your recipe, I would be grateful and excited to try it. I look forward to cooking with you! Please email your recipes, comments or questions to Rose@greenepublishing.c om.Seeking Hot Water Cornbread Rose Klein ColumnistFrank NathanExecutive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness Tips Searching For AmbrosiaCracker SezLEARNN AUNT LOU TA DRIVE CallForAFREEConsultation.NoFeesorCostsUntilRecovery TollFree877-997-8181 www.CaminezLaw.com MonticelloOffice€1307S.JeffersonSt.850-997-8181 TallahasseeOffice€1882CapitalCircleNE,Suite103 JonD.Caminez,BoardCertifiedCivilTrialAttorney ShannonBrown,ParalegalScottL.Wolf,AttorneyBarneyStallworth,Investigator WWW.CAMINEZLAW.COM Thehiringofalawyerisanimportantdecisionthatshouldnotbebasedsolelyuponadvertisements. Beforeyoudecide,askustosendyouwritteninformationaboutourqualificationsandexperiences.€AutoAccidents €Truck&Tractor TrailerAccidents €MotorcycleAccidents €WrongfulDeath €DefectiveProducts €MedicalNegligence/ Malpractice €Slip&Fall €PremisesLiability €NursingHome Negligence Accidents-Injury-DeathCases PracticingPersonalInjuryLawSince1972

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013Madison County Carrier € 3AWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Oldest Living Man Is 123 Years OldIn the mountain village of Frasquicia, Bolivia, a herder by the name of Carmelo Flores Laura, is now the oldest living man ever recorded. According to the country’s civil registry, Carmelo is 123 years old and needs no glasses to help him see or cane to assist him in walking. His wife died more than a decade ago, only one of his three children is living, Cecilia (67 years old), and most of his grandchildren and great-grandchildren have moved away. He lives in a straw-roofed hut with a dirt oor and his diet consists of wild grain, foxes, lizards and skunk meat.Swimming And Diving Now Possible With PrimatesIn Johannesburg, Africa, researchers think that swimming and diving; behaviors previously thought absent from apes, may now be possible. Videos observed by the researchers show Cooper, a chimp owned by humans in Missouri, diving repeatedly into a swimming pool. Also viewed was Suryia, an orangutan living in a South Carolina zoo, diving and swimming. Chimps, gorillas and orangutans have been thought unable to dive or swim because zoos have used moats in previous years to conne the primates, who often drowned if they ventured into deep water. However, both primates observed in the videos appeared comfortable in the water and instead of using a dog-paddle stroke used by earthly mammals, they used a “frog kick” motion to swim, much like the human breast stroke.Zoo Replaces Animals With Household PetsIn the People’s Park of Luohe, China, a local zoo was found to be replacing more exotic animal species with common animals. A visitor took her son to the zoo to show him the animals and the different sounds they make. The observant child recognized that the lion was “barking like a dog.” The “lion” turned out to be a Tibetan Mastiff, a large, longhaired dog breed. Three other species were also housed incorrectly, such as a white fox in a leopard’s den and a second dog in a wolf pen.Man Tweets For MarijuanaIn Concord, Ontario, a mechanic shop worker was red after searching for marijuana with a Twitter post. Sunith Baheerathan, tweeted that he was at the Mr. Lube in Concord and asked, “Any dealers inVaughan wanna make a 20sac chop? Come to Keele/Langstaff Mr. Lube, need a spliff or two to help me last this open to close.” The tweet was answered by the York Regional Police saying, “Awesome! Can we come too?” Police informed Mr. Lube management who addressed the issue with a tweet of their own, “Thank you to the York Regional Police for your help and great work. The matter has now been handled.” The last tweet on the controversy was from Sunith Baheerathan, “Just got the call of termination.” Fire Truck Cont. From Page 1A Car Vs. Tree Cont. From Page 1ANeither McKinstry, nor his passengers, Andrea Autumn McKinstry, 24, and Xandar Dade McKinstry, 5, were injured in the crash. FHP Trooper William Harrell was the investigating ofcer. Free Lunch Cont. From Page 1Areduced price lunches. This means that ALL students attending the Madison County Excel School, along with Madison County Central, Greenville Elementary, Lee Elementary, and Pinetta Elementary Schools will receive healthy breakfasts and lunches each day at no charge during the school year 2013 – 2014, without having to ll out the usual applications. Only Madison County High School students still need the Free and Reduced Price Application in order to qualify, and parents must have that application lled out and turned in to their child’s school ofce, by August 30, 2013, or mailed to the Madison County School Board Annex, Food & Nutrition Department, 210 NE Duval Ave., Madison FL, 32340. Again, the deadline is August 30, 2013...and until their completed applications are approved, the students will have to pay full price. Incomplete applications for free or reduced price meals cannot be processed or approved. Parents, please be sure to ll in all the blanks and specify how often income amount is received (weekly or monthly). For help in completing the application, please contact Jan at (850) 973-1540 or Iris at (850) 973-1539. Student breakfast prices for 2013-14 are as follows: Pre-K – 8th grade: No charge 9th – 12th grade: Full price $1.00, reduced price $.30 Student lunch prices for 2013-14 are: Pre-K – 8th grade: No charge 9th – 12th grade: Full price $2.05, reduced price $.40 Commission Cont. From Page 1AThe smaller children’s tennis courts would get young children and pre-teens involved in the sport, much like T-ball and Little League get them involved in softball and baseball; the courts could also be adapted for adult use by moving the nets. The Commission also approved a First Reading of Ordinances 2013-2 and 2013-3. These two ordinances would amend the City of Madison Municipal Fireghter’s Pension Trust Fund and the City of Madison Police Ofcers’ Retirement Trust Fund, bringing the city into compliance with the Internal Revenue Service’s regulations. The City also decided to delay action on several other items until its meeting in September: one was a motion to sell the Woman’s Club building to the Woman’s Club; the idea had been presented to the city commission by City Manager Tim Bennett at a special budget meeting Aug.1, as a way to cut costs. The city would no longer be responsible for maintenance, and would not have to install a $15,000 sewer line connection. The Commission however, decided to postpone the decision until the September meeting. Another item they decided to take up at their next meeting was whether or not to acquire a piece of property at 107 SE Pineland Avenue. The property would give the city access to one of its wastewater lift stations. The commission did not take any action on the proposed Golf Cart Crossings at several intersections around town. As a cost-cutting measure, the city proposed having its meter reading duties performed with used golf carts rather than full-sized vehicles; the golf carts would consume less fuel and be more cost efcient to operate, but they would also require several special marked crossings of busy streets at points which are deemed to be safe and practical, both to the city employees and other motorists on the road. A Department of Transportation trafc engineer will do a required evaluation of the proposed crossings, and if they pass muster, city staff can then begin a proposed rewrite of city ordinances regarding the crossings. In another cost-conscious measure, the Commission voted to authorize the city manager, Tim Bennett, to approve any change orders, up to 10 percent of the cost of construction, involved in the city’s Community Development Block Grant for Housing Rehabilitation and Demolition/ Replacement. Change orders that go above 10 percent would be reviewed and either approved or disapproved by the City Commission. The City Commission also approved rescheduling its September meeting to Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013. FROMPAGEONEBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. The thorny question of how to continue maintenance for Greenville’s Evergreen Cemetery will not be decided until the Greenville Town Council meets again in September. Over the course of the last few council meetings, representatives of the Bush Estate have appealed for help from the city, because the funding set up for the cemetery’s maintenance is running out. The funding came from an account set up decades ago by the late Council Bush, who is now interred in the cemetery, but since the recession of 2008, the stock dividends that paid for the mowing, weed-eating and general upkeep have dried up. The Bush Estate carried on with money that had accumulated, but nally appealed to the City of Greenville, which owns the cemetery. If the city could help out with the weed-eating and trimming around the headstones, the Bush Estate people could continue mowing on a somewhat reduced schedule. The problem with that, however, is that in a town as small as Greenville, there are very few staff and employees to begin with, and of those few, they often have more than enough to do already; on top of that, there is little or no money in the town budget to hire a lawn service or part-timer. There had been discussion of asking for help from the inmates at MCI; since the cemetery was publicly owned by Greenville, it should be eligible for help from inmate labor, was the thinking. Then, there was the problem of the cemetery plots themselves being sold to individuals. Did that make parts of the cemetery private property and therefore ineligible for help from MCI? Patricia Hinton, former Greenville Town Clerk, said that she has several generations of her family buried in Evergreen, including, most recently, her mother, and urged the council to “reach some clarity” on what it intended to do, even if it meant charging families extra, because “we need to know.” The dilemma as it currently stands, is that MCI cannot help out with the cemetery unless the town of Greenville cancels its agreement with the Bush Estate, a private group. MCI will not participate if any other private groups or parties are involved in any way. If that agreement is canceled, MCI can then do full maintenance. It can work cooperatively with the city, but not with the Bush Estate. However, that would mean canceling a decades-long arrangement created by one of the people now resting within the cemetery gates. The Council agreed to consider its options and make a nal decision at its Sept. 9 meeting.Evergreen Cemetery Question Postponed Until September Meeting Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Ofce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersSteven Godfrey, Tori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette DunnBookeeping Brooke Kinsley Classified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) Madison Fire & Rescue had responded to. Adkins attempted to pass into the right travel lane when the front of her 2006 Chevrolet struck the right rear of the re truck. Adkins was taken to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital where she was treated for minor injuries. The four reghters, including Fleming, Socrates Pierre, 28, Michael Dupree, 34, and Brandon Bagg ett, 34, all of Madison, were not injured in the mishap.

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.If you think being involved in 4-H means only agriculture and goat-tending, you’re about to be educated, just like I was when I went to the Extension Ofce in Madison County. Becky Bennett, one of the ofce agents, acknowledged this thought by saying, “4-H is one of the best kept secrets. 4-H does so much more than most people realize.” 4-H is the oldest youth development organization in the U.S., with roots going back as far as 1909. The beginnings of 4-H did in fact begin with agriculture when Corn Clubs for boys was developed in 1903. The boys would grow corn and then compete with their produce. Soon after, girls joined in by starting Tomato Clubs, but diversied more into life skills necessary for girls of that time, with activities such as sewing and food preparation. The boy’s clubs expanded into more involved agriculture and animal care. These skills were organized and taught to youth with “learn by doing” programs that are still in effect today. The four H’s on the emblem stand for Head, Heart, Hands and Health. Head is Mental Development, Heart is Emotional Development, Hands is Skills Development and Health is Physical Development. This represents the 4-H Mission, “The Florida 4-H Youth Development Program uses a learn-by-doing approach and caring adults to help youth gain the knowledge and life skills they need to be productive responsible citizens.” This mission is accomplished through the many programs offered through what the Extension calls clubs. If you join 4-H today, club options could be animal management, gardening projects, public speaking, ecology, consumer education, energy projects, clothing construction, computer technology or nancial management, just to name a few. Bennett says that clubs at the local ofce are based on the needs and wants of the community. During the summer, there are day and night camps as well. Regional and National opportunities are also available. Bennett does stress that even if a club is not being offered, it can still be participated in through way of 4-H materials and special projects. And speaking of special projects, teachers can benet from the local Extension Ofce by requesting 4-H materials to supplement their classroom curriculum. If you are interested in joining 4-H and wondering who is eligible, anyone ages ve through 18 can join and 4-H serves youth from all backgrounds and interests. If you are an adult and interested in 4-H, you can become a volunteer. The requirements for volunteers are to be 21 years of age, willing to take a background check and to love children. Adult volunteers are greatly appreciated and needed for any amount of time they can afford and for sharing their knowledge of their life skills with the youth. If you’re concerned about the cost of 4-H, Bennett says, “A $1 joining fee covers the entire year and the most you would ever pay would be $25 for a special programs fee, unless it’s an overnight stay, which would cost a little more.” Bennett adds, “It is possible to participate in clubs all year and pay no more than the $1 fee.” Currently there are sixty-seven 4-H groups in Florida with about 230,000 youth involved. Here in Madison County, if you’re interested in learning more about 4-H and its clubs, you can go online to madison.ifas.u.edu email Becky Bennett at bvbennett@u.edu or call her ofce at 850-973-4138. A new 4-H year is about to kick off on September 1 that will run through August 31 and will include a year’s worth of new clubs, activities, workshops and competitions. If you’re looking for extra activities for you or your children, consider 4-H where today’s youth and adults can have a fun, hands-on partnership while learning relevant andThe Madison County Farm Bureau is once again accepting nominations for the George Townsend Good Neighbor Award. This award was named after Mr. George Townsend, who exemplied generosity and a kind and loving spirit to everyone. He was truly a good neighbor with everyone he came in contact with. The deadline to nominate a resident of Madison County, for this prestigious award, is Aug. 30. There is no set length required for the nomination letter, so one can write as much as they want to about their nominee. Please drop your letter off at the local Madison County Farm Bureau ofce, or mail it to 233 West Base Street Madison, FL 32340. The winner will be announced at the annual Farm Bureau meeting and dinner, which will be held on September 17 at the Madison County Central School, at 6:30 p.m. August 24 The Hamburg-Lovett Volunteer Fire Department will hold its annual peanut boil Saturday, Aug. 24, beginning at 5 p.m. at the Hamburg-Lovett VFD Fire Station on Highway 150 North, between Madison and Greenville. August 28 Tobacco Free Madison Partnership Meeting Wednesday, Aug. 28, at 3:30 p.m. at Madison County Central School Media Center. For more information, call (850) 973-5000, ext. 120. September 7 The Florida National Guard 868th Engineering Company will host an open house on Saturday, Sept. 7, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the National Guard Armory, located at 1416 SW 11th Street in Live Oak. Meet WWE Superstar Ted DiBiase from 1-3 p.m. For more information, contact local recruiter, SSG Amana NesSmith at (386) 438-3968. November 1 Members of the Madison High School Class of 1973 are planning a class reunion to be held December 27-29, 2013. The committee is asking that all class members please contact one of the persons listed below to express your interest in participating in the reunion and receive further information. The registration deadline is November 1, 2013. To register, or for more information, please contact: Mary Frances Mauldin, mauldinm73@gmail.com ; Sharon James Postell, goldenlife59@gmail.com (850) 9736200; Renetta Warren Parrish, renetta.parrish@yahoo.com (850) 464-0610; or Fagarie Wormack,fwormack@yahoo.com. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 4A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Community Calendar Elon CryerElon “Elaine” Cryer, 88 of Lee, Fla. passed away at her home on Aug. 14, 2013. She was one of 11 children born to Odie Bishop Beckner and Maggie Beckner in Celina, Texas. She married Walter E. Cryer on Dec. 7, 1946 and was married to him for 65 years before his death in 2012. She worked for State Farm Insurance in Dallas, Texas for 15 years before moving to Lee to pursue another business in 1971. Mr. and Mrs. Cryer ran Cryer Kennels for 40 years. She is survived by one daughter, Jan Roach and husband Glenn of Lee; two grand-daughters, Stacey Hyytiainen and husband Mika of Bedford, Texas; Katie Roach of Lee; one great-grand-dog, Ginger; one great-grandchild, Hope Hyytiainen of Bedford; and many dear cousins, nephews, nieces and friends. Her husband Walter and son Jamie, preceded her in death, as well as her parents, three brothers and seven sisters. A memorial service will be held in Texas at a later date. In lieu of owers, please contact Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308 or their web address, bigbendhospice.org.Did You Know?lemons contain more sugar than strawberries. Obituary Nominations Being Accepted For The George Townsend Good Neighbor Award Todays 4-H Teaches Valuable Life Skills Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 16, 2013Becky Bennett, one of the three Extension Agents in Madison County who, helps todays youth learn life skills through fun and education. HEY! WE’RE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]It’s never been easier to share your local news with friends and family!

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.As the song says, the times they are a-changing, especially in the world of education. Madison County School Superintendent, Doug Brown visited the Rotary Club to talk about some of the profound shifts in education and what it means as far as what exactly is coming down the pike for Madison County’s schools. The sheer volume of information available just a few decades ago was stagg ering, when one observer noted that the amount of information printed on the front page of the Sunday New York Times was more than the average person living in the 1800s would have had access to in his entire lifetime. The arrival of the computer age multiplied that information access exponentially, and the technology that has evolved in the last few years, particularly the computer, has changed education in ways no one could even imagine 20 or 30 years ago. The big desktop monitors with separate hard drives the size of footlockers morphed into smaller, fully integrated laptop/notebook computers, which then morphed into even smaller tablets, smart phones, and other handheld “smart” devices with wireless internet capability. Today, there is hardly a teenager anywhere who would be caught dead without one of these smart devices attached to his/her hand. There is the social media aspect, of course, but the now almost innite access to vast stores of information is something unparalleled in actual history and only barely hinted at in science ction TV shows of 40 or 50 years ago. Today, one needs only to Google something he or she wants to know about, and multiple answers appear onscreen in a split second, a speed that leaves even television’s Mr. Spock and the U.S.S. Enterprise’s onboard computer in the dust. This change, allowing such rapid access to innite amounts of information, has shifted the student/teacher dynamic in modern education. Before, the student’s learning of a subject depended almost entirely on the teacher’s depth of knowledge of said subject and ability to effectively share that knowledge. Now, the teacher is more of a facilitator in the student’s search for knowledge. This does not mean the teacher has become unimportant, Brown explained, only that the role has shifted. An instructor’s in-depth knowledge of the subject at hand is still paramount, because most students may still need guidance in understanding, assimilating and putting information into context. Another aspect of education that was virtually unknown 30 years ago is virtual instruction and the virtual classroom. Now, all Florida public high school students will be required to take at least one online course before graduating, so that they will be familiar with how the process works and prepared for online learning demands in their future, demands that may even be required by their jobs. Home schooling, a movement that was primarily groups of parents teaching their children what they knew of various subjects when it rst started, is more and more becoming an online venture. Another major shift in education has come about because our understanding of how the human brain works has changed signicantly over the decades, leading to more and more individualized instruction and changing the basic look of today’s classroom. The straight lines and rows of desks squarely facing the front, where a teacher stood before the blackboard are mostly gone. Walk into any classroom today, and you’ll see multiple groups of children engaged in different learning activities. One group may be on their computers engaged in online learning, another group may be working on a project, and another may be gathered in a circle around the teacher, who is helping them with personalized instruction plans. Preparing students for the job market of the future has become something of a moving target, and a bigger challenge than ever. “We’ve become a ‘free agent nation,’” said Brown, with many high school students preparing for jobs that don’t even exist yet, and a signicant number of today’s work force employed in jobs that did not exist when they were in high school. Another challenge to education is that the country has become deeply divided, in a global society where competing ideas collide with each other. Students need to learn how to look at these competing ideas critically and how to judge reams of information for accuracy or possible bias; for instance, by looking at sources of that information. But the most immediate change in the near future is the new “Common Core” State Standards Initiative. Contrary to the impression many people have of Common Core, it is not a federally-run program, but an initiative that began at the state level, with the Association of State Governors agreeing that there needed to be a single set of uniform educational standards that did not vary from one state to another, because people are so mobile in modern society. They may grow up and attend schools in several different states, and work in several different more. Common Core is a program that seeks to bring consistency to state education curriculums, and each state can opt in or opt out; so far, 45 states, including Florida, have adopted the Common Core Standards. Common Core’s mission is to provide consistent standards across state borders, so that there is a clear understanding of what students are expected to learn at each grade level, in math and English language arts. The standards needed to be robust enough to be challenging, and perhaps more importantly, relevant to the modern world, so that students are prepared to succeed in the media-saturated 21st society, where skills such as critical thinking and problem solving will be crucial. Critical thinking, creativity and collaborative effort – learning to work with others on projects are all part of the Common Core curriculum, but the traditional “three Rs” (reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmatic) are also included. For a complete and thorough explanation of the academic skills expected of students at each level, visit the website www.commoncore.org The one drawback that Brown sees with the Common Core program is that it seems to perpetuate the highstakes testing environment that plagues Florida’s schools and teachers today. “I have an issue with that,” he said. “But I don’t discount the idea of accountability completely.” Another challenge Madison Schools are facing this year is the new FCAT standards that have left some of its schools with ‘D’ and ‘F’ grades. “It is what it is,” he said. “And my job is to turn it around. I’m going to go out on a limb and guarantee that there will be no ‘D’ or ‘F’ schools next year. I can’t go to my job thinking it’s okay to have a ‘D’ or ‘F’ school.” And there are positives for Madison next year, with two new public charter schools opening: the James Madison Preparatory High School, accepting its rst class of STEMfocused ninth graders (and then adding a grade each year until it is a full-edged high school, and the New Millenium School, an elementary school that will be opening soon near Greenville. Finally, perhaps biggest and best positive in the near future is the renovation of the 32-year-old Madison County High School building, made possible by a grant. It is a renovation sorely needed, both to update the aging facility to meet new technological demands and to correct several problems with the original design. For instance, at roofs on large buildings just don’t work well in Florida; too much rain. Water collecting on the roof and causing leaks has been a problem there for years. Another example, the ceramic pipelines at the school were installed in soil that has proved too corrosive over time, and have needed numerous repairs. They will be replaced in the renovation process. “We’ve got a lot of issues to deal with,” he said. But if there are some challenges, there are also positives, too, if everyone is willing to work together. It will be an interesting year, especially now that school has started, and the curtain rises on the year ahead. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013Madison County Carrier € 5A AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Congressional ReviewThe Republican-led House passed a series of bills to rein in what Republicans say is an IRS gone wild. The bills go next to the Democratled Senate where the bills are expected to receive a rocky reception. Reining in the IRS: The House passed the Stop Government Abuse Act, a bill to “guard families and small business owners against needless government harassment.” The vote was 232-183, along party lines. The Controversy: House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) released this statement: “This kind of bill shouldn’t be necessary, but in an era when the president’s IRS is targeting Americans for their political beliefs and government agencies are choking small businesses with red tape, Congress needs to act. (H.R.2879) Taxpayer ‘Bill of Rights’: The House passed a measure that would put constraints on the IRS and give taxpayers the right to appeal; to be informed, assisted and heard; and to be provided with privacy, confidentiality and representation. (H.R.2768) IRS Conference Spending: The House passed a measure to impose a moratorium on conferences held by the IRS in light of an audit revealing excessive spending on such events. The Controversy: An Inspector General’s report shows that a division of the IRS held a conference for an estimated 2,609 employees that cost taxpayers $4.1 million. The IRS spent $64,000 on gifts, $135,000 on event speakers and $50,000 on training videos, including a “Star Trek” parody, the report states. (H.R. 2769) Stop Targeting Our Politics IRS Act: The House passed a bill that would expand the list of legal reasons to fire an IRS worker to include political actions. The Controversy: The bill is largely a response to the IRS’s recent acknowledgement that it targeted conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status. The scandal led to a wave of outrage, with Republican lawmakers charging that those responsible were not adequately punished. Democrats and the President say the issue has been identified and addressed, and it is time to move on. (H.R. 2565) Federal Stafford Loans: The House approved a Senate bill that would allow interest rates on student loans to move with the financial markets. The bill now goes to President Obama for a signature. The Controversy: The bill is expected to raise billions of dollars each year. Some say the government should not profit from those seeking higher education. (H.R.1911) Regulations for the EPA: The House passed a bill that would require the EPA to submit a cost estimate report for any new rule, and a description of the resulting effects on employment and the economy. The bill goes next to the Senate. (H.R. 1582) Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act: The House rejected a measure that would increase accountability for and transparency in the federal regulatory process by requiring Congress to approve all new major regulations. (H.R.367) Nuclear Prevention Act : The House passed a bill to impose tighter sanctions on the Iran, cutting its oil exports to hinder the “flow of funds” to its nuclear program. (H.R.85) Transportation $109 Billion Worth of Spending Stalls in Both Chambers: Party leaders in the House decided not to bring the transportation bill to the floor, and GOP members in the Senate blocked the bill. Congress has sent none of the 12 appropriations bills to a conference committee, setting the stage for another continuing resolution to keep the government funded in the next fiscal year. The Controversy: Most Republicans were pushing to include a mandate for approval of the Keystone XL pipeline. Most Democrats rejected the mandate, and President Obama vowed to veto the bill if such language was included. Senate Confirmations : The Senate confirmed Samantha Power to be the U.S. representative to the United Nations. Superintendent Doug Brown: Changes Are ComingGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Noris, August 7, 2013Madison County School Superintendent Doug Brown discusses changes in store for Madison's public schools.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 6A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Justin ForehandCapital City Bank welcomes Justin Forehand as our new president for Jefferson and Madison counties.With more than 21 years of banking experience, Justin will lead the team of local bankers youve come to know and trust. Your bankers continue to be dedicated to meeting your “nancial needs and helping you reach your “nancial goals.850.342.2500 www.ccbg.com Tom Graham: Turning 90 In StyleTom Graham celebrated his 90th birthday Saturday, August 10, with an Irish-American military-themed party at the United Methodis t Cooperative Ministries Building. About 90 friends and family gathered to help him celebrate with cake and refreshments. A good time was had b y all...especially Tom!Photo submittedTom Graham gathers with his daughter, granddaughters, and great-granddaughters. (Left to right) Christina Graham, Cookie Graham, Cameron Holmes, Stephanie Holmes, Brandy Graham, Alyssa Graham, Mandy Mauldin, Tom, Amberlea Graham, Laurel Graham (hidden behind balloon) and Liz Graham.Photo submittedSons, grandsons and great-grandsons gather around the guest of honor. (Left to right) Joe Graham, Chris Graham, Todd Holmes, Tom Graham, Jim Graham and Bobby Graham. Standing in front, is Tag Graham. By Ana Kincaid Relish Contributor Any way you add it up, potato chips are America’s favorite snack food. We enjoy them during a televised football game, at holiday get-togethers, with a late night movie or along side our lunchtime sandwich. This great snack was rst made popular when two very different men had a disagreement and, as a result, created America’s favorite fun food. In 1853, wealthy Americans often vacationed in upstate New York at the Moon Lake Lodge in Saratoga Springs. Among the guests present that season was Cornelius Vanderbilt, a leading millionaire nancier of his day, who was known to be exacting in both the boardroom and the dining room. Equally exacting in his kitchen was the lodge’s chef George Crum, a Native American and former jockey. One evening at the lodge, Vanderbilt ordered sliced potatoes with his dinner. His reaction to the dish changed American culinary history: The potatoes were cut too thick! Because Vanderbilt was used to having things the way he wanted, he sent them back to the kitchen. Chef Crum was furious at having his potatoes returned with directions to re-cut them. The chef picked up his sharpest knife and decided to slice them so thin that Vanderbilt could read the newspaper through them. Then he fried them very crisp, added salt and brought them out to the table himself. Vanderbilt, on tasting the second dish, declared them outstanding and ate them all. Crum named the new treat “Saratoga Chips” to honor their city of their creation. By the 1920s, potatoes prepared this way were called “potato chips” and were marketed nationally. Spinach-Feta Dip Try serving this lightened, but still avoreful, version of a classic spinch dip with potato chips. 3/4cup fat-free sour cream 1/2 cup 2 percent reduced-fat cottage cheese 1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry 2 green onions, thinly sliced 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1/4 teaspoon coarse salt 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese 1. Place sour cream and cottage cheese in bowl of a food processor; process until smooth. Add spinach, green onions, lemon juice, salt and pepper; process to combine. Add feta and pulse just until combined. Transfer to bowl. Cover and refrigerate at least one hour. Makes two cups; serves eight.History of Potato Chips

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013Madison County Carrier € 7A Submitted by ACA Aucilla Christian Academy's girls' varsity basketball team attended their seventh summer basketball camp at the University of Florida, June 28-29, 2013. Twelve varsity, junior varsity and middle school players attended camp with Head Coach Daryl Adams, Assistant Coaches Amanda Sapp and Shaina Mattingly, and ACA Middle School Coach James Burkett. Players included: Dena Bishop, Cali Burkett, Morgan Cline, Lauren Demott, Marissa Duber, Maddie Everett, Camryn Grant, Ashley Hebert, Brittney Hughes, Kayla Knecht, Kinzi Mattingly and Whitney Stevens. ACA played a total of six games and was one of the few 1A teams among the 4A and 5A schools at UF. "Teambuilding was our main focus at camp," said Coach Daryl Adams. "We improved our performance with every game, and the girls are continuing to understand that basketball takes a lot of work to succeed." Ten middle school, junior varsity and varsity boys' basketball players attended Valdosta State University's instructional basketball camp June 17-21, 2013, to further develop their fundamentals. This was the team's fourth year at VSU. ACA players included: Zack Arcensaux, Nathan Green, Ricky Finlayson, Timothy Finlayson, Jim Flournoy III, John Flournoy, Nathan Green, Carson Nennstiel, Gatlin Nennstiel and Steven Trest. "Our team has improved from last year," said ACA Varsity Head Coach Dan Nennstiel. "They're more competitive this year. The boys played well over the summer, and we enjoyed opening the gym on Thursday nights at ACA for alumni and parents to play with their sons and daughters." Thirteen ACA players also participated in Tallahassee Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) basketball tournaments with Coaches Richard Finlayson and Dan Nennstiel. This was their second year participating in AAU. Players included: Zack Arcensaux, Casey Demott, Ricky Finlayson, Timothy Finlayson, Jim Flournoy III, John Flournoy, Brandon Holm, Eric Hutsell, Ryan Jackson, Braden Mattingly, Carson Nennstiel, Gatlin Nennstiel and D.J. Wilkinson. SPORTS BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252 ACA Varsity Football Schedule*Kickoff 7:00 p.m. unless noted Aug. 23 Jamboree (W. Gadsden & Freeport) @ Corey Field Quincy Aug. 30 @ Branford High School in Branford (Kickoff 7:30 p.m.) Sept. 6 Oak Hall School Sept. 13 St. Joseph Academy Sept. 20 John Paul II Catholic High School Sept. 27 @ St. Francis Catholic High School in Gainesville Oct. 4 @ Robert F. Munroe Day School in Quincy (Kickoff 7:30 p.m.) Oct. 11 Open Oct. 18 @ Bishop John J. Synder High School in Jacksonville Oct. 26 @ Baconton Community Charter School in Baconton, GA Nov. 1 Rocky Bayou Christian School Nov. 8 Homecoming: Temple Christian Academy JV Warriors Roster And ScheduleFran Hunt ECB PublishingThe schedule and the tentative roster for the Aucilla Christian Academy junior varsity Warriors has been released. Gridiron action begins on August 29, against Sherwood Christian, at 6 p.m., away; and continues against FAMU on September 5 at 6 p.m., home; North Florida Christian on September 12 at 6 p.m., away; Sherwood Christian on September 19 at 6 p.m., home; Governors Charter on September 26 at 6 p.m., home; Governors Charter on October 3 at 6 p.m., home; and wrapping up the season is Robert F. Munroe on October 8 at 6 p.m., home. The tentative roster includes; ninth graders, John Walker, center; Darren Ellis, tight end; Logan Register, offensive line, line backer; and Joe Hannon, running back/linebacker/quarterback; eighth graders, Joe Walton quarterback; Logan Boyer, offensive line; Jake Pridgeon, offensive line; Stewart Dalzell, wide receiver/cornerback;, Jacob Dukes, wide receiver/cornerback; and Hunter Key, running back; seventh graders, Evan Courtney, offensive line/defensive line; Ian Hutsell, wide receiver/cornerback; Ayush Patel, offensive line/defensive line; Andrew Burrus, wide receiver/defensive back; and sixth graders, Joshua Eades, offensive line/defensive line; Austin Hebert, wide receiver/defensive back; Brandon Hannon, wide receiver/defensive back; and Jamieson Dalzell, wide receiver/defensive back.. Coaching the JV Warriors is Daryl Adams. Madison County High School Cowboy Varsity Football Schedule 2013August 23 Kickoff Classic vs. Suwannee: Home @ 7:30 p.m. August 30 Tampa Catholic: Away @ 7:00 p.m. September 6 Eastern Christian Academy: Home @ 7:30 p.m. September 13 Gainesville: Away @ 7:30 p.m. September 20 Trinity: Home @ 7:30 p.m. September 27 Pace: Home @ 7:30 p.m. October 4 Taylor: Away @ 7:30 p.m. October 11 True Institute (Ga.) Pending*: Home @ 7:30 p.m. October 18 Fort White: Away @ 7:30 p.m. October 25 Deland: Away @ 7:30 p.m. November 1 Fernandina Beach: HOMECOMING @ 7:30 p.m. November 8 OPEN November 15 PLAY OFFS BEGIN Madison County High School J.V. Football Schedule 2013August 29: Away vs. Wakulla @ 7 p.m. September 4: Away vs. Columbia @ 7 p.m. September 12: Home vs. Suwannee @ 7 p.m. September 19 : Home vs. Baker County @ 6 p.m. September 26: Away vs. Pelham @ 5:30 p.m. October 3: Away vs. Taylor County @ 7 p.m. October 10: Home vs. Columbia @ 7 p.m. October 17: Home vs. Wakulla @ 7 p.m. Madison County Central School Bronco Football 2013August 27: Home vs. Baker @ 7 p.m. September 5: Home vs. Lake City Middle @ 7 p.m. September 10: Away vs. Wakulla @ 7 p.m. September 19: Away vs. Richardson @ 7 p.m. September 26 : Home vs. Taylor @ 7 p.m. October 2 : Home vs. Hamilton @ 7 p.m. October 15: Away vs. Suwannee @ 7 p.m. October 22: Florida Star Championship @ TBA ACA Basketball Players Attend Camps & AAU TournamentsPhoto SubmittedLeft to right: Asst. Coach Shaina Mattingly, Camryn Grant, Dena Bishop, Asst. Coach Amanda Sapp, Ashley Hebert, Maddie Everett, Kinzi Mattingly, Kayla Knecht, Morgan Cline, MS Coach James Burkett, Whitney Stevens, Brittney Hughes, ACA Head Coach Daryl Adams, Marissa Duber, Cali Burkett and Lauren Demott.

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Madison County now has a second option for parents and their highschool-aged children. James Madison Preparatory High School will open this year as a Public Charter School. Being a charter school means that they will be independent of the county school board and will have more freedom to be innovative with their student’s curriculum. However, being a public school, they will still be held accountable to state and federal academic standards. Margaret Ann Bunch, a board member for JMPHS, wants to clarify to the community that the new high school is a tuition-free public school and open to every student who wishes to enroll. She stated, “James Madison Preparatory is an option for kids who are on track to go straight into college.” The school will be different for Madison County in that it will focus on STEM education. S.T.E.M. is an acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. S.T.E.M. schools are emerging across the country as a means for allowing students to gain an advantage in occupations that are reported to be growing 70 percent faster than other occupations. This doesn’t mean that these four subjects will be the only ones taught at JMPHS, but that the subjects of science, technology, engineering and math will be interwoven with the additional curriculum. The school presented the community an opportunity to see physical changes made to the old Primary and Excel school buildings and to ask questions this past Monday evening with an open house. Board members and staff were on hand to speak with parents, grandparents and students about the school. Attitudes of school staff and its supporters were enthusiastic and feedback given by the community was positive. Bunch says there are a few remaining spots for the inaugural class of 9th grade. If you are interested or need further information you can either speak with Bill Gemmill, the school’s principal at the school, 176 NW Crane Avenue in Madison, or visit their website at JMPHS.org www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 8A € Madison County Carrier SCHOOL MCHS Holds Open HouseBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.Several days before the rst day of school, a steady stream of cars were turning in at the Madison County High School, and the parking areas were already pretty full. It was a few minutes before the Aug. 13 Open House was scheduled to begin. In the cafeteria, Principal Ben Killingsworth had just nished up a welcome-andorientation session for incoming ninth graders and their parents. The rest of the evening, parents and students toured the halls and classrooms, meeting and greeting their children’s teachers and talking to them about what to expect for the coming year.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 13, 2013No, its not the “rst day of school, but the halls are still “lled...with students and parents visiting during MCHSs Open House. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 13, 2013Honors English teacher, Glyndell Presley (center, facing front) goes over the syllabus and talks about some of the books students will be reading this year.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 13, 2013Band director Geoff Hill (far right) talks to incoming student Hank Thomas and his mother, Betsy Rykard. Hank will be in the MCHS Marching Band and the Concert Band.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 13, 2013In the cafeteria, MCHS Principal Ben Killingsworth (background, facing camera) makes sure parents and students get the information they need. Madison County Gets Second Option For High School Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 12, 2013James Madison Preparatory High School opens 2013 with the inaugural class of 9th grade.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 12, 2013English, Critical Thinking and Human Geography teacher, Lauri Sellers.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 12, 2013Posing for Carrier camera were Cat, J.P., and Claire Maultsby while attending the open house.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 12, 2013supporters of JMPHS attending the open house, are pictured left to right, Jackie and Kin Johnson, and Bailey and Ethel Barefoot.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013Madison County Carrier € 9ASCHOOL Ali Parks Receives Junior Auxillary ScholarshipThe Junior Auxiliary of Madison County Florida would like to congratulate Ali Parks on being the recipient of the chapter scholarship this year. Ali graduated from Madison County High School and will be pursuing her education at NFCC to become a Nurse. Photo Submitted Back To School Word Search CHEERLEADING COWBOYS FOOTBALL FRESHMEN GRADUATION JUNIORS MADISON SCHOOL SENIORS SOPHOMORES Pictured left to right: Ali Park with Chapter President Lori Newman.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . .10A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, August 21, 2013 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 8/19/2013 THROUGH 8/25/2013 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell) run, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ”ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves, buttons around neck with circular cut-out on back, beautiful gown $100. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250. Size 10 Teen Dress bright baby blue dress, halter top bodice with sequins stitched throughout; built-in crinoline with sequin appliques on lace overlay. Cinderella looking beautiful dress! $200.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 and leave a message.3/3, run, n/c Deadline for Classieds Every Monday and Wednesday 3:00 p.m. Of“ce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-41417/18 rtn n/c New “ve bedroom three bath doublewide home must go now. Make offer. Selling below cost! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cYes we take trades! Replace your old home with a more ef“cient and much stronger safer home now. Call 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNow is the best time to buy a new mobile home! Low rates means new homes under $400 month! 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cStop throwing money away! Our new homes cost less than $100 month to heat and cool! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNice triplewide, “replace, glamour bath, sliding glass doors, new metal roof. Must sell now. Reduced to only $22,900 cash. 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cBlow out pricing on all 2012 mobile homes. Making room for new 2013 homes. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2013 Homes of Merit tape and texture starting at $375 per month. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cUsed single wide 16x80 3 bedroom 2 bath home ready to go at $15,900. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2006 Fleetwood home. Super clean and looks brand new. Call Mike at 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cNew and used homes starting as low as $6,500 on doublewides. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age 18yr. Day and evening classes. 386-362-10658/7 8/28, pdAdvertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper of“ce is seeking an outstanding individual to join or sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-do-attitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Inc s newspaper of“ce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.8/2 rtn, n/c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cMan of many trades and talents available for hire. Honest, reliable, creative, and reasonable/fair pricing. Specializes in custom deck building, sheds, fencing, special projects. Can also do pressure washing, and gardening (tree trimmings, ”ower beds, grooming seasonal shrubs and trees etc.) If interested, please Call John at 850-673-9192. References available.5/1 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com7/10 rtn, cGift Shop Close Out Sale Sparks Tractor Company All John Deere merchandise 50% off starting July 1st August 30th. Layaway available. Regular business hours are Monday Friday from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. (850) 973-3355.7/17 8/28, cDRIVER NEEDED CDL required. Call Grubbs Petroleum. (850) 997-5632.7/24 rtn, c3 BD 2 BA Mobile Home for Sale Completely re-modeled. New roof, wall, air conditioner, plus many others. Located off of Hwy 53. Will “nance up to 20 years. $59,500.00 Call for appointment. (386) 792-2532 or (850) 929-4707. Palmetto Holdings. 8/7 8/28, cFor Sale 5 Acres of Land in Lee, Fl. Lots of Beautiful Trees, Excellent Drainage. Property Located On a Dead End Rd. Very Secure Lot. Driveway with Culvert. Property Located Next to 178 NE Carnation Way, Lee, Fl. 32059. Asking $45,000. Call (941) 629-3675.8/7 8/28, pd For Sale 2006 Expedition; Eddie Bauer; White Very nice family car in very good condition. $8,500 OBO. Call (850) 464-1230 for more information.Town of Greenville Temporary Part-Time Town Superintendent The Town of Greenville (pop 837) is seeking a highly motivated and quali“ed individual to serve approximately “fteen to twenty hours per week, as needed, for the position of Part-Time Town Superintendent. The Town Superintendent is designated as a Charter Of“cer under the current Town of Greenville Charter and serves at the pleasure of the “ve-member Town Council. The position is responsible for directing and supervising the administration of all current departments of the Town except the Town Clerk and Town Attorney. The Town Superintendent shall attend all Council meetings unless excused by Council and shall have the right to take part in discussions, but not vote. The Town Superintendent shall see that all laws, Charter provisions, ordinances, resolutions, and other acts of the Council subject to enforcement by the Town Superintendent are faithfully executed. The Town Superintendent shall also prepare and submit the annual Town budget, budget message, and capital program to Council, and shall keep the Council fully advised as to the “nancial condition and future needs of the Town, and shall make such recommendations to the Council concerning the affairs of the Town as he/she deems desirable. The individual must posses a high school diploma or higher and experience in budget and human resources. Excellent communication and management skills are essential. Local government experience is desired but not required. Must pass full background check, must be bondable, and must pass drug test. Compensation may be in the form of a contract or salary and will be negotiable depending upon quali“cations. Funding for the position is subject to annual budget considerations by Town Council. Position open until 12:00 pm, Friday, August 23, 2013 Candidates may be interviewed by a Screening Committee and/or Town Council, with “nal selection made by Town Council. Submit resume and three references to: Town Clerk, Town of Greenville, 154 SW Old Mission Avenue,P.O. Box 235, Greenville, FL 32331. The Town of Greenville is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Af“rmative Action/Equal Opportunity Housing/Section 504 Employer.8/9 8/21, cAsphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.8/14 rtn, n/c EMPLOYMENT The Aucilla Area Solid Waste Facility is accepting applications for a Land“ll Equipment Operator/Spotter. Duties include operating several pieces of light equipment though out the work day, spotting loads of garbage when emptied, and routine maintenance of equipment. Applications can be picked up at the Land“ll of“ce between the hours of 8:00 am and 4:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday, at 1313 S.W. Greenville Hills Road Greenville, Florida. Applications will be accepted until the position is “lled. Aucilla Area Solid Waste Facility is an equal opportunity employer and a Drug Free Workplace. If you have any question please contact 850-948-4875.8/16, 8/21, cLittle Pine Pediatrics is now accepting applications for a clerical position in the Madison of“ce Requirements for the position: must have High School Diploma, basic computer skills, work well with children and very personable.8/21, c 3 BD Trailer For Rent Water furnished. No calls after 8 p.m. (850) 973-6735.8/21, pd Mechanic Utility equipment “eld service tech. (Bucket truck and diggers etc). Must have drivers license, CDL a plus. Must be able to work overtime and pass a drug test. Pay is by experience. (904) 751-6020.8/21, 8/28, pd Diesel Shop Mechanic Needed Must have at least 3 years experience, welding is a plus. Contact M.C. LOGGING (850) 973-4410 or (850) 672-0108.8/21, 8/28, pd Adoption ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888) 986-1520 or text (347) 406-1924; www.davidandregisadopt.com-Adam B. Sklar FL# 0150789. Auctions Public Auction Online & Onsite August 27 @ 10am Preview: 08/26 10-4pm 7575 NW 70 Street, Miami, Fl 33166 Cigarette & Tobacco Manufacturing / Packaging Equipment, Forklifts, Unprinted Paper & Foil, Tools, Racking, Servers, Electronics & Accessories. 15% -18%BP Bankruptcy Vehicles: 2007 Nissan Altima 2.5 S & 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan SE 10% 13% BP (Case #13-12543 / Case #13-18780) Visit www.moeckerauctions.com for Details, Photos and Catalog Moecker Auctions (800) 840-BIDS $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to con“rm. AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin Education MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Of“ce Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-374-7294. Help Wanted DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. National Certi“cations. VA Bene“ts Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here … Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Real Estate/ Mobile Homes Mobile Homes with land. Ready to move in. Owner “nancing with approved credit. 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473. LandHomesExpress.com. 2 BD 1 BA Trailer (850) 869-0916.8/21 rtn, c 4 Bedroom 2 Bath Trailer For Rent Call (850) 869-0916 for more information.8/21 rtn, c 200 9 Hometown ContentSudoku Puzzle #2991-MMedium1 234 3526 75 6 135 7589 5972 2 1 8435 7598

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013Madison County Carrier 11A ----Legals---IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 40-2012-CA-000354 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. DARLENE FUQUA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DARLENE FUQUA; MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. / NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 16, 2013, and entered in Case No. 40-2012-CA-000354, of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for MADISON County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and DARLENE FUQUA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DARLENE FUQUA; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 125 SW RANGE AVE, MADISON IN MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA 32340, at 11:00 A.M., on the 28th day of August, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 EAST, FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING AND RUN NORTH 444.17 FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 55, AS SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY IS NOW LOCATED, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF APPROXIMATELY 490 FEET, TO A POINT OF 188.06 FEET WEST OF SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN EAST 188.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING A PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 EAST, IN MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must “le a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 23rd day of July, 2013. TIM SANDERS As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Ramona Dickinson As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 145 N. Hernando, Rm. 408, Lake City, FL 32055, Phone No. (386)758-2163 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com File No.: 12-07186 JPMC8/14, 8/21 The following is a list of unclaimed bond money held by the Madison County Sheriffs Of“ce. Persons having or claiming any interest in said funds or any portion of them shall “le their written claim with the Sheriff or Clerk of Court and shall make suf“cient proof to said Sheriff or Clerk of his ownership and upon so doing shall be entitled to received any part of the money so claimed. Unless such bond money is claimed on or before the “rst day of September, 2012, same shall be declared forfeited and all claims in reference thereto are forever barred. DEFENDANT DATE POSTED AMOUNT POSTED KAREN HARRELSON9/7/9930.00 ADRIAN CANDELARIO RODRIGUEZ 12/31/041146.00 MARIO PEREZ A/K/A MIGUEL ROBLERO 4/18/05790.00 LANA ARTHUR9/26/05540.00 TELLAS DETRAIL BARNUM1/13/09390.00 WALLACE MCARTHUR10/20/09390.00 LOUIS RODRIGUEZ3/2/11540.008/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28 REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS RFQ Emergency Management Contractual Services Notice Change Of Date The Madison County Emergency Management will receive sealed quali“cation documents at the Board of County Commissioners, 229 SW Pinkney St., Room 219, Madison, Florida 32340 until Friday, August 30th, 2013 at 12:00 PM Quali“cations received will be publicly opened on Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013 at 12:00 PM for the following: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CONTRACTUAL SERVICES MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA Any quali“cations received after Friday, August 30th, 2013 at 12:00 PM, will be retained at the Emergency Management Of“ce. Emergency Management reserves the right to reject any and all documents received, waive formalities and re-advertise and award the RFQ in the best interest of Madison County. The Board of County Commissioners does not discriminate because of race, creed, color, national origin or handicap status. Anyone wishing to obtain RFQ documents may contact Emergency Management at 850-973-3698. Any questions concerning the RFQ speci“cations should be directed to Tom Cisco. Five (5) sets of quali“cation documents must be submitted and labeled on the outside of the envelope as SEALED RFQ EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CONTRACTUAL SERVICESŽ8/21 LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting for the Executive Committee Members on Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00 A.M. at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Of“ce located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW Live Oak, Florida.8/21 LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a Finance & Audit Committee Meeting on Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 9:30 A.M. at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Of“ce located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida.8/21 SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT PUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application for permit was received on July 12, 2013: Nestle Waters North America, Inc., 690 NE Hawthorn Avenue, Lee, FL 32059, has submitted an application to modify Water Use Permit Number 2-98-00025M4, for beverage processing use, requesting removal of a permit condition requiring in-house bottling of all water. The project is located in Township 1 North, Range 10 East, Section 24, and Township 1 North, Range 11 East, Sections 19 and 20, in Madison County. Interested persons may comment upon the application or submit a written request for a staff report containing proposed agency action regarding the application by writing to the Suwannee River Water Management District, Attn: Resource Management, 9225 C.R. 49, Live Oak, Florida 32060. Such comments or requests must be received by 5:00 PM within 14 days from the date of publication. No further public notice will be provided regarding this application. A copy of the staff report must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceedings. Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an administrative hearing, pursuant to Title 28, Florida Administrative Code, regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a written request after reviewing the staff report.8/21 LEGAL NOTICE MADISON COUNTY TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED COORDINATING BOARD BUSINESS MEETING The North Central Florida Regional Planning Council announces a business meeting to which all persons are invited. DATE AND TIME: September 9, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. PLACE: County Commissioners Meeting Room Madison County Courthouse Annex located at 112 E. Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida GENERAL SUBJECT MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED: To conduct a regular business meeting of the Madison County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board. A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: North Central Florida Regional Planning Council, 2009 NW 67th Place, Gainesville, Florida 32653-1603. Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this public hearing and business meeting is asked to advise the agency at least 2 business days before the meeting by contacting 352.955.2200 If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the agency using the Florida Relay Service, 1.800. 955.8771 (TDD) or 1.800. 955.8770 (Voice). If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at the meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.8/21

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 12A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Girls To Queens: Empowerment For The JourneyBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.The large meeting room at the Madison Senior Center was filled to almost overflowing with young girls, many of them teenagers, some with their families, many with friends. They sat at tables draped in black tablecloths with pink satiny overlays, in chairs covered with the same pink-andblack or pink-andwhite color palette. But this wasn’t just any pink...it was a deep, rich, rosepink, a powerful pink, repeated in the rosepink flower centerpieces and rose-pink square vases, a bold color most fitting for the themes that came up several times during the presentations: Empowerment was one. Validation was the other. There were others as well, including healthy self-esteem, confidence, character, integrity, reputation and relationships, but the concepts of empowerment and validation were at the foundation of the Girls to Queens Event – the idea that each and every girl in the room must be bold enough to make the choices that are best for her, regardless of peer pressure and other negative influences. Equal to empowerment is validation – both the validation that comes from parents and people who love her and rally around her on her journey, as well as the internal validation that comes from within a girl who is able to see that her choices are good, who knows that she is a worthwhile person and who doesn’t have to depend on others to tell her this. The event, hosted by PHAT, Boyz to Kings, Healthy Start, the Chamber of Commerce, Exclusive Hair Salon & Accessories and numerous other community partners, featured a variety of speakers and included several skits to show the young ladies and future queens in the audience how the concepts of empowerment and validation might translate to real-life situations. In one skit, a young girl who is doing well in school, is in a dual enrollment program, and is well on her way to success, turns down the advances of a football star who has a reputation for “playing the field” and has even gotten one girlfriend pregnant and then abandoned her. The girl he is hitting on uses her intelligence and discernment to realize how harmful a relationship with this boy might be. She also has the healthy self-esteem, the boldness and the confidence to explain her own accomplishments and goals as she politely tells him, “I’m sorry, but I just don’t have room for you in my life right now,” a line that brought forth a round of spontaneous applause from the audience; a line that says to all the young girls out there, “Yes, he may be a popular football star and the Big Man On Campus, but guess what? My dreams, my plans and my goals are just as important to me as his are to him, and it’s okay for me to protect those dreams and goals.” Cindy Vees, Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce, spoke about the importance of developing healthy selfesteem in the face of a slew of negative images that can come from social media, movies, fashion magazines, and even friends or family. If all they see when they look in the mirror is that they don’t resemble impossibly perfect images thrown at them by popular culture, or that they’re not a cheerleader or that they hate their hair, then this is always going to cripple their self-esteem. Healthy self-esteem isn’t vanity; it is realizing that the impossibly perfect images are the result of professional makeup artists; that even supermodels can look radically different when they’re caught on camera just going to the grocery store; and that it is very important for young girls to learn to let go of the habit of comparing themselves to others. Self-esteem is learning to like what they see in the mirror; realizing that they have a nice smile or that they actually like the way their hair looks, and especially, learning to say to the “You-have-to-looklike-this-this” popular culture image, “No, I don’t; it’s perfectly okay to look like me.” It is learning to reverse the human tendency to brood constantly on the negative while forgetting all about the positive, whether that means verbally reminding themselves to appreciate the positive things seen in the mirror, keeping a daily journal of all the good things they have accomplished all the positive things that happened (no matter how small), so that they’re not forgotten, deleting the hurtful or negative comments from Facebook and replacing them with positive ones, choosing friends who will build them up rather than tear them down, or realizing that they don’t have to cave in to peer pressure or give in to inappropriate relationships with boys in order to be popular. Deveda Bellamy, speaking on the concept of character and integrity, also mentioned the hurtful tendency of constantly comparing oneself to others. “I don’t know how to be anybody else but Deveda,” she said. “There’s a difference between wanting to be somebody else, and learning to appreciate all the good things about her that inspire you.” Also, in a society where young girls had more choices and more access than ever before, they needed character and integrity to know what was right and what was wrong, to help them make the right decisions for themselves, to realize the importance of keeping their word and earning the trust of others. “When you start this journey, know who you are,” said Bellamy. “Stand up for what’s right.” For example, if they saw someone being bullied, would they be willing to step in and let people know they weren’t cool with that, even if it meant taking a few hits for an unpopular opinion? That was integrity.It meant being aware that they would be negatively judged by other people and receive unwanted attention by dressing inappropriately or provocatively, and that they might have to take a few hits from peer pressure groups for not following all the latest fashion trends. “I once had a pastor who would say, ‘If you’re not selling anything, don’t dress like you’re having a sale,” Bellamy said. Of course, everyone makes mistakes and everyone falls down, but it is not failure if they learn from their mistakes, get up again and keep going, as speaker Vantasia explained. When her original dreams of becoming a nurse were sidelined by an unexpected pregnancy, she picked herself up and started over in another direction, and now runs her own salon. Her dreams had to change, but she learned from her experience. She stood up again and focused on the positives she still had; a fiance who didn’t desert her, a child she regards as a “gift from God,” and future as a wife, mother and entrepreneur. Sandreka Miller told the young ladies about the importance of reputation and how that would affect the way people responded to them, and Denise Robinson brought it all home talking about how all of these things came together to create healthy, nurturing relationships. “There’s wisdom here,” Merv Mattair told the young girls. “There are ladies who have been around a while. They’ve got a message they want to give, to empower you.” They have made the journey, and they know the pitfalls. They can point out the road signs. There are also the young ladies like his own daughter Lyric Mattair, one of the speakers just starting out on her journey, exploring the question of “Who Am I?” As Deveda Bellamy had told the young ladies earlier that evening, all those who are waiting to discover who they are, “Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Don’t be afraid to ask for clarification.” It is quite a journey the future queens have ahead, and it is only just beginning. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 14, 2013.Deveda Bellamy talks about the importance of character and integrity when it comes to making choices in life. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 14, 2013.Cindy Vees, left, discusses the importance of healthy self-esteem and the image in the mirror, with the help of a young volunteer from the audience.



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Wed. August 21, 2013VOL. 50 NO. 3 www.greenepublishing.com 50 cents Index2 Sections, 24 Pages Local Weather Veiwpoints 2A From Page One3A Obituaries 4A Around Madison5-6,12A Sports 7A School 8-9A Classied/Legals10-11A Path of Faith Section B Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports, that for the past several months, the Sheriffs Ofce has received complaints from customers and staff at the Pinetta Post Ofce of an older white male exposing himself to customers and staff as they left the Pinetta Post Ofce. The Sheriffs Ofce Criminal Investigative Unit invested numerous hours conducting covert surveillance in attempt to identify the individual and possibly catch him in the act. On Monday, Aug. 12, Doy Goss Thomas, 65, of 286 NE Pansy Way in Pinetta was arrested and charged with ve counts of lewdness and indecent exposure after Madison County Sheriffs Ofce investigators observed Thomas standing next to his truck in the Pinetta Post Ofce parking area, exposing himself to Pinetta Post Ofce customers as they left the building. Thomas was later identied as the same suspect who exposed himself to ve other victims on ve different dates and times. Doy Goss ThomasF l a s h e r E x p o s e d By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Its almost time to hit the stadium bleachers to cheer on your favorite team. We have the entire season schedules for Madison County Central School, Madison County JV and Varsity High School, and Aucilla Christian Academy JV and Varsity so you wont miss out on any of the games. Go Broncos, Cowboys and Warriors!Football Season Is HereBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Aman was killed near the 265-milepost on Interstate 10 in an automobile accident early Saturday morning, Aug. 17, According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Kejuan J. Haywood, 20, of Jacksonville, was traveling westbound on I-10 in the right travel lane when he lost control of the 2006 Chevrolet Impala he was driving. The Impala left the roadway and onto the north shoulder while rotating clockwise. The car struck several trees with its drivers side before coming to a nal rest against a tree facing southwest on the north shoulder of I-10. Madison County EMS pronounced Haywood dead at the scene. FHP Cpl. E. Hunt was the crash investigator. PHOTOS BY RUSSELLMan Killed In Crash PHOTOS BY RUSSELLBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Awoman struck a re truck that had stopped for another wreck on Saturday morning, Aug. 17. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, the accident occurred on Interstate 10, one mile west of US 221. FHP reported that Lillie Adkins, 20, of Wausau, was eastbound in the left travel lane of the road and that the 2011 Freightliner re truck was facing east with its emergency lights and equipment operation. Madison reghter Brandon Fleming, 26, of Madison, had stopped the re truck in the left travel lane due to another crash in the median thatWoman Strikes Fire Truck With Car Were moving forward with the Community Eligibility Option, said Jan McHargue of the Madison County School Board Administration. The USDA approved the nal inclusion Madison County Excel School in the number of district schools eligible for universal free breakfasts and lunches, based on a percentage of students in that school who are already eligible for free orFree Universal Breakfasts /Lunches ApprovedFor All Except High SchoolBy Lynette Norris Green Publishing, Inc.At their August meeting, the City Commission approved allowing city staff to apply for a $50,000 grant from the Florida Recreation Development Association to build childrens tennis courts at Lanier Field. The City of Madison has no other public tennis court facility for several years; unless those inclined to play tennis were either members of the Madison Country Club, or high school students at Madison County High School, they would be pretty much out of luck. City Commission Approves Grant Application, First Reading Of City OrdinancesAn agreement to allow Lafayette County to dump trash in the Aucilla Area Regional Landfill, as well as a resolution honoring a local pastor and pursuing a grant for a recreation complex at the Methodist Childrens Home are on the agenda for the Wednesday, Aug. 21, Madison County Commission meeting. The agenda, which can be amended is shown below: CONSENT AGENDA Approval of the Preliminary Estimate of the Permanent Population for Madison County to Determine State Revenue Sharing Funds. Approval of Resolution 201308-21 and Agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation for New Road Construction of Genoa Road from SR 53 to Balboa Drive. Approval of Resolution 201308-21A and Agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation for Resurfacing or Reconstruction of CR 146 (NW Little Cat) from SR 53 to CR 150/NW Lovett Road. Budget Amendment Request for Fines and Forfeitures/State Court Facility to Amend for Additional FY 2013 Court Services Personnel. Approval of Sheriffs Department Confiscated Currency Expenditure in the Amount of $6,180.00. Approval of Letter to the Honorable Sheriff Benjamin J. Stewart Regarding Budget. PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 1. UNFINISHED BUSINESS 1. NEW BUSINESS 1. Presentation of the Payment in Lieu of Taxes Check and Presentation on the Minimum Flows and Levels for the Lower Santa Fe and Ichetucknee Rivers and Springs Mr. Jon Dinges, SRWMD. 2. Presentation by Kiwanis Club Concerning Efforts to Seek Grant for Recreation Complex for Methodist Childrens Home Mr. Jim Wylie and Mr. Jerome Wyche. 3. Resolution in Honor of Charles W. Evans, Pastor of Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church Mr. Jerome Wyche. 4. Approval of Name and Lettering for EMS and Dispatch Center County Coordinator. 5. Consideration of Contract Between Aucilla Landfill and Lafayette County to Allow Lafayette County to Dispose of Solid Waste in the Aucilla Landfill County Coordinator and County Attorney.Madison County Commission To Discuss Landll Agreement With Lafayette By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Miraculously, no one was injured as a 2001 Toyota Camry slammed into a tree on Interstate 10 on Saturday night, Aug. 17. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Jeremiah Dade McKinstry, 33, of Gainesville, was westbound on I-10 in the inside lane. McKinstry said that the blue SUV was driving slower in the outside lane and, as he was attempting to pass by the SUV, it changed lanes and applied brakes. When the driver of the SUV applied the brakes, it caused McKinstry to apply his brakes and when he did, he lost control of the vehicle. The Toyota ran off the roadway onto the north shoulder while it rotated clockwise. The car entered the tree line and struck a pine tree, before it came to a nal rest. N o O n e I n j u r e d A s C a r S t r i k e s T r e e Please See Fire Truck On Page 3A Please See Car Vs. Tree On Page 3A Please See Free Lunch On Page 3A Please See Commission On Page 3A See Page 12A

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Unhealthy cholesterol levels increase your risk for heart disease, so keeping yours low is key to a healthier heart. Your diet is central to controlling your cholesterol. Some foods can actually lower your cholesterol, while others only make matters worse. Avoid saturated or trans fats. Foods containing high levels of saturated fats or trans fatssuch as potato chips and packaged cookiescan increase your cholesterol levels much more signicantly than cholesterolcontaining foods such as eggs. Saturated fat and trans fat both increase LDL (bad) cholesterol. Trans fat lowers your levels of HDL (good) cholesterol, which can put you at increased cardiovascular risk. Make smart choices. Choose foods rich in unsaturated fats, ber, and protein. Fruits, vegetables, sh, beans, nuts, and seeds are all great cholesterol regulators. The best foods for lowering cholesterol are oatmeal, sh, walnuts (and other nuts), olive oil, and foods fortied with sterols or stanolssubstances found in plants that help block the absorption of cholesterol. Remember that la- bels can be deceiving. Navigating food labels can often be complicated since packaged foods with labels like cholesterol free or low cholesterol arent necessarily hearthealthy; they might even contain cholesterol thats heart-risky. Stick to basics whenever possible: fruit, veggies, nuts, and lean proteins. Lowering your cho- lesterol with sh or sh oil supplements By adding sh like salmon or herring to your diet twice a week, you can signicantly lower your cholesterol, and thus your risk for heart attack. Fish contain omega-3 fatty acids, which work like superheroes, doing good deeds for your heartand your whole body. Way back yonder, when I was 20 years old, I went ta visit aunt Lilly May n uncle Ar lie. They told me that aunt Lillys sister, Lous, husband, Roy, had passed away with uh heart attack. Aunt Lou never had uh driven license. Lilly said Lou needed some driven lessons n askt if I would teach her. I knew that Lou grew up on uh farm so I gured she already had drove. Lou lived in thuh big city. Roy had just bought uh new Buick before he passed. Lilly n Arlie took me ta Lous house ta ride with Lou to the country where she could practice. When Lou took off, she lurched uh few times but I didnt think much of it. When she pulled onto thuh Interstate, instead of mergn she pulled in thuh middle of thuh interstate n stopped. Cars was screechn to uh stop. I thought we was gonna die. I hollered, GO, GO, GO, GO, GO! When we got in thuh country, we came up on uh railroad. I said, Lou yer sposed ta stop at uh railroad. She did, right on top of thuh railroad. I said, Lou, I meant at, not on, so you could see if uh train is comen, which there might be, so GO,GO GO! We pulled up ta main street in thuh little town n I said, Turn left. She did, not in thuh left lane, in thuh parkn lane on thuh left side of thuh street. I got er ta get in thuh driven lane n we headed outa town. I wanted ta teach her how ta pass so when thuh road was clear I said, Stomp thuh throttle n go in thuh left lane like yer passn another car. She did uh purty good job of that so we went on ta Lilly n Arlies place. It never felt so good ta get outa uh car. Later on in thuh day, Arlie offered ta go with Lou fer uh drive. They came back in uh few minutes n Arlie was shaken n pail. He said, We was riden in thuh country n all thuh sudden Lou oored it n went in thuh other lane. I thought she had uh death wish. We all lived through it n Lou nally got her driven license n became uh purty good driver. Next time I taught somebody ta drive, I started um out in uh pasture in rst gear. Sincerely Yourn Cracola OLustee ( Cracker fer short ) Iwas looking through some old papers in my workshop the other day when I ran across a certificate recognizing my flight in a Zero G trainer. It was July 1967. I was just 19 years old, having finished my first year as an Air Force Academy cadet. I was in southern Ohio at Wright-Patterson AFB with about half my class. We were learning about the research and development activities headquartered at that base. Late in the afternoon, we were offered an opportunity to fly the Zero G aircraft used by the astronauts to train in a weightless environment. I jumped at the chance along with about half a dozen of my classmates. Our aircraft was a modified turboprop C-131, the first Zero G aircraft. It had been superseded by the better performing C-135 turbojet but that wasnt available to us. The difference between the two was the time you were weightless: the C131 period was 15-20 seconds per cycle while the C-135 was double that amount. I say cycle because the pilots flew a parabolic arc through our restricted airspace. As the aircraft gained speed, the pilots pulled back on the flight controls, causing the aircraft to climb. Once we increased speed and began to climb, they pushed the controls forward until we reached Zero G. They held that attitude until we coasted over the top and began to descend. Then theyd pull back on the controls, the G (gravitational pull) would increase, and we would repeat the cycle. Across the sky wed fly, up and down like a sine wave. The cabin of the aircraft was empty and completely padded. When the aircraft went to Zero G, we free-floated. It took a couple of cycles to get used to the effect, and then we started to have fun -like being against the rear bulkhead and pushing off to mimic Superman. Literally you could fly for nearly 40 feet before coming to the other end. One of my fellow testers grabbed me by the wrist and gave it a twist; the result was that I started to spin like a top. One thing you had to get used to was the timing of the period of weightlessness. You didnt want to be at the ceiling when the weightless period ended and the G began to load up. That mistake would send you plummeting to the floor. It may have been padded, but you were still in for a jolt. I made that mistake once and learned how to time the weightless period better. The aircraft had the nickname vomit comet for the tendency of the weightless subjects to get airsick. For whatever reason (probably because I was having the time of my life), that didnt affect me. At about 6 p.m. and after 1520 cycles, the pilots called it off and we headed home to land. Flying a fighter like the F-4, we always had to deal with gravitational pull -positive, negative, and zero. It was really important to strap in very securely to prevent getting thrown around. I was secured to my ejection seat by nine straps and fittings and another three for environmental systems. I strapped in before starting the engines and then once airborne, cinched them down again before beginning heavy maneuvering. We always had to deal with gravitational (G) forces, but the most extreme was during air combat maneuvering (ACM), sometimes referred to as dogfighting. Here, it was also important to make sure all of your equipment (checklists, maps, etc,) were properly stowed away. Getting slapped in the face with a bulky checklist can be disconcerting; trying to find where it went can be difficult there are a lot of nooks and crannies in the confined space of a cockpit for things to hide. Zero G also brought a lot of dust and dirt from the floor of the cockpit; not much you can do about that. Positive G was a common occurrence. The F-4 could comfortably pull 5-6 Gs without bleeding off too much airspeed. In the correct configuration, the airframe was rated up to 8.5 Gs but pulling that hard would really bleed off the airspeed quickly. Modern fighters like the F-16 and F-18 can pull 9 Gs but that takes a lot of practice and stamina on the part of the pilot because that is almost the limit that the human body can withstand. While Zero G is fun, negative G (when youre pushing forward and blood is rushing to your head) is very uncomfortable. You wouldnt want to do that for very long. Here on earth, we are used to one G. Flying introduces additional forces that you simply have to get accustomed to. The weightlessness of space travel is still another complication.www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 14, 2013 2A Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist Jim Dietrich Guest Columnist Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. D i d Y o u K n o w . Zero G The family of Doris Alderman would like to express their appreciation for the prayers, visits, cards, owers and phone calls during her recent illness and the loss of our loved one. We would especially like to thank the staff of Madison County Memorial Hospital and the Family 1st Wellness Center for the wonderful care they provided.Thank YouLetters To The EditorIf you read my column (and I certainly hope that you do), I normally write about foods I have prepared and then share a recipe with you. Today I am asking you for your expertise and recipes. On occasion, I eat out and will experience a food so tasty that I want to go home and recreate it. This morning, running late and not having time for a proper breakfast, I remembered one of those times. I was visiting all my friends back home in Arkansas and on one particular day had traveled several hours to a small town in the country with my friend Karen, who had a speaking engagement. After the meeting, the group was kind enough to feed us lunch and the only item I remember is the hot water cornbread. Im ashamed to say that I have always lived in the South and until then, had only heard of this old time delicacy. I remember biting into the crunchy golden outside of the two-inch patty and then experiencing the almost velvety texture of the center. The avor of the cornbread was simple, but amazing. It was a perfect bite. I had to know what I was eating and when I was told it was cornbread, I was amazed. After doing some research, I was even more amazed, because the ingredients were so few and so basic. There were, however, some variations. Almost all recipes included cornmeal, the backbone of the recipe; some had an addition of our, some added baking powder and all had hot or boiling water. One recipe used only self-rising our and hot water. A few of the recipes used shortening or bacon drippings mixed into the dough. When shaping the cornbread, instructions included two to ve inch patties, oblong patties and long sticks. One website presented possible additions such as onions, garlic, corn, cheese, jalapeno, spices and fresh herbs. All recipes for the cornbread involved frying; oil, shortening and bacon drippings were suggested. Two recipes I looked at suggested a resting period for the dough; one said to allow the dough to cool and the other instructed you to cover the dough so that it could steam. Unfortunately, this research is as close as Ive come to making hot water cornbread. The remainder of my time in Arkansas was spent visiting with other friends and after I returned home, my mind and momentum went elsewhere; the typical out of sight, out of mind condition. So, here is where I need your expertise and help. If you are a master of hot water cornbread and would be willing to share your recipe, I would be grateful and excited to try it. I look forward to cooking with you! Please email your recipes, comments or questions to Rose@greenepublishing.c om.S e e k i n g H o t W a t e r C o r n b r e a d Rose Klein ColumnistFrank NathanExecutive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness TipsSearching For AmbrosiaCracker SezLEARNN AUNT LOU TA DRIVE CallForAFREEConsultation.NoFeesorCostsUntilRecovery TollFree877-997-8181 www.CaminezLaw.com MonticelloOffice1307S.JeffersonSt.850-997-8181 TallahasseeOffice1882CapitalCircleNE,Suite103 JonD.Caminez,BoardCertifiedCivilTrialAttorney ShannonBrown,ParalegalScottL.Wolf,AttorneyBarneyStallworth,Investigator WWW.CAMINEZLAW.COM Thehiringofalawyerisanimportantdecisionthatshouldnotbebasedsolelyuponadvertisements. Beforeyoudecide,askustosendyouwritteninformationaboutourqualificationsandexperiences.AutoAccidents Truck&Tractor TrailerAccidents MotorcycleAccidents WrongfulDeath DefectiveProducts MedicalNegligence/ Malpractice Slip&Fall PremisesLiability NursingHome Negligence Accidents-Injury-DeathCases PracticingPersonalInjuryLawSince1972

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 Madison County Carrier 3AWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Oldest Living Man Is 123 Years OldIn the mountain village of Frasquicia, Bolivia, a herder by the name of Carmelo Flores Laura, is now the oldest living man ever recorded. According to the countrys civil registry, Carmelo is 123 years old and needs no glasses to help him see or cane to assist him in walking. His wife died more than a decade ago, only one of his three children is living, Cecilia (67 years old), and most of his grandchildren and great-grandchildren have moved away. He lives in a straw-roofed hut with a dirt oor and his diet consists of wild grain, foxes, lizards and skunk meat.Swimming And Diving Now Possible With PrimatesIn Johannesburg, Africa, researchers think that swimming and diving; behaviors previously thought absent from apes, may now be possible. Videos observed by the researchers show Cooper, a chimp owned by humans in Missouri, diving repeatedly into a swimming pool. Also viewed was Suryia, an orangutan living in a South Carolina zoo, diving and swimming. Chimps, gorillas and orangutans have been thought unable to dive or swim because zoos have used moats in previous years to conne the primates, who often drowned if they ventured into deep water. However, both primates observed in the videos appeared comfortable in the water and instead of using a dog-paddle stroke used by earthly mammals, they used a frog kick motion to swim, much like the human breast stroke.Zoo Replaces Animals With Household PetsIn the Peoples Park of Luohe, China, a local zoo was found to be replacing more exotic animal species with common animals. A visitor took her son to the zoo to show him the animals and the different sounds they make. The observant child recognized that the lion was barking like a dog. The lion turned out to be a Tibetan Mastiff, a large, longhaired dog breed. Three other species were also housed incorrectly, such as a white fox in a leopards den and a second dog in a wolf pen.Man Tweets For MarijuanaIn Concord, Ontario, a mechanic shop worker was red after searching for marijuana with a Twitter post. Sunith Baheerathan, tweeted that he was at the Mr. Lube in Concord and asked, Any dealers inVaughan wanna make a 20sac chop? Come to Keele/Langstaff Mr. Lube, need a spliff or two to help me last this open to close. The tweet was answered by the York Regional Police saying, Awesome! Can we come too? Police informed Mr. Lube management who addressed the issue with a tweet of their own, Thank you to the York Regional Police for your help and great work. The matter has now been handled. The last tweet on the controversy was from Sunith Baheerathan, Just got the call of termination. Fire Truck Cont. From Page 1A Car Vs. Tree Cont. From Page 1ANeither McKinstry, nor his passengers, Andrea Autumn McKinstry, 24, and Xandar Dade McKinstry, 5, were injured in the crash. FHP Trooper William Harrell was the investigating ofcer. Free Lunch Cont. From Page 1Areduced price lunches. This means that ALL students attending the Madison County Excel School, along with Madison County Central, Greenville Elementary, Lee Elementary, and Pinetta Elementary Schools will receive healthy breakfasts and lunches each day at no charge during the school year 2013 2014, without having to ll out the usual applications. Only Madison County High School students still need the Free and Reduced Price Application in order to qualify, and parents must have that application lled out and turned in to their childs school ofce, by August 30, 2013, or mailed to the Madison County School Board Annex, Food & Nutrition Department, 210 NE Duval Ave., Madison FL, 32340. Again, the deadline is August 30, 2013...and until their completed applications are approved, the students will have to pay full price. Incomplete applications for free or reduced price meals cannot be processed or approved. Parents, please be sure to ll in all the blanks and specify how often income amount is received (weekly or monthly). For help in completing the application, please contact Jan at (850) 973-1540 or Iris at (850) 973-1539. Student breakfast prices for 2013-14 are as follows: Pre-K 8th grade: No charge 9th 12th grade: Full price $1.00, reduced price $.30 Student lunch prices for 2013-14 are: Pre-K 8th grade: No charge 9th 12th grade: Full price $2.05, reduced price $.40 Commission Cont. From Page 1AThe smaller childrens tennis courts would get young children and pre-teens involved in the sport, much like T-ball and Little League get them involved in softball and baseball; the courts could also be adapted for adult use by moving the nets. The Commission also approved a First Reading of Ordinances 2013-2 and 2013-3. These two ordinances would amend the City of Madison Municipal Fireghters Pension Trust Fund and the City of Madison Police Ofcers Retirement Trust Fund, bringing the city into compliance with the Internal Revenue Services regulations. The City also decided to delay action on several other items until its meeting in September: one was a motion to sell the Womans Club building to the Womans Club; the idea had been presented to the city commission by City Manager Tim Bennett at a special budget meeting Aug.1, as a way to cut costs. The city would no longer be responsible for maintenance, and would not have to install a $15,000 sewer line connection. The Commission however, decided to postpone the decision until the September meeting. Another item they decided to take up at their next meeting was whether or not to acquire a piece of property at 107 SE Pineland Avenue. The property would give the city access to one of its wastewater lift stations. The commission did not take any action on the proposed Golf Cart Crossings at several intersections around town. As a cost-cutting measure, the city proposed having its meter reading duties performed with used golf carts rather than full-sized vehicles; the golf carts would consume less fuel and be more cost efcient to operate, but they would also require several special marked crossings of busy streets at points which are deemed to be safe and practical, both to the city employees and other motorists on the road. A Department of Transportation trafc engineer will do a required evaluation of the proposed crossings, and if they pass muster, city staff can then begin a proposed rewrite of city ordinances regarding the crossings. In another cost-conscious measure, the Commission voted to authorize the city manager, Tim Bennett, to approve any change orders, up to 10 percent of the cost of construction, involved in the citys Community Development Block Grant for Housing Rehabilitation and Demolition/ Replacement. Change orders that go above 10 percent would be reviewed and either approved or disapproved by the City Commission. The City Commission also approved rescheduling its September meeting to Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013. FROMPAGEONEBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. The thorny question of how to continue maintenance for Greenvilles Evergreen Cemetery will not be decided until the Greenville Town Council meets again in September. Over the course of the last few council meetings, representatives of the Bush Estate have appealed for help from the city, because the funding set up for the cemeterys maintenance is running out. The funding came from an account set up decades ago by the late Council Bush, who is now interred in the cemetery, but since the recession of 2008, the stock dividends that paid for the mowing, weed-eating and general upkeep have dried up. The Bush Estate carried on with money that had accumulated, but nally appealed to the City of Greenville, which owns the cemetery. If the city could help out with the weed-eating and trimming around the headstones, the Bush Estate people could continue mowing on a somewhat reduced schedule. The problem with that, however, is that in a town as small as Greenville, there are very few staff and employees to begin with, and of those few, they often have more than enough to do already; on top of that, there is little or no money in the town budget to hire a lawn service or part-timer. There had been discussion of asking for help from the inmates at MCI; since the cemetery was publicly owned by Greenville, it should be eligible for help from inmate labor, was the thinking. Then, there was the problem of the cemetery plots themselves being sold to individuals. Did that make parts of the cemetery private property and therefore ineligible for help from MCI? Patricia Hinton, former Greenville Town Clerk, said that she has several generations of her family buried in Evergreen, including, most recently, her mother, and urged the council to reach some clarity on what it intended to do, even if it meant charging families extra, because we need to know. The dilemma as it currently stands, is that MCI cannot help out with the cemetery unless the town of Greenville cancels its agreement with the Bush Estate, a private group. MCI will not participate if any other private groups or parties are involved in any way. If that agreement is canceled, MCI can then do full maintenance. It can work cooperatively with the city, but not with the Bush Estate. However, that would mean canceling a decades-long arrangement created by one of the people now resting within the cemetery gates. The Council agreed to consider its options and make a nal decision at its Sept. 9 meeting.Evergreen Cemetery Question Postponed Until September Meeting Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Ofce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersSteven Godfrey, Tori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette DunnBookeeping Brooke Kinsley Classified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) Madison Fire & Rescue had responded to. Adkins attempted to pass into the right travel lane when the front of her 2006 Chevrolet struck the right rear of the re truck. Adkins was taken to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital where she was treated for minor injuries. The four reghters, including Fleming, Socrates Pierre, 28, Michael Dupree, 34, and Brandon Bagg ett, 34, all of Madison, were not injured in the mishap.

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.If you think being involved in 4-H means only agriculture and goat-tending, youre about to be educated, just like I was when I went to the Extension Ofce in Madison County. Becky Bennett, one of the ofce agents, acknowledged this thought by saying, -H is one of the best kept secrets. 4-H does so much more than most people realize. 4-H is the oldest youth development organization in the U.S., with roots going back as far as 1909. The beginnings of 4-H did in fact begin with agriculture when Corn Clubs for boys was developed in 1903. The boys would grow corn and then compete with their produce. Soon after, girls joined in by starting Tomato Clubs, but diversied more into life skills necessary for girls of that time, with activities such as sewing and food preparation. The boys clubs expanded into more involved agriculture and animal care. These skills were organized and taught to youth with learn by doing programs that are still in effect today. The four Hs on the emblem stand for Head, Heart, Hands and Health. Head is Mental Development, Heart is Emotional Development, Hands is Skills Development and Health is Physical Development. This represents the 4-H Mission, The Florida 4-H Youth Development Program uses a learn-by-doing approach and caring adults to help youth gain the knowledge and life skills they need to be productive responsible citizens. This mission is accomplished through the many programs offered through what the Extension calls clubs. If you join 4-H today, club options could be animal management, gardening projects, public speaking, ecology, consumer education, energy projects, clothing construction, computer technology or nancial management, just to name a few. Bennett says that clubs at the local ofce are based on the needs and wants of the community. During the summer, there are day and night camps as well. Regional and National opportunities are also available. Bennett does stress that even if a club is not being offered, it can still be participated in through way of 4-H materials and special projects. And speaking of special projects, teachers can benet from the local Extension Ofce by requesting 4-H materials to supplement their classroom curriculum. If you are interested in joining 4-H and wondering who is eligible, anyone ages ve through 18 can join and 4-H serves youth from all backgrounds and interests. If you are an adult and interested in 4-H, you can become a volunteer. The requirements for volunteers are to be 21 years of age, willing to take a background check and to love children. Adult volunteers are greatly appreciated and needed for any amount of time they can afford and for sharing their knowledge of their life skills with the youth. If youre concerned about the cost of 4-H, Bennett says, A $1 joining fee covers the entire year and the most you would ever pay would be $25 for a special programs fee, unless its an overnight stay, which would cost a little more. Bennett adds, It is possible to participate in clubs all year and pay no more than the $1 fee. Currently there are sixty-seven 4-H groups in Florida with about 230,000 youth involved. Here in Madison County, if youre interested in learning more about 4-H and its clubs, you can go online to madison.ifas.u.edu, email Becky Bennett at bvbennett@u.edu or call her ofce at 850-973-4138. A new 4-H year is about to kick off on September 1 that will run through August 31 and will include a years worth of new clubs, activities, workshops and competitions. If youre looking for extra activities for you or your children, consider 4-H where todays youth and adults can have a fun, hands-on partnership while learning relevant andThe Madison County Farm Bureau is once again accepting nominations for the George Townsend Good Neighbor Award. This award was named after Mr. George Townsend, who exemplied generosity and a kind and loving spirit to everyone. He was truly a good neighbor with everyone he came in contact with. The deadline to nominate a resident of Madison County, for this prestigious award, is Aug. 30. There is no set length required for the nomination letter, so one can write as much as they want to about their nominee. Please drop your letter off at the local Madison County Farm Bureau ofce, or mail it to 233 West Base Street Madison, FL 32340. The winner will be announced at the annual Farm Bureau meeting and dinner, which will be held on September 17 at the Madison County Central School, at 6:30 p.m. August 24 The Hamburg-Lovett Volunteer Fire Department will hold its annual peanut boil Saturday, Aug. 24, beginning at 5 p.m. at the Hamburg-Lovett VFD Fire Station on Highway 150 North, between Madison and Greenville. August 28 Tobacco Free Madison Partnership Meeting Wednesday, Aug. 28, at 3:30 p.m. at Madison County Central School Media Center. For more information, call (850) 973-5000, ext. 120. September 7 The Florida National Guard 868th Engineering Company will host an open house on Saturday, Sept. 7, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the National Guard Armory, located at 1416 SW 11th Street in Live Oak. Meet WWE Superstar Ted DiBiase from 1-3 p.m. For more information, contact local recruiter, SSG Amana NesSmith at (386) 438-3968. November 1 Members of the Madison High School Class of 1973 are planning a class reunion to be held December 27-29, 2013. The committee is asking that all class members please contact one of the persons listed below to express your interest in participating in the reunion and receive further information. The registration deadline is November 1, 2013. To register, or for more information, please contact: Mary Frances Mauldin, mauldinm73@gmail.com; Sharon James Postell, goldenlife59@gmail.com, (850) 973-6200; Renetta Warren Parrish, renetta.parrish@yahoo.com, (850) 464-0610; or Fagarie Wormack,fwormack@yahoo.com. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 4A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Community Calendar Elon CryerElon Elaine Cryer, 88 of Lee, Fla. passed away at her home on Aug. 14, 2013. She was one of 11 children born to Odie Bishop Beckner and Maggie Beckner in Celina, Texas. She married Walter E. Cryer on Dec. 7, 1946 and was married to him for 65 years before his death in 2012. She worked for State Farm Insurance in Dallas, Texas for 15 years before moving to Lee to pursue another business in 1971. Mr. and Mrs. Cryer ran Cryer Kennels for 40 years. She is survived by one daughter, Jan Roach and husband Glenn of Lee; two grand-daughters, Stacey Hyytiainen and husband Mika of Bedford, Texas; Katie Roach of Lee; one great-grand-dog, Ginger; one great-grandchild, Hope Hyytiainen of Bedford; and many dear cousins, nephews, nieces and friends. Her husband Walter and son Jamie, preceded her in death, as well as her parents, three brothers and seven sisters. A memorial service will be held in Texas at a later date. In lieu of owers, please contact Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308 or their web address, bigbendhospice.org.Did You Know?lemons contain more sugar than strawberries. ObituaryN o m i n a t i o n s B e i n g A c c e p t e d F o r T h e G e o r g e T o w n s e n d G o o d N e i g h b o r A w a r d T o d a y s 4 H T e a c h e s V a l u a b l e L i f e S k i l l s Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 16, 2013Becky Bennett, one of the three Extension Agents in Madison County who, helps todays youth learn life skills through fun and education. HEY! WERE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]Its never been easier to share your local news with friends and family!

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.As the song says, the times they are a-changing, especially in the world of education. Madison County School Superintendent, Doug Brown visited the Rotary Club to talk about some of the profound shifts in education and what it means as far as what exactly is coming down the pike for Madison Countys schools. The sheer volume of information available just a few decades ago was staggering, when one observer noted that the amount of information printed on the front page of the Sunday New York Times was more than the average person living in the 1800s would have had access to in his entire lifetime. The arrival of the computer age multiplied that information access exponentially, and the technology that has evolved in the last few years, particularly the computer, has changed education in ways no one could even imagine 20 or 30 years ago. The big desktop monitors with separate hard drives the size of footlockers morphed into smaller, fully integrated laptop/notebook computers, which then morphed into even smaller tablets, smart phones, and other handheld smart devices with wireless internet capability. Today, there is hardly a teenager anywhere who would be caught dead without one of these smart devices attached to his/her hand. There is the social media aspect, of course, but the now almost innite access to vast stores of information is something unparalleled in actual history and only barely hinted at in science ction TV shows of 40 or 50 years ago. Today, one needs only to Google something he or she wants to know about, and multiple answers appear onscreen in a split second, a speed that leaves even televisions Mr. Spock and the U.S.S. Enterprises onboard computer in the dust. This change, allowing such rapid access to innite amounts of information, has shifted the student/teacher dynamic in modern education. Before, the students learning of a subject depended almost entirely on the teachers depth of knowledge of said subject and ability to effectively share that knowledge. Now, the teacher is more of a facilitator in the students search for knowledge. This does not mean the teacher has become unimportant, Brown explained, only that the role has shifted. An instructors in-depth knowledge of the subject at hand is still paramount, because most students may still need guidance in understanding, assimilating and putting information into context. Another aspect of education that was virtually unknown 30 years ago is virtual instruction and the virtual classroom. Now, all Florida public high school students will be required to take at least one online course before graduating, so that they will be familiar with how the process works and prepared for online learning demands in their future, demands that may even be required by their jobs. Home schooling, a movement that was primarily groups of parents teaching their children what they knew of various subjects when it rst started, is more and more becoming an online venture. Another major shift in education has come about because our understanding of how the human brain works has changed signicantly over the decades, leading to more and more individualized instruction and changing the basic look of todays classroom. The straight lines and rows of desks squarely facing the front, where a teacher stood before the blackboard are mostly gone. Walk into any classroom today, and youll see multiple groups of children engaged in different learning activities. One group may be on their computers engaged in online learning, another group may be working on a project, and another may be gathered in a circle around the teacher, who is helping them with personalized instruction plans. Preparing students for the job market of the future has become something of a moving target, and a bigger challenge than ever. Weve become a free agent nation, said Brown, with many high school students preparing for jobs that dont even exist yet, and a signicant number of todays work force employed in jobs that did not exist when they were in high school. Another challenge to education is that the country has become deeply divided, in a global society where competing ideas collide with each other. Students need to learn how to look at these competing ideas critically and how to judge reams of information for accuracy or possible bias; for instance, by looking at sources of that information. But the most immediate change in the near future is the new Common Core State Standards Initiative. Contrary to the impression many people have of Common Core, it is not a federally-run program, but an initiative that began at the state level, with the Association of State Governors agreeing that there needed to be a single set of uniform educational standards that did not vary from one state to another, because people are so mobile in modern society. They may grow up and attend schools in several different states, and work in several different more. Common Core is a program that seeks to bring consistency to state education curriculums, and each state can opt in or opt out; so far, 45 states, including Florida, have adopted the Common Core Standards. Common Cores mission is to provide consistent standards across state borders, so that there is a clear understanding of what students are expected to learn at each grade level, in math and English language arts. The standards needed to be robust enough to be challenging, and perhaps more importantly, relevant to the modern world, so that students are prepared to succeed in the media-saturated 21st society, where skills such as critical thinking and problem solving will be crucial. Critical thinking, creativity and collaborative effort learning to work with others on projects are all part of the Common Core curriculum, but the traditional three Rs (reading, riting and rithmatic) are also included. For a complete and thorough explanation of the academic skills expected of students at each level, visit the website www.commoncore.org. The one drawback that Brown sees with the Common Core program is that it seems to perpetuate the highstakes testing environment that plagues Floridas schools and teachers today. I have an issue with that, he said. But I dont discount the idea of accountability completely. Another challenge Madison Schools are facing this year is the new FCAT standards that have left some of its schools with D and F grades. It is what it is, he said. And my job is to turn it around. Im going to go out on a limb and guarantee that there will be no D or F schools next year. I cant go to my job thinking its okay to have a D or F school. And there are positives for Madison next year, with two new public charter schools opening: the James Madison Preparatory High School, accepting its rst class of STEMfocused ninth graders (and then adding a grade each year until it is a full-edged high school, and the New Millenium School, an elementary school that will be opening soon near Greenville. Finally, perhaps biggest and best positive in the near future is the renovation of the 32-year-old Madison County High School building, made possible by a grant. It is a renovation sorely needed, both to update the aging facility to meet new technological demands and to correct several problems with the original design. For instance, at roofs on large buildings just dont work well in Florida; too much rain. Water collecting on the roof and causing leaks has been a problem there for years. Another example, the ceramic pipelines at the school were installed in soil that has proved too corrosive over time, and have needed numerous repairs. They will be replaced in the renovation process. Weve got a lot of issues to deal with, he said. But if there are some challenges, there are also positives, too, if everyone is willing to work together. It will be an interesting year, especially now that school has started, and the curtain rises on the year ahead. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 Madison County Carrier 5A AROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Congressional ReviewThe Republican-led House passed a series of bills to rein in what Republicans say is an IRS gone wild. The bills go next to the Democratled Senate where the bills are expected to receive a rocky reception. Reining in the IRS: The House passed the Stop Government Abuse Act, a bill to guard families and small business owners against needless government harassment. The vote was 232-183, along party lines. The Controversy: House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) released this statement: This kind of bill shouldnt be necessary, but in an era when the presidents IRS is targeting Americans for their political beliefs and government agencies are choking small businesses with red tape, Congress needs to act. (H.R.2879) Taxpayer Bill of Rights: The House passed a measure that would put constraints on the IRS and give taxpayers the right to appeal; to be informed, assisted and heard; and to be provided with privacy, confidentiality and representation. (H.R.2768) IRS Conference Spending: The House passed a measure to impose a moratorium on conferences held by the IRS in light of an audit revealing excessive spending on such events. The Controversy: An Inspector Generals report shows that a division of the IRS held a conference for an estimated 2,609 employees that cost taxpayers $4.1 million. The IRS spent $64,000 on gifts, $135,000 on event speakers and $50,000 on training videos, including a Star Trek parody, the report states. (H.R. 2769) Stop Targeting Our Politics IRS Act: The House passed a bill that would expand the list of legal reasons to fire an IRS worker to include political actions. The Controversy: The bill is largely a response to the IRSs recent acknowledgement that it targeted conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status. The scandal led to a wave of outrage, with Republican lawmakers charging that those responsible were not adequately punished. Democrats and the President say the issue has been identified and addressed, and it is time to move on. (H.R. 2565) Federal Stafford Loans: The House approved a Senate bill that would allow interest rates on student loans to move with the financial markets. The bill now goes to President Obama for a signature. The Controversy: The bill is expected to raise billions of dollars each year. Some say the government should not profit from those seeking higher education. (H.R.1911) Regulations for the EPA: The House passed a bill that would require the EPA to submit a cost estimate report for any new rule, and a description of the resulting effects on employment and the economy. The bill goes next to the Senate. (H.R. 1582) Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act: The House rejected a measure that would increase accountability for and transparency in the federal regulatory process by requiring Congress to approve all new major regulations. (H.R.367) Nuclear Prevention Act: The House passed a bill to impose tighter sanctions on the Iran, cutting its oil exports to hinder the flow of funds to its nuclear program. (H.R.85) Transportation $109 Billion Worth of Spending Stalls in Both Chambers: Party leaders in the House decided not to bring the transportation bill to the floor, and GOP members in the Senate blocked the bill. Congress has sent none of the 12 appropriations bills to a conference committee, setting the stage for another continuing resolution to keep the government funded in the next fiscal year. The Controversy: Most Republicans were pushing to include a mandate for approval of the Keystone XL pipeline. Most Democrats rejected the mandate, and President Obama vowed to veto the bill if such language was included. Senate Confirmations : The Senate confirmed Samantha Power to be the U.S. representative to the United Nations. S u p e r i n t e n d e n t D o u g B r o w n : C h a n g e s A r e C o m i n g Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Noris, August 7, 2013Madison County School Superintendent Doug Brown discusses changes in store for Madison's public schools.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 6A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Justin ForehandCapital City Bank welcomes Justin Forehand as our new president for Jefferson and Madison counties.With more than 21 years of banking experience, Justin will lead the team of local bankers youve come to know and trust. Your bankers continue to be dedicated to meeting your nancial needs and helping you reach your nancial goals.850.342.2500 www.ccbg.com Tom Graham: Turning 90 In StyleTom Graham celebrated his 90th birthday Saturday, August 10, with an Irish-American military-themed party at the United Methodist Cooperative Ministries Building. About 90 friends and family gathered to help him celebrate with cake and refreshments. A good time was had by all...especially Tom!Photo submittedTom Graham gathers with his daughter, granddaughters, and great-granddaughters. (Left to right) Christina Graham, Cookie Graham, Cameron Holmes, Stephanie Holmes, Brandy Graham, Alyssa Graham, Mandy Mauldin, Tom, Amberlea Graham, Laurel Graham (hidden behind balloon) and Liz Graham.Photo submittedSons, grandsons and great-grandsons gather around the guest of honor. (Left to right) Joe Graham, Chris Graham, Todd Holmes, Tom Graham, Jim Graham and Bobby Graham. Standing in front, is Tag Graham. By Ana Kincaid Relish Contributor Any way you add it up, potato chips are Americas favorite snack food. We enjoy them during a televised football game, at holiday get-togethers, with a late night movie or along side our lunchtime sandwich. This great snack was rst made popular when two very different men had a disagreement and, as a result, created Americas favorite fun food. In 1853, wealthy Americans often vacationed in upstate New York at the Moon Lake Lodge in Saratoga Springs. Among the guests present that season was Cornelius Vanderbilt, a leading millionaire nancier of his day, who was known to be exacting in both the boardroom and the dining room. Equally exacting in his kitchen was the lodges chef George Crum, a Native American and former jockey. One evening at the lodge, Vanderbilt ordered sliced potatoes with his dinner. His reaction to the dish changed American culinary history: The potatoes were cut too thick! Because Vanderbilt was used to having things the way he wanted, he sent them back to the kitchen. Chef Crum was furious at having his potatoes returned with directions to re-cut them. The chef picked up his sharpest knife and decided to slice them so thin that Vanderbilt could read the newspaper through them. Then he fried them very crisp, added salt and brought them out to the table himself. Vanderbilt, on tasting the second dish, declared them outstanding and ate them all. Crum named the new treat Saratoga Chips to honor their city of their creation. By the 1920s, potatoes prepared this way were called potato chips and were marketed nationally. Spinach-Feta Dip Try serving this lightened, but still avoreful, version of a classic spinch dip with potato chips. 3/4cup fat-free sour cream 1/2 cup 2 percent reduced-fat cottage cheese 1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry 2 green onions, thinly sliced 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1/4 teaspoon coarse salt 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese 1. Place sour cream and cottage cheese in bowl of a food processor; process until smooth. Add spinach, green onions, lemon juice, salt and pepper; process to combine. Add feta and pulse just until combined. Transfer to bowl. Cover and refrigerate at least one hour. Makes two cups; serves eight.History of Potato Chips

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 Madison County Carrier 7A Submitted by ACA Aucilla Christian Academy's girls' varsity basketball team attended their seventh summer basketball camp at the University of Florida, June 28-29, 2013. Twelve varsity, junior varsity and middle school players attended camp with Head Coach Daryl Adams, Assistant Coaches Amanda Sapp and Shaina Mattingly, and ACA Middle School Coach James Burkett. Players included: Dena Bishop, Cali Burkett, Morgan Cline, Lauren Demott, Marissa Duber, Maddie Everett, Camryn Grant, Ashley Hebert, Brittney Hughes, Kayla Knecht, Kinzi Mattingly and Whitney Stevens. ACA played a total of six games and was one of the few 1A teams among the 4A and 5A schools at UF. "Teambuilding was our main focus at camp," said Coach Daryl Adams. "We improved our performance with every game, and the girls are continuing to understand that basketball takes a lot of work to succeed." Ten middle school, junior varsity and varsity boys' basketball players attended Valdosta State University's instructional basketball camp June 17-21, 2013, to further develop their fundamentals. This was the team's fourth year at VSU. ACA players included: Zack Arcensaux, Nathan Green, Ricky Finlayson, Timothy Finlayson, Jim Flournoy III, John Flournoy, Nathan Green, Carson Nennstiel, Gatlin Nennstiel and Steven Trest. "Our team has improved from last year," said ACA Varsity Head Coach Dan Nennstiel. "They're more competitive this year. The boys played well over the summer, and we enjoyed opening the gym on Thursday nights at ACA for alumni and parents to play with their sons and daughters." Thirteen ACA players also participated in Tallahassee Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) basketball tournaments with Coaches Richard Finlayson and Dan Nennstiel. This was their second year participating in AAU. Players included: Zack Arcensaux, Casey Demott, Ricky Finlayson, Timothy Finlayson, Jim Flournoy III, John Flournoy, Brandon Holm, Eric Hutsell, Ryan Jackson, Braden Mattingly, Carson Nennstiel, Gatlin Nennstiel and D.J. Wilkinson. SPORTS BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252 ACA Varsity Football Schedule*Kickoff 7:00 p.m. unless noted Aug. 23 Jamboree (W. Gadsden & Freeport) @ Corey Field Quincy Aug. 30 @ Branford High School in Branford (Kickoff 7:30 p.m.) Sept. 6 Oak Hall School Sept. 13 St. Joseph Academy Sept. 20 John Paul II Catholic High School Sept. 27 @ St. Francis Catholic High School in Gainesville Oct. 4 @ Robert F. Munroe Day School in Quincy (Kickoff 7:30 p.m.) Oct. 11 Open Oct. 18 @ Bishop John J. Synder High School in Jacksonville Oct. 26 @ Baconton Community Charter School in Baconton, GA Nov. 1 Rocky Bayou Christian School Nov. 8 Homecoming: Temple Christian Academy JV Warriors Roster And ScheduleFran Hunt ECB PublishingThe schedule and the tentative roster for the Aucilla Christian Academy junior varsity Warriors has been released. Gridiron action begins on August 29, against Sherwood Christian, at 6 p.m., away; and continues against FAMU on September 5 at 6 p.m., home; North Florida Christian on September 12 at 6 p.m., away; Sherwood Christian on September 19 at 6 p.m., home; Governors Charter on September 26 at 6 p.m., home; Governors Charter on October 3 at 6 p.m., home; and wrapping up the season is Robert F. Munroe on October 8 at 6 p.m., home. The tentative roster includes; ninth graders, John Walker, center; Darren Ellis, tight end; Logan Register, offensive line, line backer; and Joe Hannon, running back/linebacker/quarterback; eighth graders, Joe Walton quarterback; Logan Boyer, offensive line; Jake Pridgeon, offensive line; Stewart Dalzell, wide receiver/cornerback;, Jacob Dukes, wide receiver/cornerback; and Hunter Key, running back; seventh graders, Evan Courtney, offensive line/defensive line; Ian Hutsell, wide receiver/cornerback; Ayush Patel, offensive line/defensive line; Andrew Burrus, wide receiver/defensive back; and sixth graders, Joshua Eades, offensive line/defensive line; Austin Hebert, wide receiver/defensive back; Brandon Hannon, wide receiver/defensive back; and Jamieson Dalzell, wide receiver/defensive back.. Coaching the JV Warriors is Daryl Adams. Madison County High School Cowboy Varsity Football Schedule 2013August 23 Kickoff Classic vs. Suwannee: Home @ 7:30 p.m. August 30 Tampa Catholic: Away @ 7:00 p.m. September 6 Eastern Christian Academy: Home @ 7:30 p.m. September 13 Gainesville: Away @ 7:30 p.m. September 20 Trinity: Home @ 7:30 p.m. September 27 Pace: Home @ 7:30 p.m. October 4 Taylor: Away @ 7:30 p.m. October 11 True Institute (Ga.) Pending*: Home @ 7:30 p.m. October 18 Fort White: Away @ 7:30 p.m. October 25 Deland: Away @ 7:30 p.m. November 1 Fernandina Beach: HOMECOMING @ 7:30 p.m. November 8 OPEN November 15 PLAY OFFS BEGIN Madison County High School J.V. Football Schedule 2013August 29: Away vs. Wakulla @ 7 p.m. September 4: Away vs. Columbia @ 7 p.m. September 12: Home vs. Suwannee @ 7 p.m. September 19 : Home vs. Baker County @ 6 p.m. September 26: Away vs. Pelham @ 5:30 p.m. October 3: Away vs. Taylor County @ 7 p.m. October 10: Home vs. Columbia @ 7 p.m. October 17: Home vs. Wakulla @ 7 p.m. Madison County Central School Bronco Football 2013August 27: Home vs. Baker @ 7 p.m. September 5: Home vs. Lake City Middle @ 7 p.m. September 10: Away vs. Wakulla @ 7 p.m. September 19: Away vs. Richardson @ 7 p.m. September 26: Home vs. Taylor @ 7 p.m. October 2: Home vs. Hamilton @ 7 p.m. October 15: Away vs. Suwannee @ 7 p.m. October 22: Florida Star Championship @ TBA A C A B a s k e t b a l l P l a y e r s A t t e n d C a m p s & A A U T o u r n a m e n t s Photo SubmittedLeft to right: Asst. Coach Shaina Mattingly, Camryn Grant, Dena Bishop, Asst. Coach Amanda Sapp, Ashley Hebert, Maddie Everett, Kinzi Mattingly, Kayla Knecht, Morgan Cline, MS Coach James Burkett, Whitney Stevens, Brittney Hughes, ACA Head Coach Daryl Adams, Marissa Duber, Cali Burkett and Lauren Demott.

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Madison County now has a second option for parents and their highschool-aged children. James Madison Preparatory High School will open this year as a Public Charter School. Being a charter school means that they will be independent of the county school board and will have more freedom to be innovative with their students curriculum. However, being a public school, they will still be held accountable to state and federal academic standards. Margaret Ann Bunch, a board member for JMPHS, wants to clarify to the community that the new high school is a tuition-free public school and open to every student who wishes to enroll. She stated, James Madison Preparatory is an option for kids who are on track to go straight into college. The school will be different for Madison County in that it will focus on STEM education. S.T.E.M. is an acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. S.T.E.M. schools are emerging across the country as a means for allowing students to gain an advantage in occupations that are reported to be growing 70 percent faster than other occupations. This doesnt mean that these four subjects will be the only ones taught at JMPHS, but that the subjects of science, technology, engineering and math will be interwoven with the additional curriculum. The school presented the community an opportunity to see physical changes made to the old Primary and Excel school buildings and to ask questions this past Monday evening with an open house. Board members and staff were on hand to speak with parents, grandparents and students about the school. Attitudes of school staff and its supporters were enthusiastic and feedback given by the community was positive. Bunch says there are a few remaining spots for the inaugural class of 9th grade. If you are interested or need further information you can either speak with Bill Gemmill, the schools principal at the school, 176 NW Crane Avenue in Madison, or visit their website at JMPHS.org. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 8A Madison County Carrier SCHOOL M C H S H o l d s O p e n H o u s e By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.Several days before the rst day of school, a steady stream of cars were turning in at the Madison County High School, and the parking areas were already pretty full. It was a few minutes before the Aug. 13 Open House was scheduled to begin. In the cafeteria, Principal Ben Killingsworth had just nished up a welcome-andorientation session for incoming ninth graders and their parents. The rest of the evening, parents and students toured the halls and classrooms, meeting and greeting their childrens teachers and talking to them about what to expect for the coming year.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 13, 2013No, its not the rst day of school, but the halls are still lled...with students and parents visiting during MCHSs Open House. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 13, 2013Honors English teacher, Glyndell Presley (center, facing front) goes over the syllabus and talks about some of the books students will be reading this year.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 13, 2013Band director Geoff Hill (far right) talks to incoming student Hank Thomas and his mother, Betsy Rykard. Hank will be in the MCHS Marching Band and the Concert Band.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 13, 2013In the cafeteria, MCHS Principal Ben Killingsworth (background, facing camera) makes sure parents and students get the information they need. Madison County Gets Second Option For High School Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 12, 2013James Madison Preparatory High School opens 2013 with the inaugural class of 9th grade.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 12, 2013English, Critical Thinking and Human Geography teacher, Lauri Sellers.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 12, 2013Posing for Carrier camera were Cat, J.P., and Claire Maultsby while attending the open house.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, August 12, 2013supporters of JMPHS attending the open house, are pictured left to right, Jackie and Kin Johnson, and Bailey and Ethel Barefoot.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 Madison County Carrier 9ASCHOOL Ali Parks Receives Junior Auxillary ScholarshipThe Junior Auxiliary of Madison County Florida would like to congratulate Ali Parks on being the recipient of the chapter scholarship this year. Ali graduated from Madison County High School and will be pursuing her education at NFCC to become a Nurse. Photo Submitted B a c k T o S c h o o l W o r d S e a r c h CHEERLEADING COWBOYS FOOTBALL FRESHMEN GRADUATION JUNIORS MADISON SCHOOL SENIORS SOPHOMORES Pictured left to right: Ali Park with Chapter President Lori Newman.

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Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250. Size 10 Teen Dress bright baby blue dress, halter top bodice with sequins stitched throughout; built-in crinoline with sequin appliques on lace overlay. Cinderella looking beautiful dress! $200.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 and leave a message.3/3, run, n/c D e a d l i n e f o r C l a s s i e d s E v e r y M o n d a y a n d W e d n e s d a y 3 : 0 0 p m Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-41417/18 rtn n/c New ve bedroom three bath doublewide home must go now. Make offer. Selling below cost! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cYes we take trades! Replace your old home with a more efcient and much stronger safer home now. Call 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNow is the best time to buy a new mobile home! Low rates means new homes under $400 month! 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cStop throwing money away! Our new homes cost less than $100 month to heat and cool! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNice triplewide, replace, glamour bath, sliding glass doors, new metal roof. Must sell now. Reduced to only $22,900 cash. 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cBlow out pricing on all 2012 mobile homes. Making room for new 2013 homes. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2013 Homes of Merit tape and texture starting at $375 per month. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cUsed single wide 16x80 3 bedroom 2 bath home ready to go at $15,900. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2006 Fleetwood home. Super clean and looks brand new. Call Mike at 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cNew and used homes starting as low as $6,500 on doublewides. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age 18yr. Day and evening classes. 386-362-10658/7 8/28, pdAdvertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper ofce is seeking an outstanding individual to join or sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-do-attitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.8/2 rtn, n/c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cMan of many trades and talents available for hire. Honest, reliable, creative, and reasonable/fair pricing. Specializes in custom deck building, sheds, fencing, special projects. Can also do pressure washing, and gardening (tree trimmings, ower beds, grooming seasonal shrubs and trees etc.) If interested, please Call John at 850-673-9192. References available.5/1 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com7/10 rtn, cGift Shop Close Out Sale Sparks Tractor Company All John Deere merchandise 50% off starting July 1st August 30th. Layaway available. Regular business hours are Monday Friday from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. (850) 973-3355.7/17 8/28, cDRIVER NEEDED CDL required. Call Grubbs Petroleum. (850) 997-5632.7/24 rtn, c3 BD 2 BA Mobile Home for Sale Completely re-modeled. New roof, wall, air conditioner, plus many others. Located off of Hwy 53. Will nance up to 20 years. $59,500.00 Call for appointment. (386) 792-2532 or (850) 929-4707. Palmetto Holdings. 8/7 8/28, cFor Sale 5 Acres of Land in Lee, Fl. Lots of Beautiful Trees, Excellent Drainage. Property Located On a Dead End Rd. Very Secure Lot. Driveway with Culvert. Property Located Next to 178 NE Carnation Way, Lee, Fl. 32059. Asking $45,000. Call (941) 629-3675.8/7 8/28, pd For Sale 2006 Expedition; Eddie Bauer; White Very nice family car in very good condition. $8,500 OBO. Call (850) 464-1230 for more information.Town of Greenville Temporary Part-Time Town Superintendent The Town of Greenville (pop 837) is seeking a highly motivated and qualied individual to serve approximately fteen to twenty hours per week, as needed, for the position of Part-Time Town Superintendent. The Town Superintendent is designated as a Charter Ofcer under the current Town of Greenville Charter and serves at the pleasure of the ve-member Town Council. The position is responsible for directing and supervising the administration of all current departments of the Town except the Town Clerk and Town Attorney. The Town Superintendent shall attend all Council meetings unless excused by Council and shall have the right to take part in discussions, but not vote. The Town Superintendent shall see that all laws, Charter provisions, ordinances, resolutions, and other acts of the Council subject to enforcement by the Town Superintendent are faithfully executed. The Town Superintendent shall also prepare and submit the annual Town budget, budget message, and capital program to Council, and shall keep the Council fully advised as to the nancial condition and future needs of the Town, and shall make such recommendations to the Council concerning the affairs of the Town as he/she deems desirable. The individual must posses a high school diploma or higher and experience in budget and human resources. Excellent communication and management skills are essential. Local government experience is desired but not required. Must pass full background check, must be bondable, and must pass drug test. Compensation may be in the form of a contract or salary and will be negotiable depending upon qualications. Funding for the position is subject to annual budget considerations by Town Council. Position open until 12:00 pm, Friday, August 23, 2013 Candidates may be interviewed by a Screening Committee and/or Town Council, with nal selection made by Town Council. Submit resume and three references to: Town Clerk, Town of Greenville, 154 SW Old Mission Avenue,P.O. Box 235, Greenville, FL 32331. The Town of Greenville is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Afrmative Action/Equal Opportunity Housing/Section 504 Employer.8/9 8/21, cAsphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.8/14 rtn, n/c EMPLOYMENT The Aucilla Area Solid Waste Facility is accepting applications for a Landll Equipment Operator/Spotter. Duties include operating several pieces of light equipment though out the work day, spotting loads of garbage when emptied, and routine maintenance of equipment. Applications can be picked up at the Landll ofce between the hours of 8:00 am and 4:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday, at 1313 S.W. Greenville Hills Road Greenville, Florida. Applications will be accepted until the position is lled. Aucilla Area Solid Waste Facility is an equal opportunity employer and a Drug Free Workplace. If you have any question please contact 850-948-4875.8/16, 8/21, cLittle Pine Pediatrics is now accepting applications for a clerical position in the Madison ofce. Requirements for the position: must have High School Diploma, basic computer skills, work well with children and very personable.8/21, c 3 BD Trailer For Rent Water furnished. No calls after 8 p.m. (850) 973-6735.8/21, pd Mechanic Utility equipment eld service tech. (Bucket truck and diggers etc). Must have drivers license, CDL a plus. Must be able to work overtime and pass a drug test. Pay is by experience. (904) 751-6020.8/21, 8/28, pd Diesel Shop Mechanic Needed Must have at least 3 years experience, welding is a plus. Contact M.C. LOGGING (850) 973-4410 or (850) 672-0108.8/21, 8/28, pd Adoption ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888) 986-1520 or text (347) 406-1924; www.davidandregisadopt.com-Adam B. Sklar FL# 0150789. Auctions Public Auction Online & Onsite August 27 @ 10am Preview: 08/26 10-4pm 7575 NW 70 Street, Miami, Fl 33166 Cigarette & Tobacco Manufacturing / Packaging Equipment, Forklifts, Unprinted Paper & Foil, Tools, Racking, Servers, Electronics & Accessories. 15% -18%BP Bankruptcy Vehicles: 2007 Nissan Altima 2.5 S & 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan SE 10% 13% BP (Case #13-12543 / Case #13-18780) Visit www.moeckerauctions.com for Details, Photos and Catalog Moecker Auctions (800) 840-BIDS $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to conrm. AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin Education MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Ofce Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-374-7294. Help Wanted DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. National Certications. VA Benets Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Real Estate/ Mobile Homes Mobile Homes with land. Ready to move in. Owner nancing with approved credit. 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473. LandHomesExpress.com. 2 BD 1 BA Trailer (850) 869-0916.8/21 rtn, c 4 Bedroom 2 Bath Trailer For Rent Call (850) 869-0916 for more information.8/21 rtn, c 2009 Hometown Content Sudoku Puzzle #2991-MMedium 1 234 3526 75 6 135 7589 5972 2 1 8435 7598

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 Madison County Carrier 11A L e g a l s IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 40-2012-CA-000354 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. DARLENE FUQUA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DARLENE FUQUA; MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. / NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 16, 2013, and entered in Case No. 40-2012-CA-000354, of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for MADISON County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and DARLENE FUQUA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DARLENE FUQUA; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 125 SW RANGE AVE, MADISON IN MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA 32340, at 11:00 A.M., on the 28th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 EAST, FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING AND RUN NORTH 444.17 FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 55, AS SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY IS NOW LOCATED, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF APPROXIMATELY 490 FEET, TO A POINT OF 188.06 FEET WEST OF SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN EAST 188.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING A PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 EAST, IN MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must le a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 23rd day of July, 2013. TIM SANDERS As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Ramona Dickinson As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 145 N. Hernando, Rm. 408, Lake City, FL 32055, Phone No. (386)758-2163 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com File No.: 12-07186 JPMC8/14, 8/21 The following is a list of unclaimed bond money held by the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce. Persons having or claiming any interest in said funds or any portion of them shall le their written claim with the Sheriff or Clerk of Court and shall make sufcient proof to said Sheriff or Clerk of his ownership and upon so doing shall be entitled to received any part of the money so claimed. Unless such bond money is claimed on or before the rst day of September, 2012, same shall be declared forfeited and all claims in reference thereto are forever barred. DEFENDANT DATE POSTED AMOUNT POSTED KAREN HARRELSON 9/7/99 30.00 ADRIAN CANDELARIO RODRIGUEZ 12/31/04 1146.00 MARIO PEREZ A/K/A MIGUEL ROBLERO 4/18/05 790.00 LANA ARTHUR 9/26/05 540.00 TELLAS DETRAIL BARNUM 1/13/09 390.00 WALLACE MCARTHUR 10/20/09 390.00 LOUIS RODRIGUEZ 3/2/11 540.008/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28 REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS RFQ Emergency Management Contractual Services Notice Change Of Date The Madison County Emergency Management will receive sealed qualication documents at the Board of County Commissioners, 229 SW Pinkney St., Room 219, Madison, Florida 32340 until Friday, August 30th, 2013 at 12:00 PM. Qualications received will be publicly opened on Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013 at 12:00 PM for the following: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CONTRACTUAL SERVICES MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA Any qualications received after Friday, August 30th, 2013 at 12:00 PM, will be retained at the Emergency Management Ofce. Emergency Management reserves the right to reject any and all documents received, waive formalities and re-advertise and award the RFQ in the best interest of Madison County. The Board of County Commissioners does not discriminate because of race, creed, color, national origin or handicap status. Anyone wishing to obtain RFQ documents may contact Emergency Management at 850-973-3698. Any questions concerning the RFQ specications should be directed to Tom Cisco. Five (5) sets of qualication documents must be submitted and labeled on the outside of the envelope as SEALED RFQ EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CONTRACTUAL SERVICES8/21 LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting for the Executive Committee Members on Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00 A.M. at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Ofce located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW Live Oak, Florida.8/21 LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a Finance & Audit Committee Meeting on Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 9:30 A.M. at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Ofce located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida.8/21 SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT PUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application for permit was received on July 12, 2013: Nestle Waters North America, Inc., 690 NE Hawthorn Avenue, Lee, FL 32059, has submitted an application to modify Water Use Permit Number 2-98-00025M4, for beverage processing use, requesting removal of a permit condition requiring in-house bottling of all water. The project is located in Township 1 North, Range 10 East, Section 24, and Township 1 North, Range 11 East, Sections 19 and 20, in Madison County. Interested persons may comment upon the application or submit a written request for a staff report containing proposed agency action regarding the application by writing to the Suwannee River Water Management District, Attn: Resource Management, 9225 C.R. 49, Live Oak, Florida 32060. Such comments or requests must be received by 5:00 PM within 14 days from the date of publication. No further public notice will be provided regarding this application. A copy of the staff report must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceedings. Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an administrative hearing, pursuant to Title 28, Florida Administrative Code, regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a written request after reviewing the staff report.8/21 LEGAL NOTICE MADISON COUNTY TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED COORDINATING BOARD BUSINESS MEETING The North Central Florida Regional Planning Council announces a business meeting to which all persons are invited. DATE AND TIME: September 9, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. PLACE: County Commissioners Meeting Room Madison County Courthouse Annex located at 112 E. Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida GENERAL SUBJECT MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED: To conduct a regular business meeting of the Madison County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board. A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: North Central Florida Regional Planning Council, 2009 NW 67th Place, Gainesville, Florida 32653-1603. Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this public hearing and business meeting is asked to advise the agency at least 2 business days before the meeting by contacting 352.955.2200. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the agency using the Florida Relay Service, 1.800. 955.8771 (TDD) or 1.800. 955.8770 (Voice). If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at the meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.8/21

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 12A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Girls To Queens: Empowerment For The JourneyBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.The large meeting room at the Madison Senior Center was filled to almost overflowing with young girls, many of them teenagers, some with their families, many with friends. They sat at tables draped in black tablecloths with pink satiny overlays, in chairs covered with the same pink-andblack or pink-andwhite color palette. But this wasnt just any pink...it was a deep, rich, rosepink, a powerful pink, repeated in the rosepink flower centerpieces and rose-pink square vases, a bold color most fitting for the themes that came up several times during the presentations: Empowerment was one. Validation was the other. There were others as well, including healthy self-esteem, confidence, character, integrity, reputation and relationships, but the concepts of empowerment and validation were at the foundation of the Girls to Queens Event the idea that each and every girl in the room must be bold enough to make the choices that are best for her, regardless of peer pressure and other negative influences. Equal to empowerment is validation both the validation that comes from parents and people who love her and rally around her on her journey, as well as the internal validation that comes from within a girl who is able to see that her choices are good, who knows that she is a worthwhile person and who doesnt have to depend on others to tell her this. The event, hosted by PHAT, Boyz to Kings, Healthy Start, the Chamber of Commerce, Exclusive Hair Salon & Accessories and numerous other community partners, featured a variety of speakers and included several skits to show the young ladies and future queens in the audience how the concepts of empowerment and validation might translate to real-life situations. In one skit, a young girl who is doing well in school, is in a dual enrollment program, and is well on her way to success, turns down the advances of a football star who has a reputation for playing the field and has even gotten one girlfriend pregnant and then abandoned her. The girl he is hitting on uses her intelligence and discernment to realize how harmful a relationship with this boy might be. She also has the healthy self-esteem, the boldness and the confidence to explain her own accomplishments and goals as she politely tells him, Im sorry, but I just dont have room for you in my life right now, a line that brought forth a round of spontaneous applause from the audience; a line that says to all the young girls out there, Yes, he may be a popular football star and the Big Man On Campus, but guess what? My dreams, my plans and my goals are just as important to me as his are to him, and its okay for me to protect those dreams and goals. Cindy Vees, Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce, spoke about the importance of developing healthy selfesteem in the face of a slew of negative images that can come from social media, movies, fashion magazines, and even friends or family. If all they see when they look in the mirror is that they dont resemble impossibly perfect images thrown at them by popular culture, or that theyre not a cheerleader or that they hate their hair, then this is always going to cripple their self-esteem. Healthy self-esteem isnt vanity; it is realizing that the impossibly perfect images are the result of professional makeup artists; that even supermodels can look radically different when theyre caught on camera just going to the grocery store; and that it is very important for young girls to learn to let go of the habit of comparing themselves to others. Self-esteem is learning to like what they see in the mirror; realizing that they have a nice smile or that they actually like the way their hair looks, and especially, learning to say to the You-have-to-looklike-this-this popular culture image, No, I dont; its perfectly okay to look like me. It is learning to reverse the human tendency to brood constantly on the negative while forgetting all about the positive, whether that means verbally reminding themselves to appreciate the positive things seen in the mirror, keeping a daily journal of all the good things they have accomplished all the positive things that happened (no matter how small), so that theyre not forgotten, deleting the hurtful or negative comments from Facebook and replacing them with positive ones, choosing friends who will build them up rather than tear them down, or realizing that they dont have to cave in to peer pressure or give in to inappropriate relationships with boys in order to be popular. Deveda Bellamy, speaking on the concept of character and integrity, also mentioned the hurtful tendency of constantly comparing oneself to others. I dont know how to be anybody else but Deveda, she said. Theres a difference between wanting to be somebody else, and learning to appreciate all the good things about her that inspire you. Also, in a society where young girls had more choices and more access than ever before, they needed character and integrity to know what was right and what was wrong, to help them make the right decisions for themselves, to realize the importance of keeping their word and earning the trust of others. When you start this journey, know who you are, said Bellamy. Stand up for whats right. For example, if they saw someone being bullied, would they be willing to step in and let people know they werent cool with that, even if it meant taking a few hits for an unpopular opinion? That was integrity.It meant being aware that they would be negatively judged by other people and receive unwanted attention by dressing inappropriately or provocatively, and that they might have to take a few hits from peer pressure groups for not following all the latest fashion trends. I once had a pastor who would say, If youre not selling anything, dont dress like youre having a sale, Bellamy said. Of course, everyone makes mistakes and everyone falls down, but it is not failure if they learn from their mistakes, get up again and keep going, as speaker Vantasia explained. When her original dreams of becoming a nurse were sidelined by an unexpected pregnancy, she picked herself up and started over in another direction, and now runs her own salon. Her dreams had to change, but she learned from her experience. She stood up again and focused on the positives she still had; a fiance who didnt desert her, a child she regards as a gift from God, and future as a wife, mother and entrepreneur. Sandreka Miller told the young ladies about the importance of reputation and how that would affect the way people responded to them, and Denise Robinson brought it all home talking about how all of these things came together to create healthy, nurturing relationships. Theres wisdom here, Merv Mattair told the young girls. There are ladies who have been around a while. Theyve got a message they want to give, to empower you. They have made the journey, and they know the pitfalls. They can point out the road signs. There are also the young ladies like his own daughter Lyric Mattair, one of the speakers just starting out on her journey, exploring the question of Who Am I? As Deveda Bellamy had told the young ladies earlier that evening, all those who are waiting to discover who they are, Dont be afraid to ask questions. Dont be afraid to ask for clarification. It is quite a journey the future queens have ahead, and it is only just beginning. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 14, 2013.Deveda Bellamy talks about the importance of character and integrity when it comes to making choices in life. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, August 14, 2013.Cindy Vees, left, discusses the importance of healthy self-esteem and the image in the mirror, with the help of a young volunteer from the audience.