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Madison County carrier ( 07-24-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00393

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Madison County carrier
Portion of title:
Carrier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tommy Greene
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note:
Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID:
UF00067855:00393


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PAGE 1

One Seriously Injured In RolloverBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The driver of a 1998 Dodge Durango was seriously injured in a rollover on early Friday morning, July 19. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Taylor Evans, 22, of Annandale, Va., was westbound on Interstate 10 in the inside lane approaching the 248 mile marker, when the Durango traveled northwest onto the paved apron. Evans steered to the right and over-corrected, then traveled northwest on I-10 across the inside lane, outside lane and the paved shoulder. The Durango continued traveling in a northwesterly direction onto the north grass shoulder where it’s front collided with a standing tree. The vehicle continued through the tree and overturned. It rotated one-quarter of a turn in a clockwise direction and came to a nal rest on the north grass shoulder on its left side, facing north. The Durango caught on re at its point of rest. Evans was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital by Madison County EMS. Wed. July 24, 2013VOL. 49 NO. 51 www.greenepublishing.com 50 cents Index 2 Sections, 22 Pages Local Weather Veiwpoints2A From Page One3A Obituaries4A Around Madison 5-6A Christmas In July 7A Classieds8A Legals9A Path of Faith Section B By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Drivers are urged to use caution driving in a number of areas in Madison County this week, due to daytime lane closures. On Base Street in Madison, there will be daytime lane closures after 8 a.m. each day, between Anastasia Way and Southwest Captain Brown Road. The purpose of the closures is to construct a sidewalk in the area. On Interstate 10, through this Wednesday, daytime lane closures are scheduled from the Suwannee River Bridge and overpasses at the Suwannee County line all the way to State Road 53 (Exit 258) to replace bridge joints. There will be daytime lane closures to install a median crossover for emergency vehicles at mile marker 254 on I-10. The marker is about halfway between Exits 258 and 251. There will be daytime lane closures for eastbound traffic on Wednesday, from 8 a.m.-noon in Greenville, between US 221 North and US 221 South, in order to clean out the ditches. Repair to the bridge on Highway 53 South is set to begin this Thursday.Daytime Lane Closures Announced In Madison CountyBridge repair will begin at the bridge on Highway 53 South, just south of Madison, on Thursday. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, July 23, 2013 Page 7A By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The Lee Volunteer Fire Department, Madison Fire & Rescue and Pinetta Volunteer Fire Department were dispatched to a re at 1864 NE CR 255 early Saturday morning, July 20. According to Lee Fire Chief Jason Archambault, at a little after 1 a.m., the Lee department was the rst to arrive on scene. They found the west side of the doublewide mobile home heavily involved in re. The occupants of the home, Dan and Carol Panaro, had managed to get out of the home. “About half of the home was impacted directly by re,” Archambault said, “and the other half was impacted by smoke.” Archambault said that the cause of the re is unknown and is under investigation by the state re marshal’s ofce. PHOTOS BY RUSSELL Fire Damages Mobile HomePHOTOS BY RUSSELLBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Two people were injured and one driver was cited for failure to render aid and information in an accident that occurred Friday, July 19, at the 242-mile marker on Interstate 10. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, at approximately 12:02 p.m., Sean Rosemann, 34, of Weatherford, Tex., and Richard Richardson, 46, of Winter Haven, were traveling eastbound in separate vehicles in the inside lane of Interstate 10. Rosemann was traveling in a 2005 Dodge Ram behind Richardson, who was driving a 2001 Chevrolet van. Driver Cited For Failure To Give Aid As Two InjuredBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The Madison City Commission accepted two bids for housing rehabilitation and demolition/replacement at their Monday, July 15, meeting. The rehab and demolition is paid for through a Community Development Block Grant. The commission approved the recommendation of Martha Orthoefer, of the North Central Florida Planning Council, to approve the lowest two bids. The rst bid was from Billy Burnette Construction Company for rehab on a home on SW Horry Avenue. That bid was for $38,050. The second bid approved was from Gadcon, LLC, out of Quincy. The bid, for rehab on a home on SW Crosby Avenue, was for $20,535.75. The third bid, for rehab on a home on SW Range Avenue, was rejected. It was for $87,024. The commission will take the home into consideration in the next grant cycle. The bid exceeded the allowable funds per unit.City Commission Accepts Two Bids For Housing RehabBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc. If you are involved in an accident or other emergency situation, there are steps you can do to make sure that your loved ones will be notied. This was not the case for Christine Olson’s daughter. In 2005, her daughter, Tiffany, was involved in a fatal trafc accident. There was no emergency contact system in place and several hours passed before Ms. Olson was notied of her daughter’s passing. To help othersWho Would Your Contact Be In An Emergency? Please See Driver Cited On Page 3A Please See Emergency Contact On Page 3AChristmas In July

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Ahalf century ago in my youth, I thrilled to read adventure stories; still do to some extent. One of the greatest adventures I encountered was the story of the Lewis and Clark Expedition at the beginning of the 19th Century With the possible exception of the Apollo moon exploration from 196972, Lewis and Clark rank as the greatest exploration in our nation’s history The Genesis of the expedition was our third president, Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson was such an amazing man. He would be high on my personal list of ‘great dinner guests from history .’ It was Jefferson who completed the Louisiana Purchase from France that basically doubled the land mass of the edgling United States. And it was Jefferson who commissioned his secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to plan and recruit the Corps of Discovery that would uncover the secrets of the new addition. To an 18th Century mind like Jefferson’s, the future lay to the West. In 1750 when James Madison’s father built a great Virginia home for his young family, he faced the house west toward the future. This was the great unknown. While the old world looked to colonies in places like Africa and Asia, young America looked west toward the Pacic. This was the beginning of Manifest Destiny In 1803, America’s furthest reach westward was St. Louis on the great Mississippi River. Geographers knew there was a great western river named the Missouri that fed into the Mississippi. Sea captains had reported that on the west coast, there was a great river owing westward called the Columbia. Could the rivers be joined creating a Northwest Passage that explorers had searched for over three centuries? Meriwether Lewis was tasked with this mission. He approached the job, in Jefferson’s words, with “undaunted courage.” Lewis recruited a young army ofcer, William Clark, to be his second. Clark was a great frontiersman and knew the likely candidates who would man the expedition. While Clark interviewed prospective candidates, Lewis began to study the science from the young nation’s leading experts they would need on the frontier: medicine, astronomy, biology, mapping, zoology, surveying, etc. Most of the journey would be by water. It is important to understand how important waterways were to 19th century travelers. Today, we have great interstate highways overland and jetways across the sky, but these didn’t exist two hundred years ago. People and commerce traveled principally by rivers. Cities were born as ports to the oceans, Great Lakes, and along rivers to service vessels and their cargo. Lewis and Clark would use a specially designed keelboat and canoes to traverse the rivers. And for most of the trip outbound, they would be going upstream, against the current. Roughly thirty hardy young men would pole and row these boats west and north toward the unknown. To fuel their exertion, the men would each eat nine pounds of meat per day, nearly all of it killed by hunters who walked on the banks of the river looking for game. In the rst summer, one of their number, non-commissioned ofcer Charles Floyd took ill, most likely from appendicitis, and died. The Corps buried Sergeant Floyd near the current day Sioux Falls, Iowa. Incredibly, he was the only member of the expedition to die. Following his burial, the Corps held an election to select a private to replace the NCO. It was the rst election west of the Mississippi in this new land. The second winter (the rst having been spent near St. Louis) of 1804-05 was spent with the friendly tribe of Mandan Indians in present day North Dakota. The captains sent a small number of their Corps back toward St. Louis and civilization, carrying journals and many of the more than 300 plant and animal specimens they had discovered and cataloged for the rst time on the American continent. They also added two to their number, a French trapper Charbonneau and his teenage Shoshone bride, Sacagawea. Soon, she would deliver a son who would accompany the Corps as they blazed the trail westward. Charbonneau’s interpreting skills were of marginal use but Sacagawea’s addition would prove benecial throughout the next year, particularly when they got to western Montana and her native people. In this second year, the water became more narrow and shallow as they nally neared the source of the great Missouri. Ahead of them lay the Rocky Mountains and the Continental Divide. They spent more than a month looking for an easier passage before discovering from the Shoshone that they would need to climb and cross the rugged Bitterroot mountain range. As winter weather conditions approached, the starving expedition tackled the great obstacle. Only just before perishing, Captain Lewis stumbled upon the Nez Perce tribe that welcomed the expedition and saved them. Now it was on to the great Columbia River and downstream to the Pacic. By Captain Clark’s dead reckoning calculations, the Corps had traversed 4162 miles in their journey westward. Later measurements indicate that his error rate was less than one percent. The Corps wintered for ve months on the south back of the Columbia in present day Northern Oregon with the Clatsop tribe. As spring approached, the Corps began to paddle up river to return to civilization and completion of their mission. The trip home took less than one-fth the time of the outbound leg, for two reasons. First, they had a map which Clark had faithfully documented during the long trip. Second, they were going downstream with the current. Reaching St. Louis in September 1806, the mission was complete and the west was no longer unknown. One of the Lewis and Clark stories I enjoy the best occurred that last summer in the Mandan Village. Two trappers, heading up stream asked the captains for a guide. One of the Corps’ privates, John Colter, volunteered for this duty, was discharged from service, and returned to the west. He would go onto nd more adventure and discover Yellowstone. Green and black tea are full of anti-oxidants and polyphenols which are good for us, but they also contain very high amounts of uoride, which is highly toxic to the body.Okay, enough is enough. I've said that we shouldn't eat sugar, baked goods and pasta, Omega 6 vegetable oils, boxed cereals and crackers, store-bought salad dressings, processed foods, soy, low-fat or nofat milk, grain-fed factory-farmed meat, poultry and eggs, and well, I can handle that most of the time. But tea??? I love a cup of tea. Is NOTHING sacred? Heavy sigh! Tea leaves seem to accumulate more uoride from the soil and from the air than any other plant that we eat, and because pollution has increased over the last decades, uoride in tea is increasing as well. Green tea in particular is heavily promoted as being a very healthy beverage because of the anti-oxidants it contains. But it turns out that the uoride levels in tea are higher than the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) set for uoride in drinking water, which is 1mg/L. Doubleblind studies exist, proving the adverse health affects of uoride at the level of 1ppm in water, and there are no studies documenting safety of ingesting uoride at any level. No studies seem to exist investigating the effects of uorides on the anti-oxidants in green tea, although other studies involving antioxidants show that they are adversely affected by uoride. A sixoz cup of green or black tea seems to contain between 1.3 and 7.8mg/L of uoride, so possibly as much as eight times the suggested safe dose, and I’m sure that many of us have more than one cup of tea per day. Fluoride may be a big culprit in hypothyroid (sluggish thyroid), as uoride has a bigger afnity to the iodine receptor than iodine does, and the thyroid needs iodine to function properly. Fluoride was in fact used in several countries to treat an overactive thyroid because it was so good at reducing thyroid function. With so many people suffering from problems of hypothyroid, many being undiagnosed, one can wonder how much of the problem can be related to tea and uoridated water consumption. Fluoride’s affect on the thyroid go way beyond blocking iodine, and are far too numerous to account for here. If dental uoride is present, hypothyroid is a given. Yikes! This is serious stuff!! Dean Burk, who was Chief Chemist at the National Cancer Institute for several decades, said that “no chemical causes as much cancer, and faster, than uorides,” and uoride is particularly problematic in uterine and bone cancers. Fluoride also tends to soften bones and make them brittle, playing a role in osteoporosis. Dental uorosis (a mottling of the teeth) is the rst obvious sign of uoride poisoning, and if there is dental uorosis, there are hypothyroid problems, and probably skeletal uorosis as well. Tea also frequently contains aluminum, and uoride and aluminum together are even more problematic, creating renal and neurological problems, including possibly Alzheimer’s Disease. Chinese teas seem to have more uoride in them than Indian, oolong and Ceylon teas, decaf teas have much higher levels of uoride than caffeinated teas, and instant teas are full of uoride too. Black teas have more uoride than green, and longer brewing times increase the uoride content. The higher the grade of tea, the less the uoride, so in other words the expensive stuff really is better. In fact, one study suggested that measuring uoride content would be a good way to evaluate the quality of the tea. But even high quality tea has a fair bit of uoride in it, so what are tea lovers to do?? Black and green tea extracts that are uoride and caffeine free are available. I guess I’ll be looking for these for my tea from now on … www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 2A € Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist Did You Know...Corps Of DiscoveryAs a child, I remember my first attempt at what I considered to be cooking. I was hungry and searching for something to eat in the refrigerator when I came across a pack of unopened hot dogs. I had eaten hot dogs at home many times before, but that day I remembered my favorite way to eat them, over an open flame. Our summers usually had at least one camping trip and cooking something over fire was an essential ritual. My dad even had special roasting sticks that looked something like a cross between a clothes hanger and a fork that, to me, made roasting hot dogs and marshmallows more cool than it already was. Only until I was older did I realize that he wasn’t the inventor of this unusual device. Sad to say that when I spotted them in the outdoors section of a local department store, I was completely overwhelmed by my childhood disillusionment. Another great memory of cooking over fire was Girl Scout camp. Instead of cool roasting forks, we found our own roasting sticks, gathered from the woods, where we whittled one end to a point before sticking our hot dogs on them and into the campfire. That day at home, with no cool roasting fork, pointed stick, or campfire, I improvised. I took a fork out of the silverware drawer, poked a hot dog onto the tines and roasted it over the only flame available….the gas stove. (Apparently the other thing I lacked that day was adult supervision.) The hot dog flamed and sputtered until it had an almost black coating. After placing the charcoaled wiener into a bun, covering it with my (then) favorite hot dog condiments, ketchup and sweet pickle relish, I took my first bite. I was immediately and totally hooked on cooking. I was amazed at how good it tasted and how easy it was for me to create my own food. My parents were not as excited as I was with my newly found cooking skills when I had to explain to them the messy stovetop. Even with my permanent banishment from the kitchen, I still loved the idea of cooking and eventually was able to find my way to the stove again. I was reminded of this memory because my nephew is visiting and he shared with me his grilled cheese invention. He is 13 years old and learning to create food on his own with excitement, both his and mine. He has shared his recipe with me so that I can share it with you. Watching him cook reminds me that cooking food for yourself can really be fun, that you don’t always have to follow any rules or guidelines. Preparing food for just you can be an exciting experiment that doesn’t have to turn out perfect; nobody will be there to judge, criticize, or impress. Thank you Blake. Blake’s Grilled Cheese Rolls White bread Sliced American cheese Butter Tomato Soup (optional) Using a rolling pin, roll pin across bread slice to flatten. Place a slice of cheese on the bread. Starting at one end, roll bread and cheese to form a tube shape; Place roll in a hot skillet with melted butter over medium heat. Turn roll to brown bread evenly. Repeat with as many slices of bread, cheese and butter as desired. Dip into tomato soup to eat. Learning To Cook Kid-Style Rose Klein ColumnistFrank NathanExecutive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness Tips Searching For Ambrosia Letter To The Editor Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. Winn Dixie Thanks Customers For Their SupportDear Valuable Customer, Thank you for your recent donation to the Winn-Dixie’s Summer Backpack Hunger Relief Program to help America’s Second Harvest of the Big Bend, Inc. ght hunger in our local community. With 1 in 4 children not knowing when they will eat their next meal, your contribution will help provide students with weekend food packs to bridge the gap between meals outside of school and a nutritious foundation for the school week ahead. Winn-Dixie recognizes the important role that we and our loyal customers can play in making better, stronger communities for everyone. Food banks are the key source and provider of food to food pantries, community associations, after-school programs, social service agencies, homeless shelters, senior citizen centers and other organizations whose missions are to feed those who are hungry. Your generosity enhances that support to fuel the good work of these organizations. To learn more about how you can help feed individuals and families who struggle among us, please visit www.ghtinghunger.org or call 850-562-3033. Sincerely, Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc. America’s Second Harvest of the Big Bend, Inc.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013Madison County Carrier € 3AFROMPAGEONEWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Snail Slime Next Beauty TreatmentIn France, LouisMarie Guedon is working on, what he believes to be, a cosmetic revolution. Guedon says snail mucus can regenerate skin cells and heal cuts due to its collagen, glycolic acid and antibiotics. He has raised snails for a quarter of a century and has been producing the slime for three years. Guedon has already secured three contracts with cosmetic labs, with one already ordering three tons of slime. Snail mucus is already being used in beauty products in Asia and South America and a spa in Tokyo offers facials using real live snails.Maggots Create Noises Inside Womans HeadA British woman ended her holiday trip to Peru, by being admitted to a hospital in northern England. Rochelle Harris began hearing “scratching noises” in her head and was suffering from headaches and facial pain. The morning she woke with liquid coming from her ear is what nally drove her to seek help. The doctor at the hospital discovered maggots inside her ear, with a small hole in her ear canal. Harris recalled dislodging a y from her ear while in Peru, but had not associated that with her recent symptoms. Surgery was required to remove the family of eight maggots from her ear.Danish Teen Removed From Italy For Graf“tiIn Italy, a Danish teenager was ordered out of Pisa by a judge for defacing a landmark. The teen was arrested for carving his name on the marble wall of the Medieval Cathedral. Before being ordered to leave, he was ned for the damage and expressed his apologies.Giant Tuna Capsizes Fishing BoatIn Hawaii, Anthony Wichman’s boat was capsized after hooking a 230-pound Ahi tuna. After hooking the sh, Wichman was dragged underwater when the shing line caught on his leg, turning his boat over in the process. Wichman was able to free himself and call his wife, who was able to notify the U.S. Coast Guard. Both man and boat were recovered. Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc. 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Ofce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WriterLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersSteven Godfrey, Tori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette DunnClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) Driver Cited Cont. From Page 1ARichardson started to slow down, due to a crash on the south side of the roadway. Trafc was also backing up due to the crash. The front of Rosemann’s Dodge Ram collided with the rear of Richardson’s Chevy van. After the impact, the van was pushed into the median where it came to a nal rest. Rosemann’s Ram continued east for 200 feet and pulled off the road onto the southern shoulder. Rosemann gave Richardson limited information and left the scene. He was called back to the scene by FHP and arrived at approximately 2:15 p.m. Richardson and his passenger, James Sharp Terpening, 61, of Winter Haven, received minor injuries in the crash and were taken to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Three minor children in the van were not injured. Rosemann and his passenger, Leanne McGrath, 33, of Fort Worth, Tex., were not injured in the accident. In addition to failing to render aid/information, Rosemann was also cited for careless driving and failure to report the accident. FHP Trooper Nathan K. Stidman was the investigating ofcer. Emergency Contact Cont. From Page 1Aavoid this experience, Ms. Olson approached her Legislator and the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. The results were the start of an emergency contact information system. To make sure your emergency contact information is available to law enforcement, you can enroll online at www.hsmv.gov. Select ‘Handle It Online’ and then ‘Emergency Contact Information’. All you will need is your Florida driver license or ID card number. You will then be able to enter the names, addresses and telephone numbers for two emergency contact people. The information you give will be stored in a secured, protected database with your driver record or ID card and will only be used to notify designated contacts if you are seriously injured or killed. Only law enforcement personnel will have access to your information. Entering your emergency contact information is voluntary, but will give law enforcement immediate access to this information, and will make it easier for them to speak with someone quicker than they might otherwise in the event of an emergency. Answers Here By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. If one has bought a pair of shoes from Sketchers Shape-up shoes, they could be entitled to a $34 refund check – if they applied before the deadline. Attorney General Pam Bondi announced last week that more than 35,000 Floridians will receive refunds as part of the company’s settlement agreement with Florida, 43 other states and the Federal Trade Commission. Sketchers was accused of using deceptive advertising to market its toning shoes, including making claims that Shape-up shoes would help strengthen and tone the wearer’s buttocks, legs and abdominal muscles. Another claim made was that the shoes would help them lose weight. The checks, which will be issued by the Federal Trade Commission, must be cashed by Oct. 13. Madison Residents Could Get A Refund From Sketchers

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July 24-26 Vacation Bible School at First Baptist Church, Madison, “Colossal Coaster World,” begins at 5:30 p.m. each afternoon. July 24-26 Vacation Bible School at Cherry Lake Baptist Church, “Jungle Jaunt,” from 6-9 p.m. July 24-27 Vacation Bible School, 6-8 p.m. each evening at Madison Church of God for ages 4-12 years old, Wednesday through Friday. “Wet Day” on Saturday from 10 a.m.2 p.m. Go out and have fun, fun, fun. July 28 LifeSong will sing at 10 a.m. at Sirmans Baptist Church and Troy Pickles will share his testimony that morning. August 3 Midway Church of God will host a peanut boil and a gospel sing featuring the Singing Reectsons, beginning at 6 p.m. August 6 All residents of the Greenville community are invited to show up at the Greenville Country Christmas meeting at 7 p.m. at the new American Legion Hall (inside the old NAPA Auto Parts) at 133 Grand Street in Greenville. For more information, please call Stuart McIver (850) 371-0042 August 9-10 Madison High School Red Devil Reunion. All Red Devils welcome. August 9, Red Devil BBQ. Social, 5 p.m., dinner, 7 p.m. Dancing, 8 p.m. Jellystone Park, with Tom and the Cats, $30 per person. August 10. Golf Tournament, 8 a.m., $37 per person. Lunch included. All Red Devil Reunion Celebration. Social, 5 p.m. Dinner, 7 p.m. Dancing, 8 p.m. Jellystone Park, with band, Daddy’s Money. $30 per person. For more information, call Martha at (850) 5456274 or Liz (404) 9264273. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 4A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Elsie Day ObituariesCommunity Calendar Elsie F. Day, 88, of Atco, N.J., passed away on June 29, 2013. She was the beloved wife of the late R. Charlie Churchill, Charles J. Congdon, Sr., and Francis Day; devoted mother of Judy Rae Churchill, Colleen J. Congdon and her husband Chris Oshushek and the late Charles J. Congdon, Jr.; loving grandmother of April Day and Kasie Day; and dear aunt of Bobbi Townsend, James P. Wagner, Richard Wagner and Doris Fox. Mrs. Day worked for 30 years at the Atco Knitting Mill and was an avid needle worker and member of the Prayer Shawl Society. She was also a member of the Blue Birds at the Atco Presbyterian Church and the Atco and Winslow Senior Citizens. Relatives and friends are invited to the celebration of life on Saturday, July 27, 2013 at noon at the Atco Presbyterian Church, 2259 Atco Ave. in Atco, N.J., with a luncheon to follow. Interment will be private. In lieu of owers, the family requests memorial donations be made to the Blue Birds, 2259 Atco Ave., Atco, NJ 08004, The Winslow Senior Citizens, 33 Cooper Folly Rd., Atco, NJ 08004 Attn: Betty McDaniel or the Atco Senior Citizens, c/o Edna Day, 2167A Atco Ave., Atco, NJ 08004. For more information or to e-mail a condolence, please visit www.lpwoosterfuneralhome.comIra HughesMr. Ira Alvin “Bud” Hughes, 84, of Dalton, Ga., departed this life Tuesday evening, July 2, 2013, at a local hospital. Ira was born July 29, 1928, in Catoosa County, a son of the late Floyd and Hattie Jane Brackett Hughes. He was also preceded in death by a sister, Imogene Lawhorn, and brothers, Warren, Winfred and Marvin Hughes. He was retired from Textile Rubber Inc. and was a member of Highland Church of Christ. He was a loving brother and father and a friend to many. He was a natural jokester and loved to tell a good joke. He is survived by his daughters and sonin-law, Lisa and Robert Cross, and Vicky Patterson; grandchildren, Eric and Hollie Patterson, Brandon Patterson, Ashley Neal, Nichelle Talley and Brandon Cross; sisters and brother-in-law, Sue and C.L. Coker of Dalton, Ga., and Neva Reaves of Pinetta; brother and sister-inlaw, Hobert and Imogene Hughes of Ringgold, Ga.; 13 greatgrandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. Services to celebrate the life of Mr. Ira Alvin Hughes were held Saturday, July 6, 2013 at 4 p.m. at Ponders Melrose Chapel with Tyler Gilreath ofciating. He was laid to rest at Dailey Hill Cemetery in Catoosa County, Ga., with Brandon Patterson, Kade Harrod, David Stanley, David Weathers, Clint Benson and Tren Coffee serving as pallbearers. The family received friends at Ponders Melrose Chapel from 4 to 8 p.m. Arrangements were made by Ponders Melrose Chapel, 138 Melrose Drive, Dalton, Ga.; 706-226-4002. Doris BloehmDoris Bodenstein Bloehm, 84, of Ft. Pierce, Florida, passed away at home on July 15. The funeral service was held at 10 a.m. on July 23, 2013 at St. Mark the Evangelist Catholic Church, 1924 Zephyr Avenue in Ft. Pierce. Visitation was held from 5-7 p.m. on Monday, July 22, 2013, at Haisley Funeral Home, 3015 Okeechobee Road in Ft. Pierce. Burial followed the funeral at Riverview Cemetery, 1109 North U.S. 1 in Ft. Pierce at 11:30 a.m. Funeral arrangements are being handled by Haisley Funeral Home. Doris was born in Madison on October 6, 1928. She graduated from Madison High School and attended one year of college at Stetson University in Deland. In 1952, a young Doris Bodenstein met 33-yearold “bachelor” Charlie Bloehm. Both being bankers – she in Vero Beach and he in Ft. Pierce – they met in a banking class held in Ft. Pierce. Upon meeting the attractive Miss Bodenstein, Charlie immediately felt an attraction to her but knew he “must play his cards right” lest an unsuccessful date end in an awkward nine months of weekly classes. He waited until the class had ended to begin his courtship. Two years later, they married on November 11, 1954 and in November of 2012 celebrated their 58th wedding anniversary. Doris began her career as a secretary to then President Warren Hafeld of the Indian River Citrus Bank. She received many promotions over the years and when she retired at 65, she held the title of Vice President of commercial lending. By then, the bank had changed to First Union, now Wells Fargo. Being a thorough and detailed person, Doris always went the extra mile for her customers who expressed their appreciation through thoughtful thank-you gifts that ran the gamut from trinkets to furniture. One of her daughters was surprised to see two new chairs appear in the living room one Saturday. “Mom, where did those chairs come from?” “Oh, Dr. so-and-so gave them to me. He’s one of my customers,” she said, smiling in delight. During the time she worked for the bank, she raised three daughters during the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s who saw Mom and Dad holding the same position at separate banks. She taught her daughters by example that it was just as natural for a woman to have a career as a man. Doris was a “liberated woman” before the term was coined. When not working, she enjoyed spending summers with her family at their cottage in North Carolina. Doris is survived by her husband, Charlie; daughters, Rosalie (Rosie) Bloehm and Theresa (Terry) King; nieces, Carol Price and Kim Lybrand; nephew, Fisher Bodenstein; and brother, Calvin (Cal) Bodenstein, all who she loved dearly. Doris is preceded in death by her parents, Robert Nathan and Rosa Lee Bodenstein; her sister, Clara Lybrand; her brother, Robert Bodenstein, Jr.; and her youngest daughter, Susan J. Bloehm. The family of Doris Bloehm wishes to thank Treasure Coast Hospice for their assistance and support. Condolences to the family may be sent to dbtensix@comcast.net 49ers Hold Class ReunionPhoto submitted by Helen Ragans PhillipsThe graduating class of 1949 held their 64th class reunion at noon on Friday, April 26, at Shelbys Restaurant. Members attending were, seated: Mrs. Lucile Cherry. Standing, front row, left to right: Birdie Holton Kinard of Quincy, Helen Ragans Phillips of Madison, Willodene Lamb McManua of Monticello, Frances Cason Norris of Greenville, Doris Shaffer Cowart of Madison, Wanda Roffe Dickinson of Madison, Stanley Baxley of Merritt Island. Standing, back row, left to right: Ernest Kinsey of Madison, Walter Williams of Macclenny, Roy Wynne of Memphis, Tenn., Tommy Beggs of Madison. Not pictured: Carroll Lamb of Tallahassee and Jack Hollingsworth of Pinetta. Members not attending: C.W. Killingsworth of San Diego, Cal., Leslie Buie of Rockware, Tex., Betty McCullough Bowers of Inez, Ky., Bill Roberts of Tallahassee, Malvin Vaugh of Beaverton, Ore., Myrtice Woodard Welch of Birmingham, Ala., Dorothy Walker Gates of Ennis, Mont., Martha Cave Odom of Tallahassee, Gene Lanise Bristol of Oakland, N.J., Dorothy Jean Chancy of Lake Park, Kathleen Bass Lewis of Madison, Betty Cone Blake of Fayetteville, Ga., Genalee Hendry Huggins of Madison, Howard Williams of California and Sam Burnette of St. Petersburg. A total of 28 class members are deceased. The class plans to have another reunion in two years.Photo submitted by Helen Ragans PhillipsSeveral wives, husbands and friends were on hand visiting at the reunion. Special friends on hand were George and Gladys Pierce of Earlton, who are cousins of classmate Bobby Jacobs, who is deceased. Pictured, front row, left to right: Gladys Pierce, Juanita Baxby, Hiroko Cherry, Harriett Wynne, Renee Williams and Ann Waring. Back row, left to right: George Pierce, Christine Blanton, Juanita Cason and Ben Waring. Marjorie Rinker Harr MillerMarjorie Rinker Harr Miller was born on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, June 24, 1919 and died at the Presbyterian Home in Quitman, Ga., on July 20, 2013. During World War II, she worked for the U.S. Department of the Navy in Washington, D.C. She married George B. Miller, who preceded her in death. They made a home in Hempstead, N.Y. After moving to Cherry Lake in 1962, Mrs. Miller worked for the Admissions Ofce at North Florida Community College until she retired.. She was an avid quilter, and seamstress and an active member of Grace Presbyterian Church. She was also a supporting friend of the Cherry Lake Methodist Church. Survivors include her son, Gene B. Miller (Beth); her daughter, JoAnn Miller; and her niece, Martha Buhler. Graveside servicesElma Pauline Hudson WaldrepElma Pauline Hudson Waldrep, age 97, passed away on Sunday, July 21, 2013. She was born on September 8, 1915 to Wood Hampton Hudson and Nannie Mae Pulliam Hudson. She was a lifelong resident of Madison County and a member of First Baptist Church, Madison. Mrs. Waldrep was pre-deceased by her husband, Kinch William Waldrep, and daughter, Frances Waldrep. She is survived by one son, Billy Waldrep and wife Carol of Destin; a daughter, Ann Fisher and husband Branson of Perry; three grandsons: Kinch Edward Waldrep and wife Stephanie of Raleigh, N.C.; Thomas William Waldrep, Jr. and wife Ellen of WinstonSalem, N.C. and Donn Waldrep Smith and wife Robin of Madison; 13 great-grandchildren: Carolyn (Kerry) Waldrep and husband Matt Coury of Washington, D.C., Brian Waldrep of Houston, Tex., Megan Eileen, Matthew, Mimi, Catherine and Michael Waldrep of Winston-Salem, N.C., Katie Waldrep Molinder and husband Chad of Quantico, Va., Eddie Waldrep of Morristown, Ind., Abby Waldrep of Indianapolis, Ind., Sydney Waldrep of Raleigh, N.C., Laurie Smith and Keeley Smith, both of Madison; ve great-great-grandchildren: John, William, Maria and Elizabeth Waldrep Coury and Matthew Molinder. Graveside services will be held Thursday, July 25, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Harmony Cemetery in Madison County. The family will receive friends from 10-10:30 a.m. prior to the service at Beggs Funeral Home. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel, is in charge of arrangements (850) 973-4716. will be held on Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 11 a.m., at the Cherry Lake United Methodist Church. Please, no large oral memorials. Memorial gifts may be directed to Grace Presbyterian Church, the Cherry Lake United Methodist Church, or the Presbyterian Home in Quitman, Ga. Grace Foust AmersonMrs. Grace Foust Amerson, age 58, passed away Thursday, July 18, 2013, at South Georgia Medicl Center in Valdosta, Ga. She was born in Miami, and had lived in Madison since 1983. She is survived by one daughter, Delores Mabardy of Madison; two sons, Michael Mims and wife Leah of Auburn, Ala., and Ricky Amerson, of Madison; two brothers, Wayne and Tom Foust of Madison; one sister, Ann Scherman of Madison; and four grandchildren. Funeral services were held Sunday, July 21, 2013, at graveside in Oakridge Cemetery in Madison, with Rev. Pat Doyle ofciating. Beggs Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements, (850) 9732258.

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Submitted by: NFCC Ofce of College Advancement New classes begin Aug. 12, 2013 MADISON, FL The Public Safety Academy at North Florida Community College is now accepting students for its Law Enforcement Recruit, Correctional Basic Recruit and Cross-Over programs. New classes are set to begin Aug. 12. Those interested in enrolling are encouraged to contact the Public Safety Academy now. Classes are held Monday through Thursday from 6-11 p.m. at the NFCC Public Safety Academy complex on the NFCC campus in Madison, Fla. The NFCC Public Safety Academy is one of 40 criminal justice training centers approved by the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (CJSTC) to train basic recruits in law enforcement, corrections, recertication programs, and continuing workforce education. NFCC's Correctional and Law Enforcement Basic Recruit programs prepare students for the certication exams required for all Florida ofcers and require rigorous physical demands upon the recruit in defensive tactics, rearms, vehicle operations and physical tness training. Acceptance in these programs are limited to meeting requirements established by the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission, North Florida Community College, The Public Safety Academy, and our Criminal Justice Advisory Board. Students can complete training in one year or less. Those interested in training at NFCC are encouraged to begin the enrollment process now. You must be at least 18-years-old to enter NFCC's Law Enforcement and Correctional Basic Recruit programs and must pass the Florida Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test (CJBAT) before submitting an application for admission. The CJBAT can be taken on the NFCC campus. Ofcial high school/GED diploma and transcripts and passing background checks are also required for admission. Financial assistance may be available for qualied students. For more information, contact Gail Hackle, at (850) 973-1617 or hackleg@nfcc.edu. Information is also available at www.nfcc.edu/public-safety. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013Madison County Carrier € 5 AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Capital City Bank still offers Absolutely Free Checking* and free value-added services. Open a checking account and receive afreedebit card,freeonline banking with e-statements, Bill Pay and Mobile Banking^, andfreemoney+ for your old checks and debit cards! Stop by or OPENyour accountOnline today.freeIts still a great deal. 343 West Base St. | 973.4161 www.ccbg.comMEMBER FDIC*Client purchases checks. Bank rules and restrictions apply. Account subject to fees if overdrawn. ^Fees charged by mobile service provider are the responsibility of the user. +Limitations apply. Ask a banker for complete details. BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252 Plans Underway For Hickory Grove Founders DayBy Dan BuchananThe time has come for the folks at Hickory Grove to start talking about and even planning for Founder's Day at the church. This year, Founder's Day will take place on the third Saturday in October, which will be Oct. 19. It will all start with a hearty breakfast in Cousin Mary Lou's Country Kitchen. The old wood-burning stoves will again be cranked up, and bellowing wood smoke and cooking biscuits and cooking sausage and fried ham on top in iron skillets. This year, there will be more things for the young kids to do. For one thing, we will have the Hickory Grove School House in operation, and Sunday School will take place in the old house at least three times during the morning. Another new thing this year will be the presence of the new Madison Youth Ranch, which is currently being built just west of Pinetta. In fact, this year's Official Founder's Day Program will be dedicated to the construction and completion of the United Methodist Church Children's Home Madison Youth Ranch. Elwyn McLeod has got the sugar cane growing great at his home just a mile or so from the church, and with all the rain this spring and summer, it really looks great. He will be in charge of making the delicious syrup at Founder's Day again this year. You need to get to the church early and be sure to get a couple of bottles of this true southern delicacy. In fact, you can sample the syrup in the Country Kitchen should you desire. Buy a biscuit, poke a hole in the biscuit and fill it up with syrup. That is the method we use to eat syrup in our community. Mark your calendar, and send an invite to your kin folks who live in other places to be sure and not forget to attend the Hickory Grove Founder's Day celebration. The date will be Saturday, Oct. 19. Get there early and stay all day. EVERYONE is welcome at Hickory Grove Founder's Day at Hickory Grove. Photo submitted by Dan BuchananElwyn McLeod stands in his “eld of cane. Every year, McLeod prepares the homemade syrup for Hickory Grove Founders Day at his own expense and he grows and tends the cane crop. Founders Day is set for Oct. 19 this year and plans are already underway to make it an even more exciting day than it already is. Lions Club: On To The Next ChallengeBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.With the massive undertaking that was the Fourth of July God and Country Celebration behind them, the Lions Club members have been catching their breath for the last couple of meetings and getting ready to start planning ahead for their next event: the annual Lion's Club Turkey Shoot in November."I know it's a load off your shoulders with the Fourth of July over," said Lions Club President Jay Lee at one of the meetings. He was pleased with the way everything had turned out. Even the rain, which might have kept some people away, did have the silver lining effect of cooling things off, and it had stopped well before the fireworks display. "We had a good event, and I want to thank everyone who worked so hard," said Lee. Other members reported conversations with vendors who had done well enough to say that they would definitely be back next year. Even the bounce houses, whose vendors had hoped only to break even, reported profits. Out-of-town visitors from as far away as Atlanta had reported that they were impressed with the fireworks display. A lion's share of the kudos went to Ina Thompson, owner of the Mail Room, who "bent over backward to produce the souvenir booklet for the event, and did a much better job than the company the club used last year that charged nearly twice as much. "She (Thompson) did a great job on the handbook," said Christy Roebuck. "She's a member just for her contribution." Roebuck reported other conversations with people who were impressed with the handbook's quality and color, and people who were pleased that their ads looked so good because Thompson had worked very hard to make sure they did. For next year, they also discussed the possibility of adding a "fun run around the lake" with prizes, since runs draw more people. But before next year's Fourth of July event, there's the Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot, a fundraising event that takes place over three weekends in November. People pay entry fees and compete against each other shooting at targets to win frozen turkeys, or watch their friends compete while they enjoy chips and drinks offered for sale by the club. Until then, there's lots of planning ahead to do.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, July 16, 2013Lions Club President Jay Lee leads a discussion about the next upcoming challenge for the Lions Club. NFCC Public Safety Academy Enrolling Now Correctional Of“cer And Law Enforcement Recruit Programs Accepting New Students

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Tommy Hardee: Theres No Off Year In The Supervisor Of Elections OfficeBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.By his own admission, before he became Madison County Supervisor of Elections, Tommy Hardee used to wonder what on earth the Elections Office did during an off election year.Now he knows the answer: a heck of a lot. “We’re busier than ever,” he told the Rotary Club, where he was visiting with two of his staff members, Alfreda Martin and Ludie Porter, discussing what goes on in an elections office during an off year. There are new laws and mandates from the state that have to be implemented, new security procedures, voter registration lists to maintain, voter information to update, equipment upgrades that have to be done sooner or later (hopefully sooner, if funding can be found, well before the state-mandated deadlines roll around) and of course, voter registration drives – because, as Hardee has stated many times, every vote matters. Many of his efforts to bring the office up to speed have been inspired by visits to the Supervisor of Elections (SOE) Office in Bay County, currently the first and only SOE in the nation to earn an ISO 9000 rating for its high level of quality. Hardee hopes that the Madison County SOE will be the second to earn such a rating. “It doesn’t matter if Madison is a smaller county,” he said. “Our votes are just as important as Miami-Dade’s.” There was no book on how to be a Supervisor of Elections when Hardee was appointed to the office in late 2011. There were laws on what had to be done, but no “how-to” guidebook. Hardee learned the ropes from visiting other elections supervisors in other counties, and figuring out how to apply that to Madison County. Every other year, the Madison SOE office goes through its security procedures to see how they can be improved and what new procedures need to be implemented. So far, the staff has gone from 20 pages of security protocols to about 65 pages. The there is the biannual report on inactive voters that is due for the state. When a voter misses voting in two elections, he or she is moved to the Inactive Voters List. If the voters remain inactive or if they leave the county or die or otherwise become ineligible, they will eventually be removed from the polls. After New Year’s Day, the Madison SOE moved some 500 voters to the Inactive List and removed another 668 from the registration rolls; some of those removed had died, and one of the things Hardee would like to work on is getting funeral homes to send death notices to the SOE’s office. Only after such official notification can a deceased voter be removed from the voter registration rolls. On the other side of the equation, he would like to see every eligible voter in the county registered, especially young people, and he would like them to realize how important their vote is and why it is important to cast their vote and make their voice heard. Once a month, he holds voter registration drives in places like Greenville and Lee, and would like to go to other places like Pinetta. He visits schools, nursing facilities and civic clubs to talk about voting and explain how the process works with mock elections. He has even held a voter registration drive at Project Graduation. Another idea he is working on is a “Veteran’s Wall of Honor” in the Elections Office – Vote in Honor of a Veteran. “If you have a family member in the military, bring in an 8x10 and we’ll scan it in,” he said. Their photo will be placed on the wall. Since veterans are the ones who have fought for the continued right to vote for everyone, perhaps a wall of honor will encourage family members and other people to vote in their honor. He also had some interesting statistics on Madison County voters. Women turn out to vote at a significantly higher rate than men: 4850 females voters to 3806 male voters in the last election. Of those, over half are age 51 or older. The Supervisor’s office is looking at an 11 percent increase in its operating budget next year, due to state mandates, mostly involving increased payments into retirement benefits for employees and elected officials. The increase was instituted mainly due to actuarial tables, but as Hardee pointed out, Miami-Dade can afford it, but smaller counties like Madison struggle with the added expense. Another thing county offices will have to contend with is the increasing role the state wants to play in running them, mainly because of “three counties that act up every year.” One thing he is proud of is the fact that Madison County, a rural, spread-out community, has four early voting sites to make it easier for its citizens to vote. Early voting has now been extended to 14 days, and he plans to adjust the hours on weekdays and weekends to catch the most voters possible. The more people who vote early, the shorter the lines will be on Election Day. Another tip for voters, to help save time and make their voting experience as smooth as possible, is to use the sample ballots that arrive in the mail and appear in the newspaper. By studying those ballots, marking their choices ahead of time and bringing those sample ballots with them to the polls, they can shorten the time it takes to vote. As an example, the last election cycle had a lengthy ballot that included several amendments to the state constitution. Those who had prepared ahead of time and brought their sample ballots with them spent an average of 15 minutes in the voting booth. Those who hadn’t took up to 45 minutes or longer. There are also several changes to the absentee ballot system that now allows the SOE to contact a voter who forgot to sign his ballot. It also gives a 10-day extension to absentee ballots that must come in from overseas from veterans. Madison County is also in line for a grant that will help the SOE get an email system up and running to accept overseas ballots; a needed change, as Hardee pointed out, relating the story of an overseas veteran who called twice during the absentee ballot period to try to cast his vote, but the fax line refused to work properly both times. Something else voters must be aware of is the requirement to bring a photo ID that shows their signature. The most common ID used is a driver’s license or a State of Florida ID card. As most people know, Madison no longer has a DMV office, but the FLOW-Mobile (Florida Licensing On Wheels) bus brings a mobile DMV office with everything needed to get or renew a license or get a state photo ID card. It visits Madison County about once a month and its next scheduled stop is August 5 in the Winn-Dixie parking lot from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. For more information on the documentation you’ll need to bring with you to the FLOW-mobile, visit the website www.GatherGoGet.com for a checklist of papers you’ll need, or call (850) 617-2628 or (850) 443-0406 for more information about the mobile licensing program. Voters may also need to check on whether or not their signature may need to be updated with the SOE, if their signature has changed in any way over time. Visit the office at 239 S.W Pinck-Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, July 17, 2013Supervisor of Elections Tommy Hardee and Rotary Club President Wayne Conger exchange handshakes after Hardees presentation. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, July 17, 2013Supervisor of Elections employees Ludie Porter (left) and Alfreda Martin (right) stand beside a table display encouraging people to vote early. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 6A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013Madison County Carrier € 7A SEMI ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE O V E R 1 5 0 0 0 P A I R S O V E R 1 5 0 0 0 P A I R S OVER 15,000 PAIRS O N S A L E O N S A L E ON SALE U P T O UP TO 8 0 % 80% O F F OFF! D O O R DOOR B U S T E R S BUSTERS $ 8 T O $ 1 2 $ 8 TO $ 12! GROUP 1 GROUP 2 BCBG LUCKY BRAND JESSICA SIMPSON FERGIE CLARKS BARE TRAPS & MANY MOREƒ COLE HAAN DONALD PILNER VANELI BRIGHTON J.RENEE MICHAEL KORS & MANY MOREƒ H U G E S E L E C T I O N H U G E S E L E C T I O N HUGE SELECTION Of Mens Shoes on Sale 10-80% Off 813681 $ 49 99 $ 89 99 Values to $ 225 00 $ 16 99 $ 59 99 Values to $ 150 00

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE YARD/ CLOSING SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . .8A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 24, 2013 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 7/22/2013 THROUGH 7/28/2013 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell) run, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline.$50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ”ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves, buttons around neck with circular cutout on back, beautiful gown $100. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250. Size 10 Teen Dress bright baby blue dress, halter top bodice with sequins stitched throughout; built-in crinoline with sequin appliques on lace overlay. Cinderella looking beautiful dress! $200.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 and leave a message.3/3, run, n/c Of“ce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-41417/18 rtn n/c New “ve bedroom three bath doublewide home must go now. Make offer. Selling below cost! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cYes we take trades! Replace your old home with a more ef“cient and much stronger safer home now. Call 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNow is the best time to buy a new mobile home! Low rates means new homes under $400 month! 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cStop throwing money away! Our new homes cost less than $100 month to heat and cool! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNice triplewide, “replace, glamour bath, sliding glass doors, new metal roof. Must sell now. Reduced to only $22,900 cash. 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cBlow out pricing on all 2012 mobile homes. Making room for new 2013 homes. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2013 Homes of Merit tape and texture starting at $375 per month. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cUsed single wide 16x80 3 bedroom 2 bath home ready to go at $15,900. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2006 Fleetwood home. Super clean and looks brand new. Call Mike at 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cNew and used homes starting as low as $6,500 on doublewides. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age 18yr. Day and evening classes. 386-362-10657/3 7/31, pd Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Must be a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, and be able to get along with an entire of“ce staff. Must have good personality, love to talk on the telephone, and a valid drivers license. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper of“ce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.3/15 rtn, n/c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cMan of many trades and talents available for hire. Honest, reliable, creative, and reasonable/fair pricing. Specializes in custom deck building, sheds, fencing, special projects. Can also do pressure washing, and gardening (tree trimmings, ”ower beds, grooming seasonal shrubs and trees etc.) If interested, please Call John at 850-673-9192. References available.5/1 rtn, n/cBurial Lot in Pineland Cemetery For Sale (850) 869-0916.7/17 8/7, c Newspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Adoption Choosing adoption? Loving, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Let's help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, toll-free (855-779-3699) Sklar Law Firm, LLC Fl Bar #0150789. Business Opportunities A SODA/SNACK VENDING ROUTE LOCATIONS INCLUDED IN YOU LOCAL AREA $8,995 MINIMUM INVESTMENT GUARANTEE CASH FLOW 10 YEAR WARRANTEE 1-800-367-6709 Ext.99. Education ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Certi“ed Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC TRAIN can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-212-5888. Help Wanted EARNING BETTER PAY IS ONE STEP AWAY! Averitt offers Experienced CDL-A Drivers Excellent Bene“ts and Weekly Hometime. 888-362-8608, Recent Grads w/a CDL-A 1-5/wks Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer. CDL-A Company Drivers, Students or Lease a Brand New Freightliner or Peterbilt Tractor Today! Zero Down, No Credit Check, Affordable & Fuel Ef“cient. CDL-A Required. Apply Online: TheWilTrans.com. Solo & Teams. Priority Dispatch. Consistent Miles. Established Routes. No Touch Freight/Hazmat CDL A w/1 yr. OTR exp. Food Grade Tanker 855-IRT-TANKwww.indianrivertransport.comDRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com .EOE. Home Improvement Premium Metal Roo“ng, Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof pro“les in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888-779-4270 or visit www.gulfcoastsupply.com Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here … Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32. LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com7/10 rtn, c 2006 White Expedition Eddie Bauer For Sale Call (850) 464-1230 for more information. Very nice family car in very good condition. $8,500 OBO. 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Call (850) 869-0916.7/17 rtn, c 3 BD House For Rent Central heat and air. Located at 537 SW Overbrooks Street in Greenville. HUD or Section 8 voucher accepted. Contact (850) 948-7501.7/17 7/29, pdCoordinator of Institutional Research and Institutional Effectiveness See www.nfcc.edu for details.7/17 7/31, c Relationships are priceless. On and off the Clock. If you love patient-centered health care with real relationships inside a company that encourages fun on and off the clock, then DaVita is the place for you. We offer career options to “t your lifestyle! DaVita has multiple openings now as well as future opportunities in the Madison, Quincy and Tallahassee area. We are looking for future leaders with opportunities as: € LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES € REGISTERED NURSES € PATIENT CARE TECHNICIAN Dialysis experience is strongly preferred. DaVita is a FORTUNE 500 company featured in Training Magazines Top 125 and Modern Healthcares 100 Best Places to Work. Why wait? Explore a career with DaVita today! Apply Online at: http://careers.davita.com or contact Tiffy Christian at (877) 482-7625. DaVita is an Equal Opportunity Employer, CAREERS http://careers.davita.com 2011 DaVita Inc. All Rights reserved.7/17, 7/24, cExecutive Director of Development and External Affairs See www.nfcc.edu for details.7/17 7/31, c Gift Shop Close Out Sale Sparks Tractor Company All John Deere merchandise 50% off starting July 1st August 30th. Layaway available. Regular business hours are Monday Friday from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. (850) 973-3355.7/17 8/28, c Coachman Chaparral 5th Wheel Camper For Sale Two slideouts, one awning. Excellent condition. Always stored under shelter. $18,900. (850) 971-5589.7/24, pdDrivers: Company Drivers/Independent Contractors, Owner Operators.Hiring for SE Regional and OTR Home Every Week! Great Pay!! Safety Bonus! SE Pay Premium. Excellent Bene“ts, Paid Holidays & Vacations! CDL-A & 1yr OTR Exp. Req. Epes Transport System, Inc. 888-293-3232 www.epestransport.com.7/24, pd North Florida Child Development, Inc. Is seeking Preschool Teacher for Greenville Head Start Center Must have Bachelors degree in Early Childhood Education or related “eld. Submit resumes to NFCD, Human Resource Department, PO Box 38, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 or email smcgill@”oridachildren.org Closing Date:August 5, 2013 DFWP/MF/7-4/EOE C03MA001.7/24, 7/31, cHouse Cleaning, Cooking and Companionship No job to big or small with a price you can afford. Call and leave a message at (850) 210-2274. References available.7/24, pd There will be a yard/closing sale this Saturday, July 27 from 8 a.m. 1 p.m. The sale will be located at 301 Base Street in Madison. Everything must go! (850) 869-9099.7/24, pd DRIVER NEEDED CDL required. Call Grubbs Petroleum. (850) 997-5632.7/24 rtn, c

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013Madison County Carrier 9A ----Legals---Legal Notice Morven Superstorage, 434 Second Street, Morven, GA and Madison Superstorage, 298 SW Martin Luther King Drive Madison, Florida and Jasper Superstorage, 1213 US 129N, Jasper, Florida will have a liquidation Auction on July 27, 2013 at 9:00am in Morven GA. 10:30am in Madison, FL and 12:00pm in Jasper FL. Units to be sold in Morven, GA are #25M Katherine Donaldson, #11M Yolanda Jones, # 36 Dalaine Prescott and #3 Wesley Thomas. In Madison, FL units #10D Allison Graham, 11 & 6H Bert Holloway, #12E Cynthia Mc Quay, #7D Meshalene Taylor and #4D LaTonya Thompson. In Jasper, FL units #84 Maranda Bembry, and #59 & 4 Dian Williams. Owners have until 12:00pm Friday July 26, 2013 to pay in full to avoid liquidation. Contents are believed to be household items. Hickory Hill Auctions will handle the sale. For more information and to see which units or if the auction will be held see www.hickoryhillauctions.com.7/17, 7/24 LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. will hold a Planning and Evaluation Committee meeting on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 at 9:00 A.M. at the Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc., Administration Of“ce located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida.7/24 LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting for the Executive Committee Members on Tuesday, August 13, 2013, 10:00 A.M. at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Of“ce located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW Live Oak, Florida.7/24 7/24, 7/31 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JERRY WADE HUFSTETLER Deceased. File No. 2013-70-CP Division ____________ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JERRY WADE HUFSTETLER deceased, whose date of death was April 5, 2013 is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Of“ce Box 237, Madison, FL 32340 The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must “le their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must “le their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of “rst publication of this notice is July 24 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative:Personal Representative: Richard L. Coleman Patsy Hufstetler Attorney for Petitioner6 NE Dandelion Street Coleman Talley, LLP Pinetta, Florida 32360 910 North Patterson Street Valdosta, Georgia 31601 (229) 242-7562 (229) 333-0885 facsimile Florida Bar No. 07815687/24, 7/31 Would you like to give up the name tag for a business card? Ready to sell that old TV to make room for a new one? Well, this is your chance. Check out the Classifieds today! Call us to submit your classified ad at:(850) 973-4141 orMail us at:Greene Publishing, Inc.P.O. Drawer 772 €Madison, FL 32341 200 9 Hometown ContentSudoku Puzzle #2976-DDifficult12 3 1456 71 8 927 46 3681 3 4 5618 947 200 9 Hometown ContentSudoku Puzzle #2976-MMedium1 2 3 452 6718 3 647 2975 7519 4 796 547 839 Sudoku

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.It’s not something people like to talk about, and often families don’t plan for it ahead of time, putting it off until necessity hits them in the face. Then, it can be a tangled web of legal requirements, nancial pitfalls, and conicting views of how to care for an elderly relative in his/her last days, weeks, months or years of life. Twyla Sketchley, of the Sketchley Law Firm in Tallahassee, is one of 99 law rms in Florida that practices elder and guardianship law exclusively. Sketchley visited the residents at Lake Park of Madison recently to talk about the importance of planning ahead for end-of-life issues, making sure families know what their loved one’s wishes are, and making any legal arrangements necessary to make sure those wishes are carried out. The State of Florida is transitioning to a managed care system, said Sketchley, which is yet another reason for making plans now, before others, perhaps even the state, has to step in and make them. Sketchley, whose lively presentation was not quite what one might expect, included several humorous Star Wars/Star Trek and other pop culture references. The subject at hand could be quite a downer, Sketchley, an admitted “Star Wars geek,” told the audience, which was why so many people avoid talking about it. Yet it is also a subject that no one can afford to ignore, and she felt that presenting the topic in a positive, upbeat manner might make it a little easier for people to think about it. What kind of care do people want as they come to the end of their lives? Wouldn’t it be better to make their own plans, if they do not want others (family members or even strangers) making those decisions for them, should they become incapacitated and no longer able to speak for themselves? It is a rather serious topic that needs serious consideration, and it can be depressing. Addressing it with a little humor and lightheartedness here and there can help. “Otherwise,” said Sketchley, “After talking about death and dying, we can all end up having a pretty bad day.” Sketchley is also licensed to practice law in Montana, which has a right-to-die law, unlike Florida. In the Sunshine State, if people don’t make advance decisions about end-of-life health care, they essentially leave those decisions up to Tallahassee. A stranger will be appointed as their guardian, the one who will make those all-important healthcare decisions for them. Sketchley has handled a lot of guardianships for individuals who failed to leave advance plans and were later unable to tell anyone what they did or didn’t want. For herself, she said, she wants no health care at all at the end of her life; she would like to have someone simply drive her up to Montana’s Glacier Park and leave her there. Eventually, she hopes she would die of hypothermia, or perhaps in a scenario straight out of Legends of the Fall, “pr eferably with Brad Pitt somewhere in the picture.” For an individual to spend the end of his life in the manner of his own choosing, it takes some advance preparation. Since it takes a family and a village to care for the elderly, the frail and the disabled, the person making the initial end-of-life plans should include family members in the discussion to make sure everyone knows what his or her wishes are, taking into account nances and what the individual or family can afford. One of the most important documents concerned with end-of-life planning is the Advance Directive, which dictates what kind of health care you want at the end of your life. Many people don’t think about health care until they get sick, but incapacitating illness isn’t something that happens only to the elderly and the inrm. It can happen suddenly and unexpectedly to anyone, as the tragic Teri Shiavo case illustrated. A persistent, vegetative state that is not terminal but that has no brain activity, no meaningful interaction with others and nothing that constitutes what is normally considered “quality of life,” can last indenitely. It can be from a sudden illness or the result of an accident, but without an Advance Directive, the person stricken will have no say in whether life-prolonging measures are employed or not. In the Shiavo case, bitterly feuding family members meant that what should have been a private family/individual matter was eventually battled out in a very public forum...the Florida Legislature. “If you want to leave your health care decisions up to the legislature in Tallahassee, don’t ll out an Advance Directive,” said Sketchley. Another important document to consider is the Living Will, which states what kind of end-of-life treatment you desire, but doesn’t kick in until you become incompetent; it spells out the kind of care you would like to receive or would like to have withdrawn once you reach an end stage condition or are found to be in a permanent vegetative state. If you become terminally ill, there is usually a period of time when you can still function well enough to understand your situation and direct your own care. Once you are past that, the Living Will takes effect. A Living Will should not be confused with a Will, or Last Will and Testament, which directs the distribution of your property once you die. A Living Will applies only to what happens before you reach that point. Florida does recognize out-of-state Advance Directives or Living Wills, so long as these documents were executed in full compliance with the laws of that state; one problem with online documents is that they may not fully meet all of the state criteria or otherwise not be in full compliance. It is worth your time and money to have an attorney go over your Advance Directive and Living Will to make sure it is a sound legal document rather than leave it all to chance. Other end-of-life tools are the Health Care Surrogate and the Health Care Proxy. The difference is that the Health Care Surrogate is someone you specically choose to make health care decisions on your behalf if you cannot make them yourself; a Health Care Proxy is an individual who is designated by the state to make those decisions, chosen from a list of persons who presum ably w ould know your wishes. Your Health Care Surrogate should be given a copy of your Living Will along with your doctors and other family members. When it comes to a Health Care Surrogate, this is another very important choice that should be considered carefully. It doesn’t have to be a family member; it could be a close friend who understands you and what you want and can actually handle the stress of making those decisions for you when the time comes. If you choose a family member, you should also consider who might, as well as who might not be the best choice, even if they are close family, like the irresponsible child/relative you love dearly but who might just up and disappear when the time comes, or the child/relative with religious beliefs that might be incompatible with what you want. Even if the person carried out your wishes the way you would want, he or she would be enduring the extra stress of going against their religious teachings. A relative with a history of mental illness would not be a good choice, either. Whomever you wish to designate, pick someone reasonable, capable and mentally sound. Then, talk to the person. These decisions he or she will be called upon to make are hard. Will your surrogate be emotionally capable of handling them? Your surrogate should be chosen only after careful consideration and several detailed conversations to make sure that the person knows what you want and is comfortable with the responsibility. Suppose you don’t choose a surrogate? In that case, the state will choose a proxy. By law, the rst person the state must choose is your spouse. But will he or she be a capable proxy? If not, or if there is no surviving spouse, the next choice is your children. If there is only one child, and that child is capable, that might work, but if there is more than one child and they cannot all agree, it becomes a decision by committee, where the majority rules...the majority of all available children, that is. If another child lives across the country and cannot be there to add his or her input, they may feel unjustly left out of the process. Next on the list are your parents, if they are still living. After your parents, your siblings are next on the list. If there’s just one, and if he or she is a capable person who knows what you would want, that may be ne. If there is more than one, you will run into the committee situation again. Then, if none of the above are available, the next person on the list is a licensed clinical social worker. What about one of your close friends who might know you better than any family member? They’re going to be at the bottom of the list – and that includes even “friends-with-benets” or friends you may be cohabitating with. If this is the person you would want to make your decisions, but you fail to ofcially choose him or her as your Health Care Surrogate, your children or other family members will make your decisions, not the one person in the world you feel closest to and would rather put your trust in. You have to make it ofcial if that is what you want. End-of-life planning is one of the areas of elder law in which the Sketchley Law Firm can offer elderly clients and their caregivers assistance. For more information on the full range of elder law services, visit the website www.sketchleylaw.com, and click on “What is Elder Law?” www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 10A € Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Big Fish Monday Catch the biggest “sh of the week and win a FREE oil changeBring in a photo of your “sh with its measurements for a chance to win a FREE OIL CHANGE Parts/Service Hours: Mon-Fri-7:30-5:30 Sat. 7:30-3:00850-584-6178 2441 South Byron Butler Parkway Perry, Flwww.timberlandford.comSales Hours: Mon-Fri 7:30-5:30 Sat. 7:30-3:00800-763-4589Timberland FordConvenient Service Center Hours Saturday: 7:30 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Greenville Country Christmas Meeting Set By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The Greenville Country Christmas Committee will hold a meeting on Monday, Aug. 6, at 7 p.m. “We want to invite anyone and everyone who is interested in Country Christmas to attend the meeting,” Kathy Reams said. She said their ideas and input would be welcome. Greenville Country Christmas is an annual event which has been held for over 20 years where people come together to celebrate the Christmas season in Greenville. The meeting will be held inside the new American Legion Post Hall in Greenville. The Post is the old NAPA Auto parts Building. The building is located at 133Grand Street (the corner of US Highway 90 and Grand Street) in Greenville. For more information on Greenville Country Christmas, please call Stuart McIver (850) 371-0042 Class Of 1973 Reunion Being PlannedMembers of the Madison High School Class of 1973 are planning a class reunion to be held December 27-29. The committee is asking that all class members please contact one of the persons listed below to express your interest in participating in the reunion and receive further information. The registration deadline is November 1, 2013.Mary Frances Mauldin, mauldinm73@gmail.com Sharon James Postell, goldenlife59@gmail.com (850) 973-6200 Renetta Warren Parrish, renetta.parrish@yahoo.com (850) 464-0610 Fagarie Wormack, fwormack@yahoo.com Twyla Sketchley: Discussing End-Of-Life IssuesGreene Publishing Inc. Photo by Lynette NorrisElder Law attorney Twyla Sketchley talks to a group at Lake Park of Madison about the importance of advance planning for end-of-life issues.



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One Seriously Injured In RolloverBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The driver of a 1998 Dodge Durango was seriously injured in a rollover on early Friday morning, July 19. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Taylor Evans, 22, of Annandale, Va., was westbound on Interstate 10 in the inside lane approaching the 248 mile marker, when the Durango traveled northwest onto the paved apron. Evans steered to the right and over-corrected, then traveled northwest on I-10 across the inside lane, outside lane and the paved shoulder. The Durango continued traveling in a northwesterly direction onto the north grass shoulder where its front collided with a standing tree. The vehicle continued through the tree and overturned. It rotated one-quarter of a turn in a clockwise direction and came to a nal rest on the north grass shoulder on its left side, facing north. The Durango caught on re at its point of rest. Evans was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital by Madison County EMS. Wed. July 24, 2013VOL. 49 NO. 51 www.greenepublishing.com 50 cents Index2 Sections, 22 Pages Local Weather Veiwpoints 2A From Page One3A Obituaries 4A Around Madison 5-6A Christmas In July 7A Classieds 8A Legals 9A Path of Faith Section B By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Drivers are urged to use caution driving in a number of areas in Madison County this week, due to daytime lane closures. On Base Street in Madison, there will be daytime lane closures after 8 a.m. each day, between Anastasia Way and Southwest Captain Brown Road. The purpose of the closures is to construct a sidewalk in the area. On Interstate 10, through this Wednesday, daytime lane closures are scheduled from the Suwannee River Bridge and overpasses at the Suwannee County line all the way to State Road 53 (Exit 258) to replace bridge joints. There will be daytime lane closures to install a median crossover for emergency vehicles at mile marker 254 on I-10. The marker is about halfway between Exits 258 and 251. There will be daytime lane closures for eastbound traffic on Wednesday, from 8 a.m.-noon in Greenville, between US 221 North and US 221 South, in order to clean out the ditches. Repair to the bridge on Highway 53 South is set to begin this Thursday.Daytime Lane Closures Announced In Madison CountyBridge repair will begin at the bridge on Highway 53 South, just south of Madison, on Thursday. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, July 23, 2013 Page 7A By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The Lee Volunteer Fire Department, Madison Fire & Rescue and Pinetta Volunteer Fire Department were dispatched to a re at 1864 NE CR 255 early Saturday morning, July 20. According to Lee Fire Chief Jason Archambault, at a little after 1 a.m., the Lee department was the rst to arrive on scene. They found the west side of the doublewide mobile home heavily involved in re. The occupants of the home, Dan and Carol Panaro, had managed to get out of the home. About half of the home was impacted directly by re, Archambault said, and the other half was impacted by smoke. Archambault said that the cause of the re is unknown and is under investigation by the state re marshals ofce. PHOTOS BY RUSSELL Fire Damages Mobile HomePHOTOS BY RUSSELLBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Two people were injured and one driver was cited for failure to render aid and information in an accident that occurred Friday, July 19, at the 242-mile marker on Interstate 10. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, at approximately 12:02 p.m., Sean Rosemann, 34, of Weatherford, Tex., and Richard Richardson, 46, of Winter Haven, were traveling eastbound in separate vehicles in the inside lane of Interstate 10. Rosemann was traveling in a 2005 Dodge Ram behind Richardson, who was driving a 2001 Chevrolet van. Driver Cited For Failure To Give Aid As Two InjuredBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The Madison City Commission accepted two bids for housing rehabilitation and demolition/replacement at their Monday, July 15, meeting. The rehab and demolition is paid for through a Community Development Block Grant. The commission approved the recommendation of Martha Orthoefer, of the North Central Florida Planning Council, to approve the lowest two bids. The rst bid was from Billy Burnette Construction Company for rehab on a home on SW Horry Avenue. That bid was for $38,050. The second bid approved was from Gadcon, LLC, out of Quincy. The bid, for rehab on a home on SW Crosby Avenue, was for $20,535.75. The third bid, for rehab on a home on SW Range Avenue, was rejected. It was for $87,024. The commission will take the home into consideration in the next grant cycle. The bid exceeded the allowable funds per unit.City Commission Accepts Two Bids For Housing RehabBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc. If you are involved in an accident or other emergency situation, there are steps you can do to make sure that your loved ones will be notied. This was not the case for Christine Olsons daughter. In 2005, her daughter, Tiffany, was involved in a fatal trafc accident. There was no emergency contact system in place and several hours passed before Ms. Olson was notied of her daughters passing. To help othersWho Would Your Contact Be In An Emergency? Please See Driver Cited On Page 3A Please See Emergency Contact On Page 3AChristmas In July

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Ahalf century ago in my youth, I thrilled to read adventure stories; still do to some extent. One of the greatest adventures I encountered was the story of the Lewis and Clark Expedition at the beginning of the 19th Century. With the possible exception of the Apollo moon exploration from 196972, Lewis and Clark rank as the greatest exploration in our nations history The Genesis of the expedition was our third president, Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson was such an amazing man. He would be high on my personal list of great dinner guests from history . It was Jefferson who completed the Louisiana Purchase from France that basically doubled the land mass of the edgling United States. And it was Jefferson who commissioned his secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to plan and recruit the Corps of Discovery that would uncover the secrets of the new addition. To an 18th Century mind like Jeffersons, the future lay to the West. In 1750 when James Madisons father built a great Virginia home for his young family, he faced the house west toward the future. This was the great unknown. While the old world looked to colonies in places like Africa and Asia, young America looked west toward the Pacic. This was the beginning of Manifest Destiny In 1803, Americas furthest reach westward was St. Louis on the great Mississippi River. Geographers knew there was a great western river named the Missouri that fed into the Mississippi. Sea captains had reported that on the west coast, there was a great river owing westward called the Columbia. Could the rivers be joined creating a Northwest Passage that explorers had searched for over three centuries? Meriwether Lewis was tasked with this mission. He approached the job, in Jeffersons words, with undaunted courage. Lewis recruited a young army ofcer, William Clark, to be his second. Clark was a great frontiersman and knew the likely candidates who would man the expedition. While Clark interviewed prospective candidates, Lewis began to study the science from the young nations leading experts they would need on the frontier: medicine, astronomy, biology, mapping, zoology, surveying, etc. Most of the journey would be by water. It is important to understand how important waterways were to 19th century travelers. Today, we have great interstate highways overland and jetways across the sky, but these didnt exist two hundred years ago. People and commerce traveled principally by rivers. Cities were born as ports to the oceans, Great Lakes, and along rivers to service vessels and their cargo. Lewis and Clark would use a specially designed keelboat and canoes to traverse the rivers. And for most of the trip outbound, they would be going upstream, against the current. Roughly thirty hardy young men would pole and row these boats west and north toward the unknown. To fuel their exertion, the men would each eat nine pounds of meat per day, nearly all of it killed by hunters who walked on the banks of the river looking for game. In the rst summer, one of their number, non-commissioned ofcer Charles Floyd took ill, most likely from appendicitis, and died. The Corps buried Sergeant Floyd near the current day Sioux Falls, Iowa. Incredibly, he was the only member of the expedition to die. Following his burial, the Corps held an election to select a private to replace the NCO. It was the rst election west of the Mississippi in this new land. The second winter (the rst having been spent near St. Louis) of 1804-05 was spent with the friendly tribe of Mandan Indians in present day North Dakota. The captains sent a small number of their Corps back toward St. Louis and civilization, carrying journals and many of the more than 300 plant and animal specimens they had discovered and cataloged for the rst time on the American continent. They also added two to their number, a French trapper Charbonneau and his teenage Shoshone bride, Sacagawea. Soon, she would deliver a son who would accompany the Corps as they blazed the trail westward. Charbonneaus interpreting skills were of marginal use but Sacagaweas addition would prove benecial throughout the next year, particularly when they got to western Montana and her native people. In this second year, the water became more narrow and shallow as they nally neared the source of the great Missouri. Ahead of them lay the Rocky Mountains and the Continental Divide. They spent more than a month looking for an easier passage before discovering from the Shoshone that they would need to climb and cross the rugged Bitterroot mountain range. As winter weather conditions approached, the starving expedition tackled the great obstacle. Only just before perishing, Captain Lewis stumbled upon the Nez Perce tribe that welcomed the expedition and saved them. Now it was on to the great Columbia River and downstream to the Pacic. By Captain Clarks dead reckoning calculations, the Corps had traversed 4162 miles in their journey westward. Later measurements indicate that his error rate was less than one percent. The Corps wintered for ve months on the south back of the Columbia in present day Northern Oregon with the Clatsop tribe. As spring approached, the Corps began to paddle up river to return to civilization and completion of their mission. The trip home took less than one-fth the time of the outbound leg, for two reasons. First, they had a map which Clark had faithfully documented during the long trip. Second, they were going downstream with the current. Reaching St. Louis in September 1806, the mission was complete and the west was no longer unknown. One of the Lewis and Clark stories I enjoy the best occurred that last summer in the Mandan Village. Two trappers, heading up stream asked the captains for a guide. One of the Corps privates, John Colter, volunteered for this duty, was discharged from service, and returned to the west. He would go onto nd more adventure and discover Yellowstone. Green and black tea are full of anti-oxidants and polyphenols which are good for us, but they also contain very high amounts of uoride, which is highly toxic to the body.Okay, enough is enough. I've said that we shouldn't eat sugar, baked goods and pasta, Omega 6 vegetable oils, boxed cereals and crackers, store-bought salad dressings, processed foods, soy, low-fat or nofat milk, grain-fed factory-farmed meat, poultry and eggs, and well, I can handle that most of the time. But tea??? I love a cup of tea. Is NOTHING sacred? Heavy sigh! Tea leaves seem to accumulate more uoride from the soil and from the air than any other plant that we eat, and because pollution has increased over the last decades, uoride in tea is increasing as well. Green tea in particular is heavily promoted as being a very healthy beverage because of the anti-oxidants it contains. But it turns out that the uoride levels in tea are higher than the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) set for uoride in drinking water, which is 1mg/L. Doubleblind studies exist, proving the adverse health affects of uoride at the level of 1ppm in water, and there are no studies documenting safety of ingesting uoride at any level. No studies seem to exist investigating the effects of uorides on the anti-oxidants in green tea, although other studies involving antioxidants show that they are adversely affected by uoride. A sixoz cup of green or black tea seems to contain between 1.3 and 7.8mg/L of uoride, so possibly as much as eight times the suggested safe dose, and Im sure that many of us have more than one cup of tea per day. Fluoride may be a big culprit in hypothyroid (sluggish thyroid), as uoride has a bigger afnity to the iodine receptor than iodine does, and the thyroid needs iodine to function properly. Fluoride was in fact used in several countries to treat an overactive thyroid because it was so good at reducing thyroid function. With so many people suffering from problems of hypothyroid, many being undiagnosed, one can wonder how much of the problem can be related to tea and uoridated water consumption. Fluorides affect on the thyroid go way beyond blocking iodine, and are far too numerous to account for here. If dental uoride is present, hypothyroid is a given. Yikes! This is serious stuff!! Dean Burk, who was Chief Chemist at the National Cancer Institute for several decades, said that no chemical causes as much cancer, and faster, than uorides, and uoride is particularly problematic in uterine and bone cancers. Fluoride also tends to soften bones and make them brittle, playing a role in osteoporosis. Dental uorosis (a mottling of the teeth) is the rst obvious sign of uoride poisoning, and if there is dental uorosis, there are hypothyroid problems, and probably skeletal uorosis as well. Tea also frequently contains aluminum, and uoride and aluminum together are even more problematic, creating renal and neurological problems, including possibly Alzheimers Disease. Chinese teas seem to have more uoride in them than Indian, oolong and Ceylon teas, decaf teas have much higher levels of uoride than caffeinated teas, and instant teas are full of uoride too. Black teas have more uoride than green, and longer brewing times increase the uoride content. The higher the grade of tea, the less the uoride, so in other words the expensive stuff really is better. In fact, one study suggested that measuring uoride content would be a good way to evaluate the quality of the tea. But even high quality tea has a fair bit of uoride in it, so what are tea lovers to do?? Black and green tea extracts that are uoride and caffeine free are available. I guess Ill be looking for these for my tea from now on www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 2A Madison County CarrierVIEWPOINTS& OPINIONS National SecurityJoe Boyles Guest Columnist Did You Know...Corps Of DiscoveryAs a child, I remember my first attempt at what I considered to be cooking. I was hungry and searching for something to eat in the refrigerator when I came across a pack of unopened hot dogs. I had eaten hot dogs at home many times before, but that day I remembered my favorite way to eat them, over an open flame. Our summers usually had at least one camping trip and cooking something over fire was an essential ritual. My dad even had special roasting sticks that looked something like a cross between a clothes hanger and a fork that, to me, made roasting hot dogs and marshmallows more cool than it already was. Only until I was older did I realize that he wasnt the inventor of this unusual device. Sad to say that when I spotted them in the outdoors section of a local department store, I was completely overwhelmed by my childhood disillusionment. Another great memory of cooking over fire was Girl Scout camp. Instead of cool roasting forks, we found our own roasting sticks, gathered from the woods, where we whittled one end to a point before sticking our hot dogs on them and into the campfire. That day at home, with no cool roasting fork, pointed stick, or campfire, I improvised. I took a fork out of the silverware drawer, poked a hot dog onto the tines and roasted it over the only flame available.the gas stove. (Apparently the other thing I lacked that day was adult supervision.) The hot dog flamed and sputtered until it had an almost black coating. After placing the charcoaled wiener into a bun, covering it with my (then) favorite hot dog condiments, ketchup and sweet pickle relish, I took my first bite. I was immediately and totally hooked on cooking. I was amazed at how good it tasted and how easy it was for me to create my own food. My parents were not as excited as I was with my newly found cooking skills when I had to explain to them the messy stovetop. Even with my permanent banishment from the kitchen, I still loved the idea of cooking and eventually was able to find my way to the stove again. I was reminded of this memory because my nephew is visiting and he shared with me his grilled cheese invention. He is 13 years old and learning to create food on his own with excitement, both his and mine. He has shared his recipe with me so that I can share it with you. Watching him cook reminds me that cooking food for yourself can really be fun, that you dont always have to follow any rules or guidelines. Preparing food for just you can be an exciting experiment that doesnt have to turn out perfect; nobody will be there to judge, criticize, or impress. Thank you Blake. Blakes Grilled Cheese Rolls White bread Sliced American cheese Butter Tomato Soup (optional) Using a rolling pin, roll pin across bread slice to flatten. Place a slice of cheese on the bread. Starting at one end, roll bread and cheese to form a tube shape; Place roll in a hot skillet with melted butter over medium heat. Turn roll to brown bread evenly. Repeat with as many slices of bread, cheese and butter as desired. Dip into tomato soup to eat. Learning To Cook Kid-Style Rose Klein ColumnistFrank NathanExecutive Director Lake Park of Madison Health & Wellness TipsSearching For Ambrosia Letter To The EditorLetters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. Winn Dixie Thanks Customers For Their SupportDear Valuable Customer, Thank you for your recent donation to the Winn-Dixies Summer Backpack Hunger Relief Program to help Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend, Inc. ght hunger in our local community. With 1 in 4 children not knowing when they will eat their next meal, your contribution will help provide students with weekend food packs to bridge the gap between meals outside of school and a nutritious foundation for the school week ahead. Winn-Dixie recognizes the important role that we and our loyal customers can play in making better, stronger communities for everyone. Food banks are the key source and provider of food to food pantries, community associations, after-school programs, social service agencies, homeless shelters, senior citizen centers and other organizations whose missions are to feed those who are hungry. Your generosity enhances that support to fuel the good work of these organizations. To learn more about how you can help feed individuals and families who struggle among us, please visit www.ghtinghunger.org or call 850-562-3033. Sincerely, Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc. Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend, Inc.

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Madison County Carrier 3AFROMPAGEONEWorld NewsBy Rose Klein Snail Slime Next Beauty TreatmentIn France, LouisMarie Guedon is working on, what he believes to be, a cosmetic revolution. Guedon says snail mucus can regenerate skin cells and heal cuts due to its collagen, glycolic acid and antibiotics. He has raised snails for a quarter of a century and has been producing the slime for three years. Guedon has already secured three contracts with cosmetic labs, with one already ordering three tons of slime. Snail mucus is already being used in beauty products in Asia and South America and a spa in Tokyo offers facials using real live snails.Maggots Create Noises Inside Womans HeadA British woman ended her holiday trip to Peru, by being admitted to a hospital in northern England. Rochelle Harris began hearing scratching noises in her head and was suffering from headaches and facial pain. The morning she woke with liquid coming from her ear is what nally drove her to seek help. The doctor at the hospital discovered maggots inside her ear, with a small hole in her ear canal. Harris recalled dislodging a y from her ear while in Peru, but had not associated that with her recent symptoms. Surgery was required to remove the family of eight maggots from her ear.Danish Teen Removed From Italy For GraftiIn Italy, a Danish teenager was ordered out of Pisa by a judge for defacing a landmark. The teen was arrested for carving his name on the marble wall of the Medieval Cathedral. Before being ordered to leave, he was ned for the damage and expressed his apologies.Giant Tuna Capsizes Fishing BoatIn Hawaii, Anthony Wichmans boat was capsized after hooking a 230-pound Ahi tuna. After hooking the sh, Wichman was dragged underwater when the shing line caught on his leg, turning his boat over in the process. Wichman was able to free himself and call his wife, who was able to notify the U.S. Coast Guard. Both man and boat were recovered. Established 1964 A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express reading pleasure of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future residents. Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 South SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Ofce in Madison, FL 32340. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772. This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline. P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 2013E-mail Information:News news@greenepublishing.comAdvertisement ads@greenepublishing.comClassifieds / Legals classifieds@greenepublishing.comWeb Site: www.greenepublishing.com PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WriterLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignersSteven Godfrey, Tori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette DunnClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Monday at 5 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included) Driver Cited Cont. From Page 1ARichardson started to slow down, due to a crash on the south side of the roadway. Trafc was also backing up due to the crash. The front of Rosemanns Dodge Ram collided with the rear of Richardsons Chevy van. After the impact, the van was pushed into the median where it came to a nal rest. Rosemanns Ram continued east for 200 feet and pulled off the road onto the southern shoulder. Rosemann gave Richardson limited information and left the scene. He was called back to the scene by FHP and arrived at approximately 2:15 p.m. Richardson and his passenger, James Sharp Terpening, 61, of Winter Haven, received minor injuries in the crash and were taken to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Three minor children in the van were not injured. Rosemann and his passenger, Leanne McGrath, 33, of Fort Worth, Tex., were not injured in the accident. In addition to failing to render aid/information, Rosemann was also cited for careless driving and failure to report the accident. FHP Trooper Nathan K. Stidman was the investigating ofcer. Emergency Contact Cont. From Page 1Aavoid this experience, Ms. Olson approached her Legislator and the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. The results were the start of an emergency contact information system. To make sure your emergency contact information is available to law enforcement, you can enroll online at www.hsmv.gov. Select Handle It Online and then Emergency Contact Information. All you will need is your Florida driver license or ID card number. You will then be able to enter the names, addresses and telephone numbers for two emergency contact people. The information you give will be stored in a secured, protected database with your driver record or ID card and will only be used to notify designated contacts if you are seriously injured or killed. Only law enforcement personnel will have access to your information. Entering your emergency contact information is voluntary, but will give law enforcement immediate access to this information, and will make it easier for them to speak with someone quicker than they might otherwise in the event of an emergency. Answers Here By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. If one has bought a pair of shoes from Sketchers Shape-up shoes, they could be entitled to a $34 refund check if they applied before the deadline. Attorney General Pam Bondi announced last week that more than 35,000 Floridians will receive refunds as part of the companys settlement agreement with Florida, 43 other states and the Federal Trade Commission. Sketchers was accused of using deceptive advertising to market its toning shoes, including making claims that Shape-up shoes would help strengthen and tone the wearers buttocks, legs and abdominal muscles. Another claim made was that the shoes would help them lose weight. The checks, which will be issued by the Federal Trade Commission, must be cashed by Oct. 13. Madison Residents Could Get A Refund From Sketchers

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July 24-26 Vacation Bible School at First Baptist Church, Madison, Colossal Coaster World, begins at 5:30 p.m. each afternoon. July 24-26 Vacation Bible School at Cherry Lake Baptist Church, Jungle Jaunt, from 6-9 p.m. July 24-27 Vacation Bible School, 6-8 p.m. each evening at Madison Church of God for ages 4-12 years old, Wednesday through Friday. Wet Day on Saturday from 10 a.m.2 p.m. Go out and have fun, fun, fun. July 28 LifeSong will sing at 10 a.m. at Sirmans Baptist Church and Troy Pickles will share his testimony that morning. August 3 Midway Church of God will host a peanut boil and a gospel sing featuring the Singing Reectsons, beginning at 6 p.m. August 6 All residents of the Greenville community are invited to show up at the Greenville Country Christmas meeting at 7 p.m. at the new American Legion Hall (inside the old NAPA Auto Parts) at 133 Grand Street in Greenville. For more information, please call Stuart McIver (850) 371-0042 August 9-10 Madison High School Red Devil Reunion. All Red Devils welcome. August 9, Red Devil BBQ. Social, 5 p.m., dinner, 7 p.m. Dancing, 8 p.m. Jellystone Park, with Tom and the Cats, $30 per person. August 10. Golf Tournament, 8 a.m., $37 per person. Lunch included. All Red Devil Reunion Celebration. Social, 5 p.m. Dinner, 7 p.m. Dancing, 8 p.m. Jellystone Park, with band, Daddys Money. $30 per person. For more information, call Martha at (850) 5456274 or Liz (404) 9264273. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 4A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Elsie DayObituariesCommunity CalendarElsie F. Day, 88, of Atco, N.J., passed away on June 29, 2013. She was the beloved wife of the late R. Charlie Churchill, Charles J. Congdon, Sr., and Francis Day; devoted mother of Judy Rae Churchill, Colleen J. Congdon and her husband Chris Oshushek and the late Charles J. Congdon, Jr.; loving grandmother of April Day and Kasie Day; and dear aunt of Bobbi Townsend, James P. Wagner, Richard Wagner and Doris Fox. Mrs. Day worked for 30 years at the Atco Knitting Mill and was an avid needle worker and member of the Prayer Shawl Society. She was also a member of the Blue Birds at the Atco Presbyterian Church and the Atco and Winslow Senior Citizens. Relatives and friends are invited to the celebration of life on Saturday, July 27, 2013 at noon at the Atco Presbyterian Church, 2259 Atco Ave. in Atco, N.J., with a luncheon to follow. Interment will be private. In lieu of owers, the family requests memorial donations be made to the Blue Birds, 2259 Atco Ave., Atco, NJ 08004, The Winslow Senior Citizens, 33 Cooper Folly Rd., Atco, NJ 08004 Attn: Betty McDaniel or the Atco Senior Citizens, c/o Edna Day, 2167A Atco Ave., Atco, NJ 08004. For more information or to e-mail a condolence, please visit www.lpwoosterfuneralhome.comIra HughesMr. Ira Alvin Bud Hughes, 84, of Dalton, Ga., departed this life Tuesday evening, July 2, 2013, at a local hospital. Ira was born July 29, 1928, in Catoosa County, a son of the late Floyd and Hattie Jane Brackett Hughes. He was also preceded in death by a sister, Imogene Lawhorn, and brothers, Warren, Winfred and Marvin Hughes. He was retired from Textile Rubber Inc. and was a member of Highland Church of Christ. He was a loving brother and father and a friend to many. He was a natural jokester and loved to tell a good joke. He is survived by his daughters and sonin-law, Lisa and Robert Cross, and Vicky Patterson; grandchildren, Eric and Hollie Patterson, Brandon Patterson, Ashley Neal, Nichelle Talley and Brandon Cross; sisters and brother-in-law, Sue and C.L. Coker of Dalton, Ga., and Neva Reaves of Pinetta; brother and sister-inlaw, Hobert and Imogene Hughes of Ringgold, Ga.; 13 greatgrandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. Services to celebrate the life of Mr. Ira Alvin Hughes were held Saturday, July 6, 2013 at 4 p.m. at Ponders Melrose Chapel with Tyler Gilreath ofciating. He was laid to rest at Dailey Hill Cemetery in Catoosa County, Ga., with Brandon Patterson, Kade Harrod, David Stanley, David Weathers, Clint Benson and Tren Coffee serving as pallbearers. The family received friends at Ponders Melrose Chapel from 4 to 8 p.m. Arrangements were made by Ponders Melrose Chapel, 138 Melrose Drive, Dalton, Ga.; 706-226-4002. Doris BloehmDoris Bodenstein Bloehm, 84, of Ft. Pierce, Florida, passed away at home on July 15. The funeral service was held at 10 a.m. on July 23, 2013 at St. Mark the Evangelist Catholic Church, 1924 Zephyr Avenue in Ft. Pierce. Visitation was held from 5-7 p.m. on Monday, July 22, 2013, at Haisley Funeral Home, 3015 Okeechobee Road in Ft. Pierce. Burial followed the funeral at Riverview Cemetery, 1109 North U.S. 1 in Ft. Pierce at 11:30 a.m. Funeral arrangements are being handled by Haisley Funeral Home. Doris was born in Madison on October 6, 1928. She graduated from Madison High School and attended one year of college at Stetson University in Deland. In 1952, a young Doris Bodenstein met 33-yearold bachelor Charlie Bloehm. Both being bankers she in Vero Beach and he in Ft. Pierce they met in a banking class held in Ft. Pierce. Upon meeting the attractive Miss Bodenstein, Charlie immediately felt an attraction to her but knew he must play his cards right lest an unsuccessful date end in an awkward nine months of weekly classes. He waited until the class had ended to begin his courtship. Two years later, they married on November 11, 1954 and in November of 2012 celebrated their 58th wedding anniversary. Doris began her career as a secretary to then President Warren Hafeld of the Indian River Citrus Bank. She received many promotions over the years and when she retired at 65, she held the title of Vice President of commercial lending. By then, the bank had changed to First Union, now Wells Fargo. Being a thorough and detailed person, Doris always went the extra mile for her customers who expressed their appreciation through thoughtful thank-you gifts that ran the gamut from trinkets to furniture. One of her daughters was surprised to see two new chairs appear in the living room one Saturday. Mom, where did those chairs come from? Oh, Dr. so-and-so gave them to me. Hes one of my customers, she said, smiling in delight. During the time she worked for the bank, she raised three daughters during the 50s, 60s and 70s who saw Mom and Dad holding the same position at separate banks. She taught her daughters by example that it was just as natural for a woman to have a career as a man. Doris was a liberated woman before the term was coined. When not working, she enjoyed spending summers with her family at their cottage in North Carolina. Doris is survived by her husband, Charlie; daughters, Rosalie (Rosie) Bloehm and Theresa (Terry) King; nieces, Carol Price and Kim Lybrand; nephew, Fisher Bodenstein; and brother, Calvin (Cal) Bodenstein, all who she loved dearly. Doris is preceded in death by her parents, Robert Nathan and Rosa Lee Bodenstein; her sister, Clara Lybrand; her brother, Robert Bodenstein, Jr.; and her youngest daughter, Susan J. Bloehm. The family of Doris Bloehm wishes to thank Treasure Coast Hospice for their assistance and support. Condolences to the family may be sent to dbtensix@comcast.net. 49ers Hold Class ReunionPhoto submitted by Helen Ragans PhillipsThe graduating class of 1949 held their 64th class reunion at noon on Friday, April 26, at Shelbys Restaurant. Members attending were, seated: Mrs. Lucile Cherry. Standing, front row, left to right: Birdie Holton Kinard of Quincy, Helen Ragans Phillips of Madison, Willodene Lamb McManua of Monticello, Frances Cason Norris of Greenville, Doris Shaffer Cowart of Madison, Wanda Roffe Dickinson of Madison, Stanley Baxley of Merritt Island. Standing, back row, left to right: Ernest Kinsey of Madison, Walter Williams of Macclenny, Roy Wynne of Memphis, Tenn., Tommy Beggs of Madison. Not pictured: Carroll Lamb of Tallahassee and Jack Hollingsworth of Pinetta. Members not attending: C.W. Killingsworth of San Diego, Cal., Leslie Buie of Rockware, Tex., Betty McCullough Bowers of Inez, Ky., Bill Roberts of Tallahassee, Malvin Vaugh of Beaverton, Ore., Myrtice Woodard Welch of Birmingham, Ala., Dorothy Walker Gates of Ennis, Mont., Martha Cave Odom of Tallahassee, Gene Lanise Bristol of Oakland, N.J., Dorothy Jean Chancy of Lake Park, Kathleen Bass Lewis of Madison, Betty Cone Blake of Fayetteville, Ga., Genalee Hendry Huggins of Madison, Howard Williams of California and Sam Burnette of St. Petersburg. A total of 28 class members are deceased. The class plans to have another reunion in two years.Photo submitted by Helen Ragans PhillipsSeveral wives, husbands and friends were on hand visiting at the reunion. Special friends on hand were George and Gladys Pierce of Earlton, who are cousins of classmate Bobby Jacobs, who is deceased. Pictured, front row, left to right: Gladys Pierce, Juanita Baxby, Hiroko Cherry, Harriett Wynne, Renee Williams and Ann Waring. Back row, left to right: George Pierce, Christine Blanton, Juanita Cason and Ben Waring. Marjorie Rinker Harr MillerMarjorie Rinker Harr Miller was born on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, June 24, 1919 and died at the Presbyterian Home in Quitman, Ga., on July 20, 2013. During World War II, she worked for the U.S. Department of the Navy in Washington, D.C. She married George B. Miller, who preceded her in death. They made a home in Hempstead, N.Y. After moving to Cherry Lake in 1962, Mrs. Miller worked for the Admissions Ofce at North Florida Community College until she retired.. She was an avid quilter, and seamstress and an active member of Grace Presbyterian Church. She was also a supporting friend of the Cherry Lake Methodist Church. Survivors include her son, Gene B. Miller (Beth); her daughter, JoAnn Miller; and her niece, Martha Buhler. Graveside servicesElma Pauline Hudson WaldrepElma Pauline Hudson Waldrep, age 97, passed away on Sunday, July 21, 2013. She was born on September 8, 1915 to Wood Hampton Hudson and Nannie Mae Pulliam Hudson. She was a lifelong resident of Madison County and a member of First Baptist Church, Madison. Mrs. Waldrep was pre-deceased by her husband, Kinch William Waldrep, and daughter, Frances Waldrep. She is survived by one son, Billy Waldrep and wife Carol of Destin; a daughter, Ann Fisher and husband Branson of Perry; three grandsons: Kinch Edward Waldrep and wife Stephanie of Raleigh, N.C.; Thomas William Waldrep, Jr. and wife Ellen of WinstonSalem, N.C. and Donn Waldrep Smith and wife Robin of Madison; 13 great-grandchildren: Carolyn (Kerry) Waldrep and husband Matt Coury of Washington, D.C., Brian Waldrep of Houston, Tex., Megan Eileen, Matthew, Mimi, Catherine and Michael Waldrep of Winston-Salem, N.C., Katie Waldrep Molinder and husband Chad of Quantico, Va., Eddie Waldrep of Morristown, Ind., Abby Waldrep of Indianapolis, Ind., Sydney Waldrep of Raleigh, N.C., Laurie Smith and Keeley Smith, both of Madison; ve great-great-grandchildren: John, William, Maria and Elizabeth Waldrep Coury and Matthew Molinder. Graveside services will be held Thursday, July 25, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Harmony Cemetery in Madison County. The family will receive friends from 10-10:30 a.m. prior to the service at Beggs Funeral Home. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel, is in charge of arrangements (850) 973-4716. will be held on Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 11 a.m., at the Cherry Lake United Methodist Church. Please, no large oral memorials. Memorial gifts may be directed to Grace Presbyterian Church, the Cherry Lake United Methodist Church, or the Presbyterian Home in Quitman, Ga. Grace Foust AmersonMrs. Grace Foust Amerson, age 58, passed away Thursday, July 18, 2013, at South Georgia Medicl Center in Valdosta, Ga. She was born in Miami, and had lived in Madison since 1983. She is survived by one daughter, Delores Mabardy of Madison; two sons, Michael Mims and wife Leah of Auburn, Ala., and Ricky Amerson, of Madison; two brothers, Wayne and Tom Foust of Madison; one sister, Ann Scherman of Madison; and four grandchildren. Funeral services were held Sunday, July 21, 2013, at graveside in Oakridge Cemetery in Madison, with Rev. Pat Doyle ofciating. Beggs Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements, (850) 9732258.

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Submitted by: NFCC Ofce of College Advancement New classes begin Aug. 12, 2013 MADISON, FL The Public Safety Academy at North Florida Community College is now accepting students for its Law Enforcement Recruit, Correctional Basic Recruit and Cross-Over programs. New classes are set to begin Aug. 12. Those interested in enrolling are encouraged to contact the Public Safety Academy now. Classes are held Monday through Thursday from 6-11 p.m. at the NFCC Public Safety Academy complex on the NFCC campus in Madison, Fla. The NFCC Public Safety Academy is one of 40 criminal justice training centers approved by the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission (CJSTC) to train basic recruits in law enforcement, corrections, recertication programs, and continuing workforce education. NFCCs Correctional and Law Enforcement Basic Recruit programs prepare students for the certication exams required for all Florida ofcers and require rigorous physical demands upon the recruit in defensive tactics, rearms, vehicle operations and physical tness training. Acceptance in these programs are limited to meeting requirements established by the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission, North Florida Community College, The Public Safety Academy, and our Criminal Justice Advisory Board. Students can complete training in one year or less. Those interested in training at NFCC are encouraged to begin the enrollment process now. You must be at least 18-years-old to enter NFCCs Law Enforcement and Correctional Basic Recruit programs and must pass the Florida Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test (CJBAT) before submitting an application for admission. The CJBAT can be taken on the NFCC campus. Ofcial high school/GED diploma and transcripts and passing background checks are also required for admission. Financial assistance may be available for qualied students. For more information, contact Gail Hackle, at (850) 973-1617 or hackleg@nfcc.edu. Information is also available at www.nfcc.edu/public-safety. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Madison County Carrier 5 AAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Capital City Bank still offers Absolutely Free Checking* and free value-added services. Open a checking account and receive afreedebit card,freeonline banking with e-statements, Bill Pay and Mobile Banking^, andfreemoney+ for your old checks and debit cards! Stop by or OPENyour accountOnline today.freeIts still a great deal. 343 West Base St. | 973.4161 www.ccbg.comMEMBER FDIC*Client purchases checks. Bank rules and restrictions apply. Account subject to fees if overdrawn. ^Fees charged by mobile service provider are the responsibility of the user. +Limitations apply. Ask a banker for complete details. BAILEY MONUMENT CO 740252 Plans Underway For Hickory Grove Founders DayBy Dan BuchananThe time has come for the folks at Hickory Grove to start talking about and even planning for Founders Day at the church. This year, Founders Day will take place on the third Saturday in October, which will be Oct. 19. It will all start with a hearty breakfast in Cousin Mary Lous Country Kitchen. The old wood-burning stoves will again be cranked up, and bellowing wood smoke and cooking biscuits and cooking sausage and fried ham on top in iron skillets. This year, there will be more things for the young kids to do. For one thing, we will have the Hickory Grove School House in operation, and Sunday School will take place in the old house at least three times during the morning. Another new thing this year will be the presence of the new Madison Youth Ranch, which is currently being built just west of Pinetta. In fact, this years Official Founders Day Program will be dedicated to the construction and completion of the United Methodist Church Childrens Home Madison Youth Ranch. Elwyn McLeod has got the sugar cane growing great at his home just a mile or so from the church, and with all the rain this spring and summer, it really looks great. He will be in charge of making the delicious syrup at Founders Day again this year. You need to get to the church early and be sure to get a couple of bottles of this true southern delicacy. In fact, you can sample the syrup in the Country Kitchen should you desire. Buy a biscuit, poke a hole in the biscuit and fill it up with syrup. That is the method we use to eat syrup in our community. Mark your calendar, and send an invite to your kin folks who live in other places to be sure and not forget to attend the Hickory Grove Founders Day celebration. The date will be Saturday, Oct. 19. Get there early and stay all day. EVERYONE is welcome at Hickory Grove Founders Day at Hickory Grove. Photo submitted by Dan BuchananElwyn McLeod stands in his eld of cane. Every year, McLeod prepares the homemade syrup for Hickory Grove Founders Day at his own expense and he grows and tends the cane crop. Founders Day is set for Oct. 19 this year and plans are already underway to make it an even more exciting day than it already is. Lions Club: On To The Next ChallengeBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.With the massive undertaking that was the Fourth of July God and Country Celebration behind them, the Lions Club members have been catching their breath for the last couple of meetings and getting ready to start planning ahead for their next event: the annual Lions Club Turkey Shoot in November.I know its a load off your shoulders with the Fourth of July over, said Lions Club President Jay Lee at one of the meetings. He was pleased with the way everything had turned out. Even the rain, which might have kept some people away, did have the silver lining effect of cooling things off, and it had stopped well before the fireworks display. We had a good event, and I want to thank everyone who worked so hard, said Lee. Other members reported conversations with vendors who had done well enough to say that they would definitely be back next year. Even the bounce houses, whose vendors had hoped only to break even, reported profits. Out-of-town visitors from as far away as Atlanta had reported that they were impressed with the fireworks display. A lions share of the kudos went to Ina Thompson, owner of the Mail Room, who bent over backward to produce the souvenir booklet for the event, and did a much better job than the company the club used last year that charged nearly twice as much. She (Thompson) did a great job on the handbook, said Christy Roebuck. Shes a member just for her contribution. Roebuck reported other conversations with people who were impressed with the handbooks quality and color, and people who were pleased that their ads looked so good because Thompson had worked very hard to make sure they did. For next year, they also discussed the possibility of adding a fun run around the lake with prizes, since runs draw more people. But before next years Fourth of July event, theres the Thanksgiving Turkey Shoot, a fundraising event that takes place over three weekends in November. People pay entry fees and compete against each other shooting at targets to win frozen turkeys, or watch their friends compete while they enjoy chips and drinks offered for sale by the club. Until then, theres lots of planning ahead to do.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, July 16, 2013Lions Club President Jay Lee leads a discussion about the next upcoming challenge for the Lions Club. NFCC Public Safety Academy Enrolling Now Correctional Ofcer And Law Enforcement Recruit Programs Accepting New Students

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Tommy Hardee: Theres No Off Year In The Supervisor Of Elections OfficeBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.By his own admission, before he became Madison County Supervisor of Elections, Tommy Hardee used to wonder what on earth the Elections Office did during an off election year.Now he knows the answer: a heck of a lot. Were busier than ever, he told the Rotary Club, where he was visiting with two of his staff members, Alfreda Martin and Ludie Porter, discussing what goes on in an elections office during an off year. There are new laws and mandates from the state that have to be implemented, new security procedures, voter registration lists to maintain, voter information to update, equipment upgrades that have to be done sooner or later (hopefully sooner, if funding can be found, well before the state-mandated deadlines roll around) and of course, voter registration drives because, as Hardee has stated many times, every vote matters. Many of his efforts to bring the office up to speed have been inspired by visits to the Supervisor of Elections (SOE) Office in Bay County, currently the first and only SOE in the nation to earn an ISO 9000 rating for its high level of quality. Hardee hopes that the Madison County SOE will be the second to earn such a rating. It doesnt matter if Madison is a smaller county, he said. Our votes are just as important as Miami-Dades. There was no book on how to be a Supervisor of Elections when Hardee was appointed to the office in late 2011. There were laws on what had to be done, but no how-to guidebook. Hardee learned the ropes from visiting other elections supervisors in other counties, and figuring out how to apply that to Madison County. Every other year, the Madison SOE office goes through its security procedures to see how they can be improved and what new procedures need to be implemented. So far, the staff has gone from 20 pages of security protocols to about 65 pages. The there is the biannual report on inactive voters that is due for the state. When a voter misses voting in two elections, he or she is moved to the Inactive Voters List. If the voters remain inactive or if they leave the county or die or otherwise become ineligible, they will eventually be removed from the polls. After New Years Day, the Madison SOE moved some 500 voters to the Inactive List and removed another 668 from the registration rolls; some of those removed had died, and one of the things Hardee would like to work on is getting funeral homes to send death notices to the SOEs office. Only after such official notification can a deceased voter be removed from the voter registration rolls. On the other side of the equation, he would like to see every eligible voter in the county registered, especially young people, and he would like them to realize how important their vote is and why it is important to cast their vote and make their voice heard. Once a month, he holds voter registration drives in places like Greenville and Lee, and would like to go to other places like Pinetta. He visits schools, nursing facilities and civic clubs to talk about voting and explain how the process works with mock elections. He has even held a voter registration drive at Project Graduation. Another idea he is working on is a Veterans Wall of Honor in the Elections Office Vote in Honor of a Veteran. If you have a family member in the military, bring in an 8x10 and well scan it in, he said. Their photo will be placed on the wall. Since veterans are the ones who have fought for the continued right to vote for everyone, perhaps a wall of honor will encourage family members and other people to vote in their honor. He also had some interesting statistics on Madison County voters. Women turn out to vote at a significantly higher rate than men: 4850 females voters to 3806 male voters in the last election. Of those, over half are age 51 or older. The Supervisors office is looking at an 11 percent increase in its operating budget next year, due to state mandates, mostly involving increased payments into retirement benefits for employees and elected officials. The increase was instituted mainly due to actuarial tables, but as Hardee pointed out, Miami-Dade can afford it, but smaller counties like Madison struggle with the added expense. Another thing county offices will have to contend with is the increasing role the state wants to play in running them, mainly because of three counties that act up every year. One thing he is proud of is the fact that Madison County, a rural, spread-out community, has four early voting sites to make it easier for its citizens to vote. Early voting has now been extended to 14 days, and he plans to adjust the hours on weekdays and weekends to catch the most voters possible. The more people who vote early, the shorter the lines will be on Election Day. Another tip for voters, to help save time and make their voting experience as smooth as possible, is to use the sample ballots that arrive in the mail and appear in the newspaper. By studying those ballots, marking their choices ahead of time and bringing those sample ballots with them to the polls, they can shorten the time it takes to vote. As an example, the last election cycle had a lengthy ballot that included several amendments to the state constitution. Those who had prepared ahead of time and brought their sample ballots with them spent an average of 15 minutes in the voting booth. Those who hadnt took up to 45 minutes or longer. There are also several changes to the absentee ballot system that now allows the SOE to contact a voter who forgot to sign his ballot. It also gives a 10-day extension to absentee ballots that must come in from overseas from veterans. Madison County is also in line for a grant that will help the SOE get an email system up and running to accept overseas ballots; a needed change, as Hardee pointed out, relating the story of an overseas veteran who called twice during the absentee ballot period to try to cast his vote, but the fax line refused to work properly both times. Something else voters must be aware of is the requirement to bring a photo ID that shows their signature. The most common ID used is a drivers license or a State of Florida ID card. As most people know, Madison no longer has a DMV office, but the FLOW-Mobile (Florida Licensing On Wheels) bus brings a mobile DMV office with everything needed to get or renew a license or get a state photo ID card. It visits Madison County about once a month and its next scheduled stop is August 5 in the Winn-Dixie parking lot from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. For more information on the documentation youll need to bring with you to the FLOW-mobile, visit the website www.GatherGoGet.com for a checklist of papers youll need, or call (850) 617-2628 or (850) 443-0406 for more information about the mobile licensing program. Voters may also need to check on whether or not their signature may need to be updated with the SOE, if their signature has changed in any way over time. Visit the office at 239 S.W Pinck-Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, July 17, 2013Supervisor of Elections Tommy Hardee and Rotary Club President Wayne Conger exchange handshakes after Hardees presentation. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, July 17, 2013Supervisor of Elections employees Ludie Porter (left) and Alfreda Martin (right) stand beside a table display encouraging people to vote early. www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 6A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Madison County Carrier 7A SEMI ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE OVER 15,000 PAIRS OVER 15,000 PAIRS OVER 15,000 P AIRS ON SALE ON SALE ON SALE UP TO UP TO 80% 80% OFF! OFF! DOOR DOOR BUSTERS BUSTERS $ 8 TO $ 12! $ 8 TO $ 12! GROUP 1 GROUP 2 BCBG LUCKY BRAND JESSICA SIMPSON FERGIE CLARKS BARE TRAPS & MANY MORE COLE HAAN DONALD PILNER VANELI BRIGHTON J.RENEE MICHAEL KORS & MANY MORE HUGE SELECTION HUGE SELECTION HUGE SELECTION Of Mens Shoes on Sale 10-80% Off 813681 $ 49 99 $ 89 99 Values to $ 225 00 $ 16 99 $ 59 99 Values to $ 150 00

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE YARD/ CLOSING SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTEDwww.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . .8A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, July 24, 2013 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 7/22/2013 THROUGH 7/28/2013I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell) run, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline.$50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves, buttons around neck with circular cutout on back, beautiful gown $100. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250. Size 10 Teen Dress bright baby blue dress, halter top bodice with sequins stitched throughout; built-in crinoline with sequin appliques on lace overlay. Cinderella looking beautiful dress! $200.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 and leave a message.3/3, run, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-41417/18 rtn n/c New ve bedroom three bath doublewide home must go now. Make offer. Selling below cost! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cYes we take trades! Replace your old home with a more efcient and much stronger safer home now. Call 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNow is the best time to buy a new mobile home! Low rates means new homes under $400 month! 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cStop throwing money away! Our new homes cost less than $100 month to heat and cool! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNice triplewide, replace, glamour bath, sliding glass doors, new metal roof. Must sell now. Reduced to only $22,900 cash. 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cBlow out pricing on all 2012 mobile homes. Making room for new 2013 homes. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2013 Homes of Merit tape and texture starting at $375 per month. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cUsed single wide 16x80 3 bedroom 2 bath home ready to go at $15,900. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2006 Fleetwood home. Super clean and looks brand new. Call Mike at 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cNew and used homes starting as low as $6,500 on doublewides. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age 18yr. Day and evening classes. 386-362-10657/3 7/31, pd Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Must be a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, and be able to get along with an entire ofce staff. Must have good personality, love to talk on the telephone, and a valid drivers license. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.3/15 rtn, n/c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cMan of many trades and talents available for hire. Honest, reliable, creative, and reasonable/fair pricing. Specializes in custom deck building, sheds, fencing, special projects. Can also do pressure washing, and gardening (tree trimmings, ower beds, grooming seasonal shrubs and trees etc.) If interested, please Call John at 850-673-9192. References available.5/1 rtn, n/cBurial Lot in Pineland Cemetery For Sale (850) 869-0916.7/17 8/7, c Newspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Adoption Choosing adoption? Loving, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Let's help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, toll-free (855-779-3699) Sklar Law Firm, LLC Fl Bar #0150789. Business Opportunities A SODA/SNACK VENDING ROUTE LOCATIONS INCLUDED IN YOU LOCAL AREA $8,995 MINIMUM INVESTMENT GUARANTEE CASH FLOW 10 YEAR WARRANTEE 1-800-367-6709 Ext.99. Education ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Certied Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC TRAIN can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-212-5888. Help Wanted EARNING BETTER PAY IS ONE STEP AWAY! Averitt offers Experienced CDL-A Drivers Excellent Benets and Weekly Hometime. 888-362-8608, Recent Grads w/a CDL-A 1-5/wks Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer. CDL-A Company Drivers, Students or Lease a Brand New Freightliner or Peterbilt Tractor Today! Zero Down, No Credit Check, Affordable & Fuel Efcient. CDL-A Required. Apply Online: TheWilTrans.com. Solo & Teams. Priority Dispatch. Consistent Miles. Established Routes. No Touch Freight/Hazmat CDL A w/1 yr. OTR exp. Food Grade Tanker 855-IRT-TANKwww.indianrivertransport.comDRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com .EOE. Home Improvement Premium Metal Roong, Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof proles in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888-779-4270 or visit www.gulfcoastsupply.com Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32. LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com7/10 rtn, c 2006 White Expedition Eddie Bauer For Sale Call (850) 464-1230 for more information. Very nice family car in very good condition. $8,500 OBO. 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Call (850) 869-0916.7/17 rtn, c 3 BD House For Rent Central heat and air. Located at 537 SW Overbrooks Street in Greenville. HUD or Section 8 voucher accepted. Contact (850) 948-7501.7/17 7/29, pdCoordinator of Institutional Research and Institutional Effectiveness See www.nfcc.edu for details.7/17 7/31, c Relationships are priceless. On and off the Clock. If you love patient-centered health care with real relationships inside a company that encourages fun on and off the clock, then DaVita is the place for you. We offer career options to t your lifestyle! DaVita has multiple openings now as well as future opportunities in the Madison, Quincy and Tallahassee area. We are looking for future leaders with opportunities as: LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES REGISTERED NURSES PATIENT CARE TECHNICIAN Dialysis experience is strongly preferred. DaVita is a FORTUNE 500 company featured in Training Magazines Top 125 and Modern Healthcares 100 Best Places to Work. Why wait? Explore a career with DaVita today! Apply Online at: http://careers.davita.com or contact Tiffy Christian at (877) 482-7625. DaVita is an Equal Opportunity Employer, CAREERS http://careers.davita.com 2011 DaVita Inc. All Rights reserved.7/17, 7/24, cExecutive Director of Development and External Affairs. See www.nfcc.edu for details.7/17 7/31, c Gift Shop Close Out Sale Sparks Tractor Company All John Deere merchandise 50% off starting July 1st August 30th. Layaway available. Regular business hours are Monday Friday from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. (850) 973-3355.7/17 8/28, c Coachman Chaparral 5th Wheel Camper For Sale Two slideouts, one awning. Excellent condition. Always stored under shelter. $18,900. (850) 971-5589.7/24, pdDrivers: Company Drivers/Independent Contractors, Owner Operators.Hiring for SE Regional and OTR. Home Every Week! Great Pay!! Safety Bonus! SE Pay Premium. Excellent Benets, Paid Holidays & Vacations! CDL-A & 1yr OTR Exp. Req. Epes Transport System, Inc. 888-293-3232 www.epestransport.com.7/24, pd North Florida Child Development, Inc. Is seeking Preschool Teacher for Greenville Head Start Center Must have Bachelors degree in Early Childhood Education or related eld. Submit resumes to NFCD, Human Resource Department, PO Box 38, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 or email smcgill@oridachildren.org Closing Date:August 5, 2013 DFWP/MF/7-4/EOE C03MA001.7/24, 7/31, cHouse Cleaning, Cooking and Companionship No job to big or small with a price you can afford. Call and leave a message at (850) 210-2274. References available.7/24, pd There will be a yard/closing sale this Saturday, July 27 from 8 a.m. 1 p.m. The sale will be located at 301 Base Street in Madison. Everything must go! (850) 869-9099.7/24, pd DRIVER NEEDED CDL required. Call Grubbs Petroleum. (850) 997-5632.7/24 rtn, c

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www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Madison County Carrier 9A ----Legals---Legal Notice Morven Superstorage, 434 Second Street, Morven, GA and Madison Superstorage, 298 SW Martin Luther King Drive Madison, Florida and Jasper Superstorage, 1213 US 129N, Jasper, Florida will have a liquidation Auction on July 27, 2013 at 9:00am in Morven GA. 10:30am in Madison, FL and 12:00pm in Jasper FL. Units to be sold in Morven, GA are #25M Katherine Donaldson, #11M Yolanda Jones, # 36 Dalaine Prescott and #3 Wesley Thomas. In Madison, FL units #10D Allison Graham, 11 & 6H Bert Holloway, #12E Cynthia Mc Quay, #7D Meshalene Taylor and #4D LaTonya Thompson. In Jasper, FL units #84 Maranda Bembry, and #59 & 4 Dian Williams. Owners have until 12:00pm Friday July 26, 2013 to pay in full to avoid liquidation. Contents are believed to be household items. Hickory Hill Auctions will handle the sale. For more information and to see which units or if the auction will be held see www.hickoryhillauctions.com.7/17, 7/24 LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. will hold a Planning and Evaluation Committee meeting on Tuesday, August 13, 2013 at 9:00 A.M. at the Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc., Administration Ofce located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida.7/24 LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting for the Executive Committee Members on Tuesday, August 13, 2013, 10:00 A.M. at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Ofce located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW Live Oak, Florida.7/24 7/24, 7/31 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JERRY WADE HUFSTETLER Deceased. File No. 2013-70-CP Division ____________ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JERRY WADE HUFSTETLER deceased, whose date of death was April 5, 2013 is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Ofce Box 237, Madison, FL 32340 The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must le their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must le their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of rst publication of this notice is July 24 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative:Personal Representative: Richard L. Coleman Patsy Hufstetler Attorney for Petitioner6 NE Dandelion Street Coleman Talley, LLP Pinetta, Florida 32360 910 North Patterson Street Valdosta, Georgia 31601 (229) 242-7562 (229) 333-0885 facsimile Florida Bar No. 07815687/24, 7/31 Would you like to give up the name tag for a business card? Ready to sell that old TV to make room for a new one? Well, this is your chance. Check out the Classifieds today! Call us to submit your classified ad at:(850) 973-4141 orMail us at:Greene Publishing, Inc.P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 2009 Hometown ContentSudoku Puzzle #2976-DDifficult12 3 1456 71 8 927 46 3681 3 4 5618 947 2009 Hometown ContentSudoku Puzzle #2976-MMedium1 2 3 452 6718 3 647 2975 7519 4 796 547 839 Sudoku

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.Its not something people like to talk about, and often families dont plan for it ahead of time, putting it off until necessity hits them in the face. Then, it can be a tangled web of legal requirements, nancial pitfalls, and conicting views of how to care for an elderly relative in his/her last days, weeks, months or years of life. Twyla Sketchley, of the Sketchley Law Firm in Tallahassee, is one of 99 law rms in Florida that practices elder and guardianship law exclusively. Sketchley visited the residents at Lake Park of Madison recently to talk about the importance of planning ahead for end-of-life issues, making sure families know what their loved ones wishes are, and making any legal arrangements necessary to make sure those wishes are carried out. The State of Florida is transitioning to a managed care system, said Sketchley, which is yet another reason for making plans now, before others, perhaps even the state, has to step in and make them. Sketchley, whose lively presentation was not quite what one might expect, included several humorous Star Wars/Star Trek and other pop culture references. The subject at hand could be quite a downer, Sketchley, an admitted Star Wars geek, told the audience, which was why so many people avoid talking about it. Yet it is also a subject that no one can afford to ignore, and she felt that presenting the topic in a positive, upbeat manner might make it a little easier for people to think about it. What kind of care do people want as they come to the end of their lives? Wouldnt it be better to make their own plans, if they do not want others (family members or even strangers) making those decisions for them, should they become incapacitated and no longer able to speak for themselves? It is a rather serious topic that needs serious consideration, and it can be depressing. Addressing it with a little humor and lightheartedness here and there can help. Otherwise, said Sketchley, After talking about death and dying, we can all end up having a pretty bad day. Sketchley is also licensed to practice law in Montana, which has a right-to-die law, unlike Florida. In the Sunshine State, if people dont make advance decisions about end-of-life health care, they essentially leave those decisions up to Tallahassee. A stranger will be appointed as their guardian, the one who will make those all-important healthcare decisions for them. Sketchley has handled a lot of guardianships for individuals who failed to leave advance plans and were later unable to tell anyone what they did or didnt want. For herself, she said, she wants no health care at all at the end of her life; she would like to have someone simply drive her up to Montanas Glacier Park and leave her there. Eventually, she hopes she would die of hypothermia, or perhaps in a scenario straight out of Legends of the Fall, pr eferably with Brad Pitt somewhere in the picture. For an individual to spend the end of his life in the manner of his own choosing, it takes some advance preparation. Since it takes a family and a village to care for the elderly, the frail and the disabled, the person making the initial end-of-life plans should include family members in the discussion to make sure everyone knows what his or her wishes are, taking into account nances and what the individual or family can afford. One of the most important documents concerned with end-of-life planning is the Advance Directive, which dictates what kind of health care you want at the end of your life. Many people dont think about health care until they get sick, but incapacitating illness isnt something that happens only to the elderly and the inrm. It can happen suddenly and unexpectedly to anyone, as the tragic Teri Shiavo case illustrated. A persistent, vegetative state that is not terminal but that has no brain activity, no meaningful interaction with others and nothing that constitutes what is normally considered quality of life, can last indenitely. It can be from a sudden illness or the result of an accident, but without an Advance Directive, the person stricken will have no say in whether life-prolonging measures are employed or not. In the Shiavo case, bitterly feuding family members meant that what should have been a private family/individual matter was eventually battled out in a very public forum...the Florida Legislature. If you want to leave your health care decisions up to the legislature in Tallahassee, dont ll out an Advance Directive, said Sketchley. Another important document to consider is the Living Will, which states what kind of end-of-life treatment you desire, but doesnt kick in until you become incompetent; it spells out the kind of care you would like to receive or would like to have withdrawn once you reach an end stage condition or are found to be in a permanent vegetative state. If you become terminally ill, there is usually a period of time when you can still function well enough to understand your situation and direct your own care. Once you are past that, the Living Will takes effect. A Living Will should not be confused with a Will, or Last Will and Testament, which directs the distribution of your property once you die. A Living Will applies only to what happens before you reach that point. Florida does recognize out-of-state Advance Directives or Living Wills, so long as these documents were executed in full compliance with the laws of that state; one problem with online documents is that they may not fully meet all of the state criteria or otherwise not be in full compliance. It is worth your time and money to have an attorney go over your Advance Directive and Living Will to make sure it is a sound legal document rather than leave it all to chance. Other end-of-life tools are the Health Care Surrogate and the Health Care Proxy. The difference is that the Health Care Surrogate is someone you specically choose to make health care decisions on your behalf if you cannot make them yourself; a Health Care Proxy is an individual who is designated by the state to make those decisions, chosen from a list of persons who presum ably w ould know your wishes. Your Health Care Surrogate should be given a copy of your Living Will along with your doctors and other family members. When it comes to a Health Care Surrogate, this is another very important choice that should be considered carefully. It doesnt have to be a family member; it could be a close friend who understands you and what you want and can actually handle the stress of making those decisions for you when the time comes. If you choose a family member, you should also consider who might, as well as who might not be the best choice, even if they are close family, like the irresponsible child/relative you love dearly but who might just up and disappear when the time comes, or the child/relative with religious beliefs that might be incompatible with what you want. Even if the person carried out your wishes the way you would want, he or she would be enduring the extra stress of going against their religious teachings. A relative with a history of mental illness would not be a good choice, either. Whomever you wish to designate, pick someone reasonable, capable and mentally sound. Then, talk to the person. These decisions he or she will be called upon to make are hard. Will your surrogate be emotionally capable of handling them? Your surrogate should be chosen only after careful consideration and several detailed conversations to make sure that the person knows what you want and is comfortable with the responsibility. Suppose you dont choose a surrogate? In that case, the state will choose a proxy. By law, the rst person the state must choose is your spouse. But will he or she be a capable proxy? If not, or if there is no surviving spouse, the next choice is your children. If there is only one child, and that child is capable, that might work, but if there is more than one child and they cannot all agree, it becomes a decision by committee, where the majority rules...the majority of all available children, that is. If another child lives across the country and cannot be there to add his or her input, they may feel unjustly left out of the process. Next on the list are your parents, if they are still living. After your parents, your siblings are next on the list. If theres just one, and if he or she is a capable person who knows what you would want, that may be ne. If there is more than one, you will run into the committee situation again. Then, if none of the above are available, the next person on the list is a licensed clinical social worker. What about one of your close friends who might know you better than any family member? Theyre going to be at the bottom of the list and that includes even friends-with-benets or friends you may be cohabitating with. If this is the person you would want to make your decisions, but you fail to ofcially choose him or her as your Health Care Surrogate, your children or other family members will make your decisions, not the one person in the world you feel closest to and would rather put your trust in. You have to make it ofcial if that is what you want. End-of-life planning is one of the areas of elder law in which the Sketchley Law Firm can offer elderly clients and their caregivers assistance. For more information on the full range of elder law services, visit the website www.sketchleylaw.com, and click on What is Elder Law? www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, July 24, 2013 10A Madison County CarrierAROUNDMADISONCOUNTY Big Fish MondayCatch the biggest sh of the week and win a FREE oil changeBring in a photo of your sh with its measurements for a chance to win a FREE OIL CHANGEParts/Service Hours: Mon-Fri-7:30-5:30 Sat. 7:30-3:00850-584-6178 2441 South Byron Butler Parkway Perry, Flwww.timberlandford.comSales Hours: Mon-Fri 7:30-5:30 Sat. 7:30-3:00800-763-4589Timberland FordConvenient Service Center Hours Saturday: 7:30 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Greenville Country Christmas Meeting Set By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. The Greenville Country Christmas Committee will hold a meeting on Monday, Aug. 6, at 7 p.m. We want to invite anyone and everyone who is interested in Country Christmas to attend the meeting, Kathy Reams said. She said their ideas and input would be welcome. Greenville Country Christmas is an annual event which has been held for over 20 years where people come together to celebrate the Christmas season in Greenville. The meeting will be held inside the new American Legion Post Hall in Greenville. The Post is the old NAPA Auto parts Building. The building is located at 133Grand Street (the corner of US Highway 90 and Grand Street) in Greenville. For more information on Greenville Country Christmas, please call Stuart McIver (850) 371-0042 Class Of 1973 Reunion Being PlannedMembers of the Madison High School Class of 1973 are planning a class reunion to be held December 27-29. The committee is asking that all class members please contact one of the persons listed below to express your interest in participating in the reunion and receive further information. The registration deadline is November 1, 2013.Mary Frances Mauldin, mauldinm73@gmail.com Sharon James Postell, goldenlife59@gmail.com (850) 973-6200 Renetta Warren Parrish, renetta.parrish@yahoo.com (850) 464-0610 Fagarie Wormack, fwormack@yahoo.com Twyla Sketchley: Discussing End-Of-Life IssuesGreene Publishing Inc. Photo by Lynette NorrisElder Law attorney Twyla Sketchley talks to a group at Lake Park of Madison about the importance of advance planning for end-of-life issues.