Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00174
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: August 12, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00174
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

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VOL. 46 NO. 52O Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


District

Back-To-

School

Event Set

For

August 15
On August 15, start-
ing at noon, the King of
the Grill Cook-Off and
Car Show Extravaganza
will be launched at
Madison Recreation
Center. These two excit-
ing events will be com-
plemented with the
District Back-to-School
Fair. Representatives
from various health and
service agencies will
also be available to an-
swer questions.
The Health Depart-
ment will also be open
from 1 until 4 p.m. that
Please see School,
Page 4A
Parents Of
Disabled
Children
Invited To
Presentation
Parents of children
with autism and other
disabilities are invited to
attend a presentation by
Lee R. Clark, Ph.D., Se-
nior Advo-
cate/Investigator with
the Advocacy Center for
Persons with Disabili-
ties, Inc. The presenta-
tion will be held Tuesday,
September 1, from 6:30-8
p.m. at the First Baptist
Church in Madison.
Specific topics to be
addressed include, but
are not limited, to:
Please see Parents,
Page 4A

Local
Mitigation
Strategy
Meeting
Set For
August 19
As part of ongoing
efforts for updating the
Local Mitigation Strate-
gy (LMS) for Madison
County, Madison County
Emergency Manage-
ment will hold a public
meeting on Wednesday,
August 19, at 5:30 p.m., at
the County Commission
Meeting Room in the
Courthouse Annex, lo-
cated at 229
SW Pinckney Street.
The meeting will
provide an opportunity
for the residents of
Madison County to re-
view and comment on
Please see Meeting,
Page 4A


Ci


Side


Iks


Madison residents discuss concerns that include city sidewalks


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Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, August 7, 2009
This sidewalk hazard is located near the corner of Macon
and Horry in downtown Madison. The missing sections and pro-
truding pieces are severe, making it extremely difficult for wheel-
chair travel. Similar spots exist along both blocks that meet on
this corner.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
When the Concerned Citizens of Madi-
son met on August 4 at the Art Guild to re-
sume discussions of several concerns they
look to address, including the formation of
a formal Neighborhood Watch program,
many expressed displeasure with the man-
ner in which the city handled their com-
plaints. The tone was passionate, although
several expressed the importance of com-
municating and collaborating with local of-
ficials and law enforcement to bring their


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fe- -n ""~

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Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, August 7, 2009
This sidewalk is in the historic district of downtown Madison on
Livingston Street. The sidewalk was likely built during or before
WWII. It is heavily cracked, but passable.


concerns to action, the sidewalk concerns and asked to pro-
Among other key issues discussed was vide this detail of the city's current and fu-


the poor condition of sidewalks through-
out the city, with the historic district par-
ticularly emphasized. The group reviewed
a few illustrations and cost details provid-
ed from the city, although the information
was general, and didn't detail which side-
walks were currently scheduled for, or un-
der repair, nor did it include budget
information.
The next morning, City Manager
Harold Emrich was interviewed regarding


ture repair schedule.
Emrich acknowledged the concern as
very "legitimate," providing a budget and
geographic summary, which included five
repair locations that are along the down-
town Walking Tour:
NE Livingston & Hancock
NE Range & Livingston
SW Hancock & Rutledge
NE Sumpter & Horry
Please see Sidewalks, Page 4A


Smokey


Bear Turns

65 Years Old


Federal Guidelines For

2009 H1N1 Influenza In

Schools Offer Many Options-


Updated federal guidelines offer
state and local public health and
school officials a range of options for
responding to 2009 H1N1 influenza in
schools, depending on how severe the
flu may be in their communities. The
guidance says officials should balance
the risk of flu in their communities
with the disruption that school dis-
missals will cause in education and
the wider community.
The guidance from the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
was announced today at a joint news
conference by Health and Human Ser-
vices Secretary Kathleen Sebelius,
Education Secretary Arne Duncan,
Homeland Security Secretary Janet
Napolitano, and CDC Director
Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.
The school guidance is a part of a
broader national framework to re-
spond to novel H1N1 influenza, which
includes encouraging people to be
vaccinated against the virus and to
take other actions to avoid infection.
The CDC anticipates more illness af-
ter the school year starts, because flu
typically is transmitted more easily in
the fall and winter.
"We're going to continue to do


everything possible to keep our chil-
dren and all Americans healthy
and safe this fall," Secretary Sebelius
said. "But all Americans also have a
part to play The best way to prevent
the spread of flu is vaccination. A sea-
sonal flu vaccine is ready to go, and
we should have one for the 2009 H1N1
flu by mid-October."
"The federal government contin-
ues to coordinate closely with state
and local governments, school dis-
tricts and the private sector on H1N1
preparation as we head into the fall
flu season-and the upcoming school
year," said Secretary Napolitano.
"Readiness for H1N1 is a shared re-
sponsibility, and the guidance re-
leased today provides communities
with the tools they need to protect the
health of their students and teach-
ers."
For an outbreak similar in severi-
ty to the spring 2009 H1N1 infection,
the guidelines recommend basic good
hygiene, such as hand washing. In ad-
dition, students or staff members
with flu-like illness (showing symp-
toms of flu) should stay home at least
24 hours after fever symptoms have
Please see Swine Flu, Page 4A


rnoiuu bufiiLuU
Smokey Bear made a special appearance at
Hickory Grove's annual Founder's Day. Smokey is
pictured with Olivia (left) and Gracie Galbraith.
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Smokey Bear will celebrate its 65th birthday
on Sunday, August 9. It was on that date in 1944 that
Smokey Bear made his debut appearance nation-
wide on posters and billboards as the United States
Forest Service, promoting the message of forest fire
prevention.
The first message that Smokey Bear
brought to light was "Care would prevent nine out of
Please see Smokey, Page 4A


I Lca Wethr


3 Sections, 34 Pages Wed Thu Fri Sat
Around Madison 5 -10A Obituaries 5A 92/74 ./1_ 87/72 __87/72 /15 90/72
Classifieds 14A From Page One 4A 8/12 3 814
Legals 15A Health & Nutrition 12A Variable clouds with scattered Scattered thunderstorms possible. A few thunderstorms possible. Scattered thunderstorms. Highs in
Bridal 10A Back To School B Section showers and thunderstorms, the low 90s and lows in the low
mainly in the aft. 70s.


IIne


r OA-I-





2A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 12, 2009


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Wandering With
The Publisher

Mary Ellen Greene
Columnist


Happy 99th Birthday
To My Father


This Saturday, August 15, 2009, is a special day
in our families' lives.
The patriarch of our family, William Buford Sel-
man, Sr., will turn a "young" 99 years old.
Not many people live long enough to turn 99,
and many of those who do are not still in their right
minds to know the significance of such a feat, and
many do not realize the unusualness of such a
birthday. But, our Dad does.
Dad was born in Armuchee, Ga. on August 15,
1910, to Jonah and Lottie Selman. He was the oldest
son of the family of six children. The only other re-
maining living sibling in his family is his brother,
Gordon, who also is a resident of Madison. Dad's
mother was a music teacher and homemaker, and
his father was a rural mail carrier. In the small
community of Aruuchee, Ga., everyone knew every
one else, and it was a fun place for us, as children, to
visit our kin that we saw about once a year.
In Dad's immediate family were: Jessie, the old-
est child, and the only girl of the family She has
passed away. She and her husband, Cyril, owned a
restaurant in Aruuchee, and we always enjoyed go-
ing to vist them and eating in their place of busi-
ness. They had three children of their own: Joyce,
Ronald, and C.C. I can remember going to visit and
playing with our cousins. What fun we always had
with the Lynch family!
The second-born child of the Selman family
was our father, William Buford Selman. He finished
high school in Aruchee after skipping several
grades along the way for his scholastic excellence.
He later worked in repairs for a telephone ex-
change company with Southern Bell. During the
Depression, he worked for the Georgia Agriculture
Dept. inspecting cotton. This is how he came to
Madison. He worked with the Ag. Dept. for three
years as a statistician in the United States Cotton
Service. He later worked with the Van H. Priest
Co. as their head bookkeeper for their 16 stores in
Florida and Georgia. The company, was, of
course, based in Madison. Their office was located
in the building still standing at Lake Francis to
the left of the Madison Woman's Club building. It
was known as the "Van H. Priest Warehouse." Af-
ter meeting my mother, Berta Lucile Green, who
worked for the Van H. Priest Co. also, they dated
for a little time, and they decided to get married.
Mother was working at the Priest Dime Store in
downtown Madison, and after marrying Dad, they
branched out on their own and opened Lucile's
Dress Shop next door to the Priest Dime Store.
They ran the dress shop for 60 years, until it
burned when downtown Madison caught fire in
1997. Dad simply said at the time that it was the
Lord's way of saying, "Buford, it's time to take
Lucile, (who had developed Parkinson's Disase),
and go home. And, he did. Mother died at age 83.
Third in line of my dad's family was Uncle
Roy Selman, who was a real estate investor, and,
who also owned a lumber yard, andl sawmill busi-
ness. Roy was a County Commissioner for Floyd
County, Ga., for many years. Roy is also deceased,
and his wife, Irene, passed away in 2005. Their
daughter, Linda, still resides in Georgia with her
family The fourth child was Uncle Gordan Sel-
man of Madison. He was married to Hettie and
they had two children: Martha and Don, who still
lives here. The fifth child was Uncle Clyde, who
was the Vice-President of the 1st National Bank of
Rome, Ga. He and his wife Jeanette had two boys.
The baby of the family was Uncle James, a carpen-
ter, also deceased. He had one daughter.
Our family feels blessed to have had Dad as our
patriarch these many, many years. We wish a hap-
py 99th birthday to the best Dad in the World.
Happy, Happy Birthday, Daddy! May you have
99 more wonderful years.Thank you, Dad, for all
you have meant to me and your family, and still are,
and for being our "guiding light" these many, many
years.


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word,
comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


What's The


Problem?
In 2000, our Hospital board received $400,000.
From the state legislature for architectural services
on a 50 bed hospital. These monies were to be re-
ceived through Florida Department of Health
(FDOH).
This project was put out for bids, and Mr. Ruther-
ford and his group (CRA) received the contract on 23
March 2000. Sometime in 2001, Mr. Rutherford's
group finished the architectural work, and came up
with the figure of $16 Million for a 50 bed hospital
building.
In September 2001, 30 acres of land was acquired
from the School Board, where engineering and land
preparation were in progress. At some point, they
ran out of money and the project stopped. I have no
problems with the above, the following is where the
problem starts.
Today, we have a continuing contract (voted in by
the Board) with Mr. Rutherford and his group. (CRA).
Article (5) of the contract with CRA has a "Termina-
tion clause," when they (CRA) ran out of money the
contract become null and void. My question is, "how
was this now closed contract with the Hospital and
CRA to be re-opened in 2006"?
According to Statute 287.055 Section 2 subtitle 2-g
says, "A continuing contract" is a contract for profes-
sional services entered into in accordance with all the
procedures of this act between an agency and a firm
whereby the firm provides professional services to the
agency for projects in which construction costs do not
exceed $1 million, remember this number) or for work
of a specified nature as outlined in the contract re-
quired by the agency, with no time limitation except
that the contract must provide a (termination clause).
It then goes on to say, "Firms providing professional
services under continuing contracts shall not be re-
quired to bid against one another." That statement
would, in itself, eliminate the bidding for the new con-
tract, were it not for the fact that the original contract
was no longer in progress for nearly six years.
On 12/26/2006, a motion by hospital board mem-
ber Mr. Sale, was approved by a 3 to 4 margin approv-
ing the continuation of the 2000 architectural contract
with CRA eliminating the bid procedure. The minutes
state that the contract with CRA was open ended as
far as the time factor goes. At the Hospital board meet-
ing 1-18-2007, the minutes state that the continuation
of the contract with CRA was the "right thing to do."
On 05/09/2008, a man met with Mr. Abercrombie.
As the man told me, "We now have 1.3 million dollars
budgeted for architectural engineering costs. A cost of
19.8 million is expected for a 25 bed hospital today.
Please understand, I am not accusing anyone of
wrong doings. With that said, I think there is a con-
flict of interest. I believe CRA ran over budget in 2000
and this is one way of paying him what we as a com-
munity owe them and this type project, I'm sure we
do owe them something. But the law is clear, to me
anyway. "see the figures above, "50,000 and 1 Million"
This new contract exceeds these figures set by the
State.
I don't know about anyone else in this county,
but, I work hard for my money. I want to know where
my tax money is going, why it's needed, and of what
benefit it is to my community It seems to me that we
rush into things because it feels good. Do we really
need a hospital? Why not a really top notch Health
Care facility? We certainly have half the beds we
were going to get back in 2000. "I just don't get it"
When and if we ever do get a Hospital, how will we
pay for the up keep of the grounds, buildings) em-
ployees and make payments on the interest and prin-
ciple? The up keep on such a building could easily
cost three or more million dollars a year. Then, we
have salaries to pay, equipment to purchase where
are we going to get these funds?
I want the 12 cent tax removed, we don't have the
monies to maintain much less build a hospital.

George Pouliotte


&Mcrac, s

9C 6BOCs


Emerald Greene
Publisher


Striking The


Wrong Nerves
I received several responses regarding my edi-
torial last week. I got several "atta boys" and I re-
ceived two emails that I feel came out of left field.
Apparently I struck a few nerves, but I must say,
"They were the wrong nerves."
One statement that was written (regarding the
quotes given about taking from one half and giving
to the other half) said, "This whole statement is tar-
geting minority and lower-class citizens."
WRONG this statement says..... "Get up and
go to work and earn a living. Don't sit at home all
day and expect the working class of America to feed
you, clothe you, and pay all your expenses." This is
not targeted at anyone particular...... the working
men (and women) of America don't care if those sit-
ting at home are white, black, yellow, or red. We
don't care if they are Baptist, Methodist, Catholic
or Pentecostal. We just want you to get up and go to
work and earn your own living.
There are millions of Americans who don't
work, outside of the home, because of REAL dis-
abilities, or age. I/we don't have a problem with
them. I/we are happy to help the elderly/disabled -
the deserving.
The problem in this country is the tens of mil-
lions of young, healthy, but just lazy people who
are sitting at home watching television all day and
collecting a check to do so. That problem has noth-
ing to do with color..... it has everything to do with
"home-raising" and work ethic, and the lack of
both. It is not right for the government to try to step
in and reward these sorts of mind-sets, once again,
regardless of age, color, creed, or nationality
The other email I received told me I was spiri-
tually weak, greedy, fearful, and needed to read my
Bible.
This one dumbfounded me. Receiving a letter
from someone, who does not know me, and with-
in that letter tells me I need to read my Bible and
search Jesus out more...... and that I "Fake Jesus
Christ as your savior."
And this comes from what? The fact that I'm
against higher taxes? The fact that I'm against high-
er prices on life's necessities, as a result of the high-
er taxes?
Am I spiritually weak because I see that this
country is spending nearly $300 billion a year on a
Medicaid program that is intended for the low-in-
come citizens, but yet wants to implement yet an-
other government program that will cost
TRILLIONS of more dollars?
I think not!!!
Until then....see you around the town.
I-B I


Q ST WS Online Poll


How do you feel about the plan to overhaul the

nation's health care system?


Yes Do it


I'm not quite sure yet


It's way too expensive


Not a good idea at all
I I I I I I
0 5 10 15 20 25 30

This week's question: How do you think the minimum wage increase will effect the economy?

To view and participate in our weekly online poll, visit www.greenepublishing.com.





Wednesday, August 12, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 3A


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Homecomings

And Revivals
On Sunday, August 16, Midway Baptist Church
of Madison will be celebrating its 65th Anniversary
celebration and homecoming, with special guest, Dr.
Olin Charles Horton. Sunday School will begin at
10:30 a.m., Morning worship at 11:30 a.m., and lunch
at 1 p.m.
Dr. Horton has been in the ministry for 52 years
and was ordained at New Home Baptist Church in
Perry. Attending New Orleans Baptist Theological
Seminary, he received a doctorate of ministry de-
gree.
Macedonia Baptist Church will be hosting a re-
vival beginning with a fish fry on Saturday after-
noon, Aug. 22, at 6 p.m.
Services for the revival will begin Sunday morn-
ing, Aug. 23, at 11 a.m. through Wednesday night,
Aug. 26. Evening services will begin at 7 p.m. The
guest speaker will be former pastor, Brother Bill
Reynolds, of Alabama. Brother Reynolds was the
pastor of Macedonia Baptist Church during the ear-
ly 1970s. Please come and join with us, celebrating
the Word of God.
Belated birthday wishes are extended to Terri
Reynolds, who celebrated her big day on Saturday,
August 8. Belated birthday wishes also go out to
Chloe Cline, who celebrated her birthday on Tues-
day, August 11.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great
week and a beautiful forever! May God bless each
and every one of you.





Brenda Roberson and Department of Revenue
vs. Kendrick Richardson support
Darren Bass and Department of Revenue vs.
Deanna Bass support
Tyrra Meserve and Department of Revenue vs.
Scot Breaux support
Kathy Hepburn vs. Alashie Lee repeat domes-
tic injunction
Reba Johnson vs. Claude Johnson domestic in-
junction
Estrella Martinize vs. Jesus I. Martinez disso-
lution of marriage

Whatever You Need,
Greene Publishing, Inc.

Classifieds

Have .

It! :E


GREENE
Publishing, Inc.
1695 S. SR 53 Madison 973-4141


Blue Dogs


During the last two
election cycles, Republi-
cans have been given a
severe thrashing from
the American elec-
torate. Democrats are
firmly in control of our
federal government and
liberals are in the dri-
ver's seat. If there was
ever any doubt, our
president is the most
liberal to ever occupy
the White House. In the
House of Representa-
tives, liberal Democrats
are in charge of most
committees. Speaker
Nancy Pelosi represents
the far left fringe of her
San Francisco district.
In the Senate, where De-
mocrats hold a super
majority of 60 seats, the
situation is slightly bet-
ter with more moder-
ates in key positions.
So what is a conser-
vative to do? An impor-
tant constituency is the
Democrat Blue Dog
Coalition in the House.
This moderate federa-
tion of 52 representa-
tives holds the key to
slowing down the radi-
cal agenda pushed by
Pelosi's liberal troops.
A lot of these Blue Dogs
are southerners, but
more than half come
from other mostly rural,
conservative districts
throughout the nation.
Before there were
Blue Dogs, there were
Yellow Dog Democrats
who would "vote for a
yellow dog before a Re-
publican." Times
change and when one
conservative southern-
er proclaimed that "lib-
erals had choked the
Yellow Dogs blue," the
Blue Dogs were born.
It is pretty easy to
find the Blue Dog web-


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H. Bronson, Commissioner.Funding supplied by the USDA Forest Service, an equal opportunity provider.


site under www.ho-
use.gov. At the Bluedogs
website, you can learn
about their members
and position statements
on major issues. You
can also find an update
ticker that indicates the
Federal debt now ex-
ceeds $11 trillion. Fiscal
responsibility has been
the most important uni-
fying force for the Blue
Dogs since they were
first formed.
A key member of
the Blue Dog Coalition
is seven-term Represen-
tative Allen Boyd (FL-
02) from neighboring
Monticello. Not long
ago, he cast one of the
219 affirmative votes in
the House to pass the
onerous Cap and Trade
Bill (HR-2454). Immedi-
ately, he posted a news
release on his website
proclaiming how proud
he was of this historic
vote. Once Boyd re-
turned home, he was ex-
coriated by the public
for his vote in favor of
the liberal "Cap and
Tax" bill in places like
Panama City and Live
Oak. Since then, he has
pulled his earlier news
release. I think Mr.
Boyd recognizes that
many of his con-
stituents are very upset
with him over this vote.
In some respects,
Cap and Trade was an
easy vote for Blue Dogs
because it is a hidden
tax on energy users. As
far as I know, it would
not add any to the na-
tional debt, the foremost
issue that unites Blue
Dogs. But a hidden tax
is still a tax and over
time, energy users
would feel the pain of
much higher costs in
their monthly light bill.
That's why there
was such a strong state-
ment about this in our
last Tri-County Co-op
newsletter.
The current battle
in the House is over
health care reform and
here, the Blue Dogs
can't run for cover. The
energy bill (HR-3200)
that has passed out of
the Energy and Com-
merce Committee by a
31-28 vote will add mas-
sively to the federal debt
($250 billion over the
next 10 years) according
to the Congressional
Budget Office (CBO).


After wrestling
some concessions from
the liberals who run
this committee, four of
seven Blue Dogs voted
in favor of the bill.
Three Blue Dogs (Math-
eson of Utah, Melancon
of Louisiana, and Bar-
row of Georgia) joined
two other Democrats in
voting with all the Re-
publicans against this
bill which would begin
the socialization of our
health care system.
Now that the House
has adjourned for their
August recess and mem-
bers have returned
home, they are catching
an earfull from the peo-
ple they supposedly rep-
resent about Cap and
Trade, but especially
about Health Care Re-
form. The Blue Dogs
are finding out that
"Public Option" and sin-
gle-payer might be popu-
lar inside the Beltway,
but they aren't back
home. One of those
Blue Dogs who's getting
ripped is Mike Ross of
Arkansas. He voted in
favor of HR-3200 in com-
mittee and at a townhall
meeting last week in
Southern Arkansas, his
constituents let him
have it. Good for them.
My guess is that as
Allen Boyd holds town-
hall meetings in famil-
iar places like Live Oak,
Blountstown, Marian-
na, Chipley, Perry, and
Cross City this month,
he is going to get an ear-
full about both issues.
He hasn't taken a
position on health care
yet as far as I know, so
this is an opportunity
for voters to tell him
what they think about
big government taking
over our health care sys-
tem.
Some of these town-
hall meetings have got-
ten pretty raucous lately
The reason is because
the people are frustrated
because we feel that our
elected representatives
have become tone-deaf.
They are our neighbors
here at home, but once
they are captured by the
Washington crowd, we
hardly know them. As
Dwight Eisenhower fa-
mously said more than a
half century ago, "The
problem with Washing-
ton is everyone's too far
from home."


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Publisher
Emerald Greene
Editor
Jacob Bembry
Production Manager
Heather Bowen
Staff Writers
Michael Curtis and
Bryant Thigpen
Graphic Designers
Stephen Bochia and
Amber Acree
Advertising
Sales Representtives
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy McKinney,
Jeanette Dunn
and Chelsea Bouley
Classified and Legal Ads
Laura Little
Deadline for classified is
Monday at 3 p.m.
Deadline for Legal Advertisement
is Monday at 5 p.m.
There will be a $3 charge
for Affidavits.
Circulation Department
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
Subscription Rates
*In-County $35*
Out-of-County $45
(State & local taxes included)

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper
[USPS 324 800] designed
for the express reading
pleasure of the people of its
circulation area, be they
past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing Inc.,
1695 South SR 53, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post
Office in Madison, FL
32340.
POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to MADI-
SON COUNTY CARRI-
ER, P.O. Drawer 772,
Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper re-
serves the right to reject any
advertisement, news matter,
or subscriptions that, in the
opinion of the manage-
ment, will not be for the
best interest of the county
and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investi-
gate any advertisement sub-
mitted.
All photos given to
Greene Publishing Inc. for
publication in this newspa-
per must be picked up no
later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off.
Greene Publishing, Inc. will
not be responsible for pho-
tos beyond said deadline.





4A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 12, 2009


FROM PAGE ONE


Smokey

cont from Page 1A
10 forest fires," according to Poytner Online's Al
Tompkins. "Before Smokey, the government experi-
mented with fire-prevention messages that were tied
to World War II," he said.
Because of Smokey and the nationwide message
of prevention and education on awareness, forest
fires have decreased.
Every year during National Wildfire Prevention
Week, Rangers from Madison County's Division of
Forestry visit every public school within the county
Smokey Bear and the rangers visit every first grade
class, educating the students on the dangers and pre-
vention of wild fires. Smokey Bear is often spotted
in parades downtown visiting with children.
How did Smokey Bear come into existence? Ac-
cording to smokeybear.com, "One spring day in 1950
in the Capitan Mountains of New Mexico, an opera-
tor in one of the fire towers to the north of the Cap-
tains spotted smoke and called the location into the
nearest ranger station. The first crew discovered a
major fire being swept along the ground between the
trees, driven by a strong wind. Word spread rapidly
and more crews reported to help. Forest Rangers,
army soldiers, Native American crews, men from
the New Mexico State Game Department, and civil-
ian volunteers worked together to gain control of
the raging fire. As soon as they contained the fire to
one spot, the wind would push it across the lines.
During one of the lulls in firefighting, a report of a
lonely bear cub who had been seen wandering near
the fire line was reported. The men left him alone
because they thought the mother bear might come
for him."
And it continues, "About 30 firefighters, mainly
soldiers but also a Capitan High School student,
Several soldiers were caught directly in the path of
the fire storm, barely escaping by laying face down
on a rockslide for over an hour until the fire had
burned past them. In spite of the experience, the
firefighters were safe except for a few scorches and
some burned holes in their clothes. Nearby, the lit-
tle cub had been caught in the path of the same fire
and had not fared as well. He had taken refuge in a
tree that was now completely charred. His climb
had saved his life but left him badly burned on the
paws and hind legs. The soldiers removed the little
bear cub from the burned tree, but they did not
know what to do with him. A rancher, who had been
helping the firefighters, agreed to take the cub
home. A New Mexico Department of Game and Fish
Ranger heard about the cub when he returned to
the fire camp and drove to the rancher's home to get
the bear. The cub needed veterinary aid and was
flown in a small plane to Santa Fe where the burns
were treated and bandaged."
The bear made headlines nationwide, and was
presented to the agency for the purpose of fire pre-
vention publicity
The original Smokey Bear lived at the National
Zoo in Washington, D.C., but passed away Novem-
ber 9, 1976.


* Black Buck Antelope

Available Year Round

(386) 294-1211


FISHIIG FOR A


Parents


School


cont from Page 1A
*What does the Advocacy Center do
*Developing and Implementing an effective IEP
- how to navigate the system
*Discipline and students with disabilities
*Transition from school to community age of
majority, etc.
*Speech as a program and related service
*Service delivery option
Lee Clark has spent the last 31 years working
with high risk students and their families. Further,
he is a consumer, for the last 10 years, having been
diagnosed as having bipolar disorder and adult
ADHD. He has been a social worker, classroom
teacher, school principal, district administrator and
for 18 years worked in the Department of Education
in numerous positions, most recently as the state
consultant for students with emotional disabilities.
Time will be allocated after the formal presenta-
tion and Question and Answer session to answer
specific questions and address specific issues.
Contact Betsy Thompson at 973-5192 or Teresa
Gallegos at 973-6489 if you plan to attend.


Swine Flu

cont from Page 1A
ended.
"We can all work to keep our children healthy
now by practicing prevention, close monitoring, and
using common sense," Secretary Duncan said. "We
hope no schools have to close. But if they do, we need
to make sure that children keep learning."
The guidelines also recommend schools have
plans in place to deal with possible infection. For in-
stance, people with flu-like illness should be sent to
a room away from other people until they can be
sent home. Schools should have plans for continuing
the education of students who are at home, through
phone calls, homework packets, Internet lessons and
other approaches. And schools should have contin-
gency plans to fill important positions such as
school nurses.
If H1N1 flu causes higher rates of severe illness,
hospitalizations and deaths, school officials could
add to or intensify their responses, the guidelines
say Under these conditions, the guidelines advise
parents to check their children every morning for
illness, and keep the children home if they have a
fever.
In addition, schools could begin actively screen-
ing students upon arrival and sending ill students
home immediately. If one family member is ill, stu-
dents should stay home for five days from the day
the illness develops, the guidelines say.
"Influenza can be unpredictable, so preparation
and planning are key," said Dr. Frieden. "We can't
stop the tide of flu, but we can reduce the number of
people who become very ill by preparing well and
acting effectively"






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cont from Page 1A
day, in order to provide required back-to-school im-
munizations. Health Department personnel will be
serving at the back-to-school event and will be refer-
ring people who can then travel conveniently up the
street to the health department for same-day service.
Other organizations will be present as well to pro-
vide information for the new school year. Most of
these organizations will also be providing some
back-to school supplies. School personnel will also
be in attendance.
Local Health Department and Healthy Start
staff volunteered to help fill the gap created from the
loss of funding for a district back-to-school event.
They are to be complemented for their efforts, as
everyone is urged to stop by and enjoy the day's
events.
The Madison Recreation Center is located on
MLK (360A), adjacent to the southern side of the old
middle school.

Meeting

cont from Page 1A
the LMS Draft Mitigation plan. For additional infor-
mation, contact Emergency Management Director
Vicki Brown by phone (850) 973-3698, or by e-mail at
madisoncoem@embarqmail.com.

Sidewalks

cont from Page 1A
N Washington & NE Marion
Emrich noted these areas were pointed out in
previous residential inquiries that were made
priority because they were along the Walking
Tour, which is a current tourism activity. And
while he emphasized his desire to address all
sidewalk repairs if it were feasible, he regretful-
ly noted the current budget simply doesn't have
the level of funding necessary to do so.
"Last year was the first year we included a
line item for sidewalks in the budget. It was a
modest amount of $12,000, but it was a begin-
ning. Our staff has worked hard to stretch it as
far as possible, using the funds almost exclusive-
ly for materials. All the labor has been per-
formed by the Streets Department or inmate
labor. Our guys did a great job splitting their
time among numerous other responsibilities, in-
cluding yard debris pick-up, street and curb re-
pair, recycling pick-up and right of way
maintenance," Emrich explained.
Besides the repairs along the walking tour,
another priority area currently under repair is
the two blocks that come together at Horry (be-
tween Macon and Bunker) and Macon (between
and Horry and Washington). These two blocks
possess extreme sidewalk damage, including
massive crater-like breaks and elevated jagged
edges that, created a hazard for pedestrians and
wheelchairs.
The city manager escorted this reporter to
the location, where Supervisor J.R. Olmsted and
his crew were working. According to Olmsted,
the materials being used in this repair would be
$5,000. He additionally praised his crew and the
prison labor employed for keeping costs as low
as possible.
The city manager shared the concerned citi-
zen's desire to beatify the historic district, and
especially the desire for all sidewalks to be safe.
In fact, although still characterizing it as mod-
est, the proposed budget he is currently bringing
to the commission calls for a $3,000 increase to
$15,000 for sidewalk repairs.
"I know Madison residents and business
owners are disappointed when they hear the op-
tion to accelerate or increase sidewalk repairs is
a budget and manpower issue. Sidewalk repair is
a general fund item that competes with police
and fire in the budget, among other services,
which are also high priorities and the commis-
sioners have made it clear that increasing taxes
isn't an option," Emrich added.
Most of the sidewalks in Madison, especially
those in the historic district, are all over 50 years
old, making the need for repairs extensive
throughout the community. One of the other op-
tions commonly mentioned is a grant, although
here too, the choice is often a trade-off for essen-
tials.
For example, one of the grants potentially
available for these types of renovations is the
Community Development Block Grant, or CDBG
grant.
"Recently the city applied for a CDBG grant
to repair or replace a wastewater lift station. A
breakdown in this system could have catastroph-
ic health consequences and costs, but we weren't
approved. So, while the city is open to any sug-
gestions and will pursue all directives laid down
by the commission, money is extremely tight and
current options are very limited," Emrich went
on to say.
The city manager also expressed his desire
to increase communication with all concerned
citizens and emphasize his availability to dis-
cuss all issues.
"I hope residents or business owners will call
me at 973-5081 or stop by anytime. I'm available
to speak at meetings and hope the information
and tour I provided today was helpful. I truly


wish we had the resources to complete a city-
wide sidewalk renovation, and we will continue
to work it as much as resources allow," he con-
cluded.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.





Wednesday, August 12, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 5A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


WNNUN I iTY


IALXN0AF


August 15
LifeSong's Home-
coming 2009 will be held
at Yogi Bear's Jellystone
Park in Madison on Sat-
urday, August 15, at 7
p.m. This evening will
be a live recording, and
will feature the Bradys,
LifeSong and Stephen
Jones. Admission is
free. A love offering will
be received during the
concert. For more infor-
mation, call (850) 464-
0114 or (904) 472-7865, or
v i s i t
www.lifesongmusic.org.
August 15
An outreach min-
istry with free food,
clothes, health screen-
ing and the Word of God
will meet at the
Greenville Park Pavil-
ion in Haffye Hayes
Park on August 15 at 10
a.m.
August 15
Excellence Dance
Studio Inc. presents
King of the Grill show-
down and Art on Wheel
Exhibition, Aug. 15,
noon-4 p.m., Madison
County Recreation Cen-
ter, Hwy 360A. For more
information, call (850)
322-7673.
August 29
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park will host a Con-
tainer Gardening Work-
shop on Saturday, Aug.
29. Participants will
learn how to avoid
many of the pests and
diseases associated with
summertime gardening
in containers and ex-
plore warm weather
flower and vegetable
gardening. The class
will cover proper group-
ing of plants, choosing
the right container, se-
lecting the right plants
to grow for each season
and touch on annuals,
perennials and ferns.
Bring your pruners and
take home some cut-
tings. This is a hands-on
workshop and fees are
$5 per workshop, includ-
ing park admission. For
additional information
or to register for the
workshops, please call
(386) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.
org.
Tuesday in August
Tuesday in August
at 1:30 p.m., TABE (Test
of Adult Basic Educa-
tion) will be given at
NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), in Madison,
Florida. TABE is re-
quired for acceptance
into vocation-
al/technical programs.
Photo ID is required.
Pre-registration is re-
quired. To register
please call 850/973-9451.
Wednesday in


August
Wednesday at
8:30 a.m. & 1:30 p.m., CJ-
BAT (Criminal Justice
Basic Abilities Test) will
be given at NFCC Test-
ing Center (Bldg. #16),
Madison, Florida. CJ-
BAT is required for ac-
ceptance into
Corrections & Law En-
forcement programs.
Photo ID required. Pre-
registration is required.
To register please call
850/973-9451.
Thursday in August
Thursday in Au-
gust at 8:30 a.m. & 1:30
p.m. College Placement
Test (CPT), NFCC Test-
ing Center Bldg. #16),
8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.,
Madison. Register in
NFCC Student Services
24 hours before test. For
information please call
850/973-9451.
September 4-6
The Madison High
School Class of 1974 has
its 35th reunion
planned. The event will
take place September 4-
6, Labor Day weekend.
Interested members
need to respond ASAP
to Shirley Johnson, 293
SW Georgiana Trail,
Madison, FL 32340 or
call (850) 973-2953 o (850)
973-3932 or Linda Bass
at (850) 971-5873. Reunite
with classmates online
a t
www.myschoolreunited.
com.
September 12
Seniors save on auto
insurance. Florida re-
quires all auto insur-
ance companies give
drivers 50 and older
with a good driving
record and that com-
plete the AARP Driver
Safety Program, a pre-
mium discount for three
years. There will be a
class at the Madison
Ext. Bldg. on Saturday,
Sept. 12, at 9 a.m. Call
(850) 843-0092 to reserve
a seat.
Thursday
Redemptive Recov-
ery Classes/Support
Group is held every
Thursday in the old
First Baptist Church
sanctuary, and is for ad-
dicts and the family of
addicts who are seeking
to recover and need
help. The class is free,
and starts at 7 p.m. For
more information,
please call (850) 464-
9022.
Thursdays-Mondays
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park will host an ongo-
ing wood carving work-
shop on Thursdays
through Mondays, from
noon until 4 p.m. Partic-
ipants can create figure
carvings, wood spirits,
spoons, bowls, relief
carvings and more dur-
ing this four-hour class.
Workshop fees are $15
per session and include


SHOW UP & sPEAK OUT! -'"P '
OBackR-To-School F Youth Forum
OSCIC B 10 ci-Ll (J~l- fJonii LOLaI.

MDlSI0On RECREWRTZOn CEllTER
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August 29th Excellence Dance Studio, Inc. presents 3rd Annual Dance
Concert & Showstopper Production Stageplay Entitled "Purple Clouds"
Saturday Night 6pm 8pm at North Florida Community College Van H. Priest
Auditorium For more information or for non-profit informational booth
registration application please call 850-212-5983 admission is FREE!
www.excellencedancestudioinc.org
KING OF THE GRILL T-SHIRTS ARE ON SALE: $10. To reserve your t-shirt see our Parent Volunteer
Coordinator, Cosandra Herring @ Cash Man in the Harvey's shopping Center 973-2244
King of the Grill Local Celebrity Judges are Fl House Rep. Curtis Richardson, Sheriff Ben Stewart,
Supervisor of Elections Jada Woods Williams, & DOH Doug Freer
Art on Wheels Car Show Judges Police Officer Willie McGhee, Duvaughn CarShow Customs,
Reggie Dennis & Mike.
WE INVITE U 2 COME &
SPEAK UR SIDE ABOUT THE THINGS
THAT U GO THROUGH a OLY U KNOW ABOUT

F O R' IMLEAS iCALf50.64.72


park admission. For ad-
ditional information or
to register for the work-
shops, please call (386)
397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.
org.
Each Weekday
Except Tuesday
The Senior Citizens
Center offers computer
classes to seniors 60 and
older each weekday ex-
cept Tuesday For more
information or to sign
up, please call (850) 973-
4241. A regular instruc-
tor is needed to teach
these classes. Interested
individuals should ask
to speak with Sharon
concerning the opening
at the number above.
Every
Tuesday-Saturday
The Diamonds in
the Ruff Adoption Pro-
gram at the Suwannee
Valley Humane Society
is open every Tuesday
through Saturday from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is lo-
cated on 1156 SE Bisbee
Loop, Madison, FL
32340. For more infor-
mation, or directions,
call (866) 236-7812 or
(850) 971-9904.
First Saturday of
Each Month
Everyone is invited
to gospel (open mic)
sings at Lee Worship
Center the first Satur-
day night of each
month, beginning at 7
p.m. The church is locat-
ed at 397 Magnolia Dr. in
Lee. Everyone is asked
to bring a dish for the
pot luck supper. There
will be great musicians,
so those who can play
an instrument are wel-


come to come and join
in. Bring a friend with
you. For more informa-
tion, call Allen Mc-
Cormick at (850)
673-9481.
Second and Fourth
Saturday of Each
Month
The Madison
Church of God hosts a
free soup kitchen the
second and fourth Sat-
urday of each month at
the Greenville Senior
Citizens Center. Lunch
is served from noon to 1
p.m.
Third Tuesday of
Each Month
The Greater
Greenville Area Dia-
betes Support Group is
a free educational ser-
vice and support for dia-
betes and those wanting
to prevent diabetes. The
group meets the third
Tuesday of each month
at the Greenville Public
Library Conference
Room at 312 SW Church
St., Greenville, 11-11:30
a.m. Everyone is wel-
come!
Every Wednesday
and Friday
The Senior Citizens
Center's sewing club for
seniors 60 and older
meets every Wednesday
and Friday. For more in-
formation or to sign up,
please call (850) 973-
4241.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison Coun-
ty Health Education
Club is holding a free
educational service and
support group for people
interested in preventing
or controlling diabetes,


high blood pressure, ele-
vated cholesterol levels,
obesity and other chron-
ic health conditions.
The club meets the third
Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
12:15-12:45 p.m. Every-
one is welcome to bring
their own lunch.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison Coun-
ty Diabetes Support
Group is a free educa-
tional service and sup-
port group for diabetes
and those wanting to pre-
vent diabetes. The group
meets the third Wednes-
day of each month at the
Madison Public Library
Conference Room at 378
NW College Loop, Madi-
son, 11:45 a.m.-12:10 p.m.
Everyone is welcome is
bring their own lunch.
For details, contact Mar-
cia Kazmierski at (386)
752-2461 or Lorraine
Miller at (386) 752-6439.


Fourth Wednesday of
Each Month
An informational
meeting for those injured
and needing help return-
ing to work will be held
the fourth Wednesday of
each month from 12-3
p.m. at the Madison Coun-
ty Extension Office locat-
ed at 184 College Loop,
Madison. The meeting is
free and open to the pub-
lic. For more information,
please call (850) 245-3489.
Fourth Tuesday of
Each Month
Big Bend Hospice's
adult Grief Support
Group meets on the
fourth Tuesday of each
month at the Madison
County Senior Center, lo-
cated at 4886 SW Rutledge.
The group is open to any-
one in the community
who has experienced the
death of someone in their
life. The support groups
are a free community
service. For more infor-
mation, please call
Casey Shaffer at 566-
6189.


Florida Boys

And Girls Clubs

Looking For

Clunker Cars

Boys and Girls Clubs throughout Florida are
looking for "Clunker Cars" to be donated as a way
of raising funds. The benefits offered for dona-
tions include a tax write-off for itemizers and
knowledge that the old clunker is helping a "Pos-
itive Place for Kids."
If you want to donate, the Florida Clubs can
be reached by calling (800) 246-0493.


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Wednesday, August 12, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 7A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


H


e Society Pr


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Suwannee Valley Humane Society has an ex-
ceptional record of care for its animals. More amazing
than that, however, is that volunteers run the entire fa-
cility


ase


volunteers who walk and play with them. I truly can't
say enough for all they do."
As a "no-kill" shelter (only exceptions are medical
and behavioral) set up on 21 acres, animals often stay at
the shelter for extended periods of time, just like Sissy
and Morris. Puppies and kittens are luckier, usually
finding homes more quickly Of course, shots and


SVolunteers
checkups are performed regularly, and for those who
don't get adopted, there is a lovely cemetery for them.
Another valuable service available through the Hu-
mane Society is a $25 voucher to spay or neuter cats and
dogs at participating vets in the area. The program is
funded by a grant from the "Florida Animal Friend" li-
cense plate program.
Locally, call (850) 971-9904, or toll-free (866) 236-7812,
for voucher details or to arrange a visit, or perhaps to
adopt a new loving member to the family
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, July 29, 2009
Shirley Tegra grows and sells plants from a shop
located adjacent to the Suwannee Valley Humane So-
ciety in Lee, with all proceeds going to support the


ureene rublisning, Inc. rnoto uy Iiicnaei LurtIs, July z9, zuu9
Youth volunteers, many students at Lee Elemen-
tary School, help out at the animal shelter over the
summer. They were a huge hit with all the cats and
dogs that appreciated the extra rubs and hugs. Pic-
tured sitting left to right: Emma Grosskopf, Chastin
Dickinson and Brandon McCool. Standing, left to
right: Barbara Tippy and Hope Candy.
is home to 78 animals, divided equally among cats and
dogs. Some are long-term residents, like "Sissy," a tabby
cat that would love to move to a nice home, although the
affection and care she has received over the past six
years has been wonderful.
"They treat me purrrr-fectly," she could be heard
saying. One of Sissy's old friends, Morris, a shepherd
mix who has lived at the shelter for over five years, was
recently adopted, and other well-behaved adult pets are
available to those willing to give them care.
This same care is exactly what each animal re-
ceives from a staff of volunteers and helpers who treat
them as though they were their own. Animal Care and
Shelter Coordinator Barbara Tippy, herself a volunteer,
expressed tremendous praise for the adult and youth
who have made the facility one of the best in the region.
"The staff of volunteers that work here are incred-
ible. We couldn't do it without them. We are supported
exclusively by donations and the proceeds from our two
thrift stores and our plant shop all of which are run by
volunteers as well," Tippy said. "During the summer,
the animals have received an extra treat from our youth



Got

ifSa


S


Recorder


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, July 29, 2009
The volunteers at the Suwannee Valley Humane
Society are dedicated to making sure every animal
finds a home, and is treated like family until they do.
Pictured sitting left to right: Marge Hutchinson and
Barbara Tippy. Standing front, left to right: Jennifer
Johnson, Molly Maguire, Candy Mosher and Lexie
Soles. Standing back, left to right: Mike Mosher and
Nakia Sherwood.


Carl Joseph &
Madison High School
t 1970s events.


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or call (352-377-2178)


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TURNOVER


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8A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 12, 2009


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Mat ol UiqWk tool igtad&uate tLad4 Ati



Focit Ctqbte xttatj Edk&ttion AvI Retdctk


Dr. Richard A. Raines, a 1976
graduate of Madison High School, is
the Director of the Air Force's Cyber-
space Technical Center of Excellence,
located at Wright Patterson Air Force
Base, Ohio. His duties are to facilitate
and ensure the advancements of cy-
berspace technical capabilities and
resources for the Air Force and Dr.
Raines is a retired Air Force officer,
serving over 21 years of combined ac-
tive duty in the Army and Air Force.
His background includes technical
assignments in Germany as a radar
and computer analyst, as well as sys-
tems engineer for the procurement of
Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumen-
tation (ACMI) systems. Since 1994, he
has been assigned to the Air Force In-
stitute of Technology, where he has
served in numerous educational and
research capacities.
In 2002, he founded the Air Force
Center for Cyberspace Research
(CCR). Under his direction, the CCR
has become the Department of De-
fense lead for cyberspace education
and research. The CCR has received
national designation/recognition as a
Center of Excellence from the De-
partment of Homeland Security, the
National Security Agency, and the
National Science Foundation. In addi-
tion to his role as Director of the Air
Force center, he currently serves as a
Department of Defense Force Trans-
formation Chair, responsible for the
development of cyber professionals


and capabilities. He also holds the
highest academic distinction of Pro-
fessor of Electrical Engineering, rec-
ognized for sustained and
outstanding scholarship and contri-
butions to the engineering profes-
sion.
Dr. Raines leads a team of 22 re-
searchers dedicated to the develop-
ment, design and implementation of
cutting-edge technologies for the de-
fense and protection of our national
cyber infrastructure. His team annu-
ally produces between 40-50 research
efforts, which transition to the De-
partment of Defense for further de-
velopment and deployment to the
warfighter.
Dr. Raines received his formal ed-
ucation from Florida State University
(Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engi-
neering (with distinction); the Air
Force Institute of Technology (Mas-
ter's degree in Computer Engineer-
ing); and Virginia Polytechnic
Institute and State University (doc-
torate degree in Electrical Engineer-
ing). He is a Senior Member of the
Institute for Electronic and Electrical
Engineers (IEEE) and serves on nu-
merous advisory panels across the
Department of Defense and Federal
Government. He has led and per-
formed research on communication
systems vulnerabilities such as the
Iridium satellite communication sys-
tem and for the Presidential Airlift
Squadron. In 2007, he was elected to


Thwn VC Yoaw


A year ago today, our family suf-
fered a great loss. Marjell Daddy -
PaPa left us and we want to give
heartfelt thanks again to family and
friends, churches and ministers, com-
munity and medical personnel, Hos-
pice in its entirety Dr. Schindler and
staff, and to all others who had a part
in his life and death. In the long diffi-
cult time since retiring in 1986 for
health reasons and especially his last
year of being unable to do the things
he loved, he seldom "grumbled, mur-
mured or complained."
He touched us all in so many


Amb


ways and left the world a better place.
He loved God, talked about Him and
never failed to give Him thanks in all
his stories. What a way with words he
had and what a great storyteller he
was.
We felt surrounded by much love,
care, concern, prayers though often
not aware of the hearts and hands
that gave. We appreciate all the calls,
cards, food, flowers, Gideon Bibles,
money, yard work.
We still are so blessed and pray
God's continued peace and blessings
up us one and all. Amen!


Serving Madison,

Jefferson, Taylor &

Lafayette Counties


Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King Agent Glen King Agent

233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071

Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St.* Monticello (850) 997-2213

Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399


the national Hall of Fame for Elec-
tronic Warfare and Information Oper-
ations (AOC) for his contributions to
the advancements of these technolo-
gies. In 2008, Dr. Raines was named
the Air Force Science and Engineer-
ing Educator of the Year. He is an ac-
complished speaker and author,
having provided over 100 talks inter-
nationally on communication theory
and cyber security and has written


and presented over 150 articles at in-
ternational conferences and techni-
cal journals on communication
systems and security.
Dr. Raines is married to the for-
mer Helen Wilson of Madison. They
have two children, Garrett of Indi-
anapolis, Ind., and Kelley of Athens,
Ohio.
Dr. Raines is the son of Bill and
Pat Raines of Madison.


rnoto submitted
Richard A. Raines, left, is pictured with Michael Wynne, Secretary of the Air
Force. Raines leads Cyber Security Education and Research for the United
States Air Force.

Daylight Spa And Salon

Welcomes Christine Walker


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Daylight Salon and Spa welcomes
Christine Walker as its new hair styl-
ist.
Christine has 10 years experience
as a hairdresser and 25 years as a nail
technician. She was an apprentice
with Penny Jordan at Jordan Salon
and Day Spa in Valdosta, Ga.
Christine is offering some specials
for her customers. She is offering a
free haircut with perm or color ser-
vice. She is also offering a free brow
wax with a haircut to students.
Christine is married to David
Walker, from Pinetta. The couple has
two children, Daniel and Katie, who
are students at Pinetta Elementary
School. She also has a daughter from a
previous
marriage,
Jessica
Pert, who
recently
finished


Christine Walker
registered nurses' school and works at
South Georgia Medical Center.
Christine welcomes everyone to
come in, meet her and take advantage
of her haircutting experience.
To call for specials or make an ap-
pointment, please call 973-8998.


daylight
salon and spa
Welcomes


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Wednesday, August 12, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 11A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Learning Center Searching

Computer Instructor


For


By Bryant Thigpen keeping them off the youth, adults are also
Greene Publishing, Inc. streets, and helping welcome to participate
The Madi- in the classes.
son/Greenville "We have a lot
Learning Center in going on," stated
Greenville is cur- Otis Norton, own-
rently searching for -- er of the Learning
a computer instruc- -- Center. The center
interested in vol- GED prep course
unteering hlis every Saturday
time to tefrh rom 9-11 a.m., and
computer cla-- se is currently work-
The classes ill\ ing on different
be schedi u le II projects that will al-
based upon the in- low the center to of-
structor's availabil- rer more to the
ity. community
The purpose of \ If anyone is
the Learning Center is to them further their edu- interested in volunteer-
help the local youth in cation. Although the cen- ing, please call (850) 997-
the county, hopefully ter's spotlight is on the 5683 or (850) 508-3566.

U-Pick Brings Different

Approach To Farming
By Bryant Thigpen ucts includestrawberries, sweet corn,
Greene Publishing, Inc. onions, tomatoes, squash, melons, pep-
In a world where everything is in- pers, peas, beans, okra and sweet pota-
stant, gardening and farming on a low toes. This farm is open year-round.
scale basis is becoming a thing of the Tuten's U-Pick offers a wide vari-
past. Many people who are 60 years of ety of things to choose from, such as
age or older fondly remember growing tomatoes, egg plant, peppers, squash,
up on a farm. Because of physical ail- watermelon, cantaloupe, peas, corn
ments, it's hard for them to plant and and sweet potatoes. Tuten's is open
grow a garden, but there's still a way from October until the end of Novem-
for them to pick their own vegetables ber for the fall season, and May and
and fruit. U-Pick farms take care of June for the spring. Locally owned by
the planting and nurturing, but the Timmy and Mickey Tuten and Jim
customer benefits from the joys of Doner, Tuten's has been serving the
reaping the harvest. U-pick farms people of Madison for 15 plus years.
have a lot to offer its customers. Before visiting U-Pick farms,
Blueberries U-Pick is typically please call to confirm dates of opera-
open May through August. This com- tion, as well as the availability of the
pany allows citizens to pick as many products.
fresh blueberries as the customer When visiting the farm, remem-
would like. This U-Pick farm is located ber to dress in clothes that are com-
at 332 NE Chamomile Way in Madison. fortable and one wouldn't mind
Tanya's U-Pick is located at SE getting dirty Some farms may require
Gunpowder Avenue in Madison and one to bring his/herr own containers.
has a variety to pick from. Their prod- Support local farmers.


Photo Submitted
Shekinah is based out of Madison and is composed of (left to right) Phillip
Holbrook, Dan Campbell, Liane Wakefield, Tom Fico and Marcus Holbrook.

Local Merchants To Hold

Country Jamboree


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Businesses in down-
town Madison are team-
ing up to host the
Country Jamboree on
the South side of the
Country Store in down-
town Madison. The
event will be held on
Friday, August 28, from
6-9 p.m.
This event is spon-
sored by the Spaghetti
House, Ashlyn's Rose
Petal Florist, Granny's
This-N-That and the
Country Store, in an ef-
fort to remind the citi-
zens of businesses
located downtown. The
effort is supported by
the Madison County
Chamber of Commerce
and Tourism.
To kick off the
evening is a new group
in the world of gospel


music, LifeSong.
LifeSong signed with
Lamp Music Group in
the summer of 2009, and
recently released their
latest project, Brand
New Start. The group is
composed of three
young guys: Ethan
Brooks (age 17), Bryant
Thigpen (age 21) and
Steven Gunter (age 26).
One of gospel mu-
sic's most exciting
groups, Shekinah, will
take the stage next.
From Madison, Shek-
inah travels with a four-
piece band and deliver
God's word in the style
of southern gospel mu-
sic. Shekinah is com-
posed of Phillip
Holbrook, Marcus Hol-
brook, Liane Wakefield,
Dan Campbell and Tom
Fico.
Elvis tribute artist


the GaddisGirls will
then entertain the
crowd. The girls, Kam-
brie (age 12) and Kelsie
(age 9) are from the
state of North Carolina
and have been dancing
and entertaining since
the age of three. The
girls have had the privi-
lege of performing at
Graceland Crossing, as
well as other Elvis en-
tertainment events.
The event will be
held outdoors, so please
bring lawn chairs.
There is no cost for ad-
mission, however a love
offering will be re-
ceived during the con-
cert.
For more informa-
tion, please contact
Myrtice Thompkins at
(850) 973-2050 or Jen-
nifer Funk at (850) 973-
2476.


Tcate of the Tcwnv


Interested in trying some delicious local flavor?
These restaurants are only minutes away and ready
to delight your palate with offerings from some of the best
kitchens around.
Experience "home" cooking as the name implies,
as these great eateries literally are part of your home;
the North Florida and South Georgia area.


r CS /6' S

EATS & TREATS
Now SERVING
BREAKFAST
This Week's Special:
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,jo9od Food & yaw
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229-247-8362
(1-75 exit 18, next to Sleep Inn)

Seafood
Steaks, Chicken & Burgers
Vegetarian Items
Daily Specials
Full Bar With Tropical Drinks
Healthy Kids Menu
Covered Patio Overlooking
Kids Play Area
Watch Your Favorite Sporting Event

SOpen 7 Days A Week
Lunch & Dinner
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O'NEAL'S
COUNTRY BUFFET

All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet!
Hours: 10:30 am 2:30 pm
5 Days A Week Monday Friday
$750 Price includes Salad Bar, Homemade Cobblers, Beverage and Tax
Friday & Saturday Nights: 5pm 9 pm
All You Can Eat Old Fashioned Seafood, Fish Fry, Country Buffet
$950 Price includes entire meal plus tax
Sunday Dinner Buffet
All You Can Eat With All The Trimmings
10:30 am 3:00 pm -Total Price $850





10A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 12, 2009


BRIDAL GUIDE


(O [ou[f


Tzouh0e


your presence in a wedding ceremony of jenny Bill when you say "I do" to your friend's groom.


Figure this out; you have a grand double wed- to Joseph James and Jane Will
ding with your longtime pal. Double weddings can Smith. The other parts of the inv
bring double excitement while at the same time not change from the standard for
keeping the budget at its best. If you happen to
have a cousin, a brother, a sister or a close friend
who by instance is marrying at the same time as
you, you can plan a double wedding to share the ex-
penses that come with the hosting of this spe-
cial event. Instead of putting up two small
wedding ceremonies, you can combine more
resources available for one grand event. A joint
wedding with a relative who is marrying at the
same time as you can give your attendees and
the family a blessed union ceremony. Guests who
are from far don't have to travel twice almost at the
QqM-- n fw/- i-*-iiln frl- qfflnnd. h ^ 41.,rlrth XX 4dinac/ At th cn> y no-.-w^


am111e Ll111t LU tLLtenDU UUL11 WetUUII1. AtL Lltte sa111t
point, the conflict of whose wedding is to be first is
not likely to erupt. However, for you to have a suc-
cessful joint wedding you need to plan it adequate-
ly. Else, the double wedding may in the end turn
double trouble.
First, while preparing wedding invitations en-
sure that the names of both couples are in the in-
vitations so as not to cause bolt from the blue when
they find it late that they are attending a double
wedding. If you are in a joint wedding with your
sister or brother, the elder sister or brother can be
listed first in the invitations. For instance, an invi-
tation line would go like; we are glad to request


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Call or visit our website
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iams to Michael
itation may need
mat.


Mini-weddings have been popularly practiced
as an alternative to the double weddings. Some
couples have preferred to have the mini-weddings
so as to have each bride get her moment of spot-
light. Compared to joint weddings, mini-weddings
can be tiresome and seemingly long. Double wed-


_=N. ~ dings can be successfully by blending the color
'e schemes, order of events and the theme with-
out losing any of the person's individuality. It
is possible for each bride to show her own style,
Sand the style to her bridesmaids. However, it
SL would be brilliant to keep everything harmo-
nious. For example, you can choose the right
color shade combinations that are likely to go
well with each other. A successful double wedding


There is always a slight difference in the
arrangement of a double wedding ceremony since
the two couples will follow the routine each at a
time. Each couple will in turn take the vow or light
the unity candle one after the other. This can be
confusing to the couples. The best way to prepare
is to do practice and more practice so as when the
d-day comes, there will be no disorder. Making a
prior practice will ensure that things are respond-
ed to appropriately and everything runs smoothly.
You don't want to be a price of the wrong man

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requires working together
phere of love.












\ ?
*V~ ~ K .orrf~


to bring out that atmos-







$ ?5







Op


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f4op
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rwc ~Ldie


(WddinMi




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Home Repair Maintenane
From pressure washing and yard care
to painting and cabinets call
Curt or Maryann at Mac Services

850-8973-4180


Directory



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850-673-6349


W. I -AII


Model Rockets Model Trains
Remote Control
Planes, Cars & Boats
Science Kits


Tire a MMuffle
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1064 E. US 90 Madison, FL
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Wednesday, August 12, 2009


Madison County Carrier I IA


m





12A Madison County Carrier


www.2reenepublishin2.com


Wednesday, August 12, 2009


HEALTH & NUTRITION


Easy Tips To Elevate Your Walk To A Workout

When it comes to keepingfit, walking is more than a step in the right direction


(NAPSI)-There's an easy way to shape up that's
accessible, affordable and can accommodate even
the busiest of schedules--it's walking. No wonder it's
the No. 1 fitness activity for adults. And with the
simple addition of a few fitness goals and a pedome-
ter, you have everything you need to elevate your
walk to a workout.
Walk It Out
Many people don't realize the walking they al-
ready do each day is a positive step to help them get
fit. In fact, studies at the Stanford School of Medi-
cine have uncovered a long list of benefits from
walking, including reduced body fat, lowered cho-
lesterol and blood pressure as well as increased flex-
ibility and mental well-being. It's widely
recommended that adults take 10,000 steps a day, the


equivalent of about five miles, wl
achieved by walking 30 to 60 minutes a
in multiple 10-minute increments over
the day.
Walking is also a key component to
plans, including that of trainer-to-the-s
Braganza, who's helped shape some o
bodies in Hollywood, from Jessica A
Berry "For me, being fit is a lifestyle.
just going to the gym every day. That's
recommend walking to my clients as a
exercise," Braganza said. "Adding a fev
into your daily routine can help you m
every step counts."
A Passion for Pedomete
One of Braganza's favorite fitne
pedometer, which can keep track
you're taking and give you a benchm
during progress. Stanford School of
search also shows using a ped
increase physical activity by about 2
an extra mile--each day, proving it's
motivational tool that can push you t
Further Your Finish Lil
"I arm all of my clients with a p
ensure they're still held accountable
I'm not there," Braganza said. "It's 1
personal trainer in their pocket that
ing them to go further."
Braganza recommends the GOs
Pedometer from Omron, which fea
sensor technology, making it one of
curate pedometers available. Using


Legisl


Families

New legislation introduced in Coi
let parents use pretax dollars to help
creasingly common investment in tt
health: cord blood banking for their n
Called the Family Cord Blood Ban
legislation would amend the current t
low individuals and couples to use mo
flexible spending accounts (FSAs), h<
accounts (HSAs), health reimbursem
ments (HRAs) or the medical expense
tion to pay for umbilical cord blood ba
A growing number of parents ar<
choice to save their newborn's un
blood, which is a rich source of none
stem cells. Saving these cells in a cor
ensures that they will be available for


which can be
it one time or
the course of

many fitness
stars Ramona
Af the hottest
lba to Halle
SI'd be bored
why I always
great form of
w easy things
.ake sure that

rs
;ss tools is a
of the steps
lark for mea-
Medicine re-
ometer can
,000 steps--or
also a great
to go further.
ne
)edometer to
e, even when
ike having a
keeps push-


sors, it can count steps whether it's clipped at
your hip, buried in your pocket or even attached
to your bag, and since there are no moving parts,
there's no annoying clicking sound. Trusted for
its accuracy, this line of pedometers lets you
track steps taken, calories burned and distance
walked. Coupled with a seven-day memory, it pro-
vides what you need to chart progress, compare
to your goals and manage your shape-up strategy.
Free Downloadable Tip Sheet
Braganza's other get-fit tips include:
Warm Up First. Before you walk, perform
some dynamic stretching exercises (arm circles,
hip circles and leg lifts) to get your blood flowing
and reduce the risk of injury. Always wear com-
fortable shoes, preferably ones with arch sup-
port.
Mix It Up. Add variety to your walking pro-
gram, especially if your personal fitness goal in-
cludes weight loss. Try alternating intervals of
fast walking with intervals at a slower pace.
Walking up hills is also great for a challenge.
Add Cardio. Include some upper body ex-
ercises as you walk, such as arm reaches over-
head or to the sides, to add another dimension to
your walk and increase calorie burn. Hold small
water bottles while you do the exercises for
added resistance.


Learn More
mart Pocket Visit www.gosmartpedom-eters.com to down-
itures smart load all of Braganza's tips or learn more about
the most ac- pocket pedometers, including models that let you
smart sen- download your data directly to your PC.


xtion To Help


Protect Health

ngress would another genetically matched family member if
pay for an in- needed to treat disease or injury. Cord blood stem
heir families' cells are currently used to treat more than 70
ewborn. chronic or life-threatening diseases and re-
king Act, the searchers are studying their potential to treat even
ax laws to al- more conditions that affect millions of Americans,
)ney saved in including brain injury and type 1 diabetes.
health savings Because many studies involving cord blood re-
ient arrange- quire children to have access to their own stem
es tax deduc- cells, the legislation could have an important effect
banking. on advances in science and medicine. By making it
e making the easier for families to bank their cord blood, the bill
ibilical cord could accelerate the timetable for new research in-
controversial volving cord blood stem cells.
d blood bank Parents who believe cord blood preservation
r the child or should be an option through a health savings plan
Should contact their congressional representatives
to urge support for the Family Cord Blood Banking
Act. For information on how to communicate with
Congress, visit the U.S. House of Representatives at
https://writerep.house.gov/writerep/welcome.shtml
or call (202) 225-0100.


"The Dasher Heart Center at SGMC offers extensive benefits for those experiencing
heart disease. Our ability to diagnose and provide angioplasty or open heart surgery
immediately is a tremendous advantage. At SGMC we have a heart program that is


established and offers patients from our region cardiac
care close to home."


DASHER +
HEART CENTER


Question: My son is playing football this
year and I want to protect my son's teeth from a
Sports injury with a mouth guard. Are store bought
Mouthguards any good?

Answer: As a matter of fact, store bought
mouthguards are not only good, they are a good
idea. In some 200,000 annual cases of sports-
related dental injuries, mouthguards have been
known to avert oral injuries and cut the risk of
concussion by 50 percent. A study published in
the Journal of Sports Dentistry concluded that
store bought mouthguards can be as effective as
dentist fabricated mouthguards.
The investigators were surprised to discover
the thickness of the mouthguard was the most
important factor for protecting teeth. The "boil
and bite" mouthguards worked well if they were
thick enough. The thickness cushions the teeth
and reduces injury. Thin mouthguards were far
less effective. Mouthguards were also ineffective
if they had not been fitted as described in the
directions to soften the mouth guard in hot water
and bite into them the first time.
Find out more about mouthguardsonline:
www.agd.org/Newsletter/Smileline/2008/20080415.asp


Roderick K Shaw III, DMD, MAGD
Master of the Academy of General Dentistry
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmail.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of Dentistry.


SOUTH GEORGIA MEDICAL CENTER

25 1N -T 0 &-n S V l osaGA 1g3.1 0






Wednesday, August 12, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 13A


MONEY & FINANCE


Savings Rate Approaching Modern History Highs


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Few people find the topic of eco-
nomics interesting enough for picnic
conversation, although almost every
adult with a job or looking
for a job is interested in
the economy, locally in
Madison County and
throughout America. As
more and more people look
to calm their worries, how- 14%
ever, they want explana-
tions. They want the answer
to questions like, "What will
it take to turn the economy
around?" "Can all this stim- 10
ulus spending possibly turn
out okay?" or "Who's going 8
to pay for all this?"
Unfortunately, there are
no short or simple answers,
but there is a question that
might suggest how to ap-
proach the issue "How do
you eat an elephant?" Of
course, the answer is, "One
bite at a time."
So, here's the first bite. O%
The savings rate in the Unit-
ed States, especially com-
pared to nations like
Germany or France, has
been exceptionally low in Soaur<
modern times. American f(Et<
savings behavior has mostly
given way to its spending behavior,
with Americans putting aside little in
savings compared to the enormous
consumer debt load they carry
For instance, in the noted coun-
tries of Germany and France, the sav-
ings rate has remained at or above 10
percent for several decades. Over that
same period, U.S. savings rates have
plummeted from over ten percent to
less than one percent going into 2008.
There was even one point in 2005 when
the rate measured negative. That
trend has now changed.
According to government reports,
the U.S. Savings rate surged to 6.9 per-


cent through May 2009, the highest it's
been in over 15 years. And while com-
mon sense would suggest this move is
simply a natural response to economic
uncertainty, several side effects of the


Those maxed out credit cards repre-
sent and lot of goods and services, and
with nothing to replace those dollars,
America's Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) will fall, which is the official


Household Saving Rates for Selected Countries


1"I IM 1"S 1"S IMff LW S 19W It" lOW 2M I MI Z OW 2f ZM2



'OrovttanOaf oi ((ovKmw CoopwatvdondLDrvkrpww.1Z0071
'oCo&(m O ~atD' jev 1#c0 No. 82- &tV* Hk)2(oW2


shift are very positive for the economy
The shift from consumer spending
to savings sounds great to any grand-
father who has tried to get his fast-
spending children to save for the
future, and it is. Economically, it isn't
all good news immediately though, as
consumer spending accounts for ap-
proximately 70 percent of the Ameri-
can economy In fact, this component
has fallen off the shelf in the last year.
But again, savings is a good personal
practice, right? It's better to save than
to spend what one doesn't have, right?
In the short run, a sharp decrease
in consumer spending will hurt.


* Black Buck Antelope


Available Year Round

(386) 294-1211


have ac(






Information from Madison County Community Bank and SPF* to help keep your finan



Consumer Sen


Rethinking Retirement
You did everything right. You planned
for your retirement by properly
diversifying your investment portfolio,
and even scrimped in order to
maximize contributions to your
retirement plans. However, after a
year of some of the biggest stock losses
since the Great Depression, you might
be wondering whether your shrunken
nest egg will be enough to carry you
through retirement. Before drawing
any premature conclusions, it's
important that you first take charge of
your situation by asking and answering
these four critical questions.
Where do I currently stand?
Take inventory of where your
retirement accounts are held and how
they're invested. These would include
IRA's, employer sponsored accounts
(401k's, etc.) and other accounts
earmarked for retirement. Although it
might be discomforting, gather up your
latest statements from these accounts
and total how much they're worth.
The losses may seem astonishing but
do not let that discourage you.
Understanding where things stand
i Source: |ssa.ov
Have You Read...
The Wall Street Journal. Complete
Retirement Guidebook: How to Plan It,
Live It and Enjoy It by Glenn Ruffenach,
Kelly Greene. As you think about
retirement, you've got facts to face,
planning to do, decisions to make and
numbers to crunch. With the experts at The
Wall Street Journal to guide you, you'll
learn how to tailor a financial plan for the
lifestyle you want.


today will help you determine how
much you will need to save for your
future.
Can I get help with understanding
my situation?
With all of the economic tumult of
the past year, a thorough review of
your financial plan should be
considered mandatory. Whether
with the advisor who helped you put
together your plan prior to the market
downturn or another advisor who
might be a better fit, it's important to
tap into the knowledge and
experience of a financial professional
who will take the time to understand
your goals and speak to you directly
and realistically about where you
stand and what you should expect
going forward. He or she may be
able to help you in simplifying your
financial life without reducing your
retirement goals.
Should I plan on receiving Social
Security benefits?
If you have not already done so, you


may want to bec
your Social Secu
as part of your o
strategy. Inorde
your social secu
special attention
you begin with
Security benefits
Social Security
lifetime income
generally be higl
wait to take you]
For more inform
benefits as well
income planning
Social Security
(http://www.ssa.
Get Help from.
professionals
Our financial pr
you determine th
follow in pursuit
long-term finance
work with you t
understand your
and then develop
investment plan.


Interested in Learning More?
I specialize in helping people maintain a healthy
financial balance and discover smart money strategies.
Call me to set an appointment to review your
investment objectives, and to discuss any questions
you might have. I look forward to speaking with
you!
Willy Gamalero -- 973-2400
Madison County Community Bank


Sorrento Pacific Financial, LLC Registered Representatives are employed by Madison County Community Bank and regist
(Member FINRAISIPC), a registered broker-dealer. SPF and Madison County Community Bank are not affiliated. Insurance p
may be provided thru ICBA Insurance Services, Inc.
fNOT FDIC INSURED NOT GUARANTEED BY THE BANK MAY GO DOWN IN VALUE
[NOT A nPOSIT NOT INSURFD RV ANV FFnDFRAI AFNrCV


measure that determines recessions
and depressions, as well as booming
economies.
Whether politically favorable or


not, the current govern-
ment spending explosion -
also a component of GDP -
has kept the numbers
propped up to the point
some economists are de-
claring the recession al-
most over. Until consumer
spending and private busi-
ness investment comes
back, however, many re-
main skeptical, as they cer-


aping Workers

protect Their

Finances
PSI)-Having affordable insurance in place
elp Americans who have lost their jobs pro-
r families' financial well-being.
ever, a recent survey found that only 18 per-
espondents believed they would be able to af-
eir insurance for more than six months
g a layoff. The number drops to 14 percent
king at respondents under the age of 45. In-
nalysts say the findings point to an immedi-
for alternate insurance programs.
survey questioned more than 1,000 adults to
ne the threat to Americans from limited ac-
affordable insurance in light of the current
ic conditions. It was conducted by Affinion
a leading marketer of insurance services.
ndings include:
At Risk of Being Uninsured
en asked how long they believed they would
cess to affordable insurance, more than 50
percent of the respon-
dents either believed that
they would have access
for less than six months
July 2009 or didn't know how long
ciallifebalance they would have access
to affordable insurance
after losing a job.
Se Accidents Are Costly
Nearly half of re-
spondents, 45 percent,
ome familiar with believed that an out-of-
rity benefits options
overall income pocket cost of as little as
r tohelpmaximize $500 would have a "se-
rity income, pay
to the date when vere" impact on their fi-
rawing Social nancial stability This is
s. According to the
Administration, problematic given that
benefits will the average cost of hospi-
her the longer you
firstwithdrawal. talization is $560, accord-
nationonyour ing to the Agency for
as information on Healthcare Research and
g tools, visit the
website Quality
eov/). Smart Solutions
our financial
It seems people rec-
ofessionals can help ognize the value of life
te financial path to
Sof your near-and insurance but may not
:ialgoals. He will understand all their op-
o identify and
investmentgoals tions. More than half of
p a well structured respondents were either
"concerned" or "extreme-
ly concerned" that their
loved ones would be fi-
nancially vulnerable in
the event of an accident
or the death of the re-
spondent. But many did
not understand the cost
savings an Accidental
Death and Dismember-
ment (AD&D) plan might
tered through Sorrento. (SPF]
products offer.
For more informa-
tion, visit www.affini-
on.com.


tainly do not view government as a
suitable private business partner.
For consumer spending and gross
investment to return will, among oth-
er variables, require a pool of private
capital. The amount of lending
that banks can extend is a ratio
of their reserve base, for exam-
ple, which is directly tied to the
amount of savings they possess.
In other words, this surge in
American savings not only rep-
resents good personal money
management, it also creates a
massive source of funds for busi-
ness investment. As investment
grows and the economy recov-
ers, it is also a source of cash for
consumers to use for purchases.
Both of these actions will have a
positive impact on GDP, which
will then allow government
spending to decrease. Addition-
ally, the growth will create in-
creased tax revenues, which can
also be used to pay down the
stimulus debt, at least that is
what the equation shows.
The growth of actually the
return to increased savings
rates in America will be very
positive for the economy, assum-
ing the government can success-
fully unwind itself as it claims it
will. Many believe that is an un-
likely assumption, which will be
the topic of Madison Money Part 2:
Government and the economy
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Review Financial Strategies

after Life Events

Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones



If nothing ever changed in your life, you could probably
chart your financial and investment strategies and
then forget about them. But your life is full of changes
- and many of them will require you to take a new
look at how you save, invest and protect your family.

Let's run through some of the most common mile-
stones in life and see what sort of moves you might
make in response:

Marriage It sounds obvious, but once you're
married, you have to stop thinking in terms of "one"
and start thinking of "two" in most aspects of your life
- including your finances. For example, if you are an
aggressive investor but your spouse is more conserva-
tive, you both may need to compromise and choose an
investment strategy that's "down the middle." At the
same time, you'll want to set some common goals,
such as saving enough for a down payment on a
home.
Children When you have children, you have to
protect them today and invest for their future. Your
first step, then, might be to purchase life insurance.
You can typically buy a term life policy at very reason-
able rates. The exact amount of coverage you need
depends on your individual situation, but you'll proba-
bly want at least enough to pay off your mortgage and
send your children to college should anything happen
to you. And to protect your income, you might want to
consider disability insurance. Finally, it's never too
soon to start saving for college. You might want to con-
sider opening a tax-advantaged account, such as a
Section 529 college savings plan.
Job changes When you leave a job, you may
well have an important decision to make about your
401(k) or other employer-sponsored retirement plan. If
you don't need the money right away, you might want
to avoid cashing out your plan, because you'll likely
face an immediate tax bill and you'll have fewer
resources for retirement. Consequently, you may want
to roll your 401(k) to an IRA or your new employer's
plan, if it allows such transfers. Before taking action,
consult with your tax advisor.
Remarriage If you ever remarry, you may need
to change the beneficiary designations on your 401(k),
IRA and other investment accounts. You also may
need to work with your attorney to revise your will, liv-
ing trust and other documents related to your estate
plans.
Retirement For many decades, you saved and
invested for your retirement. Once you retire, however,
you should move away somewhat from the "accumula-
tion" phase and start thinking instead of how best to
manage the money you have accumulated. That
means you'll need to decide when to start taking
Social Security and how much to withdraw each year
from your various retirement accounts, such as your
401(k) and IRA. A professional financial advisor can
help you develop a withdrawal rate that's suitable for
your individual situation.

You'll encounter many important events on the road of
life. By making the right financial moves along the way,
you can help make the journey more pleasant.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by
your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


EdwardJones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631 Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204
Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


*






14A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. reenepublishin. com


Wednesday August 12, 2009


LASSF D1:0*.m. Eerona


IAP RESS SERVICES,

INC. ST*ATEWIDE


CLSSFEDPROGRA


Call Bob
850-242-9342
Now selling steel
buildings, garages,
barns and carports


6/ 0. rmn.


Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rtn, n/c


rmi
Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-rtn, n/c
Turkeys
Royal Palm, Bourbon Red,
Black Spanish & Large
Breasted Bronze. All sizes,
2 weeks old 1 1/2 yrs old

Chickens
All kinds, 5 & 6 months old
850-971-7283 or
850-838-4333
8/12,8/19, pd




White English/Pit Bull
puppies 1 males 1 female
$100 each ready now
850-342-1162
7/8, rtn,nc
Yorkie Pups
Males ready 8/1
$675 850-584-9882
8/12, 8/19, c





Educational Grants, Business
Loans and Bad Credit
Mortgages
850-673-9102
8/5,- 8/26, pd

Cash $$$ Up Front
We pay cash for your old
unwanted refrigerators and
freezers 386-590-2397

8/12, 8/19,8/26,9/2, pd


House For Rent
NW Lovett Rd (HWY 150)
in Greenville. 2 bedroom
with basement, washer and
dryer included, $400 per
month + utilities
850-584-2925
8/7, 8/12, pd
Lake Front Home

2 bedroom 2 bath, includes
Kitchen appliances, lawn
maintenance and water, 1 yr
lease $800 deposit, $800 per
month 850-973-30025
8/5, rtn, pd
Clean as new. Two story, 3
BR, 2.3 baths, formal LR &
DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. New
Kitchen, Range, Ref, D/W,
G/D. Oak Floor downstairs,
Heart Pine upstairs. 2 Central
H&A. Yard maint. included.
ADULT FAMILY. No pets.
$750 rent and deposit. Good
credit req. 205 NE Shelby Ave.
Madison. Call George 973-
8583 or 557-0994.
8/12 -rtn, c
House For Rent
1 bedroom 1 bath, washer
dryer hook up, quiet neigh-
borhood in Madison
$400/month + deposit
850-464-6091
8/12, pd
House For Rent
in Lee, 2 bd 1 bath. No Pets
$375 month, $250 deposit
850-971-5809
8/12, pd

CLEAN 3 BR, CH & CA,
new R & Refg, Oak floors.
ADULT FAMILY ONLY.
Rent $600 plus deposit.
No pets. Good credit req.
432 NE Horry Ave., Madi-
son. Call George 973-8583
or 557-0994.
rtn, c


C1outhem lllias of


Ck'madison apartments


Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer


121 &
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
rtn'cc


1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c




Modular Sales
F.G.B.C. Certifying Agent,
Pat Riley, is now in Lake
City 386-344-5024
7/15, rtn,
New Manufactured Homes
Starting at $23.70 sq. ft.
Guaranteed lowest prices in
North Florida. Call Rick
(386) 752-8196
7/29 -8/28, c
Work for the County or
State?
special financing for home
purchase call
1-800-769-0952
7/15, rtn,
Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452
7/29 -8/28, c
Needs Minor Work
3 bedroom 2 bath dou-
blewide only $9,900
Call David
386-719-0044
7/15, rtn, c
NEW 32 X 80
4 bedroom, loaded
w/upgraded options. Turn
Key... ready to move in in-
cluding well, septic, wiring,
& closing cost on your own
land. $533.33 a month w/ no
money down & 620 or better
credit score Call Lynn
850-365-5129
7/15, rtn,
Trade in's & Repos Available
Call Eric for a list of our
homes available at discount-
ed prices, many to choose
from! (386) 719-5560
7/29 -8/29, c
HOME BUYERS
Let my 20 years experience
negotiate the best buy.
386-344-5024
7/15, rtn, c
Want to buy a home?
call David for government
housing assistance programs
386-719-0044
7/15, rtn, c

1 Acre, paved road, 3 bed-
room 2 bath workshop, fire-
place only $499.00 monthly
call David 386-719-0044
7/15, rtn,c
"Brand New""
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 to many up-
grades to list, all this for only
$42,843.00 Call Eric to set
up appointment
(386) 719-5560
7/29 -8/28, c

CASH FOR YOUR USED
MOBILE HOMES 1990
OR NEWER
386-752-5355
7/15, rtn,
NEED A HOME?
Tired of being turned down
because you have no money
or credit score is too low but
you own your own land? I
have solutions
Call Lynn Sweat
386-365-5129
7/15, rtn,
Own your home
for less than rent and receive
up to $8,000 bonus! Infor-
mation Call
1-800-769-0952
7/15, rtn,
"WOW"
$150.00 and your property
puts you in a home today
call Eric at
(386) 719-5560
7/9 -8/28, c

$361,000 Available to loan
for home purchase at .5 LTV
386-365-8549
7/15, rtn, c


seomeu
We have several prog
help 1st time home
plus GOUT assistance
$8,000 $$$
Call Eric for deta
(386) 719-556(
First Time Home B
Special financing prc
can help you own a
Call Bobby at
386-288-4560

FOR SALE
4 bedroom 2 bath re
move in call
386-288-4560

5 Bedroom 3 Bath
New with zero d(
$595.00 per month
Mike 386-623-42

"JULY HOT DEA
Land/Home easy Q
$8000 Tax Credit 5(
est 386-344-502

28 X 80 5 B
Reduced $15,000 for
sale call Mike
386-623-4218

The Wait Is O0
Introducing "Mossy
the most innovative,
and affordable manu
houses in the industry
Mr. Mott (386) 752




For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suw
was $135,000, Now $
2 BR/1 BA. Fully Fur
New Metal Roof, an
Paint. Utility Buildin
Washer and Dryer. Ni
Trees. 386-719-04

Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Vi
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth
Open and Covered I
Large Screened Porc
FP, CH/A, Oak Floors
inets, and Applian
Offered Furnishec
$179,900. Call BJ Pe
850-508-1900

FOR SALE BY OV
Brick 3 BR, 2 Bath
1604 SQ. FT., Carpor
1.76 Avres, Fenced
Cement Circular D
Sidewalks, recent Ap
Corner lot on Houck
@ 3281 Sullivan Roa
ry. Call for info or
850-584-9486
or 407-791-024
7/2
House For Sal
Cherry Lake Area, re
remodeled, 3/2 1800
cypress home, new
kitchen, and roof. B
flooring on 3/4 ac
$132,500 850-929-





OFFICE BUILD
FOR RENT
across street fror
Post Office, Courtho
and Courthouse Ann
(Old Enterprise Recorder
111 SE Shelby St., Ma
Newly renovate
back to the 1920's
Call 973-4141

Commercial/Indu
Property
with state highwayfr
Corner lots. Fronts
Harvey Greene I
& Highway 53 So
Enterprise Zon
Natural gas line, 8 in
ter main, access to ci
ties, fire hydrant, and
from two power com
Property has easy ac
1-10, via SR 53 & S
Will build to suit ter
short or long term i
Call Tommy Greene
973-4141


Fulltime Grants Coor
position available at
Florida Community (
See www.nfcc.edu
details.


Fulltime Grants Co(
tor position availal
North Florida Comr
College: See www.n
for details.


Experience in Fan
,I'.,I;ii- plowing, et
perience in heavy equ
use (bulldozer, exca
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850-948-9952
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7/15, rtn, c helping others? If you
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www.2reenepublishin2.com


Madison County Carrier 15A


LEG~ALI


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

CASE NO. 2009-170-CA


Plaintiff,

vs. FORECLOSURE AND
OTHER RELIEF

CAROLYN E McMILLIAN
247 City View Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311

Defendant.


NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN;
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on July 29, 2009 in the above styled action, I,
Tim Sanders, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following de-
scribed real property:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH,
RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 1, AND RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 3,273.86
FEET; THENCE NORTH 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 2,215.16 FEET; TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES
33 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,964.01 FEET; TO
THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF NE BELLVILLE ROAD;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET; THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 33 MIN-
UTES 10 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,055.55 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 417.99 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 55 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 908.11 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 90 DE-
GREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 449.64
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 10.08 ACRES,
MORE LESS.

PROPERTY ID NO. 01-2N-10-5802-OBH-018
The sale will be held on August 27, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., to the
highest and best bidder for cash, at the West door of the Madison County
Courthouse in Madison, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida
Statutes.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the owner of the above-described property as of the date of
the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommo-
dation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra
Williams, Court Administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida
32056, telephone:(386)758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.

Dated: July 30, 2009.
Tim Sanders
As Clerk of the Court

BY: /s/ Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

8/5, 8/12


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,

Plaintiff,

vs.
CASE NO. 40-2009-CA- 000230

DONALD RAY CAPPS A/K/A D. RAY CAPPS;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD RAY CAPPS A/K/A
D. RAY CAPPS; DENISE BAILLARGEON; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DENISE BAILLARGEON; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED,
THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; AUCILLA PLANTATIONS PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; MADISON
TIMBERLAND LLC; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR
PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST DEFENDANTSS;

Defendant(s)



NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Madi-
son County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Madison County,
Florida, described as:
TRACT 117, AUCILLA PLANTATIONS UNRECORDED, MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

COMMENCE AT AN IRON ROD MARKING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 6 EAST,
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54
MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 2682.65 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREE 06 MINUTES 52 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1348.23 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE 916.79 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 11
DEGREES 54 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE 233.03
FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 12
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 2672.79 FEET TO A POINT
NORTH 87 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE 1796.09 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF AN
80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT
(335TH STREET) THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE OF
518.21 FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN CONTINUE ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 46 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 159.15 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 410.62 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 44
DEGREES 16 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 86.24
FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 13 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 88.84 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 53 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 212.55 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE LEAVING SAID
CENTERLINE, RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1/970.63 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE SOUTH 42 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 899.29 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 68
DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
2052.15 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A

SW 1 Federal Road, Lot 117
Greenville, FL 32331

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash. At the west front
doorsteps of the Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW range Ave, Madison,
Florida 32340 at 11:00 a.m., on August 20, 2009

DATED THIS 28 DAY OF July, 2009.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the Us pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 28 day of July, 2009.

CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:

Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should
contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-8771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.

8/5, 8/12



Notice

Madison County will submit the Annual Report required by the State Hous-


ing Initiatives Partnership Program for fiscal years 2006/2007,
2007/2008 and 2008/2009 by Septemberl5,2009. Copies of the reports are
available for public inspection and comment at the Office of the
Chairman of the Madison County Board of Commissioners, Madison,
Florida.


WILLIAM L. SULLIVAN
Post Office Box 729
Madison, Florida 32341


in units rented by. Darieno Choice and James Lee .The property will be
Sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the Setf-Storage Facili-
ty Ad, Section 83-806. The sale wili be held Saturday August 29,2009 at 9:00
A.M., at the Madison Mini Storage, 1088 E. U.S. 90, in Madison, Florida.
For further information call 973-6246.


8/12, 8/19


Business Name Change

From: Hughey Memorial Personal Care Center
To: Southern Living For Seniors
8/12


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


THOMAS J. BEGGS, IV,

Plaintiff,


CASE NO: 2009-261-CA


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

WILLIAM L. SULLIVAN CASE NO. 2009-169-CA
Post Office Box 729
Madison, Florida 32341

Plaintiff,

vs. FORECLOSURE AND
OTHER RELIEF
EVANS FENELON
21391 Town Lakes Drive, Apt. 127
Boca Raton, Florida 33486

EDENSWEAR CARRE
75 Tower Hill Street
Lawrence, MA. 01841

Defendants.


NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN;
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on July 29, 2009 in the above styled action, I,
Tim Sanders, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following de-
scribed real property:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH,
RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 1, AND RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,383.66
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BE-
GINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 49 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 465.01 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,996.44
FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF NE HICKORY GROVE
ROAD; THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 08 SECONDS
EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF 31.18 FEET;
THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES
30 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,043.25 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 435.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MIN-
UTES 58 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 945.36 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 10.81 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.

LESS AND EXCEPT: RIGHT OF WAY FOR COUNTY ROAD

PROPERTY APPRAISER'S ID #01-2N-10-5802-OBH-003

The sale will be held on August 27, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., to the
highest and best bidder for cash, at the West door of the Madison County
Courthouse in Madison, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida
Statutes.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the owner of the above-described property as of the date of
the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommo-
dation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra
Williams, Court Administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida
32056, telephone:(386)758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.

Dated: July 30, 2009.

Tim Sanders
As Clerk of the Court

BY: /s/ Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

8/5, 8/12


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,

Plaintiff, CASE NO.: 40-2009-CA-000026
vs. DIVISION:

PAUL KIRKLAND A/K/A PAUL M. KIRKLAND, et al,

Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale dated July 30, 2009 and entered in Case NO. 40-2009-CA-000026
of the Circuit Court Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for MADI-
SON County, Florida wherein CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, is the
Plaintiff and PAUL KIRKLAND A/K/A PAUL M. KIRKLAND; MARIE
KIRKLAND A/K/A MARIE R. KIRKLAND; MADISON COUNTY
FLORIDA; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at EAST DOOR OF THE MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:OOAM, on the 27 day of August 2009, the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judgment:

A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF NORTH-
WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 11
EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULAR-
LY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: FROM THE NORTH EST CORNER
OF SAID SECTION 32 RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 18 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1326.97 FEET TO THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
NORTHWEST QUARTER AND NORTHEAST CORNER AND POINT OF
BEGINNING OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED PARCEL, THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST
ALONG FORTY LINE 250.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 29
MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST PARALLEL WITH SECTION LINE
175.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 12 SECONDS
EAST PARALLEL WITH FORTY LINE 250.0 FEET TO SECTION LINE,
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SECTION LINE 175.0 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, CON-
TAINING 1.00 ACRE, MORE OR LESS, SUBJECT TO COUNTY MAIN-
TAINED PUBLIC ROADS AND POWER LINE A/K/A 1336 NELANTANA
STREET, LEE, FL 320590000

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 31, 2009.



Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

8/5, 8/12



The following is a list of unclaimed bond money held by the Madison Coun-
ty Sheriffs Office. Persons having or claiming any interest in said funds or
any portion ofthem shall file their written claims with the Sheriff or Clerk
of Court and shall make sufficient proof to said Sheriff or Clerk of his ow-
nesrship and upon so doing shall be entitled to receive any part of the mon-
ey so claimed. Unless such bond money is claimed on or before the first day
of September, 2009, same shall be declared forfeited and all claims in refer-
ence thereto are forever barred.

DEFENDANT DATE POSTED AMOUNT POSTED

HOPE DIXON 7/11/08 500.00
JERRY MILLER 8/10/08 36.00
JEREMY NUSBICKEL 9/20/08 86.00
JAMES PATRICK KELLY 10/6/03 1000.00
SAM JOHN WILLIAM 12/1/05 390.00
TOTAL 2012.00

8/5, 8/12, 8/19, 8/26



NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING:

The District Board of Trustees of North Florida Community College will
hold its regular monthly meeting Tuesday, August 18, 2009 at 5:30 p.m. in
the NFCC Student Center Lakeside Room, NFCC, 325 NW Turner Davis
Dr., Madison, FL. A copy of the agenda may be obtained by writing:
NFCC, Office of the President, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL
32340. For disability-related accommodations, contact the NFCC Office of
College Advancement, 850-973-1653. NFCC is an equal access/equal oppor-
tunity employer.


8/12


NOTICE OF SALE PURSANT TO CHAPTER 83. PART IV

Under the Authority of the Seff-Seivice Storage Facility Act, Section 83.805
the described below has been seized for nonpayment of rent and other ac-
crued expenses. Property consists primarily of household & personal goods


8/12


ENANTE DELHOMME, individually,

Defendant.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 29, 2009, in the above referenced case
in which THOMAS J. BEGGS, IV is Plaintiff, and ENANTE DELHOMME
is Defendant, I TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the Court, will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the West door of the Madison
County Courthouse in Madison, Florida, at 11:00 AM (or as soon thereafter
as practicable), on the 27th day of August, 2009, the following described
property set forth in the Default Final Judgment of Foreclosure:

Description: OH 10 Parcel ID: 15-2N-10-5965-010-000
A portion of Section 15, Township 2 North, Range 10 East, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of said
Section 15; thence South 00o09'21" West along the east line of said Section
15 a distance of 1321.10 feet to a concrete monument marking the northeast
corner of the South Half (S ?) of the Northeast Quarter (NE ?) of said Sec-
tion 15; thence North 89o50'02" West along the north line of said S ? of NE
? a distance of 2646.43 feet to a rebar marking the northwest corner of said
S ? of NE ?; thence South 0015'42" West along the west line of said S ? of
NE ? a distance of 989.02 feet to the northwest corner and POINT OF BE-
GINNING of the following described parcel; thence South 8944'18" East a
distance of 662.70 feet; thence South 0015'42" West a distance of 333.86
feet to the centerline of a 60 foot easement; thence North 8944'18" West
along said centerline a distance of 662.70 feet to said west line of S ? of NE
?; thence North 0015'42" East along said west line a distance of 333.86 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 5.08 acres, more or less. Density exception: 03-23-B

SUBJECT TO the ARTICLES OF THE ASSOCIATION OF THE OAK
HILLS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION; RESTRICTIONS AND
PROTECTIVE COVENANTS for OAK HILLS (an unrecorded subdivision
in Madison County, Florida) as more particularly described in the Official
Records of Madison County, Florida, including OR Book 705 Page 94, and
OR Book 705 Page 96.
ALSO SUBJECT TO that easement for utilities granted to Tri County Elec-
tric Corporation and recorded in OR Book 708 Pages 199 to 203 of the pub-
lic records of Madison County, Florida.
ALSO SUBJECT TO existing county graded road rights-of-way.
ALSO SUBJECT TO a 60 foot easement for ingress and egress as recorded
in OR Book 673, Page 140 of the public records of Madison County, Flori-
da.

Together with all structures, improvements, fixtures, appliances, and appur-
tenances on said property or used in conjunction therewith.

Description: OH 11 Parcel ID: 15-2N-10-5965-011-000
A portion of Section 15, Township 2 North, Range 10 East, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of said
Section 15; thence South 00o09'21" West along the east line of said Section
15 a distance of 1321.10 feet to a concrete monument marking the northeast
corner of the South Half (S ?) of the Northeast Quarter (NE ?) of said Sec-
tion 15; thence North 89o50'02" West along the north line of said S ? of NE
? a distance of 2646.43 feet to a rebar marking the northwest corner of said
S ? of NE ?; thence South 0015'42" West along the west line of said S ? of
NE ? and along the west line of the North Half (N ?) of the Southeast Quar-
ter (SE ?) of said Section 15 a distance of 1322.88 feet to the centerline of a
60 foot easement, said point marking the northwest corner and POINT OF
BEGINNING of the following described parcel; thence South 8944'18"
East along said easement centerline a distance of 662.70 feet; thence South
0015'42" West a distance of 333.86 feet; thence North 8944'18" West a
distance of 662.70 feet to said west line of N ? of SE ?; thence North
0015'42" East along said west line a distance of 333.86 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING.
Containing 5.08 acres, more or less. Density exception: 03-24-B

SUBJECT TO the ARTICLES OF THE ASSOCIATION OF THE OAK
HILLS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION; RESTRICTIONS AND
PROTECTIVE COVENANTS for OAK HILLS (an unrecorded subdivision
in Madison County, Florida) as more particularly described in the Official
Records of Madison County, Florida, including OR Book 705 Page 94, and
OR Book 705 Page 96.
ALSO SUBJECT TO that easement for utilities granted to Tri County Elec-
tric Corporation and recorded in OR Book 708 Pages 199 to 203 of the pub-
lic records of Madison County, Florida.
ALSO SUBJECT TO existing county graded road rights-of-way.
ALSO SUBJECT TO a 60 foot easement for ingress and egress as recorded
in OR Book 673, Page 140 of the public records of Madison County, Flori-
da.

Together with all structures, improvements, fixtures, appliances, and appur-
tenances on said property or used in conjunction therewith.

The property will be sold in separate, serial sales.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE. IF ANY. OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

[Note: In accordance with Rule 2.065, Florida Rules of Judicial Administra-
tion, please be advised as follows: If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida 32056-
1569, Telephone: (386) 758-2163, within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this Notice or pleading. If you are hearing or voice impaired,
please call: 1-800-955-8771.]

WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 29th day of
July, 2009 at Madison, Madison County, Florida.

TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
Scot B. Copeland, Esq.
LAW OFFICES OF SCOT B. COPELAND, P.L.
FBN: 0156681
P.O. Drawer 916
Madison, FL 32341


8/5, 8/12


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ADOPTION OF THE PROPOSED EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL RE-
PORT OF THE MADISON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

Madison County, Florida, by and though its Board of County Commission-
ers, will consider the adoption of the Evaluation and Appraisal Report on
the Madison County Comprehensive Plan, for transmittal to the Florida De-
partment of Community Affairs (DCA) for its review of sufficiency through
Ordinance, pursuant to the requirements of Chapter 163.3191, Florida
Statutes.

The public hearing on the report will be held:
When: Wednesday, August 19, 2009 at 5:00 p.m.
Where: Madison County Annex Building:
Downstairs Board Room;
229 SW Pinckney Street, Madison, FL

The proposed report may be reviewed by the public at 229 SW Pinckney
Street, Suite 219, Madison, FL between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Interested parties are encouraged to appear at this hearing and provide
comments regarding the proposed report. Persons needing special access
considerations should call the Madison County Planning and Zoning De-
partment at (850) 973-3179 at least 48 hours before the date of the meeting
for scheduling purposes.






1 GA Madison County Carrier www.2reenepublishin2.com Wednesday, August 12, 2009


cit T Iam)


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I


16A Madison County Carrier


Wednesday, August 12, 2009


IW~


II
~9~ :

















The Spirit Of Madison County


Section

Wednesday, August 12, 2009


TIPS FOR A SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL YEAR


Whether it's the
beginning of the
school year or well
into the semester,
sometimes helping a
child succeed academ-
ically means under-
standing how he or
she learns best.
Experts say chil-
dren's individual
learning styles are
linked to one or more
of their senses and
can generally be clas-
sified in one of four
categories: visual, au-
ditory, kinesthetic or
tactile. Knowing the
group in which your
child falls can help
him or her overcome
scholastic obstacles
and, in many cases,
move to the head of
the class.
"Successful learn-
ing happens when we


make a connection be-
tween what we are at-
tempting to learn and
our personal
strengths," says Dr.
Mary Mokris, an edu-
cation specialist for
Kumon Math and
Reading Centers.
"When the connection
is made, learning is
easy. When it isn't, dif-
ficulty follows." She
offers these tips for
identifying your
child's learning style:
Seeing Is Believing
Visual learners
learn best when
"shown" how to do
something. They
thrive on written di-
rections. If your child
is a visual learner, it
could be best for him
or her to write and
rewrite a spelling list
he or she is studying


to see the letters come
together on the page.
All Ears
Auditory learners
retain more informa-
tion from what they
hear than read. Audi-

...
-


Jack McClellan,
Principal,
m bLee Elemestary School


Lee Elementary School's Faculty and
Staff are excited about our students re-
turning for the 2009-2010 School Year.
As wonderful as our last year was, this
next will be even better. Our kids did
great: working hard, learning a lot and
earning the school another "B." Even
better, the students did so well that the school was considered
to have met the State's stringent requirements for Adequate
Yearly Progress. You rock, Rockets! And of course, we could-
n't have done it without our Lee Elementary parents! Thanks,
y'all!
We also cannot thank Warden Hicks and Officer John
Stevens enough for the wonderful job done by their work crew
at our school. In addition to the excellent job they did painting
and polishing the classrooms and hallways and maintaining
the school grounds, they presented us with some great artwork
in our front office. Please come by and check it out!
Our open house will be on Monday, August 24, from 5:30 to
7 p.m. Our classrooms will open to visit after a short meeting
in our cafeteria. If you aren't able to attend, we will be able to
answer any questions that you might have at our booth at the
Family Fun Day at the Madison Rec Center on August 15th
from Noon till 4.
School starts on August 24 at 8 a.m. You can drop off your
students at the front office beginning at 7:30. In order not miss
instruction or cause disruption, please make sure your stu-
dent is at school before 8 and not picked up before 2:40.
If you have any questions, please call your Lee Elementary
School at 973-5030.


tory learners can
make an audio record-
ing of themselves
spelling out words on
a spelling list so they
can replay them and
spell along with the
tape.
Move On
Kinesthetic learn-
ers express them-
selves through
movement and often
have trouble sitting
still. To learn a
spelling list, a kines-
thetic learner can use
his or her body to
form the letters, can
put the words on ob-


jects or can recite the
spelling of words
while jumping rope.
Feeling Smart
Tactile learners
need to feel and ma-
nipulate objects with
hands-on experience
in order to learn best.
They can use magnet-
ic letters to spell out
spelling words on the
refrigerator or form
the letters in clay or
sand.
"If you know your
child's strongest
learning style, share
this information with
the teacher," says Dr.


Mokris. "That can
help them adapt cer-
tain lessons appropri-
ately."
For instance, at
Kumon Math and
Reading Centers, in-
structors offer an oral
reading component to
the reading program
and math manipula-
tives such as the num-
ber board in the math
program. The pro-
gram currently helps
more than 4 million
children in 45 coun-
tries. For more infor-
mation, visit
www. kumon.com.


Seth Moore,
Principal,
Pinetta Elementary School


Dear PES Family and Friends,
Hard work and a positive attitude
do pay off! This was evident as we
met our set goals for last school term.
Pinetta Elementary School not only
maintained an "A" grade from the
state of Florida but we also met AYP
(adequate yearly progress) requirements set by the federal gov-
ernment. This was a huge goal that was set this time last year
and with your hard work and dedication to our school we were
successful in reaching our goals.
Now we are ready to begin a new year with new goals, chal-
lenges, and expectations. The entire faculty and staff return
from last year and are looking forward to an exciting school
year.
New for this year will be a new reading series, SRA "Imag-
ine It" for first and second grade. Last year it was purchased
for third, fourth and fifth grades and they loved it! The teach-
ers are excited about diving into something new and they have
high expectations for the students!
Again this year PES has adopted a uniform dress code for
our students. Shirts may be blue (light or navy), white, black,
grey, or yellow/gold. Students can wear Pinetta logo t-shirts or
regular pull over shirts with a collar. Pants or shorts can be
Khaki, navy blue, or black. All shoes must be closed toed and
attached to your foot (no flip-flops). If you have any questions
please give us a call at school.
You are invitedto this year's back to school open house on
Friday, August 21st from 5:00-7:00. Come meet your child's
teacher and hear a little of what will be expected of your child.
I would also like to invite you to get involved with our school.
There are so many ways you can volunteer at a school, so get
involved today!
Sincerely,
Beth Moore
Principal


t^





2B Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 12, 2009


SCHOOL & EDUCATION


If s Tlime to Put On Your Pancing Shoes


4,


~1


"Back to school"
means it's time to go
back to dancing school
as well. On Tuesday,
September 8th, the
sound of tapping feet
and lively music will
once again be heard at
Becky's Dance Steps
Studio as students put
on their dancing shoes
for the studio's 34th sea-
son of dance instruc-
tion.
Registration and
dancewear fittings for
the 2009 2010 term will
be held Wednesday, Au-
gust 19th Friday, Au-
gust 21st, from 2 p.m. -
6:00 p.m. at the studio
located at 438 East Base
Street, next to McDon-


ald's in Madison. through adult.
"Early Bird" Boys' Zone, a
discounts and special class in
door prizes Jazz, Tap &
will be given Hip Hop just
to those reg- for boys will
istering the also be in-
first day on cluded in the
Wednesday, curriculum.
August New short
19th. En- term work-
rollment is shops last-
limited so ing 6 8
be sure to weeks each
register will include
ea r 1 y Mommy &
Classes will Me classes,
be offered .-. Hip Hop for
in Ballet, \ *- Kids, and So
Tap, Jazz, . You Want to
Kinderdance Learn to
and Pointe for \ Dance!, a class
ages three or Adults with


no dance experience
that just want to get
some exercise and have
fun while exploring the
different genres of
dance.
Becky's Dance Steps
Studio is owned and op-
erated by Becky Robin-
son, a member of Dance
Masters of America.
She and her staff, which
includes Associate In-
structor, Toni Blanton
Norris, are excited
about the prospects of a
new school year after
attending conventions
and classes this sum-
mer in Orlando. For
more registration infor-
mation, call 973-4828 or
973-4444.


Ap-rw


MADISON 378 West Base t. 973-2300
Across from Mcdonald's

E AV D 3 IZACUS


PIZZA TRIO
Three Medium 1-Topping Pizzas


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Large 1 -Topping Pizza PLUS
10 Howie Wings or 6 Chicken Tenders

$14"
Plus sales txv (P-8I Fvn ira 9/1 /n0


CROWD PLEAZZER THINK EXTRA BIG
Medium Specialty Pizza
PLUS Medium 2-Topping Pizza I Extra Large Pizza
2 [age Any way you want it (up to 3 toppings)
$1899
2 ExLarge
:'$16 -11,.- -
Plus sales tax. (GP-8) Expires 9/15/09 Plus sales tax. (GP-8) Expires 9/15/09
I-- J-------- mmm ------mmmm J


Learning W


Center Holds Back


To School Jam
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison/Greenville Learning Center in Greenville will be hosting its
Third Annual Back To School Jam on Saturday, August 22, from 10-12 p.m. The
event is sponsored by Otis and Essie Norton, along with the Men's Club of Madi-
son.
The center will be giving away school supplies to needy families who have
children returning to school in the fall. These items include backpacks, pencils
and pens, paper, rulers and more.
The Madison/Greenville Learning Center is owned by Otis and Essie Nor-
ton of Monticello. The purpose of the center is to help the local youth.
"We wanted to establish this center for the community," stated Otis. "We re-
alize the young people on the streets are uneducated, and we want to help our
youth by furthering their education. This is something we wanted to do for the
youth of our community"
If you would like to donate school supplies for this cause, or give a mone-
tary gift for the center to buy school supplies, please call (850) 997-5683 or (850)
508-3566.
The Madison/Greenville Learning Center is a not-for-profit organization.




S lobby Brnett,
Principal,
^ Christian Heritage Acadamny

SaOn August 24, 2009 Christian
Heritage Academy (CHA) will wel-
Scome students Pre-K through eight
grades back for our fourth year of
teaching and training the next gener-
ation for God's glory. These past three
years have been filled with excite-
ment and continued development of our vision and our faculty.
CHA is the ministry of First Baptist Church of Greenville,
Florida. CHA offers a Christ-centered education in a Christian
environment where students are instructed with commitment
to education that places Christ at the center of all learning.
This summer has seen the remodeling of our classrooms
where the impact by our staff will make a powerful difference
in the lives of these children. Our sincere appreciation is ex-
tended to all those who help make this remodeling a success.
Education is coupled with nurture and love from the heart of
God through our dedicated staff to each student everyday.
CHA uses the ABEKA curriculum in each class.
Parents, again this year have expressed deep appreciation
for the Step Up for Students scholarship program opportuni-
ties that make it possible to send their children to private
schools. If you would like more information on this scholar-
ship program go to www.stepupforstudents.org
Again, we welcome our faculty and students back to school
with much excitement and enthusiasm for the 2009-20010
school year. If you believe this is the direction God is leading
you and your family please contact us. For more information
about CHA call (850) 948-2068.
We cherish your prayers for our school and students.
Bobby Burnett
Principal
Christian Heritage Academy


"It's Time To Put On Your Dancing Shoes!"





4 E








ST U 'D -I @

Registration &
Dancewear Fittings
Wednesday, August 19h Friday, August 21"
2:00pm 6:00pm
Wed. Specials ONLY- Early Bird Registramtion with Discounts & Door Prizes
Ballet Pointe Tap Jazz Kinderdance Hip Hop
-- Ages 3 thru Adult---
NEW CLASSES for Boys, Mommy & Me, &
So You Want to Learn to Dance! for Adult Beginners
Classes Begin
Tuesday, September 8W
Call Today!! 973-4828 973-4444
438 E. Base Street, next to McDonald's in Madison, Florida
Becky Robinson Director Member Dance Masters of America





Wednesday, August 12, 2009


www.2reenepublishin2.com


Madison County Carrier 3B


SCHOOL & EDUCATION


Shirley Joseph,
Principal,
Madison County Excel
Alternative School

The term alternative education
broadly refers to the public schools
which have been set up by the school
district, within the state of Florida,
for the population of students that
are not succeeding in the traditional
public school environment. Alternative schools offer students
who are failing academically or may have learning disabilities
or behavioral problems an opportunity to achieve in a different
setting.
The MADSION COUNTY EXCEL ALTERNATIVE
SCHOOL is the Alternative Education program for Madison
County Schools. A goal of the EXCEL School is to improve stu-
dent's academic performance, attendance, and discipline. The
curriculum is based on the Florida Sunshine Standards and
the Madison County Student Progression Plan. In addition to a
rigorous academic focus on the curriculum, our hope is to also
provide support and some type of counseling to the students.
Several budget crises for Madison County Schools have
caused us to take another look at scheduling. In order to meet
the needs of a greater number of students, there has been a
creative approach to scheduling for the 2009-2010 school year.
Though EXCEL has not received a school grade for the past
three years, the students are required to take the FCAT and it
is possible for students to graduate from the school with a reg-
ular diploma. EXCEL is not exempt from APY rating. For the
2008-2009 school year EXCEL achieved 85 % of the AYP goals.
As we begin this school year, there will be a greater focus
on the individual student. With the individual growth should
come the collective growth of the group. We solicit your help
as we embark upon this journey We truly believe that, "it takes
a village to raise a child." We know with your help and the help
and goodwill of the community that we can, and will make, a
difference.
Shirley Joseph will be assuming the leadership role at EX-
CEL for this school year. She is busy trying to schedule con-
ferences to meet individually with each parent and their
student before school begins. So, if your student will be at-
tending EXCEL in August, please call the school and make an
appointment for your conference.
Believing, Achieving, Succeeding............Yes, we can!!!!









C. Pavis Barclay,
Principal,
Greenville Elementary School



colt,,s



Welcome back to the beginning of a great school year filled
with high expectations from our faculty, staff, and students.
This year marks a new beginning for Greenville Elementary
School. Last school term the school received a letter grade of
"A" on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test also known
as the FCAT, as well as making AYP (adequate yearly progress).
We will continue to work very hard to maintain a grade of "A"
and AYP required by the No Child Left Behind Act. We are very
excited that all of our wonderful and highly qualified teachers
will be returning along with the addition of a newly assigned
Para-professional.
The PTO (Parent-Teacher Organization) is alive and well at
Greenville Elementary School. Each month we will meet and
discuss what's happening at school and how we can work to-
gether to best meet the needs of our children. The PTO sup-
ports the school in an advisory capacity, through volunteers,
fund raising, mentoring, and community activities. The PTO
and school form a partnership all year long to make the school
a "Good Place to Learn." Another organization that provides
assistance to the school is the School Advisory Council (SAC).
The SAC provides advisory support to the school and provides
important input and feedback on school improvement.
Supervision for students starts at 7:30 a.m. Students should
not be dropped off, or brought to school, before 7:30 a.m. Stu-
dents arriving to school at 7:30 a.m. will report directly to the
cafeteria for breakfast. After eating breakfast, students will re-
port to their classrooms. Teachers will be in their classrooms
at 7:45 a.m. to receive students. Our school day for students
will end at 2:45 p.m.
We welcome our parents, guardians, grandparents, and oth-
er interested individuals to visit your and our school. However,
in order to comply with the Jessica Lunsford Act, we must ask
that all visitors come to the main office and sign in so that we
may assist you in the purpose of your visit. After the first week
of school, the students should know their teacher and class-
room and should not have to be escorted to class. There-
fore, we are asking that students arriving by car should be
dropped off in the parent drop-off and pick-up area in front of
the school. Please do not park and wait for children to disap-
pear into their classroom as this will create a safety problem for


S other parents dropping off their children. Your assistance in
this matter is greatly appreciated.
Lastly, as the newly assigned principal at Greenville, I
would like to say thanks for the opportunity to serve the com-
munity where I grew up and began my education.
C. Davis Barclay


Emily Spencer,
Principal,
Latma Christian Academy







Greetings Madison County!
The LATMA Christian Academy is happy to begin its sev-
enth year in operation, and it has been a wonderful, exciting,
and history making seven years at that! The Bible instructs us
to exam ourselves and so did the Department of Education!
Therefore we have worked diligently in our studies and we are
so happy to report an increase in our Stanford 10 scores! (The
"Stanford 10" is a Standardized Test that replaces the FCAT at
LATMA)
Attending LATMA means being a part of a history making
environment. We thank God for blessing us to make and be a
part of history and we thank those of you who have supported
us in our many endeavors. We can't help but reflect on one of the
coldest days of last Winter in which we participated in the In-
auguration of President Barack Obama, our first African Amer-
ican President! We were elated when First Lady Michelle Obama
responded to our letter with an invitation to the White House!
We have accepted the invitation for the 2009-10 school term.
Our elementary students not only enjoyed a beautiful gar-
den right on the school grounds, but took a trip to the Mixon
Fruit Farm and the Mosi Museum of Science in Tampa, which
houses the largest scientific activity area for children in the
country! Our Elementary and older students can look forward to
a great trip this year as well.
At LATMA, we love working in our community. Area nurs-
ing home residents are as happy to see LATMA students on
Tuesday when we go to sing, and LATMA is happy to be there
also. This outreach will continue during this school year. Madi-
son county residents can also look forward to the Mock Consti-
tution Signing that will take place on September 18th on the
Courthouse steps and lawn, and yes that delicious lunch will be
available again!
The Annual Celebration will take place on December 12th,
so please get ready for elegant dinning, great entertainment,
and the sharing of our accomplishments in the past six years.
We will start the New Year off with the Martin Luther King, Jr.
Commemorative Breakfast, continue with our Black History
and Women's History activities and look forward to saying
farewell to our third set of graduates next Summer.
LATMA is currently accepting applications, and scholar-
ships are still available. Please call us at (850) 973-2359. Volun-
teers are also needed. If individuals or groups can share at least
an hour of time, it would be very much appreciated! Our Par-
ent/Student Orientation will take place on Tuesday evening, Au-
gust 17th at 7:00 PM. Potential parents and students are also
welcomed to come! Thank you Madison, and we wish all the oth-
er schools in the area a great and successful year. Please pray for
us as we "Train Excellent Leaders for His Excellency!
Pastor Emily Spencer, Principal








Janna Barrs,
Pa others Principal,
Madison Academy








Dear Madison Academy Students and Parents,
I trust that you are enjoying your summer break; I've cer-
tainly enjoyed mine! In checking the calendar it appears that
a new school year is quickly approaching. You know what they
say, "All good things must come to and end"; however I would
like to add to that expression...All good things must come to an
end to make way for even better things in the future!! T h e
floors are clean and shiny, many rooms are freshly painted,
and materials are arriving daily; all that's missing are teach-
ers and students!
Speaking of teachers and students, I am pleased to an-
nounce the addition of four new faces to our faculty Crysti
Burnette has accepted the fourth grade teaching position,
Bridgett Jenkins will be assisting Karen Weiland in 4K, Mrs.
Nancy Varn will be teaching Art History in middle grades, and
Kelsey Varn will be assisting us with after-school care. In ad-
dition, Shawna Swope will be assisting in the upper grade af-
ter-school care program. It appears that we have several new
families relocating to our area and they have decided to put
their children in our care. Let's make every effort to make
them feel welcome into our "family".
Our Board of Directors, alumni, parents, grandparents,
and maintenance crews have been busy this summer making
improvements to our buildings and grounds and adding items
to our PE and Music Departments. During our Open House on
August 20 we will be "showing off" some additions to our
program. Specifically, we would like for you to plan to visit our
new weight room and be sure to stop by the music room to gaze
at the new Orff Instruments! We will also have a sampling of
new PE Equipment on display in the gymnasium.
The PAT Club has met over the summer and they have an
exciting year planned!
To kick off the year they will have a display of new spirit wear
in the gym during Open House. In addition to the PAT Club,
there will be numerous other opportunities for parents, grand-
parents, and alumni to get involved in our school this year. In-
formation will be available at Open House detailing some
possibilities for involvement that you may wish to consider.
Mark your calendars with these important dates and
times; Thursday, Aggust 20th, from 5:30 to 6:30 Open House and


Monday, August 24 1, at 7:50 First Bell for the 2009-2010 school
year. Enjoy the rest of your break and we'll see you soon!

Sincerely,
Janna Barrs
Head of School






4B Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 12, 2009


SCHOOL & EDUCATION


Tips For Packing



Heathier School Lunches


Lunches that
make the nutritional
grade can help your
kids get better grades.
And, what better way
to boost that brain-
power than to fuel
those bodies with
healthy fruits and veg-
gies. Here are a few
tips to make your kids
the envy of the lunch-
room.
Covert yogurt:
In your children's
lunch, pack a plastic
container of plain yo-
gurt and fruit chunks.
Encourage them to
play detective and
identify which fruits
you included. If they
come home and identi-
fy the fruit you added,
give them a small
prize.
Thermos fu-
sions: Help your child
experiment weekly
with new 100 percent
fruit and vegetable
beverages in a ther-


mos for school.
Color your
crunch for lunch:
Have your child
choose from a rainbow
of colors to brighten
up his or her lunch.
Carrots or celery with
light ranch dressing
or apples with peanut
butter are a fun way to
crunch.
Get sporty: Pre-
portion energy snacks
for your kids as they
head to sporting
events, such as their
favorite dried fruits
and nuts.
Let them play
with their food: For a
little lunch bag fun,
slice apples into boats
(cutting apples into
eighths), or try red
pepper butterflies
(slicing red peppers
across diameter) or
cucumber hearts
(sliced with a paring
knife).
Slow-cooker


creations: Add car-
rots, potatoes, onions,
celery and all your fa-
vorite veggies togeth-
er in the Crock-Pot for
a hearty stew that
cooks while you help
with homework.
A Call To Action
The national pub-
lic health initiative en-
courages Americans
to eat more fruits and
vegetables--fresh,
frozen, canned, dried
and 100 percent juice
for their better health.
The initiative is a na-
tional call to action
that is attainable and
easy for people to un-
derstand--it is simply
to eat more fruits and
vegetables. Moms can
find these and more Get
Smart! tips, as well as
recipes, nutrition infor-
mation and more, on
the Fruits & Veggies--
More Matters Web site
www.fruitsandveggies
morematters.org.


kmen E Killingsworth
Principal,
Madison County High School








The Madison County High School faculty and staff would
like to welcome our parents and students to the 2009-2010 school
year. Our school, along with the Southern Regional Education
Board, is in the second year of a three-year partnership to in-
crease student success. This year, we will change from the tra-
tditi-ional seven period day to a modified block which has five
pe-trlid-s during the day The first two periods will change after
th-e etnd of the first semester and the remaining three will
change after the end of the first semester and the remaining
three will last the entire year. We are also assessing the academ-
ic rigor to ensure grade level proficiency.
Our main commitment is to the success of our students. Re-
search shows that poor reading and writing skills prevent many
students from graduating from high school, completing college
and contributing in the workplace. We are asking parents to re-
inforce the importance of reading and encourage your child to
read. We gave reading lists out at the end of last school year to
students in order for them to read two books over the summer
and they will be tested on it when they come back for the 2009-
2010 school year.
Our Media Center will be open for our students to check out
books on Tuesday and Thursday from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. if they
still need to check books out. Improving our students' reading
and writing skills must be our first priority. I am, as the Princi-
pal of your child, begging you to support your child in their aca-
demic development in the same manner that I see you support
your child in extracurricular events.
The 2009-2010 school year will be a very busy year as we
strive to make our school one that our students, parents and
community can be proud of. The grade we received last year is
one that is unacceptable and we will make every effort to correct
it.
Our school day will begin at 8:25 a.m. daily The buses will
come in the afternoon around 3:10 p.m. We invite you to attend
our Open House on August 20 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. We look for-
ward to talking with you during that time and if we can be of
any future, help please call at 973-5061. We look forward to a
great year.
Sincerely,
Ben F. Killingsworth
Principal
Madison County High School


Sami Stalnaker
Principal,
Madison County Central School



I IIONCO




The faculty and staff of Madison County Central School
would like to welcome all students to the 2009-2010 school year.
We are certainly excited about the upcoming year and ready to
continue our success. Our school grade improved from a "D" to a
solid "C"; only 42 points away from being a "B." We, at MCCS, are
confident in our students' abilities to achieve their fullest poten-
tial. To facilitate our students' achievements, MCCS has made
some significant changes in our teaching strategies and meth-
ods.
Kindergarten will be self-contained throughout the day,
while first and second grade teachers will be on specific grade
level teams of two or three teachers. Third, fourth and fifth
grade teachers will be teaching on teams of three; as a "Small
Learning Community" Sixth, seventh and eighth grade teachers
will continue with the grade level "House" process. MCCS has
gotten away from the traditional "self-contained" approach for
the majority of our grade levels and classes.
Our commitment to your child's success remains our high-
est priority in order to insure each child is able to meet his/her
individual goals. In order for MCCS students to achieve their
highest potential, a strong community partnership is vital to our
school. MCCS began creating a partnership by holding individ-
ual "Town Hall" meetings to encourage community involvement
and awareness. This process will continue throughout the 2009-
2010 school year as well.
Your child's school day will begin at 8:15 a.m. daily. Student
supervision will begin at 7:35 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. daily unless the
child is participating in an approved after-school program. All
students will be directed to their first period class at 8:00 am to
prepare for the day to begin. In order to prevent any unneces-
sary interruptions during the school day, please be sure your
child arrives to school on time.
MCCS's dress policy will remain the same as last year. A
copy of this policy is available at the school's main office and
will be published in the Madison County Carrier and Enterprise
Recorder. We will be hosting our annual "Open House" Thursday,
August 20th from 4:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. Pre-K and Kinder-
garten students will need to report to the school's cafeteria and
will be directed to their appropriate classes. All other students
will report to the main office area for individual home room as-
signments. MCCS's Succeed Academy will be hosting a separate
"Open House" Tuesday, August 18th beginning at 6 p.m.
Additionally, as the school year gets started, each grade lev-
el will be hosting individual "Parent Night" meetings to address
specific parental concerns.
Sincerely,
Sam Stalnaker
Principal
Madison County Central School


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Wednesday, August 12, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 5B


SCHOOL & EDUCATION


; rrHfte ?pfF^ t T air? Faf


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Several mem-
bers of Madison County
civic and educational
leadership, including
Excel School Principal
Shirley Joseph and Su-
pervisor of Elections
Jada Woods-Williams,
were among educators
and officials who ad-
dressed the students at-
tending the St. James
Missionary Baptist
Church Back-to-School
Informational Fair. Rev-
erends David DeLaugh-
ter and Octavious
Tookes welcomed chil-


all children who qualify
for it. Sam Stalnaker em-
phasized the Central
School's improvement
goals, and Shirley
Joseph reminded par-
ents and students that
the Excel School can and
will produce productive
graduates.
Other guests and
their messages included:
Sharon Reynolds,
Women's Pregnancy
Center Teenage preg-
nancy is a very emotion-
al issue and the young
women of Madison
County have a place to
go for help.


Madison County Fire
Department In addi-
tion to fire safety tips; he
excited and involved the
children regarding the
importance of being a
respectful and attentive
student.
Jerome Wyche,
Madison County Alco-
hol and Other Drug Pre-
vention Coalition Told
children about the im-
portance of good choic-
es, and that adult
helpers are available for
them and their parents.
Ashley Rudd &
Tyuanna McCall, MCHD
Students Working


(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, August 8, 2009)
Students appreciated the door prizes and school supplies they received at
the Back-to-School fair held at St. James on august 8. Pictured left to right with
host Geneva Thomas: Amber Brown, Keith Brown, Rekaeye Ware, Aquilla Powell
and Desirea Alexander.


(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, August 8, 2009)
Superintendent of Schools Lou Miller thanked Reverend David DeLaughter
for hosting the Back-to-School Fair at St. James Missionary Baptist Church.


dren, parents and speak-
ers to the gathering,
which kicked off at 9
a.m. on Saturday, August
8, following a delicious
breakfast served up by
the lovely ladies of the
church.


Elizabeth Brinson,
County Extension Office
- Food Stamp grant in-
cludes resources to pro-
vide parents guidance
regarding importance of
food choices and nutri-
tional health for all stu-


Against Tobacco (SWAT)
program Program has
been approved as a club
at the Central School
and will include leader-
ship training and field
trips.
Tim Sanders, Clerk


11


Big Bend AHEC Smok-
ing Cessation Specialist -
Entertained all in atten-
dance with lively Q & A
session regarding the
hazards of all forms of to-
bacco use, including
smokeless. He also invit-
ed everybody to join him
for the "Freestyle Con-
nections" BMX stunt bike
show he is sponsoring for
the Fifth Saturday festi-
val scheduled for August
29 at Four Freedoms
Park.
Jada Woods-
Williams, Supervisor of
Elections Having grown
up at St. James, she really
connected to all the kids,
reminding them they can
achieve their dreams but
it requires dedication and
a respect for those around
them. Her combination of
humor and understand-
ing was a big hit.
Children and guests
were treated to two gift
bag raffles during the fair.
Additionally, generous
bags of school supplies
were provided to all stu-
dents in preparation for
returning to school on
August 24.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at
michael@greenepublishin
g.com.


(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, August 8, 2009)
Preston Mathews, tobacco cessation specialist
with Big Bend AHEC, entertained students and
guests at the St. James Back-to-School Information-
al Fair.


(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, August 8, 2009)
Ashley Rudd, representing the MCHD Students Working Against Tobacco
program, introduced the kids to Mr. Grossmouth during the Back-to-School In-
formational Fair held on August 8 at St. James Missionary Baptist Church.


Following a brief
greeting by LaGretta
Woods, Superintendent
of Schools Lou Miller
opened the morning,
providing information
and warm words of en-
couragement to stu-
dents, age kindergarten
to high school. Among
other key comments that
followed, Gwen Hubbard
reviewed tutoring op-
tions, emphasizing the
value of the resource for


dents, especially those
in early developmental
stages.
Ben Stewart, Madi-
son County Sheriff Ex-
pressed his appreciation
for grant program
school district recently
received that creates ad-
ditional school resource
officer. Reminded chil-
dren their safety and
comfort are his priori-
ties as well.
Ernie Johnson,


of the Court Reminded
children to aim high and
be the best they can be,
as well as urging chil-
dren to work hard and
know there are adults
around them who want
to help. He included the
story of a special men-
toring relationship he
has with Tony Straugh-
ter who now plays foot-
ball for the University of
South Carolina.
Preston Mathews,


Richard Finlayson
Principal,
Aucilla Christian Acadarmy

Dear Parents,
I hope this finds you in the midst of a
summer filled with family, fun, fellow-
ship, and faith. Here at school this is a
busy time as we work diligently to pre-
pare for the return of your precious
children. We are very excited about the
year ahead and will continue to strive to be in a constant state
of improvement as we work to become all that God intends for
our ministry to be.
We are extremely excited about the success of our Securing
the Future capital campaign. As the temperature seems to ap-
proach 100 degrees daily, we are nearing $1.8 million in com-
mitments as we press on toward our goal of $2 million! This
level of success would be astounding under normal circum-
stances, but it is absolutely miraculous in today's economic
times. This is an awesome testimony about the ability of God
to provide for His school and we give Him the glory for these re-
sults. We would like to thank all of our supporters who have
generously committed thus far and ask that everyone pray
about how they may be able to support this campaign.
Due to the success of our Securing the Future campaign, our
first through third grades will be moving into a new classroom
building this fall. Construction is moving along well as all the
drywall is up and the sod went down today This will secure the
future for our facilities to accommodate our student growth for
many years to come and allow us to not be overcrowded in our
current facilities.
Most importantly, we will continue to strive to secure the
eternal future of our precious children as we lay a strong spiri-
tual foundation on which they can build their lives. Thank you
for the privilege of working with your children. It is an honor
and responsibility that we do not take lightly Always remem-
ber that an Aucilla Christian Academy education is an invest-
ment in the future of your children. May God continue to bless
you and your family throughout the remainder of the summer.

In Christ,
Richard Finlayson


(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, August 8, 2009)
Students were presented generous bags of school supplies at the St. James
Missionary Baptist Church Back-to-School Information Fair.




www.2reenepublishin2.com


Always look both ways
when crossing the street.


BART
ALFORD
School Board
Member
District 5


Backpack overload
leads to back pain.

Allied Therapy
of Madison, LLC
456 W. Base St. Madison, FL
850-973-2187


Cross the street only
at crosswalks.


Jesus' life journey led
Him to the "cross "walk.
Jesus said,
"Come, Follow Me."
First United Methodist Church


/


Don't talk to strangers.


1-10 exit 258
South of Madison
(850) 973-3115


Exercise helps keep
you physically and
mentally strong.


Supervisor of Elections
Jada Woods
Williams
Madisc.r FL
850-973-6507


N


Fire drills are important
at school and at home.



Serving Madison, Jefferson,
Taylor & Lafayette Counties
Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King & Glen King Agents
233W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071


Go places in a group
for added safety.

GRANNY'S
This-N-That Shop
Christine Zavasky
291 Dade St. Madison
850-973-3500


Help others
whenever you can.

4 Hall's
Tire & Muffler
Center
850-973-3026
1064 E. US 90
Madison, FL
Beside Clover Farm


It's the law
to wear a helmet
When bike riding.
ICS CREMATION
&
FUNERAL HOME
H.M. "Hank" Forbes, Jr.
Licensed Funeral Director
357 NW Wilks Lane
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3436 866-935-9273


Join a school club or
group and make
new friends.

JACKSON'S
DRUG STORE
Greenville & Monticello
850-948-3011
850-997-3553


Know the rules
for safety at home
and at school.
KENNY
I ALL
School
Board
Member
tDistrict 2


Leave strange
animals alone.
Lee's & Curls
Cheryle Warner
(owner/operator)
409 SW Range Ave. Madison
850-973-3692


Quiet is good for
studying.

THE OLD
BOOK STORE
317 SW Pinckney St.
Madison, FL
850-973-6833


Vacant lots and buildings
should be avoided.


WAYNE
VICKERS
County
Commissioner
District 2


Maintain a safe distance
from other bicycles
or cars.
MADISON
ACADEMY
3K through 8th
Hwy 90 Madison
850-973-2529


Rest is good after a long
day of learning.



1-10 & Exit 262
On site repair shop 850-971-5100
Grill 850-971-4240


Walk to school with
friends.


Walmart
Save money. Live better.


Never get in a
stranger's car.




NORTH AMERICA
Madison Bottling Plant


Stay in your seat on
the school bus.


LOCATED IN THE MADISON INDUSTRIAL PARK
850-973-3787


Exit carefully from a
car or school bus.


Lou S.
MILLER
Superintendent
of Schools 2


Obey the traffic and
school safety rules.
O'Neal's
Country Buffet
Danny & Glenda Croft
M-F Lunch
F & Sat Evening Buffet
Sunday Dinner Buffet
558 W. Base St. Madison
(850) 973-6400


Tell others about
following safety rules.

jF tness


290 S. Duval Ave
Madison, FL 32340
850-973-3517


Yield to others when
bike riding.


- I Aucilla
S Christian Academy
^ |Hwy. 158 Monticello
850-997-3597


Police officers are there
to help.


S OF
MADISON


Unless an adult is home,
don't answer the door.
IU+IAU"L
Madison Blueprinting
699 SW Genoa Way Madison, FL
Rex Miller- Owner
(850) 973-9742
Hours: Mon Fri 4:00am 5pm
Saturday 9:00am 12:00 Noon


Zap germs with
clean hands.


HEALTHY
START
Greenville, FL 850-948-2741


6B Madison County Carrier


Wednesday, August 12, 2009


rl~n
Ilm




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