Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00173
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: August 5, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00173
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

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Madison Counht


Madison County Carrier
G eene Pub Sh I' flMdion Enierprise.Peeoraer



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VOL. 45 NO. 50 Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper



Madison County Carrier Turns 45 Years Old


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
It began with a dream that has blossomed.
The printer shook his head and told a young
couple, "You two are just a couple of kids who don't
know what you are doing."
The "kids" had laid out their first-ever newspa-
per on the wrong side of the layout sheets. Knowing
it would do no good to tell them no, the printer gave
them a course in how to lay the newspaper out prop-
erly.
That was the start for Tommy and Mary Ellen
Greene 45 years ago. Today, the newspaper has been
through over four decades of changes, but is under
the same ownership and is still delivering news to
its readers in Madison County and around the
world.
The Greene family has seen a number of
changes in the newspaper business, including the
way the newspaper is typeset and laid out. It's all
now done on computers. They have owned newspa-


Mary Ellen, Tommy, and Emerald Greene
pers in Madison County and throughout north Flori-
da, but the Madison County Carrier has been their
flagship since Aug. 5, 1964.


In 1993, almost 30 years after beginning the Car-
rier, Tommy Greene purchased The Madison Enter-
prise- Recorder, one of the oldest newspapers in the
state, with its roots springing forth in 1865. At the
time the Carrier was founded, the Enterprise-
Recorder was owned by T.C. Merchant and family.
In 1998, Tommy Greene turned over the publish-
er's duties to his daughter, Emerald. Emerald con-
tinues to publish The Madison County Carrier and
The Madison Enterprise-Recorder. In 2007, she pur-
chased The Monticello News and established The Jef-
ferson County Journal with her daughters, Cheltsie,
16, and Brooke, 14.
Another big change in the newspaper business
and in the news in general is the Internet. When
breaking stories occur, the Internet affords Greene
Publishing, Inc. the opportunity to break the news
faster than they can in print.
Happy birthday to The Madison County Carrier
Greene Publishing, Inc. looks forward to many
more years of being Madison County's news leader.


FSA

Extends

CROP

Deadline
Signup for the 2009
Direct and Counter-
cyclical Payment (DCP)
Program and Average
Crop Revenue Election
(ACRE) Program has
been extended until Au-
gust 14. This deadline is
mandatory for all partic-
ipants. FSA will not ac-
cept late-filed
applications.
For the DCP, pay-
ments are based on con-
tract acres currently on
your farm. For the
ACRE program, pay-
ments are based on
crops that are actually
Please see CROP,
Page 4A

Lee Truck

Driver

Wrecks In

Jacksonville
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A n





s traffic at
Roy Phillips the north-
bound lanes of Inter-
state 95 and Interstate
295 in Jacksonville on
Monday afternoon, July
27.
According to a
Florida Highway Patrol
Please see Wreck,
Page 4A
Page 4A


Property Contaminated


In Greenville?


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A concerned
Greenville citizen, speak-
ing on condition of
anonymity, said that he is
concerned about the bur-
ial of chemicals that
were once used to treat
lumber at a now-defunct
company in the area.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection (FDEP) did a
preliminary contamina-
tion assessment report
on the property, now
owned by Pickles/CLP
Properties of North
Florida. The property is
located on what was once
formerly Sherrod Lum-
ber Company property,
just west of Greenville.
Soil samples were
taken by the FDEP who
reported, 'Arsenic and
chromium concentra-


tions in soil show signiti- standard. the situation while Sher- He tears that it could con-
cant impact from the for- The arsenic samples rod Lumber was operat- taminate wells and water
mer Sherrod Lumber were also well above the ing because all of the supplies in the area.
wood treating opera- arsenic ground water chemicals had been The FDEP has issued
tions." standard. above ground. He said several requests for
The chromium sam- The Greenville citi- his concern was that the cleanup of the property,
ples showed concentra- zen, who spoke to this re- current owners of the but say that they will
tions, well above the porter, said that he had property had buried the once again retest the
chromium ground water not been worried about wood-treating chemicals. property


Madison County Deputy


Wrecks












Greene Publishingnc Photo by Jacob B
Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Be


Patrol Car
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Madison County
deputy was involved in a
wreck, involving another
rider, in his patrol car on
Saturday, August 1.
According to a Flori-
da Highway Patrol re-
port, Marcus Jones, 38,
was traveling north on
US 221 in a marked Madi-
son County police cruis-
er.
Please see Patrol Car,
embry, August 3, 2009 Page 4A


High School Enters

Year Two Of

Improvement Plan
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Principal Ben Killingsworth
completely understands the gravity
of the situation facing Madison
County High School, recognizing
that a rating of "F" means improve-
S ment is imperative and urgent. He
also knows that graduation rates
must improve, and that all students
n deserve to be prepared for college
Kins h or to enter a productive vocation.
KillingsworthAnd although critics want immedi-
ate results, he also understands that a turnaround
Please see School, Page 4A


II ocal Weaitihe


Around Madison
Classifieds
Legals
Bridal


2 Sections, 28 Pages
6 -7A Obituaries
14A Crime
15A Health & Nutrition
9A Money & Finance


5A
4A
12-13A
8A


Wed
Wed 94/74
8/5
Variable clouds with scattered
showers and thunderstorms,
mainly in the aft.


Thu
Thu 93/74
8/6
Scattered thunderstorms possible.


Fri / /
Fri 93/75 /
8/7
A few thunderstorms possible.
Highs in the low 90s and lows in
the mid 70s.


Sat
Sat 94/75
8/8
A few thunderstorms possible.
Highs in the mid 90s and lows in
the mid 70s.


IIne





2A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 5, 2009


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Time Flies When You Are Having Fun! Has

It Really Been 45 Years? It Seems Like

Just Yesterday! Happy Birthday, To Us!


Where have the years
gone?
It seems like just yester-
day that The Husband and I
opened our first newspaper,
the Madison County Carrier,
on August 5, 1964.
We were just 24 years
old at the time, and didn't
know one thing about jour-
nalism, and as I've told readers be-
fore, we didn't know what in the
world we were doing.
The two of us had graduated in
1957 from Madison High School,
and had been dating four years dur-
ing our high school years, begin-
ning in the ninth grade, at the age
of 15. We were actually dating be-
fore either of us could drive, so our
dating years were spent walking to
the Swan Theater, and later to the
Woodard Theater, or walking to the
school dances from my home,
which was just across the street
from MHS.
As I mentioned, we graduated
from MHS in the Class of 1957,
which was a wonderful time to
grow up in. Those years were the
beginning of rock and roll, and we
remember jitterbugging to the first
Elvis Presley songs released.
I went to the University of
Florida to college, and The Hus-
band went to South Georgia Junior
College, where he played football
under the Coach there, none other
than the famous Bobby Bowden.
He also ran track there, and his
track coach was Vince Gibson, also
the FSU track coach.
The Husband had been logging
for a few years with his father and
family when we became engaged,
and he and I got married on his
birthday, October 28, 1962. We had
known for many years we would
one day get married. We wanted,
first, to finish college, and then be
ready to go into a business of our
own. We just didn't know "what"
kind of business, though, at the
time.
After finishing college at the
University of Florida in 1961, with
a BA degree in English, Speech,
and Journalism, I had returned
home to teach school. I taught sev-
enth, eighth, and ninth grade Eng-
lish, and also taught a class in
Journalism at Madison High
School, the same school I had just
graduated from in 1957. My princi-
pal that year was the late Wiley Sir-
mon, a man who taught me a lot
about being a school teacher, and a
man I highly regarded as a princi-
pal. Just a few of my students dur-
ing those years were Martha Rowe
Beggs, Tommy Bishop, Frankie Ar-
genbright, Wetzel Blair, Frances
and Rickey Ginn, and so many
more that I just don't have the
space to name them all, but believe
me, I remember every one of you
with affection.
The Husband had gone to a
few colleges like he was taking a
census, first attending Mercer Uni-
versity in Macon, Ga.; then South
Georgia Junior College, and then
he came back to Madison, where he
was in the first class at North Flori-
da Junior College. He was elected
the first Vice-President of the Stu-
dent Body that year, and had a "real
good time" at the junior college. He
founded a fraternity there whose
whole existence was to "have fun."
Get the picture?
He had a "real good time"
those many years, but alas, no de-
gree.
We had a beautiful wedding
October 28, 1962, at the "new" First
Baptist Church in Madison. We
were the first couple to be married
at the "new" church, and we have
many memories we will never for-
get, (like the groomsmen kidnap-
ping me so The Husband would tell
them where he had hidden the car),
but no such luck. His "friends" fi-
nally returned me two hours later,
after riding around all over the
county, and The Husband and I left
for a great honeymoon in the
mountains, visiting many of my fa-
ther's family in north Georgia.
I had taught school at Madison
High School my first year out of
college, while The Husband went
into the service to help serve his
country And, upon our return, I
taught school at Madison High
School a couple of years, during
which time we got married, and I


later taught at Greenville High
School. The Husband continued to


Wandering With
The Publisher

Mary Ellen Greene
Columnist


!Warm an!Iork in the deep woods
logging with his family, until 1963,
when a log fell on his leg and he
said to me, "I don't want to log any-
more. What else can I do?"
I reminded him that he had
never finished college, but, that I
could go back to teaching but, I had
no ideas for his career change.
He awoke me the next morning
at 3 a.m., and said, "Let's open a
newspaper. I've been up all night
long, making a list of what I could
do, and all of them include office
supplies and newspaper work."
I reminded him he couldn't
spell. He quickly said to me, "You
spell, and I'll figure, and we'll just
make a good team."
Thus, we launched our maiden
voyage of the Madison County Car-
rier. (Tommy's "friends" accused
him of trying to spell "Courier,"
and it came out "Carrier," but
that's what we made it anyway)
The first Carrier was published on
August 5, 1964, and the rest is histo-
ry
We didn't have much money, so
Tommy and I would visit other
newspapers in the area, and watch
how they laid out a newspaper, and
then he would come back home and
"hand-make" what we needed, as
close as he could to the expensive
machines others were using. That
saved us money, that we didn't
have, and actually became interest-
ing to other newspaper owners,
who would come to our office to see
our equipment, and then want
Tommy to help them build some of
their own as well. They were im-
pressed with his ability to "build"
what they were "buying."
Our children grew up in the
media world, and they, too, have
had many wonderful memories
growing up at the newspaper office.
As small children, if they got
sleepy, we would put their heads on
a stack of newspapers, and they
would go to sleep.
Harvey William and Emerald
have all been with us through the
years as we've owned five newspa-
pers (The Carrier the Mayo Free
Press, the Branford News, the White
Springs Leader; the Madison Enter-
prise Recorder), and other publica-
tions, which have all been a part of
our newspaper's history For that,
we are most grateful.
Now, our grandchildren have
helped us at one time or another.
All 11 grandchildren --- Thomas,
Noland, Kelli, Hunter, Joshua and
Jade (Harvey's children); Daniel,
Forest, and Matthew (all William's
children); and Cheltsie and Brooke,
(Emerald's girls), have been right
there with us at one time or anoth-
er, helping to get the newspapers on
the street. We love the fact that we
have a business our family can all
participate in, if they desire.
I will just skip over the many,
many years in-between 1964 and
now, but the stories are wonderful,
interesting, amusing, and delight-
ful. The people we have met during
our lifetime in the news business is
a story all its own. We have met two
Presidents of the United States of
America, (George Bush, Sr., and
Gerald Ford); met people like Erma
Bombeck (my favorite). I picked
her brain about her humorus
columns; talked one-on-one with
geniuses like Henry Kissinger; be-
came good friends with numerous
other news journalists, including
Al Neuharth (founder of the USA
TODAY newspaper); met famous
people like Stephen Spielberg;
been written up by various publi-
cations, including the American
Profile, the Tallahassee Democrat,
the Gainesville Sun, the Valdosta
Times, and others.
We have had the pleasure of
serving as the President and First
Lady of the Florida Press Associa-
tion; the Potentate and First Lady
of the Marzuq Shrine Center; been
presidents (and founder of a few)
many local organizations, such as
the Madison County Chamber of
Commerce; the Madison Shrine
Club; the Madison Junior Woman's


Club; the Jaycees of Madi-
son County; and many
more, too numerous to
name.
But the wonderful em-
ployees who have worked
with us and "made us what
we are today" are the ones
we appreciate the most and
have been the most reward-
in our lifetime.
We love Madison County, and
thank each and every one of
who have been gracious to us,
I to us, enjoyed our newspa-
, and who have helped us be-
e what we are today; watched
row up here, and grow as news
nalists in the journalist world.
Last year, on August 6,2008, we
together a "Happy 44th Birth-
' edition, and we hope you en-
d it. We highlighted various
loyees early in our career who
ped us "make it" back then, and
mme "what we are today" Just a
include: Annette Sircy; Eliza-
1 Almand; Stan and Faith Ezell;
Matthews; Freddy and Joyce
vard; Christine Zavasky; Dale
Bonita Thigpen; and so many
e there is not space to write all
names of all the employees
ugh the years that we do appre-
e so very much.
Today, we have a fine staff at
office who work hard to contin-
he legacy of both newspapers.
y include Emerald, Jacob,
their, Michael, Stephen, Bryant,
iam, Forest, Jeanette, Dorothy
lsea, Liz, Sheree, Bobbi, Chelt-
and Brooke,
We appreciate the Merchant
ily who owned the Enterprise-
order for many years, and who
it to us when they were ready
tire.
We received a lovely note from
ry Merchant recently who told
e had come to Madison to visit
ay or so, but we missed seeing
. How I would love to "pick his
n" today on how their newspa-
was run many years ago before
years we began. The Merchant
a were two of the most brilliant
a we have ever met in our lives,
we salute them today for all
did for Florida journalism in
years before we became, "one of
n."
We planned and invited all of
last year to the grand re-open-
of the Madison Enterprise-
order building on Shelby Street,
iss from the courthouse, and we
w many of you all came by to
where the Merchants once ran
Enterprise-Recorder for many,
ly years. It is now going to be a
derful downtown office for
eone to rent. If interested, see
Husband about it.
We could never thank every-
who has helped us with our
spapers these many, many
rs, but to start with, our parents
rrve a lot of credit. Without
n, The Husband and I could
ar, ever have been able to work
hours we did back then. Our
ants, Harvey and Cora Lee
ene, and Buford and Lucile Sel-
1, would many nights keep our
e children while we worked
the wee hours, sometimes fin-
ng the paper just in time to take
press.
And, as babies, our children
It many nights in boxes tucked
er the work tables while we
ked all night long. We also have
lank Mrs. Retha Kirkland, and
el Thomas, who also gave much
and support to us as they, too,
ched over Harvey, William, and
!rald.
We want to thank each and
y one of you for your many
:s of love, support, understand-
help, encouragement, gra-
sness, and friendship.
We love you, and hope the next
ears will be just as much fun.
Call us if we can ever help you
ny way. We love you; we love
family; we love the United
es of America; we love Florida;
we love Madison County
Thank you, one and all, for
r love, your support, your kind-
;es to our family and our news-
ers, and most of all, for being

Please call if we may ever be of
ice to you, or yours!!!
"Nuff said...Bye for now...See


&Mcrac, s

9C 6BOCs


Emerald Greene
Publisher


Stealing From The

Rich and Giving To

The Poor In The


Name Of Healthcare
"Stealing from the rich and giving to the poor in
the name of healthcare"..... While that may sound
nice to the middle class, seniors, small business own-
ers, and the poor, sometimes you have to look beyond
the persuasive speeches and beyond the headlines.
Last September, in Dover, N.H., Obama can be
quoted as saying, "I can make a firm pledge...Under
my plan, no family making less than $250,000 a year
will see any form of tax increase. Not your income
tax, not your payroll tax, not your capital gains taxes,
not any of your taxes."
Fast forward to today. Mixed into Obama's gov-
ernment healthcare bill are tax increases that no one
is talking about that will actually pay for the massive
healthcare expansion.
Let's start with cigarettes. "What the middle
class and the poor don't see is that Obama is taking
back that money and then some with his hidden tax
hikes. For instance, Obama is taking an extra 62
cents for every pack of cigarettes that you smoke.
"Insignificant you might say.
"The National Taxpayers Union notes that to-
bacco taxes take a 50 times larger share of income
from households making less than $20,000 in annual
income than those earning more than $200,000 in an-
nual income.
"In addition, families making less than $30,000 a
year shell out more than 50 percent of all taxes levied
on cigarettes, and households earning over than
$60,000, let alone those making over $200,000, pay
only 14 percent." - MoneyNews.com
Our light bill will be next. President Obama's
new budget can be expected to raise our country's en-
ergy bills by $105 billion over the next 10 years. That
will affect all of us, not just those making over
$200,000 a year.
Even after the tax hike, what American will NOT
be affected by that? The small businesses and large
businesses will be taxed.... In order to compensate
for their loses, they will have to raise prices and
rates. That, my friends, will affect each and every one
of us. Higher grocery bills, higher gas prices, higher
car maintance bills, higher costs on furniture and
household fixtures, etc, etc, etc.
When you tax one group, you tax all groups.
When we buy groceries, or buy a gallon of gas, or
buy a new couch, we are not asked if we make over
$200,000 a year, we all pay the same price as the next
person.
You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity
by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What
one person receives without working for, another
person must work for without receiving. The gov-
ernment cannot give to anybody anything that the
government does not first take from somebody
else. When half of the people get the idea that
they do not have to work because the other half is
going to take care of them, and when the other
half gets the idea that it does no good to work be-
cause somebody else is going to get what they
work for that my dear friend, is the beginning of
the end of any nation. You cannot multiply
wealth by dividing it. "*
Adrian Rogers, 1931"

"1. You cannot bring about prosperity by dis-
couraging thrift.
2. You cannot strengthen the weak by weaken-
ing the strong
3. You cannot help the poor man by destroying
the rich.
4. You cannot further the brotherhood of man
by inciting class hatred.
5. You cannot build character and courage by
taking away man's initiative and independence.
6. You cannot help small men by tearing down
big men.
7. You cannot lift the wage earner by pulling
down the wage payer
8. You cannot keep out of trouble by spending
more than your income.
9. You cannot establish security on borrowed
money.
10. You cannot help men permanently by do-
ing for them what they will not do for them-
selves. "
Rev. William J H. Boetcker; 1916

Until then.... see you around the town.


Your Local Paper Has Lots Io Ofer:!
*Community Events. Sports
*Local News* Classifieds

Cll 973-4141 to start jour silcriptio toy!





Wednesday, August 5, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 3A


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee

Limelight
Jacob Bembry
Columnist
===EM


tfop1y Birthday,

Abbie
I hope everyone has been having a great time
this week.
Everyone seemed to enjoy the peanut boil at
Midway Church of God this past Saturday. The Re-
flectsons did a great job singing and the peanuts
were delicious. A big thanks goes out to Elvoye
Thomas, Julian Penny and everyone who had a part
in preparing them.
My sister, Abbie Gail, will celebrate a birthday
this coming Sunday, August 9. I am so proud of her.
That's all the news for this week. Have a great
week and a beautiful forever. May God bless each
and every one of you.





C^SU~yAn n r


Look Who- Turyning 1!

fHtappy Biurtd y,

Prvnce/

Love Mommy Daddy A nvd

B^ 15abba/ I






Discover Bank vs. Stanley Brooks contracts
Green Tree Services vs. Traci and Donald
Meller other civil
Kimberly Smithie vs. Michael D. Smithie sim-
ple dissolution
Woodland III vs. Nasai Enterprises, Inc. mort-
gage foreclosure
Citi Mortgage, Inc. vs. Lourdes A. Castillo -
mortgage foreclosure
Sally Arnold Roberts vs. Galia Cleophat mort-
gage foreclosure
BAC Home Loans Services vs. William Doyle
Rutherford mortgage foreclosure
Shirley Charlesman and Department of Rev-
enue vs. Alfredo Cornejo support
Heather Hill and Department of Revenue vs.
Jorge Moreno other domestic
Wilbert Sears and Department of Revenue vs.
Shaquanna King support
Jamie Griffin and Department of Revenue vs.
Elbert Grann, Jr. support
Jo L Powell and Department of Revenue vs.
David Skinner support
Lisa Davis and Department of Revenue vs.
Shaquanna King support
Mattie Harris and Department of Revenue vs.
Tyrone Reaves, Jr. support
Syreeta McDaniel and Department of Revenue
vs. Harry Chaney support
Larry Solomon and Department of Revenue vs.
Kendrick Richardson support
Vontresa Hopkins and Department of Revenue
vs. Christopher Neal support
Michelle Donehew and Department of Revenue
vs. Marvin Powell support
Stacie Davis and Department of Revenue vs.
Kwamaine Prime support
Eva Vansickle and Department of Revenue vs.
James Wirtz support
Cheri B. Becker vs. Brian Becker dissolution
of marriage

Yr LecIl Paper Ha Lets o Ifer:
* Community Events %
* Sports
* Local News
* Classifieds


Last year, an old
friend of mine died in
Denver. He was well into
his 80s and a World War
II veteran. He lived a
rich and full life, but he
dodged a close call when
he was a young man. Let
me tell you about these
events.
In the early days fol-
lowing the attack on
Pearl Harbor, Don
Roesch enlisted in the
Army from his home-
town of Milwaukee. He
scored well enough on
placement tests to at-
tend flight training
where he learned the
trade of bombardier.
Next, he learned how to
ply his trade in the B-17
Flying Fortress. In the
fall of 1943, he was sent
overseas to join the
379th Bomb Group at
Kimbolton, an 8th Air
Force airfield in Cam-
bridgeshire, England.
Now a second lieu-
tenant, Don flew his first
two missions without in-
cident, but his luck ran
out on the third. On No-
vember 29, 1943, the
Mighty Eighth launched
its 140th mission the
target was the port facil-
ities of Bremen, Ger-
many The plan called
for launching 360 B-17
bombers from various
bases in England, pro-
tected by an equal num-
ber of short range P-47
and P-38 fighters. Kim-
bolton would contribute
21 Flying Forts to the
party sporting their dis-
tinctive triangle K on
the tail fin.
They would be led
by Lieutenant Colonel
Louis Rohr flying at the
head of the center for-
mation. Seven Forts
would make up the
right, high formation.
Toward the rear of this
formation was B-17G 42-
39779 commanded by
Lieutenant Eldon
Planalp of Tipton, Indi-
ana. Planalp's bom-
bardier was Don Roesch.
The G model was a rela-
tively new aircraft with
a forward firing chin
turret to guard against
head-on fighter attacks.
This aircraft was built
by Vega Aircraft in Bur-
bank, CA under contract
to Boeing.
It was after Thanks-
giving and the weather
in Northern Europe had
turned predictably rot-
ten. Weather would play
an important part in
this mission. Three
379th B-17s aborted after
takeoff for mechanical
reasons. All three came
from the right, high for-
mation reducing their
defensive strength. This
would prove costly for
Planalp's aircraft 779.
Louis Rohr would lead
18 Forts into battle.
The weather over
England was promising,
but over the North Sea, a
cold front appeared with
thick cloud cover up to
25 thousand feet. The
route of flight had to be
diverted northward, giv-
ing the German defenses
more time to organize.


As the bomber forma-
tion climbed to 28 thou-
sand feet, the engines
began to produce con-
trails which would
make the bombers easi-
er for enemy fighters to
spot. The weather com-
pounded the problem of
navigators who were
unable to locate check-
points along the route
of flight. This mission
would be flown primar-
ily through "dead reck-
oning," that is
navigation by time, dis-
tance and heading. The
mission wasn't terribly


observed.
Enemy air defenses
included both flak and
fighters. Thirteen B-
17s went missing on
this mission including
two from the 379th.
Aircraft 779 was seen
dropping out of forma-
tion in level flight nine
minutes after bomb re-
lease. The most likely
cause for its loss was
the fire from enemy
fighters, probably FW-
190s. The crew para-
chuted from the
aircraft and landed
near the village Gros-


Don Roesch


long (about six hours)
which was a blessing
since the temperature
at this altitude was mi-
nus 50 a terrible chill
for the ten man crew in-
side the open and un-
pressurized B-17.
A little more than
two hundred of the
bombers turned back
for either weather or
mechanical reasons
and returned to their
bases in England. Most
of the 154 remaining
bombers were from the
1st Air Division and
continued on their mis-
sion.
The route of flight
took the bomber forma-
tion over the northern
coast of Germany to
their initial point (IP)
north of Bremen.
From there, the attack
heading was 210 de-
grees or SSW, corrected
for 85 knot winds from
the west. The target
area was totally ob-
scured by clouds and
the 154 remaining
bombers bombed
through the overcast
based on the flak bursts
from enemy air defens-
es. Time over target
(TOT) was 1445 or mid-
afternoon. Where the
333 tons of bombs and
incendiaries fell and
target damage was un-


senging. Eight were
captured including Don
Roesch (note: his status
was missing in action -
MIA for four months
until the Red Cross noti-
fied his Mother that he
was a prisoner). Navi-
gator Ben Nordeen and
waist gunner Ken Smith
were killed, either in
the attack or during the
bailout. In the other
379th bomber lost, only
the tail gunner survived
the crash just off the
Dutch coast. The eight
POWs from 779 survived
their captivity in vari-
ous prison camps for
nearly a year and a half
before the war ended
and they returned
home.
Of the sixteen
bombers from Kim-
bolton that completed
the mission, only ten re-
turned to their home
base. Six landed at oth-
er English air bases, ei-
ther because of damage
or low fuel. Four of the
returning Forts sus-
tained battle damage.
Mission 140 was not
unusual for the 8th Air
Force in 1943. It was a
rough period as air
planners built their
learning curve. Weath-
er, poor targeting, and
heavy losses plagued
the bomber boys. The


Call 973-4141 to start your
.10


next year would be far
different. More crews
and planes poured into
England at a faster rate
than the Luftwaffe
could shoot them
down. Long range P-51
fighters were intro-
duced which greatly
mitigated the damage
that enemy fighters
could inflict. When air
planners shifted their
focus to support for the
coming invasion and
then destroying trans-
portation and oil infra-
structure, targeting
became much more fo-
cused and effective. At
this point, the 8th Air
Force contributed
mightily to the defeat of
Nazi Germany. Like
many things in warfare,
we didn't reach the an-
swer overnight, but
eventually, we got it
right.

FloridaPress Associ



Award Winning Newspaper







Chosen one of Florida's Thre Outstanding Newspapers
P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Web Site:
www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
news@greenepublishing.com
Snorts
bryant@greenepublishing.com
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
Classifieds / Legals
classifieds@greenepublishing.com

Publisher
Emerald Greene
Editor
Jacob Bembry
Production Manager
Heather Bowen
Staff Writers
Michael Curtis and
Bryant Thigpen
Graphic Designers
Stephen Bochnia and
Amber Acree
Advertising
Sales Representatives
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy McKinney,
Jeanette Dunn
and Chelsea Bouley
Classified and Legal Ads
Laura Little
Deadline for classified is
Monday at 3 p.m.
Deadline for Legal Advertisement
is Monday at 5 p.m.
There will be a $3 charge
for Affidavits.
Circulation Department
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
Subscription Rates
In-County $35
Out-of-County $45
(State & local taxes included)

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper
[USPS 324 800] designed
for the express reading
pleasure of the people of its
circulation area, be they
past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing Inc.,
1695 South SR 53, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post
Office in Madison, FL
32340.
POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to MADI-
SON COUNTY CARRI-
ER, P.O. Drawer 772,
Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper re-
serves the right to reject any
advertisement, news matter,
or subscriptions that, in the
opinion of the manage-
ment, will not be for the
best interest of the county
and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investi-
gate any advertisement sub-
mitted.
All photos given to
Greene Publishing Inc. for
publication in this newspa-


per must be picked up no
later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off.
Greene Publishing, Inc. will
not be responsible for pho-
tos beyond said deadline.


Target Bremen





4A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 5, 2009


LOCAL CRIME & FROM PAGE ONE


Madison County

CRIME BEAT
ALL SUSPECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED
INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY IN A
COURT OF LAW

Man Arrested For

Aggravated Battery
A Madison man was arrested for aggravated bat-
tery early Friday morning, July 31.
According to a Madison Police Department re-
port, Patrolman Joey Agner was dispatched to the
emergency room at the local hospital at approxi-
mately 3 a.m. Upon his arrival, he met the victim
who said that he had gotten into a verbal altercation
with Michael Wayne Macintosh.
Macintosh had punched the victim in the face
and after the defendant had fallen to the ground,
Macintosh continued striking him.
Agner went to Lake Frances and met with Mac-
Intosh, who admitted that he had hit the victim.
Macintosh was placed under arrest and taken to
the Madison County Jail.


Patrol Car


cont from Page 1A
While traveling along 221, Jones hit a deer that
had traveled into his path. Jones attempted to take
evasive action, rotating counterclockwise before
coming to a final rest, facing south in the south-
bound lane.
The Madison County Sheriff's Office assisted
the Florida Highway Patrol at the scene.
Jones' passenger, Henry Roberson, 24, of
Greenville, suffered minor injuries in the wreck.
Jones was not injured.
FHP Trooper Matt Boatwright was the investi-
gating officer.
This reporter asked Sheriff Ben Stewart if
Roberson was an unauthorized passenger, Stewart
explained that since the case is still under investiga-
tion he could not comment.
Please see video of the interview with Stewart
and of the wreck at www.greenepublishing.com.


w


Wreck
cont from Page 1A

report, Roy Phillips lost
control of his rig at
about 12:25 p.m., while
attempting to negotiate a
curve around construc-
tion activity
Phillips' tractor-
trailer, which was haul-
ing a load of lumber,
overturned in the con-
struction zone.
Jacksonville police
officers rerouted north-
bound traffic onto 1-295,
while the FHP investi-
gated the wreck.
Phillips suffered mi-
nor injuries in the
wreck.

CROP
cont from Page 1A
planted on the farm.
The deadline to re-
port crop acreage has
also been extended until
August 14. The annual,
timely and accurate re-
porting of acres for all
crops and land uses, in-
cluding failed acreage,
can prevent loss of bene-
fits for a variety of Farm
Service Agency pro-
grams. All cropland on
the farm must be report-
ed to receive benefits
from the Direct and
Counter-cyclical Pro-
gram, marketing assis-
tance loans and Load
Deficiency Payments.
Conservation Reserve
Program acreage must
be reported to receive
annual rental payments.
Crop acreage for Non-in-
sured Crop Disaster As-
sistance Program (NAP)
must also be reported.
Crop reports, form
FSA-578, Report of
Acreage, must account
for all cropland on a
farm, whether idle or
planted. Producers need
to file their acreage re-
ports by August 14.


School


cont from Page 1A
takes time and requires teamwork.
The situation rings of an old military analogy:
"It takes five miles to turn around a battleship," im-
plying that strong motion from a big body good or
bad takes time to turn around. The key to
Killingsworth's confidence regarding the future suc-
cess of the high school lies in his belief that he has
a very good plan, and that positive change will result
from its effective implementation.
In partnership with the Southern Regional Edu-
cation Board, and with additional oversight provid-
ed by a District Leadership Team, the high school is
entering the second year of a three-year plan to sys-
tematically increase student success. These plans
were generated after careful consideration of the
specific challenges facing the school, as well as input
from numerous personnel. At this point, the overall
goal is to stay the course, although several additions
are also being implemented to complement and ac-
celerate the process.
"Our sports programs and extracurricular ac-
tivities are a very important part of the high school.
We cherish them and we will continue to support
them. However, academics must come first and it
must improve. So, starting the first day of school, all
athletes will be required to participate in home-
work/study hall right after school, before sports ac-
tivities are permitted. Of course, all high school
students will be urged to attend." Killingsworth ex-
plained.
This academics plan includes other changes, but
the priority will be centered on reading and writing.
"Research has shown again and again, that
reading and writing skills are essential to workplace
success, and especially collegiate success. So, we are
structuring all programs to support this focus," he
added.
Another noticeable change is the structure of
the school periods. The year will change from the
traditional seven periods to a modified block of five
periods, where the first two periods are longer and
allow more effective support of reading and writing
objectives, as well as other identified deficiencies.
The structure will not compromise math, science or
other core subjects, however, and the school day will
run from 8:25 a.m. to 2:56 p.m.
Killingsworth also stated his intent to keep
closely connected to parents and the community,
whom he noted were essential for plans to move as
quickly and as successfully as possible.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


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Wednesday, August 5, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 5A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Frteope cae aviww renulsnco


August 2-8
Camp Weed Summer
Camp for Rising 7th, 8th
and 9th graders will take
place Aug. 2-8. Visit
www.campweed.net for a
brochure, registration
and scholarship forms.
Join in the Fun in the
Sonshine at our 85th con-
secutive summer camp.
A ministry of the Episco-
pal Diocese of Florida
for children and young
people of any (or no) de-
nomination. For more in-
formation, call
888-763-2602, Ext. 16.
August 15
LifeSong's Home-
coming 2009 will be held
at Yogi Bear's Jellystone
Park in Madison on Sat-
urday, August 15, at 7
p.m. This evening will be
a live recording, and will
feature the Bradys,
LifeSong and Stephen
Jones. Admission is free.
A love offering will be re-
ceived during the con-
cert. For more
information, call (850)
464-0114 or (904) 472-7865,
or visit
www. lifesongmusic.org.
August 15
Excellence Dance
Studio Inc. presents King
of the Grill showdown
and Art on Wheel Exhibi-


tion, Aug. 15, noon-4
p.m., Madison County
Recreation Center, Hwy
360A. For more informa-
tion, call (850) 322-7673.
August 29
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host a Container
Gardening Workshop on
Saturday, Aug. 29. Partic-
ipants will learn how to
avoid many of the pests
and diseases associated
with summertime gar-
dening in containers and
explore warm weather
flower and vegetable gar-
dening. The class will
cover proper grouping of
plants, choosing the
right container, selecting
the right plants to grow
for each season and
touch on annuals, peren-
nials and ferns. Bring
your pruners and take
home some cuttings.
This is a hands-on work-
shop and fees are $5 per
workshop, including
park admission. For ad-
ditional information or
to register for the work-
shops, please call (386)
397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.o
rg.
Tuesday in August
Tuesday in August


at 1:30 p.m., TABE (Test
of Adult Basic Educa-
tion) will be given at
NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), in Madison,
Florida. TABE is re-
quired for acceptance
into vocation-
al/technical programs.
Photo ID is required.
Pre-registration is re-
quired. To register
please call 850/973-9451.
Wednesday in August
Wednesday at 8:30
a.m. & 1:30 p.m., CJBAT
(Criminal Justice Basic
Abilities Test) will be
given at NFCC Testing
Center (Bldg. #16), Madi-
son, Florida. CJBAT is
required for acceptance
into Corrections & Law
Enforcement programs.
Photo ID required. Pre-
registration is required.
To register please call
850/973-9451.
Thursday in August
Thursday in August
at 8:30 am & 1:30 pm Col-
lege Placement Test
(CPT), NFCC Testing
Center Bldg. #16), 8:30
A.M. and 1:30 P.M., Madi-
son, Florida. Register in
NFCC Student Services
24 hours before test. For
information please call
850/973-9451.
Thursday
Redemptive Recov-
ery Classes/Support
Group is held every
Thursday in the old First
Baptist Church sanctu-
ary, and is for addicts and


b
U
pg


Alfred Henry

Hollie
Mr. Alfred Henry Hollie, age 81, died
Friday, July 31, 2009, at his home in Day.
Graveside funeral services were held
at 11 a.m. Monday, August 3, 2009, at Oak
Ridge Cemetery in Madison. Beggs Fu-
neral Home, Madison, was in charge of
arrangements.
He was born in Miami and moved to
Madison in 1975 and had lived in Day for
the past two years. He was the owner and
operator of Hollie's Locksmith Service in
Madison since 1985, and was a U.S. Navy
veteran from 1946 to 1948, and also a mem-
ber of Fellowship Baptist Church in
Madison.
He is survived by a daughter, Kim
Stewart and her husband, Sheriff Ben
Stewart, of Pinetta; a granddaughter,
Brooke Stewart, of Pinetta; his girlfriend
and companion for the past 10 years,
Cheryle Warner of Day; and several
cousins and other relatives.


Donald

Eugene

Thomas
Donald Eugene Thomas, age 70,
died Thursday, July 30,2009, in Madi-
son.
A memorial service was held
Saturday, August 1, 2009, at Mt. Olive
Family Life Center.
He was born in Madison, where
he lived all his life. He was born Sep-
tember 25, 1938 to the late Johnny
and Amanda Thomas. He worked for
Bassett Dairy as a truck driver be-
fore retiring. He also served in the
U.S. Army
He is survived by his wife, Edith
Mathis Thomas of Madison; one son,
Avery Thomas of Madison; two
daughters, Donna Thomas of Madi-
son and Crystal Farnell of Lee; sev-
eral grandchildren; and many
friends and relatives.


the family of addicts who
are seeking to recover
and need help. The class
is free, and starts at 7
p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call (850) 464-
9022.
Thursdays-Mondays
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host an ongoing
wood carving workshop
on Thursday through
Monday, from noon un-
til 4 p.m. Participants
can create figure carv-
ings, wood spirits,
spoons, bowls, relief
carvings and more dur-
ing this four-hour class.
Workshop fees are $15
per session and include
park admission. For ad-
ditional information or
to register for the work-
shops, please call (386)
397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.o
rg.
Each Weekday
Except Tuesday
The Senior Citizens
Center offers computer
classes to seniors 60 and
older each weekday ex-
cept Tuesday For more
information or to sign
up, please call (850) 973-
4241. A regular instruc-
tor is needed to teach
these classes. Interested
individuals should ask to
speak with Sharon con-
cerning the opening at
the number above.
Every
Tuesday-Saturday
The Diamonds in the
Ruff Adoption Program
at the Suwannee Valley
Humane Society is open
every Tuesday through
Saturday from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. It is located on 1156
SE Bisbee Loop, Madi-
son, FL 32340. For more
information, or direc-
tions, call (866) 236-7812
or (850) 971-9904.
First Saturday of Each
Month
Everyone is invited
to gospel (open mic)
sings at Lee Worship


4EP


Vonda Bennett
Pearce died Monday,
July 27, 2009, in Talla-
hasseee.
Funeral services
were held Thursday,
July 30, 2009 at 11 a.m.
at Beggs Funeral Home,
Madison Chapel, with
burial at Cherry Lake
Baptist Church Ceme-
tery. The family re-
ceived friends
Wednesday from 6-8
p.m. at Beggs Funeral
Home.
Donations may be
made to Big Bend Hos-
pice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, FL
32308.


Vonda Pearce, Ms.
Vonda to many, was
born in Cairo, Ga. on
February 24, 1944. She
loved to cook and fish.
Her favorite place was
the beach and she was a
huge fan of Jeff Gor-
don. She had a great big
heart and will be
missed by all who knew
her. She has been a resi-
dent of Madison County
for 40 years and was a
homemaker. She was
employed by ITT Metal
Products for over 20
years and the Dept. of
Corrections for nine
years.
She is survived by


AUGUST.15.2009






MADISON, FL

12:00PM TO 4:00PM

S E N T Y AIFE


$35 PRE-EGISRATON $40 DAY OF EVENT
TROPHY PRIZE TO BEST BAR-B-QUE


her loving husband,
Jimmy Pearce; her
mother, Myrtle Bass
Bennett; two daughters,
Donna Lisa Samaan and
(Sam) of Tallahassee,
and Wendy Miller and
(Shawn) of Dillard,
S.C.; three grandsons,
Matthew Shannon
Samaan, Finn Miller
and Henry Miller; two
sisters, Vivian Osborne
and (Doug) and Linda
McCullers and (Larry);
four brothers, Davis
Bennett and (Helen),
Ronnie Bennett and (Di-
ane), Dink Bennett and
(Margaret) and Jeff
Bennett and (Jan).
She was preceded in
death by her son, Shan-
non Rodgers; her father,
C.D. Bennett; and her
beloved grandmother,
Vassie Bass.


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Center the first Saturday
night of each month, be-
ginning at 7 p.m. The
church is located at 397
Magnolia Dr. in Lee.
Everyone is asked to
bring a dish for the pot
luck supper. There will
be great musicians, so
those who can play an in-
strument are welcome to
come and join in. Bring a
friend with you. For
more information, call
Allen McCormick at
(850) 673-9481.
Second and Fourth
Saturday of Each
Month
The Madison Church
of God hosts a free soup
kitchen the second and
fourth Saturday of each
month at the Greenville
Senior Citizens Center.
Lunch is served from
noon to 1 p.m.
Third Tuesday of
Each Month
The Greater
Greenville Area Diabetes
Support Group is a free
educational service and
support for diabetes and
those wanting to prevent
diabetes. The group
meets the third Tuesday
of each month at the
Greenville Public Li-
brary Conference Room
at 312 SW Church St.,
Greenville, 11-11:30 a.m.
Everyone is welcome!
Every Wednesday
and Friday
The Senior Citizens
Center's sewing club for
seniors 60 and older
meets every Wednesday
and Friday. For more in-
formation or to sign up,
please call (850) 973-4241.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison County
Health Education Club is
holding a free education-
al service and support
group for people inter-
ested in preventing or
controlling diabetes,
high blood pressure, ele-
vated cholesterol levels,
obesity and other chron-
ic health conditions. The


club meets the third
Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
12:15-12:45 p.m. Every-
one is welcome to bring
their own lunch.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison County
Diabetes Support Group
is a free educational ser-
vice and support group
for diabetes and those
wanting to prevent dia-
betes. The group meets
the third Wednesday of
each month at the Madi-
son Public Library Con-
ference Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
11:45 a.m.-12:10 p.m.
Everyone is welcome is
bring their own lunch.
For details, contact Mar-
cia Kazmierski at (386)
752-2461 or Lorraine
Miller at (386) 752-6439.
Fourth Wednesday of
Each Month
An informational
meeting for those in-
jured and needing help
returning to work will be
held the fourth Wednes-
day of each month from
12-3 p.m. at the Madison
County Extension Office
located at 184 College
Loop, Madison. The
meeting is free and open
to the public. For more
information, please call
(850) 245-3489.
Fourth Tuesday of
Each Month
Big Bend Hospice's
adult Grief Support
Group meets on the
fourth Tuesday of each
month at the Madison
County Senior Center, lo-
cated at 4886 SW Rut-
ledge. The group is open
to anyone in the commu-
nity who has experi-
enced the death of
someone in their life.
The support groups are a
free community service.
For more information,
please call Casey Shaffer
at 566-6189.


Vonda Bennett Pearce


Serving Madison,

Jefferson, Taylor &

Lafayette Counties


Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King Agent Glen King Agent


233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071


Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St.* Monticello (850) 997-2213


Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371


Lance Braswell, Agent

Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399



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6A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 5, 2009


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Smith Warns Rotary Members DeHarts Grow


On Wednesday, July 22, mem-
bers of the Madison Rotary Club
were captivated by a safety presen-
tation by Rusty Smith, Safety Di-
rector for Tri-County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. And although
Smith prefaced his demonstration
by saying this was his first speak-


persed to your home. At the
transformer, the power is "trans-
formed" into 240 watts of power
that is sent inside the house. The
problem is, when the power is off,
and residents hook up their gen-
erators to serve as the primary
power for the house, that same 240


to take if you're in an auto acci-
dent and a power line falls on the
vehicle. If it is safe (no fire) to
stay in the vehicle, it is best to do
so. Because exiting the vehicle
could be fatal if your body touch-
es the ground and the vehicle at
the same time. If it is mandatory


PUMPKINS

IN JULY


rnoio suDimlIea
Tri-County Electric Cooperative General Manager Julius Hackett (left) is shown here with Tri-County Elec-
tric Safety Director Rusty Smith (center) and Madison Rotary Club president Brian O'Connell (right).


ing engagement, he did a mar-
velous job of both educating and
entertaining his audience.
According to Smith, electrici-
ty can be simple to work with or it
can be most complicated and in
certain circumstances can cause
harm and even death.
His presentation included di-
rect and indirect examples of
finding oneself in harms way
with regard to electricity
For example, few of us realize
the dangers to ourselves AND to
electrical workers when we make
the decision to use a generator
during a power outage. Over
14,000 volts of electricity travel
down power lines until they reach
the transformer before being dis-


watts goes through the house,
back up the line into the trans-
former and it is at this time trans-
formed back into over 14,000
watts of live power.
The danger here, of course, is
when the lineman sees evidence
that the breakers are thrown, its
easy for him to assume that the
line is not hot. But because of
your generator, the power line is
now deadly.
A cold power line looks just
like a hot one! So it is most im-
portant that if you purchase a
generator, you hire a licensed
electrician to educate you on how
it should and should not be used!
Smith also explained to the
club important safety measures


that you have to exit the vehicle,
then jumping to the ground from
the edge of the car door is the best
way to exit from the vehicle. But
he also suggested that when you
land on the ground, you either
hop away on one foot or both feet
placed side by side as an added
precaution against electrical
shock.
Rusty Smith was joined in his
presentation by Julius Hackett,
General Manager of Tri-County
Electric. The duo received sin-
cere applause from the Madison
Rotary membership, not just be-
cause of their expertise, but also
for community service and for
providing excellent repair service
to their customer base.


rnolo submilea dy rar LIgnicap
Thelma and Dennis DeHart display two pump-
kins to give away free. They decided to grow some
pumpkins this year to see how big they get. One of
them weighed in at 40 pounds.
Dennis and Thelma DeHart of East Bunker
Street love gardening.
This summer, they decided to grow some pump-
kins to see how big they get. Dennis said, "I wanted
to challenge all of the local gardeners to see who
could grow the largest pumpkin."
His big one weighed in at 40 pounds the last time
he checked.
Not wanting to waste food, the pumpkins were
put by the side of the road with a simple signed that
read, "FREE." Dennis is hoping for some pumpkin
pie and pumpkin bread.

Clinic And Shelter

Offer Help to Get Your

Critters Fixed!


"Many physicians affiliated with South Georgia Medical Center were trained in some of the
best programs in the country. And orthopedics is no different. As innovators we are the first
in our area to provide computerized knee replacement which allows for overall better out-


comes, as well as endoscopic carpal tunnel repair and arthroscopic


rotator cuff repair."


SGMC


+


Medicine is our life. sgmc.org

25 at e s n S a d st A 1 33 .1 0


North Florida PAWS' low-cost Spay/Neuter Clinic in
Hamilton County and the Suwannee Valley Humane Soci-
ety in Madison County are making pet owners "an offer
they can't refuse!"
The Humane Society has received a generous grant
from Florida's Spay/Neuter specialty license plate fund so
they can offer an additional $25 off North Florida PAWS' al-
ready low fees. It doesn't matter where you live and there
aren't any income or other restrictions.
With the coupon, you can neuter a male cat for $5, spay
a female cat for $20, neuter a male dog up to 50 pounds for
$20, or spay a female dog up to 50 pounds for $30. Fees are
slightly higher for bigger dogs.
North Florida PAWS is a non-profit animal welfare or-
ganization which opened its clinic the first of 2008. Over
3,300 dogs and cats have been fixed so far. If we can prevent
unwanted puppies and kittens from being born in the first
place, pet owners and rescuers won't have to figure out
what to do with them.
Cats can have three litters and year and dogs can have
two litters a year. That's a lot of puppies and kittens com-
ing in to the world without enough homes for them.
Let's help "fix" the pet overpopulation problem
through affordable spaying and neutering. Too many dogs,
cats, puppies, and kittens are being euthanized or aban-
doned in our area. For those already here, please consider
adopting. You can't find a better pet than those waiting for
you at your local shelter!
Get more information on North Florida PAWS by call-
ing 386-938-4092 or visiting their website at
www.northfloridapaws.org. For $25 coupons and shelter
information, call 850-971-7812 (toll free 866-236-7812) or visit
their website at www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.






As a reminder, all of the collection sites
are closed on Sundays. Citizens are
reminded that leaving
waste in front
of a closed
collection site
is the same as
illegal dumping.


Of Electrical Hazards


A





Wednesday, August 5, 2009


www.2reenepublishin2.com


Madison County Carrier 7A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Oreen Collectio Containers


Must 6o By August 10


Provided Courtesy of
Jerome Wyche
Some might say that the
stars were properly
aligned in the universe;
others might say that
we've awakened from
having a good dream. For
the past 15 years or better,
the Solid Waste and Recy-
cling Department has
been struggling to main-
tain control of waste dis-
posal in Madison County
Evidenced by fore-
sight of previous County
Commissioners, tactical
construction of eleven
collection sites through-
out the county affected
the removal of 98 percent
of the green waste con-
tainers from the county
roadways. The remaining
two percent of these con-
tainers located primarily
along highways 90 and 150
north to highway 146
north accounts for a bad
dream every Monday


morning. Because
these areas are not
controlled, household
waste and other mate-
rials are literally
dumped on the
ground. The location
of the uncontrolled
sites at highways 90
and 150 presents an
unsightly and embar-
rassing appearance to
citizens as well as any-
one driving through
Madison County via
highway 90.
Commissioner Renetta
Parrish, County Commis-
sioner District 3, County
Manager, Allen Cherry
and Solid Waste Coordi-
nator Jerome Wyche,
met to explore possible
solutions to eliminating
this eyesore. Commis-
sioner Parrish and Coor-
dinator Wyche attended
Greenville's City Coun-
cil meeting on July 13,
where a solution was dis-


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The International F & A.M. Masons,
Inc. and the Order of the Eastern Star for
District #33 held a fundraiser on Friday,
July 24, on the Madison County Court-
house lawn.
Customers enjoyed a savory, mouthwa-
tering menu that included barbecue rib


cussed. Commissioner
Parrish and Coordinator
Wyche asserted that ille-
gal dumping by unautho-
rized citizens, both in
and out county con-
tributed to this dilem-
ma...the Council
members agreed. The
City Council Members
were receptive to the dis-
cussion and agreed to
lend their support and
assistance in area


cleanup as deci-
sions were made.
At the July 15
County Commis-
sioner's meeting,
Commissioner
Parrish present-
ed the results of
the discussion
and received
unanimous sup-
port from her
fellow Commis-
sioners to re-
move the green
containers from
highways 90 and 150 and
highway 140 and 150
north. Coordinator
Wyche presented a plan
that would promote an
orderly transition to
close the sites on August
10. Media exposure in
numerous forms will be
initiated announcing the
closure of the sites and
alerting citizens to re-
sort to proper means of
disposal in their area.


County citizens that pay
an assessment are autho-
rized to use any of the col-
lection sites in the county
as well the green collec-
tion cans. Citizens not
paying the assessment are
not eligible to use the col-
lection sites or the green
cans belonging to the
county, but must rely on
services provided by their
city government and/or
utilize the Aucilla Land
Fill to dispose of their
waste. As of press time,
the county is seeking to
purchase property some-
where along highway 150
north to establish another
controlled collection cen-
ter. Once established, the
goal to remove all of the
green containers from
county roadways will be
realized; only then will
the dream become a
reality
The Department of
Transportation and the


Madison County Road De-
partment will assist the
Solid Waste and Recycling
Department to effectively
barricade these areas.
Once the areas have aban-
doned, area surveillance
will be implemented to
identify violators. Local
law enforcement authori-
ties have been requested
to assist in identifying
and citing violators for il-
legal dumping on road-
ways and other locations.
Violators will be cited for
violating County Ordi-
nance No. 96-73, punish-
able by a fine of $300 to
$1,000 or the appropriate
jail sentence, and/or both
for illegal dumping. Citi-
zens are encouraged to re-
port any observations of
illegal dumping by calling
(850) 973-2611. The Solid
Waste and Recycling De-
partment seeks your as-
sistance in helping to
keep Madison clean.


H IlI KI


ECMRI n fDEA
World Music & Dance
Sat, Sept. 12 7 PM
(with NFCC Festival of Art
planned for daytime event)
BROTHERHOOD
Harmonic Voices Quintet
Thurs, Oct. 15 7 PM
DAVIS & DOW
JAZZ DUO
Songs from Classic Films
Thurs, Nov. 19-7 PM
THE NUTCRACKER
Sat, Dec. 12 7 PM
CORKY SIEGEL
CHAMBER BLUES
Thurs, Jan. 21 7 PM
INTERSECTION
Violin, Cello & Piano
Thurs, Feb. 18 7 PM
LANDSHARKS
Jimmy Buffett Tribute
Sat, Sept. 12 7 PM
SEASON PASSES
ON SALE NOW!
$55 Reseved [$45 Open Seatng
%A,,AA,, I.,-1m --CM.


dinners with potato salad baked beans and night, Nikki Colson, Joyce Mays, Kamilah i
bread; fresh millet or grouper fingers with Knight, Chuvala Snell-Brown, Wanda
basked beans, homemade coleslaw and Range, Gloria Randall and Barbara Rains.
bread; and mullet and grouper
sandwiches.
Those helping with the C il i Ch
fundraiser included: Lakeva hidrenL S hOiCe
Evans, Tonya Wilson, James Mob- SCHOOL OF THE ARTC
ley, Frank Rains, Willie McK-


SCustomer Appreciation Week

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PRti-tRhtD OUTLETS AT LAKE PARK
5293 MILL STORE ROAD, #36
LAKE PARK, GA
(229) 559-0577
STORE HOURS: MONDAY SATURDAY 10 8 SUNDAY 12 6 537821Dawn












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: LUSALLL for over 3 years. Our com itmn t ulit, itan Cmfrtisth sanar


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P rovidin3 academic
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Open House


"Information and Enrollment Session
for Parents and Students"

Dear Parents and Students,

We would like to invite you to Madison's newest School. The Children'd Choice Schoolof
theArts. You are cordially invited to tour our school building and see what is in store for
all children attending this first year. Come and visit us next Sunday August the 9th,
between 3:30 PM and 5:30 PM for insights into our outstanding academic curriculum
infused with the Arts. The school is located at 203 SE Seminole St. in Madison.

This first Academic year, we will be enrolling 4K Kindergarten grade levels. Classes will
run concurrent with Madison County's public school system schedule and be held from
8:30 AM 2:30 PM each scheduled school day. Academic tuition is a flat fee per month of
$290.00. For these grade levels, all supplies, a hot lunch and two healthy snacks per day
are included in the tuition.

Once regular classes have ended for the day, the school is offering classes in Art, Dance,
Drama and Music each week for all children ages 4 12 years old. These classes will run
from 3 PM 5 PM each scheduled school day. After school classes may be attended full
time for $85.00 per week or on a per class basis for $10.00 per hour of instruction. These
after school classes will also offer a healthy snack.

Class size is limited. So come, join us, for a look around and see what we have to offer as
an educational experience for your child. For additional information, call and leave a
message on the school phone at 850.973.6781, or you can send an email to us at
childrenschoicesoa@gmail.com. All messages and email will be responded to by 5 PM of
each day.

Looking forward to seeing you then,

Kevin O'Malley
Director


Fundraiser Held On Courthouse Lawn


k -IL-


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, July 24, 2009
The International F & A.M. Masons, Inc. and the Order of the Eastern Star held a fundraiser last Friday. Back row, left to right: Lake-
va Evans, Tonya Wilson, James Mobley, Frank Rains, Willie McKnight. Middle row, left to right: Nikki Colson, Joyce Mays, Kamilah Knight,
Chuvala Snell-Brown. Front row, left to right: Wanda Range, Gloria Randall and Barbara Rains.


~t I'





8A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 5, 2009


MONEY & FINANCE


Measuring The Economy


Gross Investment = I
Government Spending = G
Exports minus Imports = (X-M)
The basic formula for GDP is
therefore: GDP = C + I + G + (X M).
As noted, the official measure of a
recession or a depression is deter-
mined by the rate of change in GDP,
with a recession being defined as "two
or more consecutive quarters of de-
cline in GDP," although many econo-
mists argue that the term is
oversimplified. A depression is de-
fined as a much deeper recession, with
the drop in GDP exceeding 10 percent.
Here again, economists disagree.
In a Newsweek article from 2008,
Robert Samuelson points out that the
current recession, which has not offi-
cially been declared a depression,
could actually have numbers as severe
as the Great Depression, it's just that


the government "bought" more of this
one, potentially masking the real pic-
ture and simply postponing the in-
evitable.
Just focusing on the whole mea-
sure of GDP, however, the economy
has actually experienced successive
periods of GDP improvement, not
enough to officially call the recession
over, but certainly an improvement,
right?
Consider Samuelson's comment
above regarding government owner-
ship and put the government spending
in terms of the GDP equation above.
Private Consumption is currently
way down, so "C" has fallen in the
equation.
Gross Investment is down too, so
"I" is down, as businesses downsize
and layoff employees.
Government spending and foreign


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
One of the terms commonly used
to measure the American economy is
Gross Domestic product (GDP). As the
United States slogs through a reces-
sion, it is the rise and fall of GDP that
is used to determine whether things
are getting better or worse.
Roughly speaking, GDP is the
overall value of the goods and services
produced in America. According to
the International Monetary Fund,
2008 GDP for the United States was ap-
proximately $14.2 trillion dollars,
which represents over 20 percent of
the world's economy more than Chi-
na, Japan and Germany combined.
GDP as a basic economic formula
is measured by four basic compo-
nents:
Private Consumption = C


investment has remained high though,
especially government spending,
adding huge to the "G" to the above
equation, with the foreign investment
helping the "(X-M)" component.
The result is improved GDP and a
stock market rebounding over 20 per-
cent from its recent bottom, but with
the average business appearing little
improved. In the short run, it has ap-
parently averted the breadlines of the
Great Depression, but some might call
it economists playing with an equa-
tion. The trillion-dollar question will
now be whether the economy can now
shift to investment and consumption,
at which point the public debt can be
paid down, at least in theory Whether
it will go well according to plan is still
to be determined.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
Michael@greenepublishing.com.


.s ror ing Chinese Investment In America ,iazarbous?


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
During the week of July 27, Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner and Secretary of State Hillary Clin-
ton launched meetings with a high-level Chinese dele-
gation to discuss various economic topics, including
China's concerns about the value of the dollar. The
massive Chinese investment in U.S. Treasury bills and
bonds is no secret, although many conservatives assert
the numbers are excessive, especially since China is not
a classic ally of America.
Looking at the chart obtained from the website




Millennials, Gen X and Baby

Boomers Should Invest for Growth

Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones



Is there a "generation gap" today? In some ways, it's
possible. While many baby boomers are happy just to
understand the basics of Facebook, "Millennials" are busy
texting and twittering. And yet when it comes to investing,
baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1962),
Generation X (1963 1981) and Millennials (1982 -
2001) may have a lot in common.

Specifically, to achieve their long-term goals, these
groups should structure their investment portfolios to pro-
vide some growth potential. However, due to their age dif-
ferences, they may need to take different approaches in
how they invest for growth. Let's take a look at all three
groups:

Millennials One of your biggest objectives may be
to save enough money for a down payment on a house.
For this short-term goal, you may want an investment
whose value won't fluctuate too much. At the same time,
don't ignore the need to save for retirement, even though
it's likely decades away. Contribute as much as you can
afford to your 401(k) or other employer-sponsored plan,
and if you still have money available, consider opening an
IRA. And you may want to fund these accounts with an
appropriate amount of growth-oriented investments, such
as stocks or stock-based vehicles. (Keep in mind, though,
that the value of these investments will fluctuate over
time, sometimes significantly, and there's no guarantee
you won't lose any principal.)
Generation X Retirement is becoming more of a
reality so if you have been underutilizing your 401(k)
and IRA, now may be a good time to ratchet up your con-
tributions. And although you have less time to make up for
market drops than your Millennial co-workers, you're not
out of time, either so you still need to invest for growth
potential. Nonetheless, you may want to include a higher
percentage of bonds and other fixed-income vehicles in
your portfolio, especially if you're an older Gen X'er.
Baby Boomers Retirement is coming at you pret-
ty quickly. And it's both a short-term and a long-term goal,
because even though you may be leaving your career in
just a few years, you could spend two or even three
decades in retirement, starting a new career, going back
to school or pursuing other interests you haven't had time
to pursue. So you're faced with a paradox: On one hand,
you don't want to invest too heavily in high-growth vehi-
cles, because these are the most risky and a market
downturn could cause the value of your portfolio to drop
just when you need to start tapping into your investments.
But you can't become too conservative and put all your
money in fixed-income vehicles, because over time these
investments may lose value to inflation which means
you'll lose purchasing power. Consider investing in quali-
ty stocks, which have growth potential, along with a good
mix of bonds, Treasury bills, certificates of deposit and
other vehicles that may offer the potential for both current
income and preservation of principal.

Your need for investment growth never really disap-
pears. But at different stages of your life, you'll have to
balance this need against competing interests so
review your financial situation regularly, and make the
right moves at the right times.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your
local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


EdwardJones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631 Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204
Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


www.chinabilit-
y.com, the enor-
mous surge in
China's "Cur-
rent Account"
balance (essen-
tially a measure
of the difference
between what
goes to a country
from America
and what comes
from that coun-


try to America) V
in the past five 5
years. A big part
of this is from
the enormous 5 U g
U.S. investment 4
China has accu- -s1
mulated, report-
edly as much as
$2 trillion in U.S.
treasury and
dollar reserves.
Many experts are not pleased with this enormous
current account surplus, which peaked at 11 percent of
Gross Domestic Product in 2007, and is still projected at
9.5 percent of GDP for 2009. China has effectively taken
the biggest official long position in the dollar in history
So what if China decided to unwind their huge dol-
lar holdings? According to basic economics, the dollar
would depreciate and inflation would rise, which would
result in a "weaker dollar," meaning foreign investors
could buy more American goods for the same money
This would result in better U.S. exports, which is a very
good side effect to offset other negative forces. The blip
in inflation might actually be welcome at this point in
the recession.
So, from the perspective of the American economy,
a Chinese sell-off would not necessarily be devastating
as political banter often asserts. It's not like the Chinese
own a mortgage on the White House. In fact, during
China's recent roller coaster economy, they joined oth-
ers who sought safety in U.S. treasuries; at one point ac-
tually buying U.S. Treasuries at zero percent interest
just because America was the safest mattress in the
world.


Of course, the other critical element in t
tion is the Chinese economy It was not long
bad loans threatened Chi-
na's banking system like
the current American sce-
nario. The solution they
found was sustained dou-
ble-digit growth, which ex- formation om
panded GDP and
generated more taxes for
government projects. In


Exports
-Imports
-Two-wa


Courtesy of www.china


other words, they
grew at record levels,
so the bad debt repre-
sented a smaller por-
tion of their overall
economy as it gener-
ated big money for
the government.
They basically got
great mileage out of
their investments.
Beijing is again
looking to raise taxes
though, joining the
y tre western movement to
increase taxes on cig-
arettes, for example.
They are seeking a
return to super-
charged growth as
America seeks to re-
work its economy
Michael Curtis
ibility.com can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


WACHOVIA


Ruthellen Caldwell
Financial Specialist
City President

Wachovia Bank, N.A.
Madison Financial Center
200 W. Base Street, FL0408
Madison, FL 32340
850-973-8714
fax 850-973-8723
ruthellen.caldwell@wachovia.com


24 Hour Service: 800-WACHOVIA (922-4684) 1


July 2009


Madison County Community Bank and SPF to help keep your financial life in balance


consumerr Sense


Rethinking Retirement
You did everything right. You planned
for your retirement by properly
diversifying your investment portfolio,
and even scrimped in order to
maximize contributions to your
retirement plans. However, after a
year of some of the biggest stock losses
since the Great Depression, you might
be wondering whether your shrunken
nest egg will be enough to carry you
through retirement. Before drawing
any premature conclusions, it's
important that you first take charge of
your situation by asking and answering
these four critical questions.
Where do I currently stand?
Take inventory of where your
retirement accounts are held and how
they're invested. These would include
IRA's, employer sponsored accounts
(401k's, etc.) and other accounts
earmarked for retirement. Although it
might be discomforting, gather up your
latest statements from these accounts
and total how much they're worth.
The losses may seem astonishing but
do not let that discourage you.
Understanding where things stand
Source: .ssa.wov
Have You Read...
The Wall Street Journal. Complete
Retirement Guidebook: How to Plan It,
Live It and Enjoy It by Glenn Ruffenach,
Kelly Greene. As you think about
retirement, you've got facts to face,
planning to do, decisions to make and
numbers to crunch. With the experts at The
Wall Street Journal to guide you, you'll
learn how to tailor a financial plan for the
lifestyle you want.


today will help you determine how
much you will need to save for your
future.
Can I get help with understanding
my situation?
With all of the economic tumult of
the past year, a thorough review of
your financial plan should be
considered mandatory. Whether
with the advisor who helped you put
together your plan prior to the market
downturn or another advisor who
might be a better fit, it's important to
tap into the knowledge and
experience of a financial professional
who will take the time to understand
your goals and speak to you directly
and realistically about where you
stand and what you should expect
going forward. He or she may be
able to help you in simplifying your
financial life without reducing your
retirement goals.
Should I plan on receiving Social
Security benefits?
If you have not already done so, you


may want to become familiar with
your Social Security benefits options
as part of your overall income
strategy. In order to help maximize
your social security income, pay
special attention to the date when
you begin withdrawing Social
Security benefits. According to the
Social Security Administration,
lifetime income benefits will
generally be higher the longer you
wait to take your first withdrawal.
For more information on your
benefits as well as information on
income planning tools, visit the
Social Security website
(http://www.ssa.gov/).
Get Help from our financial
professionals
Our financial professionals can help
you determine the financial path to
follow in pursuit of your near- and
long-term financial goals. He will
work with you to identify and
understand your investment goals
and then develop a well structured
investment plan.


Interested in Learning More?
I specialize in helping people maintain a healthy
financial balance and discover smart money strategies.
Call me to set an appointment to review your
investment objectives, and to discuss any questions
you might have. I look forward to speaking with
you!
Willy Gamalero -- 973-2400
Madison County Community Bank


Sorrento Pacific Financial, LLC Registered Representatives are employed by Madison County Community Bank and registered through Sorrento. (SPF]
(Member FINRAISIPC), a registered broker-dealer. SPF and Madison County Community Bank are not affiliated. Insurance products
may be provided thru ICBA Insurance Services, Inc.
fNOT FDIC INSURED NOT GUARANTEED BY THE BANK MAY GO DOWN IN VALUE
INOT A DPOSIT NOT INSTIRFD RV ANV FFnDFRAI ACFNCV


Trade growth collapsed in 2008
[% change, year-on-year]


~1~5~a b~3~~.





Wednesday, August 5, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 9A


BRIDAL GUIDE


Lisa's
Bartenders, LLC



Call 850-321-7398
Email: lisasbartenders@yahoo.com
www.LisasBartenders.com


An estimated 120 million Americans will at-
tend a wedding at some point this summer. And
with all the gifts for the engagement party,
bridal shower, bachelor(ette) party and actual
wedding, plus the cost of travel and attire, mak-
ing the guest list can turn into an expensive hon-
or.
But even if you don't have a lot to spend on
gifts, it's important to remember the distinction
between a thoughtful, inexpensive present and
one that's downright cheap.
Brides on the number one wedding and gift
registry Web site, WeddingChannel.com, shared
some of the worst gifts they've received. Take a
look:
A set of candleholders, given by a family of
four. When the bride and groom took them
back to the store, they got a $2 credit-
which they used to buy a couple of candy


p h o t o g r a p h y

2475 71palachee Pkwym
'allahassee, FL 32301

(850) 877-4259

Call or visit our website
www.Iucchiniohoto.com


A tin of potato chips--that's it! On the up-
side, once the chips were eaten, the bride was
able to use the empty tin to hold their rice.
A hand-me-down casserole dish with a gold-
colored wire holder. In the bride's words, it re-
sembles "an Easter basket gone terribly wrong."
A set of espresso cups and saucers in a lit-
tle basket. When the bride took them out to put
them away, she discovered that they'd already
been used.
Budget-Friendly Gift-Giving Tips
So how do you avoid being one of these gift
offenders without going over budget? Here are
some budget-friendly tips:
Group gifts. Join in with a few friends and
send the couple a gift together--the gift might
end up being more substantial than if each of
6 you purchased smaller gifts on your own.


X %pecidI place bor a %peciaI dale!
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Personanzees
feet opportunity to upgrade a lower-priced gift. If
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wine. It'll be more personal and will still be bud-
get-friendly.
Shop early and smart. Once you know
where a couple's registered, keep a lookout for
store sales and friends and family discounts. It's
a great way to buy something from the couple's
wedding registry and save money
The site also offers tips for couples looking
to set up their registry, including making sure
that there's at least one store that's convenient
for out-of-town guests, and monitoring your reg-
istry to be sure there's always something to fit
everyone's budget.
For more wedding wisdom, visit
www. weddingchannel.com.


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10A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 5, 2009


SCHOOL


NFCC Health Scholars Camp Teaches


Young Students About Careers In Health Care


North Florida Com-
munity College wel-
comed 22 health care
career hopefuls, ranging
from grades sixth
through ninth, to its
campus in June for a
Health Scholars Camp
hosted by NFCC's Allied
Health Department and
the Big Bend Area
Health Education Center
(AHEC).
The camp was made
possible through fund-
ing from AHEC, which
encourages communi-
ties and academic part-
nerships to improve
health in rural commu-
nities through the re-
cruitment of area youth
into college level Health
Science programs and
eventually into the
health care field.
"I learned a lot
about CPR and how to
give CPR to pregnant
people, children and in-


fants," said camper
Whitney Stevens of
Madison, Fla.
NFCC's Registered
Nursing students Jerme-
ca Davis, Bridget Gam-
ble and Brittany Hobbs
along with NFCC in-
structors and employees
Dr. Greg Molnar, Julie
Walden, Mack Leggett
and Debbie Bass provid-
ed the young scholars
with learning opportuni-
ties and enrichment ac-
tivities that included a
fieldtrip to Imax's Hu-
man Body movie.
The week-long camp
covered everything from
seminars focusing on
disability awareness, to-
bacco prevention, and
CPR workshops to hands
on exercises during
skills labs where stu-
dents learned how to uti-
lize special medical and
scientific equipment.
Students also had the op-


portunity to learn about
health care related is-
sues while having fun
playing games such as
Health Care Bingo,
which helped students
associate facts about dif-
ferent health care profes-
sions. Students gained
additional insight into
different health care ca-
reers from guest lectur-
ers provided through the
local ASPIRE and SWAT
Programs. In addition to
the vast insight into the
medical industry each
student received certifi-
cation in Basic CPR and
First Aid.
For more informa-
tion about NFCC's Allied
Health and Registered
Nursing programs con-
tact Melody Foust at
850.973.1662 or email al-
liedhealth@nfcc.edu. Vis-
it NFCC on the web at
www.nfcc.edu.


Back Row (Left to Right): Jermeca Davis (instructor), Kristin Tuten (instruc-
tor), Greg Foust, Andrea Moore, Kallai Collinsworth, Katie Letu, Sloan Bickford,
Darby Thompson, Alyssa Kinsey, Stephen Foust, Alana Ellison, Shontaye
Clemons, and Brittany Hobbs (instructor). Middle Row (Left to Right): Casey
Hooker, Victoria Sandefur, HankThompson, Emily Weaver, Katie Hill, Ashton Pick-
els, Kelly Francis, and Bridgette Gamble (instructor). Front Row (Left to Right):
Megan Letu, Donteria Ingram, Whitney Stevens, and Savannah Salter


NFCC ANNOUNCES FALL

ORIENTATION DATES


MADISON, FL -
North Florida Commu-
nity College will hold
two orientation sessions,
Thursday, Aug. 13 at 6
p.m. and Tuesday, Aug.
18 at 10 a.m., for its Fall
Term 2009. New students
already registered for
Fall Term and those
planning to register for
Fall should attend.
Classes begin Aug. 24.
"Our goal is to pro-
vide new students with
information that will
empower them to
achieve their career, aca-
demic and life goals,"
said Bobbie O'Hara, Di-
rector of Student Ser-
vices at NFCC.
"Orientation is required
for all new and transfer
students at North Flori-
da Community College,
returning students who
have been out more than
one year, dual enroll-


ment and online stu-
dents."
In addition to the
two on-site orientation
sessions, NFCC also of-
fers an on-line orienta-
tion for those whose job
schedules or other oblig-
ations make it difficult
to attend orientation on
campus. However, NFCC
encourages students to
attend orientation on-
site as it offers students
and their families the
opportunity to ask ques-
tions, tour the campus,
locate classrooms, pur-
chase books and become
more familiar with
NFCC before classes be-
gin.
To find out more or
to register for an orien-
tation session, contact
Bobbie O'Hara, Director
of Student Services, at
850-973-1623 or
OharaR@nfcc.edu.


NFCC Announces New

Library Hours Beginning

Fall Semester
MADISON, FL North Florida Community Col-
lege's Marshall Hamilton Library is scheduled to
open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 7
p.m. and Fridays from 8 am to 4:30 p.m. beginning
August 24. The new operating hours will continue
throughout spring term.
For more information please contact the NFCC
Marshall Hamilton Library at 850.973.1624 or email
Library@nfcc.edu.


Educational activities highlight end of term


NFCC Students Visit Google


Headquarters In Atlanta


MADISON, FL -
Graduates of North
Florida Community Col-
lege's Administrative
Assistant program visit-
ed Google headquarters
in Atlanta prior to grad-
uation last term. The
students toured Google's
business suites and
were invited to lunch in
the Google dining room.
Leading the tour was
Google's Matthew
Pritchard who answered
questions and provided
information relating to
the Google business.
"The students were
in awe of the amenities
and working environ-
ment at Google," said
program instructor
Enid Kozlowski. "The
trip inspired many of
the students to think
about their future and
the type of job they
would like to seek."
Following the trip to
Google, students
learned how to look and
dress professionally
when seeking employ-
ment. Ruthellen Cad-
well, president of
Wachovia Bank in Madi-
son, spoke to the stu-
dents on how to dress for
an interview and at a


Google employee Matthew Pritchard, left, leads a tour of the Google head-
quarters in Atlanta for students in the NFCC Administrative Assistant Program -
left to right, Maria Lewis (Madison), Wendalyn Vann (Madison), Ashley Harville
(Madison), Holly Norris (Madison), Instructor Enid Kozlowski, Clyneas Brasby
(Perry), Vandela "Van" Johnson (Monticello), Prudence Hill (Madison), and
Charyle Carmichael (Live Oak).


job. She mentioned the
importance of keeping a
professional look at all
times and maintaining a
meticulous appearance.
Devonna Sewell, a
MaryKay Cosmetic and
guidance counselor at
NFCC, also spoke to the
students and expanded
on the meticulous ap-
pearance idea. Sewell
demonstrated tech-
niques for applying
makeup and shared in-
formation on how to
maintain healthy skin.
These activities
were among a variety of
educational and skill
building events that the


S' v :


Guest speaker Ruthellen Cadwell, president of
Wachovia Bank in Madison, shares tips on dressing
for success at NFCC.


students participated in
throughout the course of
the program. After grad-
uation, many of the stu-


dents entered the work
force while some decid-
ed to continue their edu-
cation.


oferedaat SLU upon completing y
Associate's Degree at NFCC:
* Psychology
* Elementary Education
* Human Services Administration
* Business Administration with a
specialization in Management


Saint Leo University admits students of any race, color, religion and national or ethnic origin.


CLASSES FORMING NOW.
Registration Begins July 6th
Classes Start August 17th
* Full-time students are eligible for the
Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAGJ.


* Approved for VA Beneits/GI Bill


SAINLEO
UNIVERSITY
What you need for where you're going.
Founded in 1889


For oreinfrmaioncal:6(50.93-3 6 orem il: 6 iso sinteoe
www~sintle.edu


North'

REGISTER NOW



i )E~ Fall Schedule available at:
WWW.NFCC.EDU

1 CALL OR VISIT OUR CAMPUS
850.973.2288
S- 325 NW Turner Davis Dr I Madison, FL

North Florida

COMMUNITY COLLEGE

-- g SmallColfege. Big Possibilities.




Wednesday, August 5, 2009


www.2reenepublishin2.com


FUN P.\(


Madison County Carrier 11A


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as these great eateries literally are part of your home;
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12A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, August 5, 2009


HEALTH


Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association Introduces Interactive Havigation Solution


That Helps Individuals and Families Find Healthcare Coverage


AskBlue, Your person-
al guide to healthcare
coverage options(TM)
also supports those
in transition from
group coverage to
individual coverage
CHICAGO, Aug. 3
/PRNewswire-US-
Newswire/ -- The Blue
Cross and Blue Shield As-
sociation (BCBSA) today
announced the launch of
AskBlue -- an interactive
Web tool that helps con-
sumers navigate through a
wide range of healthcare
options to find coverage
that best fits their personal
needs and budget.
AskBlue was created
for individuals who are ei-
ther uninsured, unem-
ployed, have lost their
employer-based coverage,
or are not eligible for group
benefits. BCBSA's AskBlue
is the only interactive edu-
cational and navigational
tool that addresses the


needs of the consumer in
the individual health in-
surance market. It was
specifically designed to
help consumers in this
challenging economic en-
vironment.
"BCBSA strongly sup-
ports a healthcare system
that provides healthcare
coverage to all Ameri-
cans," said Scott P. Serota,
president and CEO of
BCBSA. "As we work with
Congress and the adminis-
tration to assure sustain-
able and comprehensive
healthcare reforms that
help achieve this goal, we
are pleased to offer this
new interactive navigation
tool that puts powerful
healthcare solutions at the
fingertips of consumers to-
day"
The AskBlue experi-
ence provides consumers
with a summary of avail-
able Blue Cross and Blue
Shield companies' health-


care coverage options. By
providing only a zip-code,
consumers get anonymous
and confidential informa-
tion about products that fit
their needs. For consumers
who are not familiar with
the various coverage types
and benefits, AskBlue will
analyze and present cover-
age options in a clear and
concise format. The
process takes only min-
utes. Once complete, visi-
tors have the option of
contacting their local Blue
Cross and Blue Shield com-
pany for quote information
or simply leaving the on-
line experience with a
printout of personalized
options that have been tai-
lored to their needs.
During a pre-launch
demonstration of
AskBlue, participating
Blue Cross and Blue Shield
companies found over-
whelming support for the
program. A majority of


consumers -- 80 percent --
who visited AskBlue,
stayed on and obtained per-
sonalized healthcare cover-
age information.
Consumers said the tool
met their expectations for
ease of access, knowledge-
able solutions and action-
able results.
Currently 18 Blue
Cross and Blue Shield com-
panies offer AskBlue, with
plans underway to expand
the program in additional
markets. To learn more
about AskBlue, visit
www.BCBS.com.
AskBlue provides a
general overview of cer-
tain insurance products,
based on information that
the user provides during
this session. This overview
is not an application for in-
surance. It is not an offer to
provide or guarantee in-
surance coverage, or legal
or financial advice. To find
out about rates and terms


Quit Smoking Classes Offered At Crosswinds


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Crosswinds Health
and Rehabilitation Cen-
ter in Greenville is excit-
ed to announce the
formation of "Quit Smok-
ing Now" classes held
every Thursday night at
6:30 p.m. Each Thursday,
the meeting is open to
the public at no cost and
is held at the center.
Preston Mathews of
the Madison County
Health Department's
Quit Smoking Now pro-
gram instructs the class
and teaches the effects of
smoking. It is known
that tobacco in every
form causes cancer, and
second hand smoke can
also lead to cancer.


The classes last for
about an hour. The class
serves as an educational
program as well as a sup-
port group to encourage
each one to succeed.
"They support each oth-
er tremendously," stated
Dianne Sullivan, activi-
ties coordinator at Cross-
winds.
Each participant is
measured with a C20
machine to measure the
amount of carbon diox-
ide in one's body, to see
the amount they have cut
back on smoking.
The official quit-date
for each member of the
class is August 10.
"It has helped
me quit," Sullivan stat-
ed. "I don't know if I


(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Bryant Thigpen, March 26, 2009)
The Madison County Health Department is work-
ing hard to educate local residents about the dangers
of smoking and helping people drop the habit. Pic-
tured left to right are: Preston Mathews, Doug Freer
and Tyuanna McCall.


would have been success-
ful if it wouldn't have
been for Preston Math-
ews and the classes."
The meetings are
open to the public. There


are no fees for the class-
es.
For more informa-
tion on these quit smok-
ing classes, call (850)
948-4601.


for these and other insur-
ance products, how to ap-
ply for coverage, and for
much more information,
contact your local Blue
company Each Blue com-
pany is responsible for the
information that it pro-
vides.
The Blue Cross and
Blue Shield Association is
a national federation of 39
independent, community-
based and locally operated
Blue Cross and Blue Shield
companies that collectively
provide healthcare cover-


Options
age for more than 100 mil-
lion members -- one-in-
three Americans. For more
information on the Blue
Cross and Blue Shield As-
sociation and its member
companies, please visit
www.BCBS.com.
AskBlue was devel-
oped in collaboration with
Jellyvision Lab, Inc., a
provider of interactive
conversation applications
in the US.
SOURCE Blue Cross
and Blue Shield Associa-
tion


7 -E









*. -.. . .


S... -- w b*.***


*
Tl* a a se 0 emo


-II

























The TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL NEUROSCIENCE CENTER
Is an accredited Stroke Center and designated Brain & Spinal Cord Injury Acute Care Center.


Nursimi rI cme

"We Are Home When You Need Us"

MADISON NURSING CENTER
HEALTH AND REHABILITATION
Professional Rehabilitation and
Skilled Nursing Facility
2481 W. IS 90 850-973-4880
Madison. FL 32340 Fax: 850-973-3900



Nursing Iicme


Lake Park Of Madison
A skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility,
serving the long term care and rehabilitation
needs of Madison and the surrounding area.
259 SW Captain Brown Rd. Madison, FL
(850) 973-8277


Local Cardiology Office


Now Open

Dr. Shezad Sanaullah, MD, FACC

at 293 West Base Street

Call 973-8600 for an appointment



Florida Coastal Cardiology

Now Open to Schedule

Appointments



Get your heart and vascular tests

and evaluation done locally
Services performed in office

Nuclear stress test to check for blockages
in the arteries of the heart

Evaluation for the risk of a heart attack

Ultrasound of the heart and heart valves

Ultrasound of the blood supply to the brain

Ultrasound of the blood supply to the legs

Ultrasound to check for aneurysms

Monitors for heart rhythm problems


Most Insurance Accepted Including:
Medicare, United Healthcare,
Blue Cross/Blue Shield & Vista


~




Wednesday, August 5, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 13A


HEALTH


Soda May Be Next On The Radar
D 1 X4-1- -1fl--4- rn -- --1- 1-1- 4 1 - --41, -- -1 1


By ivcnael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A thirty year-old
Madison County moth-
er walked out of her
doctor's office, rubbing
her head in disbelief.
She just found out her
cholesterol and triglyc-
erides were through
the roof. She was bewil-
dered; as she did none
of the things she
thought that would
have caused it.
* She didn't eat red


meats
* She didn't eat a lot of
dairy (pizza with the
kids was about it)
* No milk or ice cream
* Minimal fatty foods
The list went on to
the point the doctor
was showing addition-
al concern as to the
root cause, until one
answer emerged and
enlightened every-
thing.
"I drink four or five
sodas a day."


That's probably
it," the doctor replied.
"Wow," she
thought. "I didn't know
sodas could do that to
me. "
Of course, she was
completely aware of
the sugar and calories
in the soda, so her only
concern was weight
gain, which had not
been a "big" problem.
Considering the
epidemic levels of obe-
sity in Madison Coun-


ty, however, wirt coro-
nary ailments, diabetes
and associated chronic
illnesses exploding -
even among Madison
County youth where
sodas are becoming a
very real and immedi-
ate threat.
Reports have
emerged that soda is
one of the next targets
for additional taxation,
like tobacco has seen
in recent years. This
lesser known link to it


Tri-County Family Heath Care



To Host Health Fair


causing a spike in co-
lesterol and triglyc-
erides certainly
underscores the gravi-
ty of the situation.
Now, along with
the effects on weight,
the huge costs social-
ly and financially to
America are extreme,
simply for letting the
soda pop too often.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
michael@greenepublis
hing.com.


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
In celebration of Communi-
ty Health Center Week, Tri-
County Health Center in
Greenville will be hosting a
health fair at Haffye Hayes Park
in Greenville on August 14. The
health fair will be held from 10-


12 p.m., and complimentary bot-
tles of water will be provided.
At the health fair, Tri-Coun-
ty will be providing important
information about health
awareness. Free blood pressure,
blood sugar, and cholesterol
checks, as well as screening for
sickle cell and osteoporosis.


(SPM Wire) Can you blame under constant attack" from
a lifetime of annoying jobs, such damaging agents as
unruly kids and fami-
ly emergencies for' '
your silver-streaked
head of hair?
It turns out that
those ever-multiply-
ing graying hairs
that tend to crop up
with age really are
signs of stress, re-
veals new research
recently published in
the science and med-
ical journal, "Cell."
However, the
stress in question is
stress on cells in
your body, not neces-
sarily the family and
work stress over your
lifetime.
According to re-
searchers at Tokyo Medical chemicals, ultraviolet light
and Dental University, "the and ionizing radiation.
DNA in [our body's] cells is "It is estimated that a sin-


Dr. Elizabeth Hengestebeck
and the Tri-County staff will be
on hand to assist patients with
information and to answer any
questions one may have about
their health.
For more information,
please call the center at (850)
948-2840.


gle cell in mammals can en-
counter approximately 100,000
DNA damaging events
per day," said Emi
Nishimura, who led
Sthe new research.
It turns out
that stress does dam-
age to the DNA in
System cells that are re-
sponsible for the col-
oring in our hair,
among other things.
According to
the researchers, the
new findings about
gray hair may lead to
advances in under-
standing other symp-
toms of aging. They
support the "stem cell
aging hypothesis,"
which proposes that
DNA damage to long-
lived stem cells can be a major
cause for the symptoms that
come with age.


Question: Are silver fillings dangerous?
Answer: What a great question. Silver fillings (called
Amalgam by dentists) have been used as the primary
filling material for a long time. There has been much
criticism of Amalgam fillings due to the mercury used
within the alloy. This debate has been going on as long
as I can remember.
In the past decade the Food & Drug
Administration has been focusing on the amalgam issue.
The focus of the investigation was to determine if there
was need to restrict the use of silver amalgam fillings due
to any hazards.
The results of the investigation were released
by the American Dental Association last week. "The
American Dental Association (ADA) agrees with the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) decision not to
place any restriction on the use of dental amalgam, a
commonly used cavity filling material. The FDA has left
the decision about dental treatment right where it needs
to be-between the dentist and the patient," states ADA
President Dr. John Findley. "This decision underscores
what the ADA has long supported-a discussion
between dentists and patients about the full range of
treatment options to help patients make educated
decisions regarding their dental care."
Amalgam fillings will continue to be placed in dentistry.
There are however many tooth colored alternatives
available in Dentistry. If you have questions, please ask
your dentist. There are more ways to fill a tooth as there
are flavors of Coca-Cola these days. Your dentist will be
your best guide.

Roderick K Shaw III, DMD, MAGD
Master of the Academy of General Dentistry
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmail.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of Dentistry.


UNINSURED??

We have a sliding-fee program for
those who qualify at
Tri-County Family Health Care
Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician
You may save $ on your prescriptions
from us, when filled at Jackson's Drugs
Please call 850-948-2840
for more information
TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.


228 NE Hancock Ave.
Madison, FL
(850) 973-2767
Hours:
Mon.-Fri. 8am to 5pm
We accept All Insurances,
K also Medicaid and Medicare
Walk-Ins Welcome
Adolfo C. Dulay. M.D. Maria L. Dulay, M.D.
Family Practice DoBneDensity Testing Faml'Dy Ptice
SPediatri


Home Oxygen Nebulizer Medication
Diabetic Shoes & Supplies Home Medical Equipment
24 Hour Service
353 NE Marion St. Phone: 850-973-4125
Madison, FL Fax: 850-973-8922

Chiropractic Physician


180 S. Cherry St., Suite D 3116 Capital Circle NE, Ste.2
Monticello, FL 32344 Tallahassee, FL 32308
850-997-1400 m .a 850-668-4200
Now exceotino Blue Cross Blue Shield and most other insurances


WHO'S TO BLAME FOR


THOSE PESKY GRAY HAIRS?


Family Halth Car


~;Cr


I


g





14A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday August 5, 2009


DedlneFo Casifed


*3 IA 'nU U UI

FLORIDAPE
IN. ST*ATEID
CLSSFEDPROGRA


I BUILD SHEDS & DECKS
Call Bob
850-242-9342
Now selling steel
buildings, garages,
barns and carports
6/10, r cc
Home Repair/Maintenance
From pressure washing and
yard care to painting and
cabinets call Curt or
Maryann @ Mac Services
850-973-4180
8/5, pd



Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rtn, n/c



Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-rtn, n/c




U PICK
Watermelons .50 cents each
782 NE Nixon Way
Madison, Fl
850-973-4459
8/5, pd
$$$
Educational Grants, Business
Loans and Bad Credit
Mortgages
850-673-9102
8/5, 8/26, pd



Estate Sale
At Ashlyn's Rose Petal
224 SW Range Ave
Friday 8/7/09 8:00 am 5:00
pm and Saturday 8/8/09 8:00
am 5:00 pm


White English/Pit Bull
puppies 1 male $100
ready now
229-221-3614
7/8, 8/5, pd


White English/Pit B
puppies 2 males 1 fen
$100 each ready noN
850-342-1162
7/



House For Rent

2 bedroom 1 bath in
$375 per month, $25
Security deposit
850-971-5809

Lake Front Home

2 bedroom 2 bath, inch
Kitchen appliances, la
maintenance and water.
lease $800 deposit, $80
month 850-973-300:
8/
Clean as new. Two store
BR, 2.3 baths, formal L
DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. Ne
Kitchen, Range, Ref, D
G/D. Oak Floor downst
Heart Pine upstairs. 2 Cc
H&A. Yard maint. inclu
ADULT FAMILY. No p
$900 rent and deposit. (
credit req. 205 NE Shelb:
Madison. Call George
8583 or 557-0994.
5/
FOR RENT
2 bedroom 1 bath mo
home near NFCC, No P
No Children. Non smo
only 850-843-0980
7/2!
House For Rent
3 bedroom 1 bath, qu
neighborhood, fenced
attached garage in Mad
$600/month + depose
850-464-6091
8/5,

CLEAN 3 BR, CH &
new R & Refg, Oak flc
ADULT FAMILY ON
Rent $685 plus depose
No pets. Good credit
432 NE Horry Ave., M
son. Call George 973-8
or 557-0994.

2 bedroom mobile ho
water, furnished, 1/4 mi
of City Limits
No calls afer 8 pm
850-973-6735



Buy, Sell or Tra
Call 973-4141
To Place Your A


ull
nale


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer



EQUAL HOUSING ncc
OPPORTUNITY
rtnccc


1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c


outhem 1Yas of

C(adison Capartments



Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c


Modular Sales
F.G.B.C. Certifying Agent,
Pat Riley, is now in Lake
City 386-344-5024
7/15, rtn, c
Needs Minor Work
3 bedroom 2 bath dou-
blewide only $9,900
Call David
386-719-0044
7/15, r c


w NEW 32 X 80
4 bedroom, loaded
/8, rtnc w/upgraded options. Turn
S Key... ready to move in in-
cluding well, septic, wiring,
& closing cost on your own
land. $533.33 a month w/ no
money down & 620 or better
Lee credit score Call Lynn
50 850-365-5129
7/15, rt, c
Trade in's & Repos Available
8/5, pd Call Eric for a list of our
homes available at discount-
ed prices, many to choose
udes from! (386) 719-5560
udes 7/29- 8/29,c
awn
yr HOME BUYERS
0 per Let my 20 years experience
25 negotiate the best buy.
5, rtn, pd 386-344-5024
7/15, rtn, c
ry, 3
.R & Want to buy a home?
w call David for government
)/W, housing assistance programs
airs, 386-719-0044
central 7/15,rtn, c
ded.
dets. 1 Acre, paved road, 3 bed-
eood room 2 bath workshop, fire-
y Ave. place only $499.00 monthly
973- call David 386-719-0044
7/15, rtn,c
8 -rtn, c "Brand New""
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 to many up-
bile grades to list, all this for only
'ets & $42,843.00 Call Eric to set
)kers up appointment
(386) 719-5560
7/29 8/28, c
), 8/5, pd
CASH FOR YOUR USED
MOBILE HOMES 1990
liet OR NEWER
yard, 386-752-5355
lison 7/15,rtn, c
sit
it NEED A HOME?
8/12, pd Tired of being turned down
because you have no money
CA, or credit score is too low but
doors. you own your own land? I
LY. have solutions
sit. Call Lynn Sweat
req. 386-365-5129
[adi- 7/15,rtn,c
8583 Own your home
for less than rent and receive
tc up to $8,000 bonus! Infor-
tme mation Call
le out 1-800-769-0952
7/15, rtn, c
"WOW"
8/5, pd $150.00 and your property
puts you in a home today
call Eric at
(386) 719-5560
ide 7/9 -8/28,c
f $361,000 Available to loan
id! for home purchase at .5 LTV
386-365-8549
7/15, rtn, c


st time uyers
We have several programs to
help 1st time home buyers
plus GOUT assistance up to
$8,000 $$$
Call Eric for details
(386) 719-5560
7/29 -8/28, c
First Time Home Buyer...
Special financing program I
can help you own a home
Call Bobby at
386-288-4560
7/15, rtn, c
FOR SALE
4 bedroom 2 bath ready to
move in call
386-288-4560
7/15, rtn, c
5 Bedroom 3 Bath Home
New with zero down
$595.00 per month call
Mike 386-623-4218
7/15, rtn, c
"JULY HOT DEALS"
Land/Home easy Qualify -
$8000 Tax Credit 5% inter-
est 386-344-5024
7/15, rtn, c
28 X 80 5 Bedroom
Reduced $15,000 for quick
sale call Mike
386-623-4218
7/15, rtn, c
Work for the County or
State?
special financing for home
purchase call
1-800-769-0952
7/15, rtn, c
Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452
7/29 -8/28, c
The Wait Is Over!
Introducing "Mossy Oak"
the most innovative, quality
and affordable manufactured
houses in the industry. Call
Mr. Mott (386) 752-1452
7/29 -8/28, c
New Manufactured Homes
Starting at $23.70 sq. ft.
Guaranted lowest prices in
North Florida. Call Rick
(386) 752-8196
7/29 -8/28, c



For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suwannee
was $135,000, Now $99,000.
2 BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Building with
Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
Trees. 386-719-0421
rtn, n/c
Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Views
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
Open and Covered Decks,
Large Screened Porch, Gas
FP, CH/A, Oak Floors & Cab-
inets, and Appliances.
Offered Furnished at
$179,900. Call BJ Peters at
850-508-1900
rtn, n/c
Completely Remodeled
3 BR/ 1 Bath, new roof,
carpet, central heat & air,
new kitchen cabinets, new
bathroom, new 200 amp
electrical, approximately
1300 sq. ft. $84,000
Oak Estates Sub Division
McWilliams Realty
(850) 973-8614
6/3,rtn, c
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Brick 3 BR, 2 Bath, and
1604 SQ. FT., Carport, Patio,
1.76 Avres, Fenced Yard,
Cement Circular Drive,
Sidewalks, recent Appraisal.
Corner lot on Houck Road
@ 3281 Sullivan Road, Per-
ry. Call for info or appt.
850-584-9486
or 407-791-0246
7/22, 8/12, pd
House For Sale
Cherry Lake Area, recently
remodeled, 3/2 1800 sq. ft.,
cypress home, new baths,
kitchen, and roof. Bamboo
flooring on 3/4 acres
$132,500 850-929-4991
8/5, rtn, pd




OFFICE BUILDING
FOR RENT
across street from
Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder Office)
111 SE Shelby St., Madison;
Newly renovated
back to the 1920's era
Call 973-4141
rtn,n/c
Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highwayfrontage.
Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Dr.
& Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone


Natural gas line, 8 inch wa-
ter main, access to city utili-
ties, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene 850-
973-4141
rtn, n/c


$$AVON$$
Earn 50%, only $10
starter kit! Call Toda
850-570-1499 or vis
www.youravon.com/td
5/1

Dental Assistant
Golden Opportunity! I
you posses a sunny, ene
attitude? Are you detail
and organized? Our den
practice is seeking an o
standing individual to p
vide concierge level sei
for our patients in the a
ing area. Dental or mec
experience a plus but no
mandatory. Is cosmetic
portant to you along wi
helping others? If you
a can-do attitude, you a
ganized, and self motiv
with a good sense of hu
then you should apply.
290-5785 to hear a mes
from Dr. Roderick Sha'
office with more details
about the position and i
tions on how to apply f
position.


AMIKIDS- Functional
ly Therapy seeking qua
Case Manager to join
expanding program. Th
responsible for in-home
comprehensive services
risk youth and families
cessful candidates must
es a B.A. and require
competencies of writing
ability to work as a teal
member as well as inde
dently, conducting intal
family assessments, me
specific time frames an
port clinical staff. Fax
sume to (386)755-1486
7
AMIKIDS-Functional
ly Therapy seeking qua
Clinicians to join oui
pending program to pr
intensive in-home thera
at risk youth and family
clusively through evid
based model. Functic
Family Therapy training
related travel expenses
Successful candidates
posses a MSW or MA/
a clinical discipline ai
BSW/BA/BS with th
years experience wor
with families. Fax resu
(386)755-1486
7

Now Hiring:
Experienced Medical'
scriptionist RN's & L
Medical Laboratory Te
ogists Please call
850-973-2271 ext 19


Experience in Farm
I'I.iin;i, plowing, etc.
perience in heavy equip
use (bulldozer, excav
etc.), must speak eng
Please have resume.
850-948-9952
Drug Free Workpla
8/5,8/12

Fulltime Grants Coor
tor position available
North Florida Commi
College: See www.nfc
for details.
8


I Call 973-4141
to Place Your A


LI


for
ay
sit
avies
13-rmt,c


Do
ergetic
ed
ntal
)ut-
)ro-
rvice
.ssist-
lical
ot
s im-
th
have
ire or-
ated
humor,


Announcements

Advertise in Over 100
Papers! One Call One
Order One Payment
The Advertising Net-
works of Florida Put
Us to work for You!
(866)742-1373
www.national-classi-
fieds.com,
info@national-classi-
fieds.com

Auctions


Honda Accord $500! for
listings call (800)366-9813
ext 9271

$500! Police Impounds!
cars, trucks, suv's from
$500! Honda, Toyota,
Chevy and more! for
listings (800)366-9813 ext
9499

Help Wanted

HEAT & AIR TECHS
have Recession Proof
Careers! 3WK Training
Accreditation.
EPA/OSHA Certified.
Local Job Placement As-
sistance. Financing
Available. May Qualify
For GI/VA Benefits.
(877)994-9904.

International Cultural
Exchange Representa-
tive: Earn supplemental
income placing and su-
pervising high school
exchange students. Vol-
unteer host families
also needed. Promote
world peace! (866)GO-
AFICE or www.afice.org.

Homes For Rent

4Br 3Ba Foreclosure!
$11,500! Only $217/Mo!
5% down 15 years @ 8%
apr. Buy, 3 Br $199/Mo!
for listings (800)366-9783
ext 5798

Homes For Sale

4Br 3Ba Foreclosure!
$11,500! Only $217/Mo!
5% down 15 years @ 8%
apr. Buy, 3 Br $199/Mo!
for listings (800)366-9783
ext 5760

Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Account-
ing, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assis-
tance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if
qualified. Call (866)858-
2121,
www.CenturaOnline.co
m.

AIRLINES ARE
HIRING
Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid
if qualified Housing
available. CALL Avia-
tion Institute of Mainte-
nance (888)349-5387.




n9rF wl^^
A'A^ ^^ ^^


Call Absolute Auction!
ssage 214+/- acre farm, house.
w's Pike County near Troy,
SAlabama. Offered in
intruc- parcels, combinations
or this and/or entirety August
13, 1:00.
729, rtn, c www.gtauctions.com
(800)996-2877. Granger,
Fami- Thagard and Associates,
lified Inc. Jack F Granger
#873.
our
ey are REAL ESTATE Auction-

to at Luxury 12,000+/- sq ft
SSuc- home, 88+/- acre horse
t poss- farm. Shelby County, Al-
abama, near Lay Lake.
g, the Offered in parcels, com-
m binations, and/or en-
-pen- tirety August 20, 1:00.
kes, www.gtauctions.com,
,et (800)996-2877. Granger,
d sup- Thagard and Associates,
re- Inc. Jack F Granger,
#873.

/29, 8/5, c Auto Donations
Fami- DONATE YOUR VEHI-
alified CLE RECEIVE $1000
r ex- GROCERY COUPON
ovide UNITED BREAST CAN-
[py for CER FOUNDATION
ies ex- Free Mammograms,
lence Breast Cancer Info
onal www.ubcf.info FREE
,g and Towing, Tax Deductible,
paid. Non-Runners Accepted,
must (888)468-5964.
MS in
nd/or Building Supplies
three
king METAL ROOFING. 40
ume to yr Warranty-Buy direct
from manufacturer
/29, c 30/colors in stock, w/all
accessories. Quick turn
Tran- around. Delivery avail-
PN's able. Gulf Coast Supply
chnol- & Mfg, (888)393-0335
www.GulfCoastSupply.c
906 om
8/5, c
85, Business
Opportunities
ing
.), Ex- ALL CASH VENDING!
ptment Do you earn $800 in a
ator, day? 25 Local Machines
lish. and Candy $9,995.
Call (888)629-9968 BO2000033
CALL US: We will not
ce be undersold!
2, 8/19, pd
Cars for Sale
rdina-
e at Acura Integra 95 $500!
unity Honda Civic 99 $400!
:c.edu Ford Taurus 01 $750!
Toyota Camry 98 $850!
5.8/12, c Police Impounds! For
listings call (800)366-9813
ext 9275.
d! Buy Police Impounds!!
99 Honda Civic $400! 97


m~l~~tI Ll Ik rr~i~eri


P I 101DFFEREN LTiCO III N I 1: 11IRTHI a F: ENTR1A FL IDA] ii


&-I- &R n i W-"


Ml;lilJ ;r1M I T Hi l m 1H1
SHunt Fish Farm Invest Possibilities
SHigh Fence Hunting Preserve? Cattle-Horse Ranch? Development Opportunity? Residential Community?
*Plantation Property? *Investment/Income Property? *Commercial Land Buildings? *High Profile Real Estate?
A uctioS


-Liv e On@it

,ulifnd~aeaPWstaterluctionsmc m 8oe-7


!PRTANT REAL ESTAT ON


HELP~5%


......... MTIM
1--.- 1 . l i







Wednesday, August 5, 2009


www.2reenepublishin2.com


Madison County Carrier 15A


LEG~AL


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.


WILLIAM L. SULLIVAN
Post Office Box 729
Madison, Florida 32341


CASE NO. 2009-170-CA


Plaintiff,

vs. FORECLOSURE AND
OTHER RELIEF

CAROLYN E McMILLIAN
247 City View Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311

Defendant.


NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN;
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on July 29, 2009 in the above styled action, I,
Tim Sanders, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following de-
scribed real property:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH,
RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 1, AND RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 3,273.86
FEET; THENCE NORTH 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 2,215.16 FEET; TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES
33 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,964.01 FEET; TO
THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF NE BELLVILLE ROAD;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET; THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 33 MIN-
UTES 10 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,055.55 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 417.99 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 55 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 908.11 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 90 DE-
GREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 449.64
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 10.08 ACRES,
MORE LESS.

PROPERTY ID NO. 01-2N-10-5802-OBH-018
The sale will be held on August 27, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., to the
highest and best bidder for cash, at the West door of the Madison County
Courthouse in Madison, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida
Statutes.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the owner of the above-described property as of the date of
the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommo-
dation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra
Williams, Court Administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida
32056, telephone:(386)758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.

Dated: July 30, 2009.
Tim Sanders
As Clerk of the Court

BY: /s/ Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

8/5, 8/12


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,

Plaintiff,

vs.
CASE NO. 40-2009-CA- 000230

DONALD RAY CAPPS A/K/A D. RAY CAPPS;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD RAY CAPPS A/K/A
D. RAY CAPPS; DENISE BAILLARGEON; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DENISE BAILLARGEON; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED,
THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; AUCILLA PLANTATIONS PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; MADISON
TIMBERLAND LLC; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR
PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST DEFENDANTSS;

Defendant(s)


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Madi-
son County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Madison County,
Florida, described as:
TRACT 117, AUCILLA PLANTATIONS UNRECORDED, MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

COMMENCE AT AN IRON ROD MARKING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 6 EAST,
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54
MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 2682.65 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREE 06 MINUTES 52 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1348.23 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE 916.79 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 11
DEGREES 54 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE 233.03
FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 12
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 2672.79 FEET TO A POINT
NORTH 87 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE 1796.09 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF AN
80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT
(335TH STREET) THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE OF
518.21 FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN CONTINUE ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 46 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 159.15 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 410.62 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 44
DEGREES 16 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 86.24
FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 13 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 88.84 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 53 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 212.55 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE LEAVING SAID
CENTERLINE, RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1/970.63 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE SOUTH 42 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 899.29 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 68
DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
2052.15 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A

SW 1 Federal Road, Lot 117
Greenville, FL 32331

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash. At the west front
doorsteps of the Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW range Ave, Madison,
Florida 32340 at 11:00 a.m., on August 20, 2009

DATED THIS 28 DAY OF July, 2009.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the Us pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 28 day of July, 2009.

CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:

Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should
contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-8771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.

8/5, 8/12


I*IEr~fn-IcICrImn t~


PLANtOIO-AaFACUARMU C'MMlUtMflAT.

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.


WILLIAM L. SULLIVAN
Post Office Box 729
Madison, Florida 32341

Plaintiff,

vs.

EVANS FENELON
21391 Town Lakes Drive, Apt. 127
Boca Raton, Florida 33486


CASE NO. 2009-169-CA




FORECLOSURE AND
OTHER RELIEF


EDENSWEAR CARRE
75 Tower Hill Street
Lawrence, MA. 01841

Defendants.


NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN;
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on July 29, 2009 in the above styled action, I,
Tim Sanders, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following de-
scribed real property:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH,
RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 1, AND RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,383.66
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BE-
GINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 49 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 465.01 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,996.44
FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF NE HICKORY GROVE
ROAD; THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 08 SECONDS
EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF 31.18 FEET;
THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES
30 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,043.25 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 435.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MIN-
UTES 58 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 945.36 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 10.81 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.

LESS AND EXCEPT: RIGHT OF WAY FOR COUNTY ROAD

PROPERTY APPRAISER'S ID #01-2N-10-5802-OBH-003

The sale will be held on August 27, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., to the
highest and best bidder for cash, at the West door of the Madison County
Courthouse in Madison, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida
Statutes.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the owner of the above-described property as of the date of
the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommo-
dation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra
Williams, Court Administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida
32056, telephone:(386)758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.

Dated: July 30, 2009.

Tim Sanders
As Clerk of the Court

BY: /s/ Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

8/5, 8/12


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,

Plaintiff, CASE NO.: 40-2009-CA-000026
vs. DIVISION:

PAUL KIRKLAND A/K/A PAUL M. KIRKLAND, et al,

Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale dated July 30, 2009 and entered in Case NO. 40-2009-CA-000026
of the Circuit Court Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for MADI-
SON County, Florida wherein CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, is the
Plaintiff and PAUL KIRKLAND A/K/A PAUL M. KIRKLAND; MARIE
KIRKLAND A/K/A MARIE R. KIRKLAND; MADISON COUNTY
FLORIDA; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at EAST DOOR OF THE MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:OOAM, on the 27 day of August 2009, the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judgment:

A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF NORTH-
WEST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 11
EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULAR-
LY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: FROM THE NORTH EST CORNER
OF SAID SECTION 32 RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 18 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1326.97 FEET TO THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
NORTHWEST QUARTER AND NORTHEAST CORNER AND POINT OF
BEGINNING OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED PARCEL, THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST
ALONG FORTY LINE 250.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 29
MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST PARALLEL WITH SECTION LINE
175.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 12 SECONDS
EAST PARALLEL WITH FORTY LINE 250.0 FEET TO SECTION LINE,
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SECTION LINE 175.0 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, CON-
TAINING 1.00 ACRE, MORE OR LESS, SUBJECT TO COUNTY MAIN-
TAINED PUBLIC ROADS AND POWER LINE A/K/A 1336 NELANTANA
STREET, LEE, FL 320590000

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 31, 2009.



Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

8/5, 8/12


The following is a list of unclaimed bond money held by the Madison Coun-
ty Sheriffs Office. Persons having or claiming any interest in said funds or
any portion ofthem shall file their written claims with the Sheriff or Clerk
of Court and shall make sufficient proof to said Sheriff or Clerk of his ow-
nesrship and upon so doing shall be entitled to receive any part of the mon-
ey so claimed. Unless such bond money is claimed on or before the first day
of September, 2009, same shall be declared forfeited and all claims in refer-
ence thereto are forever barred.

DEFENDANT DATE POSTED AMOUNT POSTED

HOPE DIXON 7/11/08 500.00
JERRY MILLER 8/10/08 36.00
JEREMY NUSBICKEL 9/20/08 86.00
JAMES PATRICK KELLY 10/6/03 1000.00
SAM JOHN WILLIAM 12/1/05 390.00
TOTAL 2012.00

8/5, 8/12, 8/19, 8/26






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CORRECTED NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING OF THE
NORTH FLORIDA BROADBAND AUTHORITY
The Notice previously given of the organizational meeting of the North
Florida Broadband Authority to be held on August 7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. at
the Lake County Community College, Building 103, 149 SE College Place,
Lake City, Florida. Should have read Lake CITY Community College,
Building 103, 149 SE College Place, Lake City, Florida.

8/5


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

THOMAS J. BEGGS, IV, CASE NO: 2009-261-CA

Plaintiff,
vs.

ENANTE DELHOMME, individually,

Defendant.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 29, 2009, in the above referenced case
in which THOMAS J. BEGGS, IV is Plaintiff, and ENANTE DELHOMME
is Defendant, I TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the Court, will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash on the front steps of the West door of the Madison
County Courthouse in Madison, Florida, at 11:00 AM (or as soon thereafter
as practicable), on the 27th day of August, 2009, the following described
property set forth in the Default Final Judgment of Foreclosure:

Description: OH 10 Parcel ID: 15-2N-10-5965-010-000
A portion of Section 15, Township 2 North, Range 10 East, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of said
Section 15; thence South 00o09'21" West along the east line of said Section
15 a distance of 1321.10 feet to a concrete monument marking the northeast
corner of the South Half (S ?) of the Northeast Quarter (NE ?) of said Sec-
tion 15; thence North 89o50'02" West along the north line of said S ? of NE
? a distance of 2646.43 feet to a rebar marking the northwest corner of said
S ? of NE ?; thence South 00 15'42" West along the west line of said S ? of
NE ? a distance of 989.02 feet to the northwest corner and POINT OF BE-
GINNING of the following described parcel; thence South 89 44'18" East a
distance of 662.70 feet; thence South 00 15'42" West a distance of 333.86
feet to the centerline of a 60 foot easement; thence North 89 44'18" West
along said centerline a distance of 662.70 feet to said west line of S ? of NE
?; thence North 00 15'42" East along said west line a distance of 333.86 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 5.08 acres, more or less. Density exception: 03-23-B

SUBJECT TO the ARTICLES OF THE ASSOCIATION OF THE OAK
HILLS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION; RESTRICTIONS AND
PROTECTIVE COVENANTS for OAK HILLS (an unrecorded subdivision
in Madison County, Florida) as more particularly described in the Official
Records of Madison County, Florida, including OR Book 705 Page 94, and
OR Book 705 Page 96.
ALSO SUBJECT TO that easement for utilities granted to Tri County Elec-
tric Corporation and recorded in OR Book 708 Pages 199 to 203 of the pub-
lic records of Madison County, Florida.
ALSO SUBJECT TO existing county graded road rights-of-way.
ALSO SUBJECT TO a 60 foot easement for ingress and egress as recorded
in OR Book 673, Page 140 of the public records of Madison County, Flori-
da.

Together with all structures, improvements, fixtures, appliances, and appur-
tenances on said property or used in conjunction therewith.

Description: OH 11 Parcel ID: 15-2N-10-5965-011-000
A portion of Section 15, Township 2 North, Range 10 East, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of said
Section 15; thence South 00o09'21" West along the east line of said Section
15 a distance of 1321.10 feet to a concrete monument marking the northeast
corner of the South Half (S ?) of the Northeast Quarter (NE ?) of said Sec-
tion 15; thence North 89o50'02" West along the north line of said S ? of NE
? a distance of 2646.43 feet to a rebar marking the northwest corner of said
S ? of NE ?; thence South 00 15'42" West along the west line of said S ? of
NE ? and along the west line of the North Half (N ?) of the Southeast Quar-
ter (SE ?) of said Section 15 a distance of 1322.88 feet to the centerline of a
60 foot easement, said point marking the northwest corner and POINT OF
BEGINNING of the following described parcel; thence South 89 44'18"
East along said easement centerline a distance of 662.70 feet; thence South
00 15'42" West a distance of 333.86 feet; thence North 89 44'18" West a
distance of 662.70 feet to said west line of N ? of SE ?; thence North
00 15'42" East along said west line a distance of 333.86 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING.
Containing 5.08 acres, more or less. Density exception: 03-24-B

SUBJECT TO the ARTICLES OF THE ASSOCIATION OF THE OAK
HILLS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION; RESTRICTIONS AND
PROTECTIVE COVENANTS for OAK HILLS (an unrecorded subdivision
in Madison County, Florida) as more particularly described in the Official
Records of Madison County, Florida, including OR Book 705 Page 94, and
OR Book 705 Page 96.
ALSO SUBJECT TO that easement for utilities granted to Tri County Elec-
tric Corporation and recorded in OR Book 708 Pages 199 to 203 of the pub-
lic records of Madison County, Florida.
ALSO SUBJECT TO existing county graded road rights-of-way.
ALSO SUBJECT TO a 60 foot easement for ingress and egress as recorded
in OR Book 673, Page 140 of the public records of Madison County, Flori-
da.

Together with all structures, improvements, fixtures, appliances, and appur-
tenances on said property or used in conjunction therewith.

The property will be sold in separate, serial sales.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE. IF ANY. OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

[Note: In accordance with Rule 2.065, Florida Rules of Judicial Administra-
tion, please be advised as follows: If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida 32056-
1569, Telephone: (386) 758-2163, within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this Notice or pleading. If you are hearing or voice impaired,
please call: 1-800-955-8771.]

WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 29th day of
July, 2009 at Madison, Madison County, Florida.

TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
Scot B. Copeland, Esq.
LAW OFFICES OF SCOT B. COPELAND, P.L.
FBN: 0156681
P.O. Drawer 916
Madison, FL 32341


8/5, 8/12


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Wednesday, August 5, 2009




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