Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00170
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: July 15, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00170
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

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ison C un CinCountyCar





Wed., July 15, 2009 hepitOfMadonoun. ....... eehorco



MaVOdiL.45 NO.47 Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper
VIOL. 45 NYO. 47 L/- Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


Car

Show

And

"King Of

The Grill

Cook-

Off" Set

For

August 15

All part of Fami-
ly Fun Day at
Madison Recre-
ation Center in-
cludes Back to
School Fair
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
If there was ever a
day in Madison County
that could answer the
question, "What can we
do today?" that day
would be August 15 from
noon to 4 p.m. at the
Madison Recreation
Center. The Excellence
Dance Studio in Talla-
hassee are sponsoring
several great attractions,
making organizers of
the Back to School Fair,
which will be held at the
same time, very grateful
for their collaboration.
The First King of
the Grill Cook-Off and
Family Fun Day promis-
es to be a real hit, as does
the Car Show Extrava
Please see Car
Show, Page 4A

NFCC Fail
Class
Inserts
Inside
Today' s
Newspaper


.



Showcase

Your Pet

In The

Paper
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Do our readers have
a special picture with
their favorite animal
they would like to share
with the world? Greene
Publishing, Inc. will be
hosting a pet page in an
upcoming issue of the
Madison County Carrier
and is searching for pic-
tures of local pets with
their owners.
The staff would
love to hear the story of
how readers got their
pets and some special
talents their pet may
have.
If anyone is inter-
ested in sharing photos
of their pet, please call
(850) 973-4141 or email
jacob@greenepublish-
ing.com.
The deadline for
photos is Friday, July
24, at 5 p.m.


Two-Year-Old


Madison Boy Recovering


Nicholas
Wright


By Jacob Bembry
SGi ene Publishing, Inc.
A two-year-old Madi-
s-:n boy was critically
Jinured after being run
i \er on Saturday, July
11, in downtown Madi-

I According to a
Florida Highway Pa-
ti':o report, Cather-
ine Anna Duah, 47,
of Tallahassee, was travel-
ing eastbound on Millinor
Street, approaching Shelby
Avenue, in a 1997 Toyota 4-
'Runner. As Duah was dri-
ving, Nicholas Wright ran
northbound, approaching
Millinor Street.


As Duah entered the in-
tersection, Wright entered di-
rectly into the path of her
Toyota SUV The front of the
SUV collided with Wright.
Wright was transported
to Madison County Memorial
Hospital for treatment. He
was transferred to Tallahas-
see Memorial Hospital,
where he remains at press
time. Friends of the family
said that he is recovering
from the horrific accident.
He is currently in stable con-
dition.
The Madison Police De-
partment responded to the
scene and then called in the
Florida Highway Patrol.


Houck Walks In Front


Of Moving Vehicle


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
According to a
Florida Highway Patrol
report, Allen Richard-
son, age 47 of Monticel-
lo, was driving a 1996
Dodge heading west on
Hwy 90 at approximate-
ly 8:10 p.m., on Saturday,
July 4.
James Houck, age 50
of Greenville, walked
into the path of the vehi-
cle. The front of the ve-


hicle collided with the
left side of Houck.
Houck then landed on
the hood and struck the
right side of the wind-
shield of the vehicle.
Houck came to a final
rest on his back, with
his head toward the
north, in the outside
lane of westbound U.S.
Hwy 90. The dodge came
to final rest facing west
in the inside westbound
lane of US 90.


Houck is stated to
have been drinking alco-
hol.
Houck was treated
on the scene for serious
injuries by Madison
County Rescue and then
transported to Tallahas-
see Memorial Hospital.
Greenville Fire and
the Madison County
Sheriff's Office also as-
sisted with traffic and
treatment of Houck at
the scene.


Illegal Dumping Could


Be Costly To Violators
By Michael Curtis identified and will be notified with a
Greene Publishing, Inc. written warning, advising them of the
Perhaps it's because they didn't "illegal dumping."
know, or perhaps it's because they did- In an effort to work with the citi-
n't care, but dozens of bags of trash zens of the county, and understanding
were dumped at the front fences of sev- that routines are not always conve-
eral waste collection sites over the niently changed, a request for viola-
Fourth of July weekend. tion of County Ordinance 96-73 will
Over the past few months, notices not be pursued this time, however, fu-
have been provided through the ture violators will be subject to cita-
newspaper, via postings and through tion. Violation of the ordinance is
thousands of leaflets that were handed punishable by a fine of up to $1000, but
out announcing the Sunday closure, not less than $300, or imprisonment in
beginning July 5, of all county collec- the Madison County Jail for a period of
tion sites. Handcuffed by a massive re- up to one year or both.
duction in the small county grant from To ensure resident awareness,
the Department of Environmental Pro- leaflets will continue to be passed out
tection, tough decisions were required, at all collection centers and a site
and the Sunday closure was deter- schedule is posted below, as well as on
mined to be a necessary, albeit unde- the county web site. Of course, offi-
sirable, choice. cials realize that the economic chal-
As sites opened on Monday, July 6, lenges facing the county are difficult
there were reports of dozens of bags of on many, further acknowledging that
household waste, along with other cooperation is greatly appreciated.
items, piled in front of the entry gates. Michael Curtis can be reached at
A majority of the violators have been Michael@greenepublishing.com.

Madison County Solid Waste

And Recycling Department

Site Operation Hours Effective July 5, 2009
Cherry Lake Tues. 7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Sun. Closed Wed. Closed
Mon. 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Thurs. 7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Tues. 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Fri. 7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Wedd 7 a m -7 m Sat. 7 a.m.-7 p.m.


Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


Sun.
Mon.


/ L.JJJ. / .J. .
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.

Eridu
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.

Greenville
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.


Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


Lee
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.


Madison Industrial
Sun. Closed
Mon. 7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Tues. Closed
Wed. 7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Please see Schedule, Page 4A


Woman Stabs

Victim With

Butcher Knife
Madison County
Sheriff Ben Stewart re-
ports that on Sunday,
July 12, at 1:38 a.m.,
Madison County
Deputies responded to
671 SW Georgetown
Road Madison concern-
ing a stabbing incident.
Upon arrival,
deputies met with the
victim and secured the Wilhemina Pride
scene for EMS to re-
spond. The investigation discovered that the victim
and co-habitant, Wilhemenia Pride, 45, engaged in a
verbal argument that quickly became physical. The
physical altercation resulted in the victim being
stabbed several times with a butcher knife.
Wilhemenia Pride was arrested and charged
with aggravated battery and domestic violence.
Additional charges are pending.

Car, Two Kilos Of

Cocaine Seized


Photo Submitted
Deputy Jason Whitfield is pictured with his K-9,
Lucky, after a traffic stop led to a huge money and
drug seizure.
Federal drug agents have finally released infor-
mation from a drug bust in February
Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports
that on Friday, February 20, the Madison County
Sheriff's Office personnel initiated a traffic stop on a
2002 Chevrolet Avalanche on I-10 in Madison County
The sole occupant and driver of the vehicle was
Kelvin Laneer Burton, 42, of Ocala. The Madison
Please see Car, Page 4A

Cash, Cocaine Seized
$71,000 in cash and 5.5 kilos of
cocaine seized during traffic stoo.


rnllu su UIIIIItu
Deputies Doug Haskell, left, and Kevin Ander-
son, right, along with Sheriff Ben Stewart are pic-
tured with the $71,000 in cash and 5.5 kilos of
cocaine that were seized on July 1.
Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports
that on Friday, July 1, Madison County Sheriff's Of-
fice personnel initiated a traffic stop on a 1996 Acu-
ra for traveling 80 miles per hour in a 70-mile per
hour posted speed zone on 1-10 in Madison County
Please see Cash, Page 4A


I ~~Indx


Around Madison
Classifieds
Legals
Bridal


2 Sections, 26 Pages
5-7A Obituaries
16A Fun in the Sun
17A Fun Page
11A Money & Finance


5A
8-9A
10A
12A


Wed Thu Fr' Sat 86/72
Wed 92/74 hu 93/74 F 87/73 7 86/72
7/15 -. 7/16 7/17 7/18
Partly cloudy with isolated thunder- A few thunderstorms possible. Afew thunderstorms possible. A few thunderstorms possible.
storms developing during the after- Highs in the low 90s and lows in Highs in the mid 80s and lows in
noon. the mid 70s. the low 70s.





2A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 15, 2009


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Wandering With
The Publisher
Mary Ellen Greene
Colunlilt
J


,z L009


We, the McQuay Family, would like to take
this opportunity to thank everyone for their
love and support during the illness and passing
of our loved one, Darrell McQuay You showed
us kindness and concern in so many ways and
we appreciate it so much.
We would also like to thank Cooks and:
Cooper Funeral Home, Covenant Hospice and
the congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses.
Thank you so much,
The McQuay Family


Letters to the Editor are typed wordfor word, commafor comma, as sent to this newspaper


Why Coaches

Should Not Coach

Their Own Children
We should all be proud of MADISON girls for their
energy and commitment,having just witnessed 5 days
of competitive fastpitch softball I am very
awed,inspired and PROUD. Madison 12 and Under was
undefeated until Sunday night,and as of this moment
continue to be in the top 2 teams, one of which will rep-
resent the State of Florida!
What I am not proud of, and am in fact very angry
and disappointed with is the lack of professional be-
havior by the coaching staff. It is a league policy that no
tobacco product be 'consumed' on the field or in the dug
out, yet one of our coaches blatantly dismisses this rule
as one that does not apply to him! There is no ac-
knowledgement of his use, and despite the OFFICIAL
position -his misbehavior is overlooked. In a similar
fashion there is an unofficial policy of coaches giving
their own children maximum playing time, there is no
system of'checks& balances", no over sight and no easy
way to evaluate the intent of the coaching staff. There
is also no way to protest a coach unfairly placing his
own child in a position for nearly every inning of every
game in a 6 game tournament!
Obviously, its very difficult to measure OBJEC-
TIVELY what player is best suited to play?? Does a fa-
ther really have a chance at being an OBJECTIVE
judge of skill in his own child? Some conditions are
measurable-for example when a 2nd baseman drops
the ball 3 times in one inning and her dad seems inca-
pable of noticing this and putting another, fresh player
in. Or when a catcher overthrows third base, or drops
the pitch ,and again the Dad can't see it,as a former
catcher himself, living vicariously through THIS ex-
perience he can't seem to imagine any other player
contributing,or deserving the same chance as his
child!
These are measurable,concrete facts, errors
should be recorded in the scorebook,yet even these can
be manipulated,like the tobacco products.
All the players seem to notice these abberations,
yet the "Dad-Coaches" have no sence of fairness, and
certainly no desire to inspire good sportsmanship.
They tell themselves they volunteer their time for the
good of all the girls, its just very very noticeable that
their own offspring benefit the very MOST.
In a small town like Madison, there is a cost for
speaking the truth, especially if you are not a long
term resident, the cost of keeping quiet and contuin-
ing to submit to misuse of self-appointed power is ulti-
mately higher.My daughter has many talents and
skills,softball is just one of them ,she has had a better
"lesson" in abuse of power,than in fielding or batting.
That saying"with greatness comes responsibility"
seems to fit awkwardly in Madison, this team collec-
tively had greatness,but the responsibility to explore
and build on this each individual player was unfortu-
nately limited to the daughters of the coaches.
I respectfully request my name be witheld,as ret-
ribution( on my child) has been a problem in the past
when I have voiced concerns.

Reader Pleased With

Small Town Hospital
Madison County Newspaper,
I have recently been a patient at Madison County
Hospital and I would like to make a statement about
my care there.
I have been in larger hospitals, but I did not re-
ceive the same quality of care that I received in the
"small town Hospital."
First of all I want to say that the Nursing Care
was first rate, and the nurses and other members were
caring & kind. The meds were dispensed on time
Another thing that I noticed The rooms were
kept clean, neat and tidy This tribute goes a long way
toward a patients' feeling and well-being.
I hope everyone that has to be in this hospital will
feel as I do about this caring place.
Thank you,
Doris J. Burdette


Parents Express

Concern About

Prison Rash

Outbreak
This is from a crying, heart sick parent. My
only son has been directed to the Madison Correc-
tional Institution. We have a large problem going
on within those walls and no-one seems to want to
take action to fix it.
Six weeks ago we received a call from our son
that he had a rash that was so severe that he was
scratching till blood came up. We immediately sent
him money for the medical department, which is 4
dollars per visit. He went when called and received
an itch cream. This was of no help. Two weeks
went by and we are still hearing about this horrible
rash. He again went to medical and many around
him were painfully inflicted with the same thing.
He was told again by a nurse it is a Florida rash,
and given Benadryl and "itch" cream. As we had
experience with rashes like his before, we could not
help but think this was scabies.
I started inquiring about this with calls to the
nurse, then the administrator of the medical dept.
They were insisting that he was clearing up. About
the fourth week I called the health department of
Madison County since my son tells us this is
spreading so quickly. His bunk mate was ate up
with it also and at least 50 other inmates that he
knew of were suffering from the same "rash." The
itching was so bad that there is blood on their
sheets when they wake in the morning.
Back to my son, after I found out that the health
dept. has no jurisdiction over Dept. of corrections,
I call the DoC health dept. and ask to speak to the
highest up so as what I had to say needed to be ad-
dressed. I will not give names which I have unless
needed. So the first thing I was told by the woman
was that my son was very unhygienic. This she read
from Tallahassee over a computer. He has NEVER
been so. She then tells me that my son had not been
to medical at all. I told her that she was mistaken
and that she mistaken and that he another appt. to-
day and then reluctantly she agreed, funny thing
was each time an inmate goes to medical they have
to pay 4 dollars and no money was taken from my
son. They knew he had an advocate on the outside
checking on these matters. We had a screaming
match about my son's cleanliness. They were so
rude and unprofessional it was a shock to me.
Now going past the six week check point my son
is still miserable and his body is filled with sores.
But by now the guards are wearing gloves at all
times. I know their budget will be badly hurt to dis-
infect the mattresses and sterilize the clothes and
give the proper meds for what ever this condition is.
But these are prisoners who are paying for their
crimes with there lives. There is no need in putting
them thru this incredibly terrible torture.
There is no a/c in this prison so the heat will
only spread this like wildfire. I went to the press
and hoping that they could at least call my con-
cerns to the prison but they are denied access to the
prison itself. Two hours after the health dept called
me and the newspaper called, I received a call from
the prison nurse and was told my son is much bet-
ter.
From his call today he is so frustrated and mis-
erable and he says that he cannot take much more.
My concerns are with all the men of this prison but
as for my son, my husband and I feel frustrated,
helpless and hurt.
Thanks for the listening ear and pray for the
Dept of Corrections system to open their ears and
hearts for these men are not animals which and de-
serve to be treated with much more compassion.
This letter is for my son and all the other inmates
who have no loved ones to speak up for them.
Thanks for listening,
Mom and Dad


QfST W 'S Online Poll


Where did you celebrate July 4th?


Out of County

At home

Greenville

Madison

Did not celebrate

Out of State

Out of Country
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

This week's question: What is your preferred method of seeing new movies?

To view and participate in our weekly online poll, visit www.greenepublishing.com.


I ,*





Wednesday, July 15, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 3A


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Brother's Heart

Surgery
I would like to thank every one for their prayers
and concern for my brother, Danny who underwent
triple bypass surgery last week in Tallahassee. He
had a much rougher time in surgery than was antic-
ipated, but he is doing somewhat better now. Please
continue to remember him in his recovery and re-
member my whole family as we deal with another
crisis. Through Jesus Christ, we will be able to not
only come through it, but be victorious!
Happy birthday wishes are extended to Jimmy
Phillips and Ethan Phillips, who celebrate their
birthdays on Wednesday, July 15. Brenda Mc-
Cormick will celebrate her birthday on Thursday,
July 16. Carol Sue Brooks will celebrate her birth-
day on Sunday, July 19. I hope that all of you have
very happy birthdays.
That's all the news for this week. Have a great
week and a beautiful forever. May God bless each
and every one of you.





BB and T Company vs. Kenneth Burkhart, et al
- mortgage foreclosure
Wells Fargo Bank vs. James Tillman- mortgage
foreclosure
Devona Sewell vs. Anthony Sewell- domestic in-
junction
Frankie L. Turner vs. Charlie C. Carter- domes-
tic injunction
Madison Estates Inc vs. Michael C. Lyle- mort-
gage foreclosure
Woodland III Lta vs. Yolanda Medrano- mort-
gage foreclosure
Woodland III Lta vs. Narindra Arjoon- mort-
gage foreclosure
Woodland III Lta vs. Roopchan Arjoon-mort-
gage foreclosure


DAMAGE PREVENTION Is

Everyone's Responsibility



The City of Madison requests that you
please call Sunshine at 1-800-432-4770
at least 48 hours before you dig, but not
more than 5 days. Have information
ready when calling: company name/ad-
dress, contact person, phone number,
location of dig site, extent and type of
work, and date/start time of excavation.
Wait 48 hours for underground facilities
to be marked. Respect and protect the
facility operator's marks. Dig with care!
Always hand dig when within two feet on
either side of any marked lines.




Public Service Announcement
From the City of Madison

NATURAL GAS


A Gas leak could be dangerous but gas itself
has no odor. So, for your safety, a smell like
rotten eggs is added. If you smell such an
odor:

1. Don't use the telephone
2. Don't turn lights on or off, or use anything
electrical.
3. Go outside right away.
4. Ask a neighbor to call the Gas company.
5. Don't go back into the house until the gas
company says it's safe.


PLEASE KEEP GAS SAFE.


(850) 973-5081 City Hall Working Hours
(850) 973-5075 Fire Department After Hours


When it comes to re-
sponsibility for the 16
year long Vietnam War,
there are plenty who
share the blame. At the
forefront would be Lyn-
don Johnson, the presi-
dent from 1963-69, who
directed the terrible
strategy and the buildup
of American involve-
ment. Right behind LBJ
would stand Robert S.
McNamara, the Secre-
tary of Defense first for
John Kennedy and then
Johnson. Last week,
Bob McNamara passed
away at the age of 93.
McNamara came to
the Kennedy Adminis-
tration right after the
1960 election from Ford
Motor Company where
he had just ascended to
the presidency at the age
of 45. He brought a bril-
liant intellect and a sta-
tistician's mind to the
Pentagon. To say that he
ruffled the feathers of
the Pentagon brass from
the start would be an un-
derstatement.
In October 1962, Mc-
Namara helped guide
the Kennedy Adminis-
tration through the
Cuban Missile Crisis.
As a result, he gained
confidence in a theory
known as Gradual Re-
sponse where you re-
spond to an adversary in
kind while seeking an
end to hostilities by ne-
gotiated settlement. The
young SECDEF brought
this theory and his statis-
tical mind to America's
growing conflict in
Southeast Asia. The the-
ory and tool fit hand-in-
glove.
In November 1963, a
coup in South Vietnam
deposed and murdered
Ngo Dinh Diem, the na-
tion's leader. Within
weeks, John E Kennedy
was assassinated and the
presidency fell to Lyndon
Johnson. LBJ kept the
Kennedy team intact in-
cluding Bob McNamara.
Johnson formed a firm
bond with his Defense
Secretary
As the war escalated
in 1964 and early '65, Mc-
Namara authorized a
"gradual response" to
each provocation. Of
course, this left the ini-


tiative with the North
Vietnamese which was
the most serious flaw in
the theory In warfare,
you never want to put
your enemy in the dri-
ver's seat. McNamara's
theory never took into
account the resolve of
the North Vietnamese
which over time far ex-
ceeded that of our na-
tion.
As America's in-
volvement under McNa-
mara's hand took wing,
he faced growing opposi-
tion among the military
department chiefs.
Carefully, McNamara re-
placed them with service
chiefs who would do his
bidding. By early 1965,
the SECDEF had a team
that complied with his
every wish.
In March 1965, Mc-
Namara initiated an air
campaign against North
Vietnam code named
Rolling Thunder. The
design was to implement
gradual response.
Rolling Thunder would
answer every attack in
the South with an air at-
tack in the North. To en-
sure that the air
planners did not go over-
board, the president and
SECDEF picked each tar-
get to be attacked at their
infamous Tuesday
Lunches in the White
House.
For three years,
Rolling Thunder plodded
along and the North Viet-
namese improved their
air defense network to
the point that they rou-
tinely blasted Air Force
and Navy fighters from
the sky. We achieved
very little because the
targeting was so poor
and did little to effect the
battle in South Vietnam.
As 6-year POW Ron Bliss
said, "we flew mission af-
ter mission with not just
one hand but both hands
tied behind our back."
All the while, LBJ


held out the olive branch
trying to lure the North
Vietnamese to the bar-
gaining table. Why
should they? Ho Chi
Minh knew he was in the
driver's seat. He could
fight at this pace. He
knew that America did
not have the resolve to
take losses and sustain a
protracted war. Time
was on his side.
Vietnam drove LBJ
from the White House.
In March of 1965, he
made the decision to not
run for reelection and
suspended Rolling Thun-
der. By that time, a disil-
lusioned Bob McNamara
had departed the Penta-
gon for Chairmanship of
the World Bank.
McNamara had used
"body count" as a mea-
sure of success. We
killed a lot of Viet Cong
and North Vietnamese
over 16 years, many
more than the 58 thou-
sand American service-
men who died, but our
enemies were much
more willing to sacrifice
lives than we were. In
the process, a lot of
South Vietnamese were
caught in the crossfire.
The average peasant
farmer didn't really care
which side won as long
as he could successfully
raise a crop to feed his
family.
Robert McNamara
never focused on the po-
litical factor of warfare.
After Diem's assassina-
tion, the government of
South Vietnam changed
hands a dozen times.
There was never a
concerted effort for the
people to either support
the revolving govern-
ment or their war. It took
far too long for McNama-
ra to understand this.
As a result, a lot of
young people my age lost
their lives and the social
fabric of our nation was
torn apart.


Did yoa Know...

The first known transfusion

of blood was performed as ear-

ly as 1667, when Jean-Baptiste,

transfused two pints of blood

from a sheep to a young man.


McNamara


perida Press Associ4

208
Award Winning Newspaper






Chosen one of Florida's Three Outstanding Newspaprs
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Publisher
Emerald Greene
Editor
Jacob Bembry
Production Manager
Heather Bowen
Staff Writers
Michael Curtis and
Bryant Thigpen
Graphic Designers
Stephen Bochia and
Amber Acree
Advertising
Sales Represenatives
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy McKinney,
Jeanette Dunn
and Chelsea Bouley
Classified and Legal Ads
Laura Little
Deadline for classified is
Monday at 3 p.m.
Deadline for Legal Advertisement
is Monday at 5 p.m.
There will be a $3 charge
for Affidavits.
Circulation Department
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
Subscription Rates
In-County $35 *
Out-of-County $45
(State & local taxes included)

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper
[USPS 324 800] designed
for the express reading
pleasure of the people of its
circulation area, be they
past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing Inc.,
1695 South SR 53, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post
Office in Madison, FL
32340.
POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to MADI-
SON COUNTY CARRI-
ER, P.O. Drawer 772,
Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper re-
serves the right to reject any
advertisement, news matter,
or subscriptions that, in the
opinion of the manage-
ment, will not be for the
best interest of the county
and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investi-
gate any advertisement sub-
mitted.
All photos given to
Greene Publishing Inc. for
publication in this newspa
per must be picked up no
later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off.
Greene Publishing, Inc. will
not be responsible for pho-
tos beyond said deadline.





4A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 15, 2009


LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


Madison County

CRIME BEAT
ALL SUSPECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED
INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY IN A
COURT OF LAW


Woman Arrested

For DUI
Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports
that on Saturday, July 11, at 9 p.m., a citizen alerted
the Madison County Sheriff's Office of a possible
driving under the influence vehicle.
A Madison County Deputy observed a purple
two-door 1995 Pontiac traveling south on State Road
53. The deputy made several observations of erratic
maneuvers and stopped the vehicle. The driver of
the vehicle was Tina Smith, 48.
The traffic stop resulted in Smith being arrested
and charged with driving under the influence.

Whatever YoI Need,

Greene Publishing, Inc.

Classifieds a An


GREENE s
Publishing, Inc. --
1695 S. SR 53 Madison 973-4141


The Florida Department of Health's (DOH) Tampa
Unlicensed Activity (ULA) Unit announced that their
joint investigation with Hillsborough County Sheriff's
Office has led to the arrest of Brenda Grey Miller,
A.K.A. Brenda Joyce Miller, DOB: 12/16/51, on July 2,
for the alleged unlicensed practice of a health care
profession, unlicensed practice of nursing, and crimi-
nal use of personal identification information, all of
which are 3rd degree felonies and punishable by up to
five years in prison.
Brenda Grey Miller, presented a forged copy of a
nursing license bearing her name with the license
number of a legitimate registered nurse with a simi-
lar name. The fraud went undetected for approximate-
ly 18 months until a routine check of licenses by the
establishment found the license number was delin-
quent. Brenda Grey Miller has never been licensed as
a registered nurse by the Florida Department of
Health.
After being booked into the Hillsborough County
Jail, Miller was released on $6,000.00 bond.
DOH has several resources to combat unlicensed
activity:
Consumers are encouraged to use DOH's Web site
www.flhealthsource.com where they can conveniently
view the license information of their health care prac-
titioner.
Complaints may be filed anonymously by com-
pleting and mailing the complaint form on the DOH
Web site or calling 1-877-HALT-ULA (1-888-419-3456) to
have a form mailed to you.
The Florida Department of Health's (DOH) unli-

The

SFish Net
Restaurant
\Summer Seafood Specials
All You Can Eat
Alaskan White Fish

S1195
Available every night until Labor Day
(onie s with salod bar und all the Iririmnings
S'Other Spe ols .Mailable "


THURSDAY & FRIDAY 5 00PM-9 30PM
SATURDAY 4 30PM-9 30PM
l9 Sportsman Cove Rd. LAKE PARK. GEORGIA
229-559-5410
Soll. I F.r'A r t ( i,,r ,


/ X.,/S


Schedule

cont from Page 1A


Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.


7 a.m.
7 a.m.
7 a.m.


-7 p.m.
-7 p.m.
-7 p.m.


Midway
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.

Pinetta
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.

Ravenswood
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.

Rocky Ford Road
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.

Sirmans
Closed
1 p.m.-7 p.m.
Closed
1 p.m.-7 p.m.
1 p.m.-7 p.m.
1 p.m.-7 p.m.
9 a.m.-3 p.m.


Madison


Central
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Closed
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 a.m.-7 p.m.


censed activity program protects Florida residents
and visitors from the potentially serious and danger-
ous consequences of receiving medical and health
care services from an unlicensed person. The Divi-
sion of Medical Quality Assurance (MQA) investi-
gates and refers for prosecution all unlicensed health
care activity complaints and allegations. The unli-
censed activity unit works in conjunction with law en-
forcement and the state attorney's offices to prosecute
individuals practicing without a license. In many in-
stances, unlicensed activity is a felony level criminal
offense. More importantly, receiving health care from
unlicensed people is dangerous and could result in fur-
ther injury, disease or even death.
The mission of DOH and MQA is to promote, pro-
tect and improve the health of all people in Florida.
Working in conjunction with 22 boards and six councils,
MQA regulates seven types of facilities and 200-plus li-
cense types in more than 40 healthcare professions. MQA
evaluates the credentials of all applicants for licensure,
issues licenses, analyzes and investigates complaints,
inspects facilities, assists in prosecuting practice act vio-
lations, combats unlicensed activity and provides cre-
dential and discipline history about licensees to the
public. Visit http://wwwflhealthsource.com for addi-
tional information about MQA.


Extravaganza

cont from Page 1A
ganza that will also be showcased. Each would be en-
tertaining on its own, so the combination should
draw a great crowd. Call (850) 212-5983 for more in-
formation and vendor applications, or visit them on-
line at www.excellencedancestudioinc.org.
The Back to School Fair will also be conducted
at the center that day, which features a variety of
free school supplies for students who may need
them. It will also include timely health care infor-
mation from local agencies that will have represen-
tatives on hand to answer questions.
Due to reduced budgeting at the school district,
leadership from the Madison County Health Depart-
ment and the Healthy Start Coalition had been seek-
ing donations and sponsors to fill the gap and fund
this important resource for many students. The col-
laboration should prove to be the much-needed
boost organizers were seeking.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Car

cont from Page 1A
County Drug Task Force assisted with the traffic
stop. After the traffic infraction was completed, a
consensual search was conducted and two kilos of
cocaine were located in a concealed area of the ve-
hicle.
The driver was arrested and transported to the
Madison county jail pending a continued investiga-
tion. The cocaine and vehicle were seized as evi-
dence and forfeiture proceedings initiated. The
Madison County Sheriff's Office Drug Task Force
assisted with the case.


Cash

cont from Page 1A
The sole occupant and driver of the vehicle was
Carlos Peace of Tallahassee. After completing the
traffic infraction, a consensual search was conduct-
ed on the vehicle.
The search discovered a concealed compart-
ment that contained approximately 5.5 kilos of co-
caine and approximately $71,000.00 in US currency
The driver was arrested and transported to the
Madison County Jail. The cocaine and U.S. currency
was seized as evidence and forfeiture proceedings
initiated. The Madison County Sheriff's Office Drug
Task Force assisted with the case.


Complete Body Repair Frame Repair







615 NE Colin Kelly Highway
Madison, FL 32340


Under New Ownership

Tony & Indy Kelley



Day Phone: 850-973-6280
Fax: 850-973-3794


TIUCELCAD SALE
Feed, Fertilizer, Post,


Wire and LPG


SOUTHERN STATES
Brands You Trust.
People Who Know.


12% Multi Stock Sweet Feed 50#
12% Stocker Pellets 50#
SS 21% Dog Food 40#
Shelled Corn 50#


$6.95
$6.50
$12.99
$7.25


RAINBOW FERTILIZER


5-10-15 RB 50#
10-10-10 SRB 50#
16-4-8 SRB 50#


$12.95
$12.75
$12.95


SATURDAY
FILL SPECIAL
Every Saturday
Morning Until
Labor Day Weekend
Get Your 20#
Cylinder Filled
For Only
$8.95


2.5" to 3" x
3" to 3.5" x
3.5" to 4" x
5" to 6" x 8
6" to 7" x 8
1" x 6" x 1
6.5' Steel F


A
GReaT SOUTHeRn
WOOD PReSe6vinG,
;6.5' $2.75
6.5' $3.25
:6.5' $3.90
$8.50
$13.50
6' RT Lumber $ 7.65
Fence Post $4.89


FENCE WIRE
1047 Red Brand 12.5 GA
5" Gaucho Barbwire
1047 Hi Ten 14.5 GA
1348-2 12.5 GA No Climb
Horse Wire 200 Ft. Roll


$164.95
$46.95
$129.95

$275.00


FARMERS COOPERATIVE, INC
748 SW Horry Ave. Madison, FL 32340 850-973-2269
Call For Delivery Details. Sales Tax Not Included. While Supplies Last. Prices Good Until 8-1-2009


Florida Department Of Health Joint

Investigation Leads To Arrest In Tampa





Wednesday, July 15, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 5A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Frteope cae aviww renulsnco


July 15-17
The Salvation Army
Youth V-Team Shin-
ing God's Light will
host Crocodile Dock, a
Vacation Bible School,
July 15-17, 5:30 p.m. to
8:15 p.m. A picnic supper
will begin the evening at
Greenville Haffye Hayes
park with Bible school
activities at the Senior
Citizen Center for ages 5
to 95 following. Pre-reg-
ister with George or
Gale Blevins at (850) 948-
2119.
July 17
Excellence Dance
Studio Inc. presents a
youth essay challenge.
Pick up a pen during
your summer break and
earn up to $100 or studio
time. The essay deadline
is July 17. For more in-
formation, call (850) 322-
7673.
July 18
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host the "Dog Days
of Summer" on Satur-
day, July 18, from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. This all-day
event will present the
following demonstra-
tions: Lake City Police
Department K-9 Unit,
Columbia County Sher-
iffs Office K-9 Unit and
Florida Service Dogs
INC. The Lake City Ani-
mal Shelter will host a
Parade of Paws and pro-
vide hamburgers and
hotdogs as a fund-raiser.
Visitors can enjoy activi-
ties such as a local vet-
erinarian, the Florida
K-9 Association, pet pho-
tos and a pet spa. Visi-
tors are encouraged to
bring their dogs to the
park for a fun-filled day
of activities. Pets must
be leashed or under the
physical control of the
owner at all times; leash-
es may not exceed six
feet. This event is free
with regular park ad-
mission of $5 per vehicle
with up to eight persons.
For more information,
visit www.floridastate
parks.org/stephenfoster.
July 20-23
Camp Weed Summer
Camp for Children with
Parents) in Prison will
take place July 20-23.
Visit www.campweed.net
for a brochure, registra-
tion and scholarship
forms. Join in the Fun in
the Sonshine at our 85th




91. F


consecutive summer
camp. A ministry of the
Episcopal Diocese of
Florida for children and
young people of any
(or no) denomination.
Scholarships available
for qualified applicants.
For information, please
call 888-763-2602, Ext. 16.
July 25
The Evil Twin
Farms 3 D Buckle Se-
ries barrel race will be
held July 25. $100 added
money. Exhibitions start
at 9 a.m. and the show
starts at 10 a.m. The en-
try fee is $25; the exhibi-
tion fee is $3. The
remaining races in the
series will be held Aug.
22, Sept. 19, Oct. 24, Nov.
22 and Dec. 5. For more
information, please visit
www.eviltwinfarms.net/
etfbuckleseries.cfm.
July 25
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host a Summer
Herb workshop on Sat-
urday, July 25. Partici-
pants will learn how to
grow and propagate
warm weather herbs.
The second half of the
workshop will cover
cooking with herbs. Par-
ticipants will learn how
to make herb salts from
marinades. Bring your
pruners and take home
some cuttings. This is a
hands-on workshop and
fees are $5 per workshop,
including park admis-
sion. For additional in-
formation or to register
for the workshops,
please call (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephen
fosterCSO.org.
July 26-August 1
Camp Weed Summer
Camp for Rising 5th and
6th graders will take
place July 26-Aug. 1. Vis-
it www.campweed.net for
a brochure, registration
and scholarship forms.
Join in the Fun in the
Sonshine at our 85th
consecutive summer
camp. A ministry of the
Episcopal Diocese of
Florida for children and
young people of any
(or no) denomination.
For more information,
please call 888-763-2602,
Ext. 16.
July 31-August 2
The Mosley/Hodge
Family Reunion II will
be held in Madison, July
31-Aug. 2, at the United
Methodist Church recre-
ation center. All descen-
dants and relatives of
Tom Mosley and Rosa
Hodge (of West Farm)
are invited to this event.


Contact John E. Turner
(301) 808-2693 for more
information.
August 2-8
Camp Weed Sum-
mer Camp for Rising
7th, 8th and 9th graders
will take place Aug. 2-8.
Visit www.campweed
.net for a brochure, reg-
istration and scholar-
ship forms. Join in the
Fun in the Sonshine at
our 85th consecutive
summer camp. A min-
istry of the Episcopal
Diocese of Florida for
children and young peo-
ple of any (or no) de-
nomination. For more
information, call 888-
763-2602, Ext. 16.
August 15
Excellence Dance
Studio Inc. presents
King of the Grill show-
down and Art on Wheel
Exhibition, Aug. 15,
noon-4 p.m., Madison
County Recreation Cen-
ter, Hwy 360A. For more
information, call (850)
322-7673.
August 29
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host a Container
Gardening Workshop on
Saturday, Aug. 29. Partic-
ipants will learn how to
avoid many of the pests
and diseases associated
with summertime gar-
dening in containers
and explore warm
weather flower and veg-
etable gardening. The
class will cover proper
grouping of plants,
choosing the right con-
tainer, selecting the
right plants to grow for
each season and touch
on annuals, perennials
and ferns. Bring your
pruners and take home
some cuttings. This is a
hands-on workshop and
fees are $5 per workshop,
including park admis-
sion. For additional in-
formation or to register
for the workshops,
please call (386) 397-1920
or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.o
rg.
Thursday
Redemptive Recov-
ery Classes/Support
Group is held every
Thursday in the old
First Baptist Church
sanctuary, and is for ad-
dicts and the family of
addicts who are seeking
to recover and need help.
The class is free, and
starts at 7 p.m. For more
information, please call
(850) 464-9022.
Thursdays-Mondays
The Florida DEP's


Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host an ongoing
wood carving workshop
on Thursday through
Monday, from noon un-
til 4 p.m. Participants
can create figure carv-
ings, wood spirits,
spoons, bowls, relief
carvings and more dur-
ing this four-hour class.
Workshop fees are $15
per session and include
park admission. For ad-
ditional information or
to register for the work-
shops, please call (386)
397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.o
rg.
Each Weekday Except
Tuesday
The Senior Citizens
Center offers computer
classes to seniors 60 and
older each weekday ex-
cept Tuesday For more
information or to sign
up, please call (850) 973-
4241. A regular instruc-
tor is needed to teach
these classes. Interested
individuals should ask
to speak with Sharon
concerning the opening
at the number above.
Every
Tuesday-Saturday
The Diamonds in
the Ruff Adoption Pro-
gram at the Suwannee
Valley Humane Society
is open every Tuesday
through Saturday from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is lo-
cated on 1156 SE Bisbee
Loop, Madison, FL 32340.
For more information,
or directions, call (866)
236-7812 or (850) 971-9904.
First Saturday of
Each Month
Everyone is invited
to gospel (open mic)
sings at Lee Worship


Center the first Saturday
night of each month, be-
ginning at 7 p.m. The
church is located at 397
Magnolia Dr. in Lee.
Everyone is asked to
bring a dish for the pot
luck supper. There will
be great musicians, so
those who can play an
instrument are welcome
to come and join in.
Bring a friend with you.
For more information,
call Allen McCormick at
(850) 673-9481.
Second and Fourth
Saturday of Each
Month
The Madison
Church of God hosts a
free soup kitchen the
second and fourth Satur-
day of each month at the
Greenville Senior Citi-
zens Center. Lunch is
served from noon to 1
p.m.
Third Tuesday of
Each Month
The Greater
Greenville Area Dia-
betes Support Group is a
free educational service
and support for diabetes
and those wanting to pre-
vent diabetes. The group
meets the third Tuesday
of each month at the
Greenville Public Li-
brary Conference Room
at 312 SW Church St.,
Greenville, 11-11:30 a.m.
Everyone is welcome!
Every Wednesday and
Friday
The Senior Citizens
Center's sewing club for
seniors 60 and older
meets every Wednesday
and Friday For more in-
formation or to sign up,
please call (850) 973-4241.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison County


Health Education Club is
holding a free education-
al service and support
group for people interest-
ed in preventing or con-
trolling diabetes, high
blood pressure, elevated
cholesterol levels, obesi-
ty and other chronic
health conditions. The
club meets the third
Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
12:15-12:45 p.m. Everyone
is welcome to bring their
own lunch.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison County
Diabetes Support Group
is a free educational ser-
vice and support group
for diabetes and those
wanting to prevent dia-
betes. The group meets
the third Wednesday of
each month at the Madi-
son Public Library Con-
ference Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
11:45 a.m.-12:10 p.m.
Everyone is welcome is
bring their own lunch.
For details, contact Mar-
cia Kazmierski at (386)
752-2461 or Lorraine
Miller at (386) 752-6439.
Fourth Wednesday of
Each Month
An informational
meeting for those in-
jured and needing help
returning to work will
be held the fourth
Wednesday of each
month from 12-3 p.m. at
the Madison County Ex-
tension Office located at
184 College Loop, Madi-
son. The meeting is free
and open to the public.
For more information,
please call (850) 245-3489.


- I Serving Madison,

U:R U Jefferson, Taylor &

ILafayette Counties


Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King Agent Glen King Agent


233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071


Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St.* Monticello (850) 997-2213


Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371


Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399


24/7 C a Service: 1-866-275-732

"Helpig Yu*s1ha e o es.


1


I


L





6A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 15, 2009


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Chamber Director

Addresses Lions Club


With Special Thanks

To Lee Ferdon


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Ted Ensminger, di-
rector of the Madison
County Chamber of
Commerce and Tourism,
addressed the Madison
Lions Club Tuesday, July
7, at noon at Shelby's
Restaurant. Ensminger
gave a report on some of
the exciting, upcoming
events sponsored by the
Madison County Cham-
ber of Commerce, in-
cluding the upcoming
Fifth Saturday Farmers
and Friends Festival,
scheduled for August 29


ority for the chamber. In
coordination with the
Tourism Development
Council, he intends to
look for new and cre-
ative ways to attract
business to the county,
as he seeks new business
resources to facilitate in-
ternal growth.
Regarding club busi-
ness, President Lee M.
FerDon reported that
three county residents
have been assisted with
their vision and eyeglass
needs so far this year. Vi-
sion health remains the
focus (no pun intended)


Photo Submitted
Ted Ensminger, the Madison County Chamber of
Commerce and Tourism Director, addressed the
Madison Lions Club on July 7 at Shelby's Restaurant.


at Four Freedoms Park.
Over the past year,
Ensminger has intro-
duced and/or collaborat-
ed on numerous
community events,
which remains a top pri-


of Lions Club world-
wide, and in a recent
survey; the Madison Li-
ons Club indicated their
interest to develop more
programs to assist peo-
ple with their vision


Photo submitted
Madison Lions Club
President Lee M. FerDon
has been selected "Zone
Chairman" for Lions
Club of North Florida.
needs locally.
The motto of the Li-
ons Club International
is "We Serve," which lo-
cal Lions want to empha-
size as well, and are
always looking for civic
partners sharing that
common goal. For in-
stance, Lions Club col-
lects used eyeglasses to
be sent overseas to help
people with vision prob-
lems in developing coun-
tries. U.S. law prohibits
reusing eyeglasses here
in the states. Anyone
wishing to contribute
eyeglasses may do so at
Shelby's Restaurant any
day of the week.
The Madison Lions
Club is also pleased to
announce that FerDon
has been selected as
"Zone Chairman"
for Lions Clubs of North
Florida for the next
year. As a member of the
Florida Annual Confer-
ence of the United
Methodist Church, and
as former pastor of
Madison First United
Methodist Church, Fer-
Don has established an
exceptional reputation
for community service
that he brings to the as-
signment.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
michael@greenepublishi
ng.com.


Mt. Zion AME To


Host Canned


Food Drive


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing,
Inc.
Mt. Zion AME
Church in Madison
has stepped up to the
plate to help the Se-
nior Citizens Council
in Madison County
with a canned food
drive. Recently, the
Senior Center has ex-
perienced a notable


drop in supplies, and
has become dependent
upon community ef-
forts to help the local
seniors.
The canned
food drive sponsored
by Mt. Zion begins ef-
fective immediately.
Donations may be
dropped off at the
church or at the Senior
Citizens Center. The


Your locd Paper is lots o Offer:
Community Events. Sports
Local News Classifieds

Call 973-4141 to start our siibsriptil tioay!


church is located at
508 West Dade Street
in Madison.
Others wishing
to contribute may do
so by calling Sharon
Underhill at the Senior
Center at (850) 973-
4241.


A Pilot Cost-Share Program for
Treatment of Cogongrass
2009 Sign-up Period: June 15 July 31
Apply for the cost-share assistance with spraying herbicide to control
this non-native grass, called one of the world's worst weeds.
SIncrease land management options
SProtect your property value
Decrease fire hazard
For guidelines and application materials, contact your local Florida
Division of Forestry office or visit: www.fl-dof.com
A message from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of Forestry. Charles
H. Bronson, Commissioner.Funding supplied by the USDA Forest Service, an equal opportunity provider.


SEL TCOTPLS 035DASA YAR
A LL I'SHELFAICES ARE-OUR Q AL DALSC O OUAT CHECKOU I T, JUST10%pIS ADDE TCOEROU
OPRAIN XPNSS.SOPWIH SFO TE OES EER AYGRCEYAN MATP ICE IH EKYPCALTO


ll Addmmll


I


BMX Stunt Show


Seeking Sponsors

Health advocates looking to bring show to
August 29 Farmers and Friends Festival
By Michael Curtis about making right choices. Local
Greene Publishing, Inc. planners are searching for partners
Organiz- -, to offer the "Ultimate Show" pack-
ers are age, which is stated as "ideal for
searching for special events such as fairs, carni-
sponsors to vals and festivals."
showcase This show involves
a very both a quarter pipe
unique ramp designed for
perfo r- BIG AIR and a box
man c e jump ramp. This
known as show is performed
"The Freestyle with at least three riders and
Connection" in allows the riders more freedom to
Madison. Perfect demonstrate all of their tricks.
for raising To discuss sponsorship
awareness and and event details, contact Pre-
audiences at ston Mathews at (850) 728-5479.
community For more information on The
events, these Freestyle Connection, visit their
BXM stunt rid- Web site located at
ers combine a www.thefreestyleconnection.com.
thrilling show Michael Curtis can be reached at
with sharp mes- michael@greenepublishing.com.
sages regarding the
importance of a tobac-
co and drug-free
lifestyle, among other
uplifting themes.
The show features
professional perform-
ers in high action mo-
ments that attract
large audiences, mak-
ing it a big win for
sponsors and the event, -- -
and especially the kids. -- -'-
The proposed perfor-
mance is currently tar-
geting August 29 as
part of the Fifth Satur-
day, Farmers and
Friends Festival sched-
uled for Four Freedoms
Park.
BMX stunt and rid-
ing competitions have
grown greatly in popu-
larity since being
showcased in the X-
Games over a decade
ago. The Freestyle Con-
nection features shows
ranging in size from lo-
cal store grand open-
ings to half-time shows
in football stadiums.
Highlights include:
Top notch BMX
professionals ready to
perform
Professional PA
system 386-719-0421
Music appropri-
ate for all ages
SBackflips! (with Jimmy Lyons -
all ramp shows) Lake City, Florida '
All shows also in- jlyons57@gmail.com
clude bike safety and a lyons57@gmai.com
motivational message





Wednesday, July 15, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 7A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Locals Attend

Statewide


Photo Submitted
Capital City Bank in Madison made a generous contribution to the Take Stock
In Children Program, and presented a check in the amount of $1,000. Pictured left
to right are: Bill Gunnels, President Capital City Bank in Madison; Faye Browning
of the Foundation and Madison Market Leader; and Darlene Hagan.

Capital City Bank Awards

Grant to Take Stock In

Children Program


The Capital City Bank Group
(CCBG) Foundation awarded a grant to
the Madison County Foundation for Ex-
cellence in Education, Inc. The grant
will be used for the Take Stock in Chil-
dren Scholarship Program, which cur-
rently serves 65 students in the grade
4-12 program for low-income families in
Madison County With this grant, a Stu-
dent Advocate will meet regularly with
students to provide friendship and en-
couragement and when necessary,
arrange for intervention strategies. The
funds will cover mentor training costs
and student meeting time.
"We believe it is important to sup-
port organizations that provide essen-
tial services to the residents of Bill
Gunnels, Madison County president.
"Community involvement is a hall-
mark of Capital City Bank and by do-
nating valuable funds for special
projects and needs, the CCBG Founda-
tion can help build stronger communi-
ties."


The CCBG Foundation is a non-
profit organization created in 1983 by
Capital City Bank Group that provides
grants to non-profit, charitable organi-
zations and institutions exempt under
Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Rev-
enue Code. The mission of the CCBG
Foundation is to invest in initiatives
that benefit local communities. A ma-
jority of the funds are distributed to
specific areas of focus, including:
arts/culture, children/youth services,
economic/community development, ed-
ucation, health/sciences and human
services.
The CCBG Foundation awards
grants twice annually to charitable or-
ganizations that enhance the lives of
the citizens within the local communi-
ties served by Capital City Bank. If you
would like to learn more about the Cap-
ital City Bank Group Foundation,
please stop by the Capital City Bank of-
fice located 603 W Base Street and ask
your banker for an application.


The State Emergency
Operations Center was
the scene for an emer-
gency communications
seminar and training
event on Saturday, June
20th. Amateur radio op-
erators (Ham Operators)
from all sixty-seven coun-
ties were invited to Talla-
hassee for this important
meeting. John Fleming of
the Florida Division of
Emergency Management
places communications
as the second highest pri-
ority in emergency re-
sponse.
"When disasters hap-
pen and the communica-
tions infrastructure is
destroyed or overloaded,
Ham Operators can get
messages through," said
Patrick Lightcap, Emer-
gency Coordinator for
Amateur Radio Emer-


agency Service
son County
and practice f
uations so
ready to hel
Madison C
wherever oui
reach," Lightc
The semi
ed training by
orologist Ben
the condition
crease the pc
hurricane de
and John F
viewing the
the State depl
operators to h
nities in Flori
er states.
Represen
ARES groups
Florida, We:
Florida, and
da gave updal
preparations
ing emergen(


Meeting
es in Madi- nications when needed.
"We train In addition to
or these sit- Patrick Lightcap
we can be (K4NRD), Madison was
lp here in represented by John
county or Cuppett (KD4EKS), As-
r radios can sistant Emergency Coor-
-ap said. dinator, and Gina
inar includ- McCulley (W4GNA), Lia-
State Mete- son with South Georgia.
Nelson on They are all mem-
ns that in- bers of the Madison
)ssibility of County Amateur Radio
development Emergency Services
leming re- (ARES), which is a na-
process of tionwide organization of
oying radio Ham Operators who vol-
elp commu- unteer their time and
ida and oth- equipment to provide ra-
dio communications to
tatives of help protect property
s in North andsave lives.
st Central For additional infor-
South Flori- mation on ARES, go on-
tes on their line to www.arrl.org or
for provid- call Pat Lightcap at 973-
cy commu- 2313.


Pictured, left to right, are: John Cuppett, Gina McCulley, and Patrick Lightcap
are pictured in the Activation/Coordination room.


Tcate of the Tcwnv


Interested in trying some delicious local flavor?
These restaurants are only minutes away and ready
to delight your palate with offerings from some of the best
kitchens around.
Experience "home" cooking as the name implies,
as these great eateries literally are part of your home;
the North Florida and South Georgia area.


Ole Times Country Buffet


Hand Cut Top Sirloin Steks On Buffel Nighlly'
Banqoet Facilitim Aailable

(229) 253-1600
193 N. Si Auu.iLinc Rud. Valdosia, GA
Lake City Mall. H, 90. in Lake City FL
Ma1tEj'r d: ,J..'=L' A narrj E pr.,,.'DU.',i elr


O NEATLS
COUNTRY BUFFET

All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet!
Hours: 10:30 am 2:30 pm
5 Days A Week Monday Friday
$750 Price includes Salad Bar, Homemade Cobblers, Beverage and Tax
Friday & Saturday Nights: 5pm 9 pm
All You Can Eat Old Fashioned Seafood, Fish Fry, Country Buffet
$950 Price includes entire meal plus tax
Sunday Dinner Buffet
All You Can Eat With All The Trimmings
10:30 am 3:00 Dm Total Price $850


1874 Clubhouse Dr.
Valdosta, GA
229-242-7700


3008James Rd. Valdosta, GA

229-247-8362
(1-75 exit 18, next to Sleep Inn)

Seafood
Steaks, Chicken & Burgers
Vegetarian Items
Daily Specials
Full Bar With Tropical Drinks
Healthy Kids Menu
Covered Patio Overlooking
Kids Play Area
Watch Your Favorite Sporting Event

Open 7 Days A Week
Lunch & Dinner
www.steawi iousevaldostac"m






EATS & TREATS
Now SERVING
BREAKFAST
This Week's Special:

Barbeque
Hours:
Mon.-Fri. 7am-3pm Sat. 1 lam-3pm
111 W. Central Ave. Valdosta, GA
229-247-4670


S.E.R.T.


Lac 52, & Slin 12 p rr
nri:r 70:ttdi-,. I ) 'n


oicesma
b5,&R'bs
wvrDtbcff~




8A Madison County Carrier www.2reenepublishin2.com


Wednesday,July 15, 2009 Wednesday,July 15, 2009


www.2reenepublishin2.com Madison County Carrier 9A


Have a sale Fun Summer!!!


Lou Miller
Madison County
Superintendent of
Schools


Itr Tiutt Fe Fwut lit Tkt Suwx


HALL'S TIRE
& MUFFLER CENTER
SEE Us FOR ALL YOUR NEW AND
USED TIRE NEEDS.
We Keep All Sizes In Stock.
From Wheelbarrow to 18-Wheeler...
We've Got Your Tires!
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE ALSO AVAILABLE!
Oil Changes & Lubrications *Tune-ups Batteries Brakes
Shocks & Struts CV Boot/Joints Transmission Service
&Much More!!!


1064 E US 90 (Next to Clover Farm) Madison, FL
850.973.3026


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The cold is gone, and now it's
time for some fun in the sun. While
considering what to do for vacation,
a lot of factors play a role into the ul-
timate decision such as money, travel
time, age of children and such. But if
a fun and inexpensive vacation is
what the doctor ordered, perhaps one
should try these fabulous locations.
If a vacation is needed and budg-
et is low, Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park
in Madison is the perfect place. Yogi
Bear's Jellystone Park is a family-
friendly park, and welcomes family
and friends of all ages. The best part
is, Yogi Bear Park is open all year
long.
The family-ori-
ented resort is
q known


pfor pro-
viding the best enter-
tainment, and fun for the whole
family. Ranger Smith and Yogi work
hard to provide a full schedule of ac-
tivities for every age, centered
around a different theme almost
every weekend of the year.
The park offers fishing lakes, full
size pool, crystal clear blue lake and
60 feet water slide, game room, na-
ture trails for ATVS, RV hook-ups
and various different types of cab-
ins.
Yogi Bear Park recently wel-
comed back Park Rangers Jerry and
Kim Smith, who will be glad to assist
helping make the family vacation a
perfect one.
The park is located on 1-10 exit
258, on SW Old St. Augustine Road.
For more information, please call
(850) 973-8269.
Local residents are very familiar
with Blue Springs, and it is definite-
ly a community attraction. The
Madison Blue Springs State Park is a
great place to enjoy an afternoon
family picnic, family reunion or just
a dip in the springs to cool off. Madi-
son Blue Springs has something for
everybody.
The park is loaded with features


such as large picnic shelters located
along the banks of the Withlacoochie
River. The spring is 82 feet wide and
25 feet deep, and is a popular spot for
swimming. The caves are a favorite
of certified divers to explore the na-
ture of the Blue Springs.
The park is located 10 miles east
of Madison on the west bank of the
Withlacoochie River. From Madison,
take State Road 6 to the Withla-
coochie River. Turn south on the
west side of the bridge at the park
sign. Go approximately 525 feet and
the entrance is south of the highway.


sion is $4 per / / ,."' ;'
vehicle (up to f
eight people). $1 per
pedestrian or bicycle. No admission
fee for children under six years of
age. Divers fee is $10 and includes
cavern and cave diving.
While Madison may be a small
community, it is rich with history
and beauty. Houses within the city
limits of Madison date back as the
early 1800's and was established dur-
ing the days of great wars. A tour of
Madison would be perfect for any
couple or family that adores signifi-
cant history.
Some places that one would want
to visit while in Madison would be
the Smith-Goza Mansion Conference
Center. Now owned by North Florida
Community College, the mansion
was built in 1860 and was added to
the U.S. National Register of His-
toric Places on June 30, 1972.
The First Baptist Church 1898
sanctuary is a popular place to take a
step back in time, and serves as the
perfect setting for traditional wed-
dings. The building was constructed
by Stephen Crockett, and is of the ar-
chitectural style of Queen Anne.
The Dial-Goza House (also
known as the William H. Dial House)


is a historic house in Madison, locat-
ed at 105 Northeast Marion Street.
The house was constructed in 1880,
and is of the Victorian Italianate ar-
chitectural style.
One of the oldest buildings in
Madison is the St. Mary's Episcopal
Church. Constructed in 1879-1881,
the style of the building is late goth-
ic revival, and is located on 108
Northwest Horry Street in Madison.
While history runs deep in the
roots of Madison, these locations
only scrape the surface of what his-
toric Madison has to offer. For more
information,
Please call the
/ / Madison
.- County
/ ',/' /, Cham-
S ber


/ V\ \\ \ of Com-
merce and
Tourism at (850) 973-2788.
Sparkling spring waters are part
of the charm of the pristine north
Florida Wacissa River. The Wacissa
River is a clear, spring-fed stream
where wildlife is abundant along this
narrow, fairly swift trail. Warbles
can be heard singing in the trees,
and wading birds can be seen search-
ing for food.
The Wacissa River offers many
angling opportunities for various
species of bream. Early mornings
out of Goose Pasture campground
can be productive for largemouth
bass. The river is one of only a hand-
ful of rivers in north Florida with
Suwannee bass, a smaller cousin to
the largemouth bass.
If Uncle Sam has been great to
you this year and you're interested
in getting out of Madison and
splurging on your vacation, Orlando
has many different attractions that
would be a fun family get-away. Or-
lando is approximately four hours
away, which is perfect to "get-away"
but not spend all day "getting-away"
driving to get to the destination.
Here's a little bit of what Orlando


has to offer.
In the Top 25 Most Visited
Tourist Destinations In America, Dis-
ney World's Magic Kingdom in Orlan-
do takes the number five spot. Disney
is one of the oldest theme parks, dat-
ing back the 50's, but has kept things
simple and family oriented, and has
held true to the traditions of why
America has loved Disney World.
Universal Studios in Orlando falls
number 12 on the Top 25 Destinations,
and is well noted to draw thrill-seek-
ing tourists. The park has gained
recognition as being the number one
TV and movie based theme park in
the world for such attractions as
Jaws, Jurassic Park, E.T. Adventure,
Fear Factor, Men In Black and live
shows.
Sea World in Orlando is ranked 13
in the


Top 25 1
Most Visited Tourist Destina-
tions In America for its great ma-
rine life shows and exhibitions. Sea
World is a nice clean and friendly
park with little to no wait for rides or
attractions. The biggest draw card for
the parks are the extravagant Shamu
and dolphin shows, which is definite-
ly a favorite among children.
Disney World, Universal Studios
and Sea World theme parks would
make for a great place to spend a
week, enjoy fun in the sun and still be
affordable.
Sparkling spring waters are part
of the charm of this pristine north
Florida Wacissa River. The Wacissa
River is a clear, spring-fed stream
where wildlife is abundant along this
narrow, fairly swift trail. Warbles can
be heard singing in the trees, and
wading birds can be seen searching
for food.
The Wacissa River offers many
angling opportunities for various
species of bream. Early mornings
out of Goose Pasture campground
can be productive for largemouth
bass. The river is one of only a hand-
ful of rivers in north Florida with
Suwannee bass, a smaller cousin to
the largemouth bass.


Canoe and Kayak
Rental and Sales
Wacissa Springs Livery 219 Wacissa Springs Rd.
Monticello, Florida 32344
850-997-2324 (land line)
570-1884 (cei)
jimdulock@hotmail.com
Wocisso River Clean Up & Funday
Saturday, July 18, 8am-2pm
Prizes for Most Trash Collected
*Photo Contest Canoe & Kayak Race
Free Return Shuttle from Goose Pasture
Coffee & Lunch Available
y Reduced Fee Canoe & Kayak Rentals


Winsel's Boats






RobaElo GLS
R7angar yamaha
Chaparall







BE AI.I


located in Winn Dixie shopping center
Get all your summer gear here
But remember to be safe!


1


-wr-"




NORTH AMERICA ,
Madison Bollling Plant

Nestle reminds you
to stay hydrated
in the heat of summer!


r jar 5

It a


LOO
SiI7. oo


Mullet
Nile Perch
Breami
Crab Legs
Catfish
Shrimp
& More


\'e il d ..itlrm in..at orders.
Hamburger, cube steak, rib eye, sausage & more.
All vacuum sealed for freshness!
Lemuel Roberts & Wayne Roberts Owners
Hours: Wed 9-5 Thur 9-6 Fri 9-7
Sat 9-2 or until sold out.
592 SW Harvey Greene Dr. Madison, FL 32340
Around the comer from the old Dixie Packers
850-973-9886


o'am -


CHtOi r9


Flats/Near Shore, Fishing, Scalloping
Whole or Half Day Trips No Fishing License Needed,
24ft Carolina Skiff, 27 Year Resident
P.O. Box 346; Steinhatchee, Florida
352/498-7183
U.S.C.G. Licensed & Approved
Scallop Season Opens July Ist


Reserve Your Safe
Family Fun Charter Soon


Please Leav
andlNo.for aretn


(2.

........... ..... :: ......


SThe City Of

Madison


Reminds Everyone To

Be Safe During The

Summer!


eName
n call


rlc,-,- W679
ooper
TIRES
L -.A


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www.Lreenepublishing.com


I OA Madison County Carrier


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Ewing Construction
ROOFING
4NeFt ornes Ada.lons Sun Roomi Sceen Rooms
Carporl Decks real Roos Shir.gle Roc.Is
S r.ir C r, ia Bur.lr. u iConrdfr ar;o ',r f.Lng C'~n.ricr3: I
BEN EWING 850-971-5043





PTive O ak aib ow
PEST CONTROL, INC. "'1


Di rectory


Advertiseyour
Business here!

Call 973-4141


Burnette
Plumbing & Well Service
Drilling & Repairs
I'l li i. l m pJlr- I ,\lr. .,m1 -I
nr W \.110 1 i I ,,lll II,'ii n \\JLr Ilhi r I { PJII,
%\\,n. Irilkl l'unImp R plaii d
.in>, KIpl.mol %11 )Hpair,
Carlton Burnette i, ,, ,
MaslerPlumber
850-973-1404 \I,. H


,r . ..- .. r,, I n r 1 I .ii l . r Il I I r
ff l l rl so n
Unternre- ecorber

973-4141




Fort Madison
Storage
Located on Hwy. 53 South
Sizes: 5x10'* 10x10' 10x20'
-- For More Information --
Call 973-4004 or 973-4141
and ask for Latrelle


Full Service Internet Provider Computer Repair
Wide Area Networking
(850) 973-8855
883 Hwy. 90 West Madison, FL
between Pizza Hut & Brenda's Styles


U *l *ll lil ig...


* *,


".Copyrighted I


... Syndicated Cc

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"ers

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FUN PAGE


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Wednesday, July 15, 2009


CL:


iii





Wednesday, July 15, 2009 www. reenepublishin2.com Madison County Carrier 11A





BRIDAL



DELICIOUS r, -t

WAYS TO U nn h


W whether planning an intimate brunch or a formal dinner reception,
here arc several delicious ways every bride and groom can add
their own special touch to their wedding festivities.


Greeting Out-of-Town Guests
* lor a sweet way to surprise visitors, have hoinemade
cookies, a thennos of cold milk or hot cocoa and some
lugs and Kisses wailing for otel guests.
* Make guests reel pIlnpered by leaving a gixxonight Ilug
and Kiss on their hotel room pillow.
Decorations and Favors With Flair
* Spread Hugs and Kisses across the place card, guest btnk
and vwdding cake tabls to add a sophisticated silver and
gold touch.
* Wrp several homemade sweets in colored cellophane or
lHugs and Kisses in law or lulle, and tic them with a auin
bow to match your wedding colors.


MONOGRAMMED MINI
CHOCOLATE CAKES
1/2 cup (I stick) butter or margarine
1/2 cup water
3 tablespoon Hershey's Cocoa
I cup all-purpxse flour
I cup sugar
/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
I epX
1/3 cup dairy sour cream
COCOA (GLAZE (recipe follows)
Decorating Icing in tube, desired color
1. Heat oven to 350YF. Line 13x9x2-inch baking pan with
parchunent paper or waxed paper.
2. Combine butter. water and acxxm in small saucepan. Cook
over mehumn heat. stirring constantly. until mixture boils.
remove frnn heat. Stir together flour. sugar. baking soda
and salt in nediumn bowl. Stir in hot cocoa mixture. Add egg
and sour cream; beat on medium speed of mixer until well
blended. Pour batter into prepared pan.
3. Bake 20 to 22 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in
center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes. Remove from
pan to wire tack- carefully remove parchmint or waxed
paper Cool completely.
4. Cut cake into small pieces, each about 2x1-3/4 indies.
(Cake will be easier to cut if frozen for several hours or up
to sewral days.) Place on cooling rack. Prepare COCOA
GI.AZE:. Spoon over top of each piece of cake, allowing
glate to run dowi sides. Allow glaze to set. Garnish with
monogram. using decorating icing. Place in foil cup. if
desired. About 24 mini cakes.
COCOA GLAZE: Bring 1/2 cup water and 1/4 cup (112 slick)
butter to boil in small saucepan. Stir in 1/2 cup Icrshcy's
Cocoa. Remove fman heat: cool slightly. graduallyy add 3 cups
powdered sugar. stimnng with whisk until mnooth. Stir in 2 tca-
spro1x s vanilla extract. About 1-1/2 cups glazc.


Dessert Ideas for Wedding Festivities
* For a small wedding or rehearsal dinner.
make your own Celebration Cake, and
decorate it with a removable centerpiece
made from Ilugs and Kisses
* For an extra dessen treat. set a silver
bowl filled with Hugs and Kisses on ihe
dcssen hl ulet next to the wedding cake.
* Host a post-wedding brunch for the
bride and groom at the home of a family
member or friend, and serve homemade
eoffxccakes. scones and crescents made
with cinnamon chips.


EASY CINNAMON CHIPS
BRUNCH CRESCENTS
2 cans (8 ounces each) refrigerated quick crescent
dinner rolls
2 tablespoons butter or mrararine, melted
1.2/3 cups (lO-ounce package) Hershey's Cinnamon
Chips, divided
CINNAMON CHIPS DRIZZLE (recipe follows)
I. Ilea oven to 375"F. Unroll dough; separate mto 16 triangles.
2. Spread melted butter on each triangle. Sprinkle I cup cinna-
mon chips evenly over tangles; gently press chips into
dough. Roll from shortest side of angle to opposite point.
Place. point side down, on ungr.ased cookie sheet: curve
into crescent shape.
3. ake 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown. Drizzle wth
Cinnamon Chips Dnzzle. Serve warm. 16 crestcnts.
CINNAMON CHIPS DRIZZLE: Place remaining 2/3 cup
chips and 1-12 Ieaspoons shortening (do nor use butter
margarine. spread or oil) in small micmroave-safe bowl.
Microwave at IIl(II (llK)(k) I minute; stir until chips arc
melted and mixture is smoth.
TUXEDO BROWNIE HUGS COOKIES
60 Hershey's Hugs Chocolates
I package (I pmund 65 ounces) original
supreme brownie mix with syrup pouch
1/4 cup Hershey's Cocoa
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 egs
1. Remove wrappers from llus Chocolates. Heat oven to
350"i. Grease and flor cookie sheet or line with purchmecnt
paper.
2. Stir brownie mix. pouch of syrup. cucoa. water, oil and eggs
in medium bowl until well blended. Drop by scant teaspoons
onto prepared cookie sheet.
3. Bake 8 minutes or until set. Cool 1 to 2 minutes. Press a Hugs
Chocolate into center of each cookie. Remove from cookie
sheet to wire rack. Cool completely. About 5 dozen cookies.


PRIDES ON A BUDGET


Houw Lo Havo


a Fabulous UJodding for LoZ/


The average wed-
ding in America costs
around $29,000, accord-
ing to The Wedding Re-
port, Inc., a wedding
industry research com-
pany. Not surprisingly,
couples are looking for
ways to save money on
their special day.
Here are some ideas
to help you have a won-
derful wedding on a bud-
get.
The Date. Having a
wedding on off-peak
months and days can be
a bargain. November
through April are slower
months for weddings, so
many halls, caterers and
other service providers
give discounts because
they have fewer book-
ings. Some will also have
discounts for weddings
held on any day other
than Saturday.
The Venue. If you
know anyone with a
beautiful home or a
large garden, consider
having the wedding
there. Be sure to factor
in the cost of renting ta-
bles and chairs. Holding
the reception at a pri-
vate place lets you buy
your own alcohol and
hire your own bar-
tenders, both of which
can save you money An-
other option is to negoti-
ate a package deal on an
all-inclusive venue such
as a hotel. The wedding
and reception are all in


one place, and out of
town guests won't have
far to go when the par-
ty's over. (Negotiate a
good deal on a block of
rooms for guests.)
Invitations. Keep
them simple. High-end
paper, custom-colored
inks, decorative linings
and multiple enclosures
all cost more. Do online
research to find the best
deal or print them
yourself. You can find
plenty of affordable op-


Photo Courtesy of Lyndi Jahelka
tions at craft, hobby or
office supply stores. To
keep postage costs down,


don't use oversized or
heavy paper.
The Dress. It's possi-
ble to save big on your
dress by choosing poly
satin instead of silk fab-
ric. Another option is to
buy a discontinued de-
sign, rather than the lat-
est one. These are
usually less expensive
and can be found at
smaller dress shops or
consignment shops.
Flowers. Do you re-
ally need fresh flowers
blanketing everything?
Many couples opt for
fresh flowers for the
bridal party and silk
arrangements as decora-
tion for the ceremony
and reception. Look into
candles, ribbons, shells
and decorative stones as
alternatives.
Food. Save serious
money by planning the
reception for a time
when guests will not
need a full, seated meal.
If your ceremony is be-
tween one and three in
the afternoon, you can


Lisa's

Bartenders, LLC




Call 850-321-7398
Email: lisasbartenders@yahoo.com
www.LisasBartenders.com


have a tea reception.
Serve tea, finger sand-
wiches, scones and mini
pastries. For a reception
starting at four or five
p.m., have a cocktail re-
ception. Drinks and hours
d'oeuvres are all you
need. Make it clear on
your invitation "Tea
(or cocktail) reception to
follow."
Decorations and Fa-
vors. Take inventory of
what you already have -
and what friends and
family have. Borrowing
is cheaper than buying
or renting, so ask
around. Do-it-yourself
favors are a great way to


personalize your wed-
ding for less. If you do
need to buy supplies in
large quantities, don't be
afraid to talk to the store
manager about a bulk
discount.
You can have a fabu-
lous wedding for less
with some planning and
elbow grease. But the
best advice for saving
money is to make a bud-
get and stick to it. You'll
be tempted to upgrade
just a little here and
there but pretty soon
your bargain wedding is
no bargain at all.
Courtesy of Family
Features.


p h o t o g r a p h y

2475 tpalachee Pkwy
T'allahassee, EFL 32301

(850) 877-4259

Call or visit our website
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O O iIiOo.4wO
~4'piu!'p4'






12A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 15, 2009


MONEY


Are You on Track toward Your
Financial Objectives?

Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones


It's been almost two years since turmoil began in the
financial markets. And during that time, your own financial
picture, along with that of virtually every other investor,
has probably changed. Still, you can do a lot to get back
on track toward the future you've envisioned and you
can start today.

What moves should you make? Here are a few to consid-
er:

Assess your current situation. You're well aware of
the change in your portfolio's value over the past two
years, and you may well have already made some adjust-
ments. But if you're going to position yourself properly for
the future, you need to review your entire financial situa-
tion: your savings, spending, investments, insurance and
income needs. Only then can you chart the course that's
right for you.
Re-evaluate your goals. Since you are already
reviewing your financial picture, now is a good time to also
re-examine your goals. Would you like to help pay for a
child's college education? Do you know when you plan to
retire? When you do retire, what sort of lifestyle do you
envision? If you haven't already done so, identify your
goals and try to put a price tag on them.
Review your strategy for reaching your goals.
Once you know about how much money your goals may
require, you'll need to review your savings and investment
strategies to determine if they are likely to provide suffi-
cient funds. You'll need to look at your investment mix to
see if it's providing the right combination of growth and
income opportunities. At the same time, you'll want to
analyze your feelings about investment risk. Before the
market decline, many investors believed they were more
comfortable with risk than they actually were. Because
different investments carry different levels of risk, it's
essential that you know your risk tolerance and factor it
into your investment decisions.
Start making necessary changes. To attain the
goals you've identified, you may well need to make some
changes. For example, during the most recent bear mar-
ket, the value of your growth-oriented investments likely
fell considerably, which means these investments may
now make up a smaller percentage of your portfolio, rela-
tive to income-oriented vehicles. Yet to achieve your long-
term objectives, you may need a good amount of expo-
sure to investments that have the potential to provide
growth, such as stocks. Consequently, you may need to
rebalance your portfolio, possibly with the help of a pro-
fessional financial advisor someone who knows your
goals, risk tolerance, family situation and other key fac-
tors.
Be flexible. After you've identified your goals and
revised your investment strategy accordingly, you have
taken some important steps but you're still not done.
None of us can predict what will happen in our lives, and
as we've seen, the financial markets are equally unpre-
dictable. So you will need to be flexible with your invest-
ment moves and prepared to make changes as neces-
sary.

In short, establish an investment strategy that's right for
your needs and follow it as best you can, but be prepared
to adjust your path as time goes by. By staying diligent,
you can help yourself advance toward your important
goals in all economic environments.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your
local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


EdwardJones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631 Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204
Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


Federal Minimum Wage Increases July 24

By Michael Curtis the last few years after a doesn't include other same position would fall
Greene Publishing, Inc. decade of being set at types of work as well, so far short of that buying


The federal mini-
mum wage will increase
to $7.25 an hour on July
24, and although this rep-
resents an increase of 70
(approximately 11 per-
cent) from the previous
level of $6.55 an hour, for
Floridians the increase
will only be four cents be-
cause the state minimum
wage is already set at
$7.21 per hour.
The national mini-
mum wage is set by Con-
gress and has been
increasing in stages over


$5.15. Overall, the mini-
mum wage affects a rela-
tively small percent of
the workforce. According
to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, about 2.2 mil-
lion American workers
make minimum wage or
less, including exempted
jobs like restaurant work-
ers.
That translates into
approximately three per-
cent of the hourly work-
force and just 1.7 percent
of the total workforce.
The government


the true number is typi-
cally understated slightly,
but the long-term trend
shows fewer minimum
wage workers in America
currently as compared to
previous years. The argu-
ment today is more about
the lost buying power
over the years for similar
positions. In other words,
there was a time when a
factory worker, for exam-
ple, could buy a house
and a car and put a kid
through college on his or
her wages, whereas that


General Motors Exits Bankruptcy


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
General Motors Co.'s
chief executive on Fri-
day, July 10, pledged a
"new beginning" for the
storied U.S. automaker as
it exited bankruptcy
ahead of schedule with
an aim to settle its debts
quickly and issue new
shares in the company as
early as next year.
CEO Fritz Hender-
son said the swift trip
through Chapter 11
showed that GM can
move fast, and added that
GM will work hard to re-
pay trust, not to mention
the money committed to
the struggling company
by the U.S. and Canadian
governments.
"Today marks a new
beginning for General
Motors, one that will al-
low every employee, in-
cluding me, to get back to
the business of design-
ing, building and selling
great cars and trucks and
serving the needs of our
customers," said Hender-
son.
Bankruptcy Judge
Robert Gerber on Sunday
paved the way for GM's
emergence when he ap-
proved the sale of the vi-
able assets to "the new
GM," though he kept the
order from officially go-
ing into effect until
Thursday to allow for ob-
jections. See story on GM
bondholders.
After some last
minute appeals failed to
extend the stay, the ap-
proval stuck and lawyers
pushed through the pa-
perwork overnight,
bringing the company
out of bankruptcy al-
most a month ahead of


July 2009


Information from Madison County Community Bank and SPF to help keep your financial lie in balance


Consumer Sense


Rethinking Retirement
You did everything right. You planned
for your retirement by properly
diversifying your investment portfolio,
and even scrimped in order to
maximize contributions to your
retirement plans. However, after a
year of some of the biggest stock losses
since the Great Depression, you might
be wondering whether your shrunken
nest egg will be enough to carry you
through retirement. Before drawing
any premature conclusions, it's
important that you first take charge of
your situation by asking and answering
these four critical questions.
Where do I currently stand?
Take inventory of where your
retirement accounts are held and how
they're invested. These would include
IRA's, employer sponsored accounts
(401k's, etc.) and other accounts
earmarked for retirement. Although it
might be discomforting, gather up your
latest statements from these accounts
and total how much they're worth.
The losses may seem astonishing but
do not let that discourage you.
Understanding where things stand
Source: www.ssa.ov
Have You Read..
The Wall Street Journal. Complete
Retirement Guidebook: How to Plan It,
Live It and Enjoy It by Glenn Ruffenach,
Kelly Greene. As you think about
retirement, you've got facts to face,
planning to do, decisions to make and
numbers to crunch. With the experts at The
Wall Street Journal to guide you, you'll
lear how to tailor a financial plan for the
lifestyle you want


today will help you determine how
much you will need to save for your
future.
Can I get help with understanding
my situation?
With all of the economic tumult of
the past year, a thorough review of
your financial plan should be
considered mandatory. Whether
with the advisor who helped you put
together your plan prior to the market
downturn or another advisor who
might be a better fit, it's important to
tap into the knowledge and
experience of a financial professional
who will take the time to understand
your goals and speak to you directly
and realistically about where you
stand and what you should expect
going forward. He or she may be
able to help you in simplifying your
financial life without reducing your
retirement goals.
Should I plan on receiving Social
Security benefits?
If you have not already done so, you


may want to become familiar with
your Social Security benefits options
as part of your overall income
strategy. In order to help maximize
your social security income, pay
special attention to the date when
you begin withdrawing Social
Security benefits. According to the
Social Security Administration,
lifetime income benefits will
generally be higher the longer you
wait to take your first withdrawal.
For more information on your
benefits as well as information on
income planning tools, visit the
Social Security website
(httoD//www ssa nov/).
Get Help from our financial
professional
Our financial professionals can help
you determine the financial path to
follow in pursuit of your near- and
long-term financial goals. He will
work with you to identify and
understand your investment goals
and then develop a well structured
investment plan.


the President Barrack
Obama's optimistic tar-
get.
Detroit-based GM
(GMGMQ), kept afloat by
government loans since
January, filed for bank-
ruptcy on June 1. The
Obama administration
committed $50 billion to
GM as part of its broader
bailout of the auto indus-
try
Henderson said Fri-
day that the company
wants to repay loans
"much sooner" than
their due date, with a
public offering of the
stock as soon as next
year.
At that point, the U.S.
government will own 60.8
percent of the common
stock and the Canadian
government will hold
11.7 percent; the United
Auto Workers retiree
trust will own 17.5 per-
cent, leaving 10 percent
to the so-called old GM.
"We want to take
that intensity, the deci-
siveness and the speed of
these last several weeks
and then transfer it from
the battle field triage of
the bankruptcy process
to the day-to-day opera-
tion of the new company
and this will be the new
norm at General Mo-
tors," Henderson said in
a conference call.
GM, which has about
$11 billion in U.S. debt,
said it was able to slash
its obligations by more
than $40 billion, mostly
from unsecured debt and
the UAW benefits trust.
GM explained that its
government debt ex-
cludes $9 billion in pre-
ferred stock.
To help GM build on
its new product portfolio,
which will consist of
only four core brands,
veteran designer Bob
Lutz will come out of re-
tirement as vice chair-
man. Jack Nerad, market
analyst for Kelley Blue
Book, said bringing him
back is part of a "critical
change" in mindset.
"Some might look at


the return of Bob Lutz as
'same old GM,' but in ac-
tuality Lutz has been a
driving force in changing
GM culture and atti-
tudes, especially in re-
gard to competitive
vehicles," Nerad said.
"He is a strong advocate
of making every GM ve-
hicle world class."
On the employment
front, GM will slash the
number of U.S. execu-
tives by 35 percent and to-
tal white-collar workers
by 20 percent by the end
of the year. GM's U.S.
workforce will drop from
about 91,000 workers at
the end of 2008 to about
64,000 by the end of this
year, the company said.
GM has a total of 235,000
employees across the
globe.
GM's exit from bank-
ruptcy comes amid an
historic downturn not
only for the company but
also for the broader U.S.
market, where con-
sumers are still grap-
pling with a reeling
housing market, tighter
credit and mounting job
losses. GM sales dropped
by 33 percent in June to
174,785 cars and trucks.
Michael Curtis
can be reached at
michael@greenepublishi
ng.com.


power today
Officials are focusing
more on job creation to-
day, given the economy,
than trying to pay higher
wages. When the market
levels out, however, the
wage increase on those
entry jobs that are paying
minimum wage will cer-
tainly be welcome by that
segment of the work-
force, especially teens.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at
michael@greenepublishin
g.com.


FOR YOUR
NEXT BUSINESS MEETING
OR ALL DAY
TRAINING SEMINAR.

Check out:






Located in Perry

Mini Conference Room
for up to 20 persons
Large Conference/Ballroom
Meeting Room for up to
85 Guests
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FOOD
Continental Breakfast
or Full Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
Bar service for Cocktail
Reception or after meeting
Happy Hour
Poolside Cocktail Parties
Live Piano Bar
Call your hosts,
Rick or Joanna
for appointment to check out the
elegant meeting, dining and
beautiful grounds
of the
Timbers of Perry.

850-584-7990.
www.timbersofperry.com


Madison County
Commuinity Bank
nl-

"Understanding This Financial Market"
Workshop
You are invited to a FREE workshop on
understanding current financial markets.

Thursday, July 16, 2009
6:30-7:15pm
Madison County Community Bank
Boardroom

RSVP requested, but not mandatory
850-973-2400
Willy Gamalero
Financial Advisor


Light Refreshments Provided


Interested in Learning More?
I specialize in helping people maintain a healthy
financial balance and discover smart money strategies.
Call me to set an appointment to review your
investment objectives, and to discuss any questions
you might have. I look forward to speaking with
you!
Willy Gamalero -- 973-2400
Madison County Community Bank


Sorrento Pacific Financial, LLC Registered Representatives are employed by Madison County Community Bank and registered through Sorrento. (SPF]
(Member FINRAISIPC), a registered broker-dealer. SPF and Madison County Community Bank are not affilated. Insurance products
may be provided thru ICBA Insurance Services, Inc.
NOT FDIC INSURED NOT GUARANTEED BY THE BANK MAY CO DOWN IN VALUE
fNnTA nrFPoIT NMT IN5IIRmn RV ANV FFnFRAI ArFNrC'


I I. ", 11 1 1 I'll I I I , I At participating locations. I


~Rf~d~a el





Wednesday, July 15, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 13A


HEALTH & NUTRITION


moms Celebrate Birth Of Healthy Children


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Prenatal care is a
growing concern for
health providers in
Madison County be-
cause of the health, so-
cial and financial
consequences of babies
born to mothers who
haven't taken care of
themselves during preg-
nancy In fact, low birth
weight and other physi-
cal challenges are
among the worst in the
state. The good news,
however, is that good
prenatal care can make
all the difference, espe-
cially the new program
now available at the
Madison County Health
Department.
According to Craig
Wilson, program manag-
er for Healthy Start and
Healthy Families, the
prenatal program
brought a group of
young women together









By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Some cold medi-
cines claim they will
shave a day off suffering
from the common cold,
but they often produce
unpleasant side effects.
A new study shows,
for the first time, that
the doctor's empathy
may be an even better
way to speed recovery
People recover from
the common cold faster
if they believe their doc-


tor shows greater com-
passion toward their
illness, according to a
University of Wisconsin
School of Medicine and
Public Health study, pub-
lished in the July issue
of Family Medicine.
The study, conduct-
ed in primary care clin-
ics, involved 350
participants who had
one of three types of en-
counters with doctors:


to learn and support
each other during preg-
nancy, and later cele-


brate the birth of their care during pregnancy
children. This fairly new brings women, and their
approach to providing partners if possible, to-


(Photo submitted)
Moms participating in the group prenatal class at the Madison County Health
Department celebrate the birth of their beautiful and healthy children. Pictured
left to right: Tiffany Moore, Ganyika Florence, Tania Richardson, Siema Baynor,
Quaniesha Bellamy and Nekedra Brooks.


no interaction at all, a
standard encounter with
discussion of medical
history and present ill-
ness, or an advanced in-
teraction where the
doctor asked more ques-
tions and seemed to
show more concern for
the patient.
Patients then rated
doctors on a question-
naire which asked if the
doctor made them feel at
ease, allowed them to tell
their story, listened to


what they had to say, un-
derstood their concerns,
acted positive, explained
things clearly, helped
them take control, and
helped them create a
plan of action.
The 84 patients who
gave their doctors per-
fect scores on the survey
were able to get rid of
their cold a full day
sooner than patients
who gave their doctors


In Madison on the corner of the Enterprise-
Recorder building every Wednesday.
Tilapia, Shrimp,
Spicy Shrimp, Catfish...........$7.50
Oysters, Crab Cakes,
Mullet (when available)................$8.50
Combine any of the 2 above ...$10.00
Combine any of the 3 above ...$12.00
Pork Chop or
Chicken Tenders.......................$6.50
Above served with hushpuppies and
choice of 2: Fries, Slaw, or Cheese Grits
Weekly Salad Special
We Start Serving at 11:00 am,
Weather permitting


lower scores, according
to the study findings. By
measuring immune cells
in secretions from nasal
washes, researchers also
found that patients who
gave doctors perfect sur-
vey scores had built up
immunity to their cold
within 48 hours after
their first visit.
"This shows if you
perceive your doctor as
empathetic, that might
influence your immune
system and help you re-
cover faster

Nftrmhe
Athe


common cold," said Dr.
David Rakel, director of
integrative medicine
and lead author of the
study "Out of every-
thing that's been studied
- zinc, vitamin C, anti-
viral medications -
nothing has worked bet-
ter at fighting a cold
than being kind to peo-


pie."
"The key here is
that the patient has to
perceive the doctor as
empathetic," he
added. "Someone may be
perceived as empathetic
by one person but not
the other. The individual
needs to find the clini-
cian with whom they be-
lieve they can form an
ongoing therapeutic re-
lationship. This also
stresses the importance
of relationship primary
care, where each indi-
vidual develops a collab-
oration and relationship
with a clinician they
trust over time."
Many people do not
Seek a physician to fight
the common cold, of
course, but it does
lend to the belief that
others' kindness
may have a healing
effect. These more
positive interac-
tions with doc-
tors may also
encourage pa-
tients to depend
less on over-the-
counter cold
remedies.
Cold medica-
tions reduce the
duration of a common
cold, but often have seri-
ous side effects such as
nausea and gastro-in-
testinal upset. Being
kind to people obviously
has no side effects and
may actually enhance
other aspects of
life. Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael
@greenepublising. com.


SGMC Welcomes

Dr. Samuel N. Ofori

Dr. Ofori received both his Bachelor of Science in Human Biology
degree and his Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery degrees
from the University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
He went on to complete his residency in Internal Medicine from
John H. Stroger Hospital of Cook County/Cook County Hospital,
Chicago where he also recently completed his Hematology-Oncology
fellowship.
Dr. Ofori is board certified in Internal Medicine and board eligible
in Hematology-Medical Oncology. He is a member of the American
Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society of Hematology and
the American College of Physicians.
He has joined The Pearlman Comprehensive Cancer Center and


gether in one large room
instead of the typical
prenatal appointment
that occurs one on one in
an exam room. Of
course, if there is reason
for an individual to have
an exam, she is taken to
a private exam room.
Research has shown
that women who partici-
pate in this type of pre-
natal care feel more
supported, enjoy their
pregnancy more, and de-
liver healthier babies.
Women who participate
are able to openly dis-
cuss their feelings and
concerns about the preg-
nancy and related topics
like relationships and
nutrition. The women
(and their partners) who
attended this series en-
joyed it so much that
they requested they still
be able to meet together
after they delivered
their babies.
"The celebration oc-


curs at the end of the
sessions, typically after
all the women have de-
livered their babies.
During this joyous occa-
sion, the attendees re-
ceive door prizes for
their bundles of joy, and
enjoy a delicious lunch
of a garden salad and
barbecue chicken," Wil-
son explained. "At the
end of the meetings, af-
ter the post-partum ap-
pointments, all the
women receive the
scrapbook that they put
together during the ses-
sions to remember their
pregnancies."
The next group ses-
sions will begin on July
14. If you or someone
you know might be in-
terested in participat-
ing, please call Healthy
Start at 973-5000.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
michael@greenepublish-
ing.com.


Question: Is it true that George Washington
had wooden teeth?

Answer: OK, you got me with this question. I have
no idea. I can say I must have missed that day in
Dental School. So, with the help of Google, I have
done a little research.
From what I gather George Washington had
a great deal of dental trouble in his lifetime. By the
time of his inaugural address as our first President at
the age of 57, he only had one remaining tooth.
Apparently he did have false teeth, 5 sets we know
about. They were not made from wood, his false teeth
were made from ivory, lead, gold wire, with implanted
human and animal teeth, and springs. The springs in
the back attached the upper and lower teeth.
Surprisingly to me the dentures were mail order. His
favorite Dentist, Dr. John Greenwood, made him three
different sets of dentures. There are records of 5 sets
of teeth made for Pres. Washington which are now on
display in various museums.
I can only imagine the sore spots under
these mail order dentures. I have often wondered
if teeth like these would be anything other than
cosmetic. I doubt they would have been functional
for chewing purposes. If you want to see 18th
Century cosmetic dentistry at its finest.... see:
www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6875436/. Thank
goodness cosmetic dentistry has come a long way
since 1776.

Roderick K Shaw III, DMD, MAGD
Master of the Academy of General Dentistry
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmail.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of Dentistry.


Oncology


Hematology


can be reached at 229-259-4616.


Samuel N. Ofori, MD
Oncology I Hematology PEARLMAN

229.259.4616 \CANCER CENTER
sgmc.org SOUTH GEORGIA MEDICAL CENTER


8~Da'3nli~





14A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 15, 2009


HEALTH & NUTRITION


QUITTING AT CROSSWINDS


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
When targeting vari-
ous segments of the pop-
ulation to warn about
the dangers of smoking,
seniors residing at nurs-
ing facilities aren't the
first group that comes to
mind. Addiction, howev-
er, has no age limit. Of
course, it's likely that
some residents will be
suffering from smoking
related illness that re-
quires, but, again, what
isn't so obvious is that
many still struggle to
kick the habit. This is
also true for the staff
working with them.
To address this time-
ly concern, Crosswinds,
a nursing facility in
Greenville, will be host-
ing a "Quit Smoking
Now" class beginning
Thursday, July 23, at 6:30.
Preston Mathews, smok-
ing cessation consultant
with Big Bend AHEC,
visited the facility at the
invitation of Activity Di-
rector Diane Sullivan,
who is also a former stu-
dent of the program. Sul-
livan recognized the
importance of hosting
the program at the facili-
ty and warmly invites all


smokers to attend.
Please see her personal
story accompanying this
article.
"Senior residents
who smoke deserve as
much help as they can
get in order to change
their life-long habit of
smoking cigarettes. Al-
most everyone says,
'Why not let the seniors
smoke? They enjoy it, it's
one of their pleasures,
and they won't be with
us much longer.' Regard-
less of the sensibility of
those comments, nurs-
ing home officials also
want to encourage se-
niors to quit smoking be-
cause of money,"
Sullivan stated.
Residents at nursing
facilities are allotted a
very limited amount of
spending money, which
is allocated from the
State. Unfortunately, the
current allotted monthly
amount a senior receives
corresponds almost ex-
actly with the price of
one carton of cigarettes.
So, as noted, there
are plenty of other rea-
sons for seniors to quit
smoking, but practically
speaking, money is right
at the top of the list.


"We are encouraging
our staff to join in on
our "Quit Smoking
Now" program as well.
During these difficult
economic times, smok-
ing is a luxury workers
can no longer afford ei-
ther. Yes, we said 'luxu-
ry' The cost of smoking
is equal roughly to the
cost of a trip to the gro-
cery store. Those of us
that are employed real-
ize how lucky we are,
and know how far our
dollars will go, and
spending those precious
dollars on smoking is in-
deed a luxury," Sullivan
added.
"Preston can help, I
know. I attended his
classes and have become
a non-smoker. I am
healthier, have more en-
ergy, and most impor-
tantly to me, I have more
dollars in my pocket for
myself and my family,"
she went onto say
The "Quit Smoking
Now" program sched-
uled for July 23 is free to
all. The community is
cordially invited to join
residents and staff in
this worthwhile effort.
Like Sullivan, those who
have completed the


course praise it, saying
that participants will be
provided information,
tools, therapy, and the


one-on-one support nec-
essary to adopt a tobac-
co-free lifestyle and
become non-smokers.


Michael Curtis
can be reached at
michael@greenepublishi
ng.com.


It's No Joke,

Smokers Are Broke
A personal testimonial and companion piece
to "Quitting At Crosswinda"


,f -L.:!:ide with excuses and $5.00 a pack. So, my husband


Three months ago ciga-
rettes were my best friends. I
started smoking in the 1960's
when smoking was cool, and
only cost 35 cents a pack.
The commercials on T.V.
showed folks that had a
black eye saying, "I'd rather
fight than switch." Commer-
cials also showed cigarettes
in pretty packages for the
ladies saying, "You've come
a long way baby." The candy
cigarettes for the kids were
fun and tasted good, too.
Of course I read the
Surgeon General's warning
but that didn't worry me. I
saw famous people that
smoked: Dean Martin, Betty
Davis, and many other
smoking celebrities, it
seemed like everybody
smoked. I saw smokers in
the Courthouse, doctor's of-
fices, hospitals and restau-
rants.
Gradually, as the price
per pack increased, so did
my hacking cough. Did I try
to quit? Sure I did, however, I
had no idea how powerful
my addiction was, and the
will power involved. Each
time I would half-heartedly
attempt to quit, I would


-iii.I.- again.
\hen Florida cracked
down on smoking and
banned smoking from
restaurants and public
places, I became outraged as
any true-blooded smoker
would. I had a long- standing
relationship with my ciga-
rettes. They calmed me
down, were my dessert after
each meal, went perfect with
each cup of coffee, and gave
me something to do while I
drove.
Then I began to work
with smoking seniors. They
had been smoking much
longer than I had, and I actu-
ally witnessed the harm cig-
arettes did to them. Senior
smokers nicotine addiction
had robbed them emotional-
ly and physically The sad
part of their situation is that
seniors receive only a small
amount of spending money
every month, and with the
cost increase of cigarettes, a
smoking senior can only af-
ford one carton for a month
and not have one single pen-
ny left over. Their addiction
has robbed them again.
During April of this
year, after 39 years of smok-
ing, I realized cigarettes
were not my best friends,
and it isn't cool to spend


and I joined the "Quit Smok-
ing Now" program.
We set our quit date for
May 12, 2009. We faithfully
attended classes one night a
week, and learned so much.
We listened to other smok-
ers, and received support
from the coach, Preston
Mathews. We got a work-
book, stress balls, mints,
nicotine replacement thera-
py, and it was free! We did
quit smoking on May 12, and
so far we have saved almost
$700.
What helped us the
most was joining "Quit
Smoking Now." It feels good
knowing our coach, Preston
Mathews, understands our
obstacles and supports us.
We looked forward to the
classes and being with other
smokers trying to quit, who
were going through the
same things we were.
Will we be successful?
We are determined to be-
come successful non-smok-
ers, and we encourage each
other every day. It feels won-
derful to become a non-
smoker, and we wish success
for anyone that takes the
steps to quit.
Preston Mathews can be
reached in Madison at (850)
973-1710.


SSAFE




SITTER




SJune 19, July 9,

SJuly 17 OR July 31


Parents, would your babysitter know what to do if your child began to
choke? Safe Sitter classes have helped thousands of adolescents
across the country learn basic lifesaving and safety techniques.

Register Now for Safe Sitter! South Georgia Medical Center is offering
this ONE DAY Safe Sitter course for boys and girls ages 11 to 13.


SAFE SITTERS learn:
How to entertain children and keep them safe
Basic child care skills (diapering, feeding, etc.)
What to do when a child chokes
Safety for the sitter
How to call for emergency help
Babysitting business skills Medicin


SAFE
S SITTER


~- +

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e is our life. sgmc.org


Classes are $25 per child. To enroll your sitter or your own son or
daughter, call 229-333-1610, ext. 5.
The Safe Sitter program may save someone you love!


Florida Coastal Cardiology

Now Open to Schedule

Appointments






Services performed in office

* Nuclear stress test to check for blockages
in the arteries of the heart

* Evaluation for the risk of a heart attack

* Ultrasound of the heart and heart valves

* Ultrasound of the blood supply to the brain

* Ultrasound of the blood supply to the legs

* Ultrasound to check for aneurysms

* Monitors for heart rhythm problems

Most Insurance Accepted Including:
Medicare, United Healthcare,
Blue Cross/Blue Shield & Vista

Help Wanted: Medical Assistant or LPN
Fax: 850-653-4135
or email: floridacoastalcardiology@yahoo.com


Val Med



Clinic




# 537165


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Wednesday, July 15, 2009


www.2reenepublishin2.com


Madison County Carrier 15A


HEALTH & NUTRITION


NFCC And
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
North Florida Com-
munity College recently
hosted Health Scholars
Camp '09 for youth inter-
ested in critical health
issues, in addition to
those considering pro-
fessions in the medical
field. Sponsored by the
Allied Health Depart-
ment at NFCC and the
Big Bend Area Health
Education Center (Big
Bend AHEC), the pro-
gram attracted several
dozen students for the
four-day event.
Open to grades six
through nine, a broad
range of activities and
speakers were featured,
covering topics such as:
team building, emer-


The MD Anderson
Cancer Center at the
University of Texas de-
veloped the ASPIRE pro-
gram with those
priorities in mind. Lo-
cated online at
www.mdanderson.org/a
spirepilot, the web-based
multimedia program
uses animation, video
and interactive story-
boards to connect youth
with the devastating ef-
fects, both personal and
social, of tobacco use in
all forms. Emphasis is
placed on building social
skills that combat peer
pressure, and on gaining
knowledge to adopt a to-
bacco-free lifestyle.
Free of charge, the
website has over five
hours of education. Stu-
dents begin with a pre-
test, then they take a
quiz after each of five
modules. Students must
score at least 75 percent
on the quizzes to move
on to the next module. If
they score less than 75
percent, they repeat the
section. After all five
modules are successful-
ly completed, the stu-
dents receive a printable
certificate that can also
be emailed to a teacher
or counselor.
With the com-
pletion of the interac-
tive web tool, organizers
at the MD Anderson


Big Bend
agency skills training,
and professional devel-
opment, as well as field
trips to local health care
facilities. Camp partici-
pants were assisted by
NFCC registered nurs-
ing students and faculty
who worked with orga-
nizers to deliver a cur-
riculum that captured
the interests of the mid-
dle school audience.
Among those fea-
tured, few messages
were more compelling
and timely than those
presented by Barbara
"Babs" Stewart, youth
tobacco training special-
ist with Big Bend AHEC.
Showcasing material
from the "AHEC Tobacco
Training And Cessation
- Initial Training" (AT-


ment Specialist and
Physician Assistant
with the Marianna office
of Big Bend AHEC,
served as the Florida Co-
ordinator for the AS-
PIRE launch.
Establishing over 30
sites statewide where
youth could receive
guidance and conve-
niently access the pro-
gram, ultimately this
effort resulted in Big
Bend AHEC registering
the third highest num-
ber of ASPIRE gradu-
ates among all partners
for the 2008-2009 school


AHEC Sponsor Health Scholars Camp'09


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, July 9, 2009)
Barbara "Babs" Stewart, youth tobacco training specialist with Big Bend
AHEC, helped students adopt a tobacco-free lifestyle during the Health Scholars
Camp sponsored with North Florida Community College. Students seated left to
right: Stephen Foust, Whitney Stevens and Courtney Strickland.


ureene runmisning, Inc. rnoto ny ivicnaei urts, July 9, zuuu)
NFCC and health department volunteers assisted Barbara "Babs" Stewart,
youth tobacco training specialist with Big Bend AHEC, promote the ATTAC IT
program to students attending the Health Scholars Camp at North Florida Com-
munity College. Pictured left to right: Bridget Gamble, Jermeca Davis, Doug
Freer, Babs Stewart, Kristen Tuten and Brittany Hobbs.


Youth Are The Real Ch


(ASPIRE: A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience)
By Michael Curtis Cancer Center sought year.
Greene Publishing, Inc. strategic partnerships For hitting this im-
As social media con- with tobacco prevention pressive milestone, Big
:inues to attract more and cessation special- Bend AHEC received
and more youth to the ists. Pilot programs professional and mone-
Internet, developing on- were arranged nation- tary recognition, but
line programs for them wide among select part- more important to Nuc-
:hat effectively address ners, including the Big cio, the program empow-
critical health issues is a Bend Area Health Edu- ered hundreds of teens
growing priority for cation Center (Big Bend to avoid becoming tobac-
health providers and ed- AHEC) in Tallahassee, co victims, while help-
ucators. Among those is- who was later recog- ing countless others find
sues receiving attention, nized for their success in the formula to quit.
however, few compare in facilitating this worth- "Over 90 percent of
urgency and conse- while program, all smokers alive today
quence to tobacco pre- Brigitta Nuccio, Cer- began smoking before
mention and cessation, tified Tobacco Treat- they were eighteen, and


over 50 percent of all to-
bacco users die of tobac-
co related illnesses. The
great doctors and re-
searchers at MD Ander-
son Cancer Center
understand the devastat-
ing effects of tobacco
use and share our fight
to combat Big Tobacco,
especially in the way it
targets youth. The AS-
PIRE program is a great
weapon in that battle,
and a great tool to lead
youth to a tobacco-free
lifestyle. Big Bend
AHEC remains commit-
ted to this worthwhile
cause and stands as a
proud partner of the AS-
PIRE program," Nuccio
said.
Tobacco Special-
ist Brigitta Nuccio and
Big Bend AHEC can be
reached at (850) 482-6500;
at their toll-free number,


TAC IT) program, Stew-
art crafted an exception-
ally powerful message
that connected well with
the youthful audience.
Employing a combi-
nation of media video,
handouts and interac-
tive quizzes students
were introduced to the
numerous consequences
of tobacco use. Stewart
emphasized that 90 per-
cent of all smokers be-
gan before they were 18,
and that 50 percent of
them will die premature-
ly from smoking related
illnesses. These conse-
quences are especially
magnified in Madison
County, due to the signif-
icant health and poverty


issues that already exist.
Initially unaware of
the social and financial
impact of tobacco use, it
was evident as the stu-
dents progressed
through the curriculum
that many were stirred
by the information. Con-
cerned not only for
themselves, but also for
family and friends, in
the end all pledged to ab-
stain from this leading
source of preventable
deaths worldwide.
Promoting healthy
behavior and a tobacco-
free lifestyle is a chal-
lenge made more and
more difficult daily be-
cause of the avalanche
of influences and im-


iampions With
1-87-QUIT-NOW-6; or via gram or school to
email at bnuc- free access to the
cio@bigbendahec.org If PIRE pilot progl
you would like your pro- please contact her to


gain
AS-
ram,
)day


ages coming at youth
from a very early age.
Family and friends, tele-
vision and the Internet,
even video games, and of
course, Big Tobacco, are
all fierce competitors in
the battle for hearts and
minds. Fortunately,
youth health advocates
like Stewart and Big
Bend AHEC are worth-
while warriors as well.
"In middle school,
our message is absti-
nence only and our pri-
mary goal is to educate
students. We are always
searching for new and
creative ways to make
these lessons fun and
memorable. We enjoyed
partnering with NFCC
on this important ini-
tiative, and will contin-
ue to combat the lies
Big Tobacco is selling
our youth today. The
ATTAC IT program is
one among several tools
BIG Bend AHEC has de-
veloped for this pur-
pose," Stewart
explained.
Big Bend AHEC
also sponsors the tobac-
co cessation program,
"Quit Smoking Now,"
which is conducted lo-
cally by Preston Math-
ews. Free classes and
one-on-one counseling
are available. Phone
(850) 973-1710 for more
information.
Michael Curtis can
be reached by email at
mcurtis@madisonmedia
group.org.

ASPIRE
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
michael@greenepublishi
ng.com.


Tallahassee Memorial
















SlrocenepCeCenter
A service ofthe comprehensive Tallahassee Memorial NeuroScience Center






















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The TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL NEUROSCIENCE CENTER
is an accredited Stroke Center and designated Brain & Spinal Cord Injury Acute Care Center.


BIG BEND


HEG
New Directions in Community Health


Aucilla Christian Academy

" NOTICE OF NON-DISCRIMINATORY
',f POLICYY AS TO STUDENTS

The Aucilla Christian Academy admits students of any
race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights,
privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or
made available to students at the school. It does not
discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic
origin in administration of its educational policies, admis-
sion policies, scholarships and loan programs and athletic
and other school-administered programs.

In an effort to encourage minority enrollment, Aucilla
Christian Academy has established a minority scholarship
program. The criteria for this scholarship is administered
the same as that of the financial needs scholarship. For
more information please call us at 997-3597.


t



t


1
1

1
1






16A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.corn


Wednesday,July 15, 2009


1 Acre, paved road, 3 bed-
DUNN'S room 2 bath workshop, fire- PART-TIME LIBRARY
Lawn Mower Repair utlhem Villas 0f place only $499.00monthly OFFICE BUILDING GREEN PUBLICI
WELDING p call David 386-719-0044 FOR RENT LIBRARY
New & Used Parts (adi 1tS7/15, irtnc across street fromLIBRARYCE
Senior Citizen Discounts "Brand New"" Post Office, Courthouse,
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 to many up- and Courthouse Annex Suwannee River RegionalA
850-973-4723 grades to list, all this for only (Old Enterprise Recorder Office) Library is currently seeking
2089 NE State Road 6 111 SE Shelby St., Madison; applicants for the position of S A li D
Madison, FL 32340 Rental assistance may be $42,843.00 Call Eric to set Newly renovated regular part-time Library
ANYTHING LEFT OVER 7 DAYS available. HUD vouchers up appointment back to the 1920's era Aide II at the Greenville CLA IFIE
WILL BE SOLD (386) 719-5560 Call 973-4141
rtn,n/c accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR 7/8-7/24,c rtn,n/c Public Library. The applicant ADSFO
I BUILD SHEDS & DECKS HC & non-HC accessible will work approximately 8
Call Bob apts. Call 850-973-8582, CASH FOR YOUR USED hours per week regularly and *M NY
850-242-9342 TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW MOBILE HOMES 1990 Commercial/Industrial also be used as a substitute 7/S13/200
Now selling steel Lawson Circle, OR NEWER Prper during other days of the
buildings, garages, n FL 32340. 386 752 5355P property week when needed. Mini- TH OU G H
buildings, garages, Madison, FL 32340. 386-752-5355 tnc with state highwayfrontage. mum qualifications include
barns and carports Equal Housing Corner lots. Fronts both graduation from a standard -1/20
N DEED A HOME? .. F;t


6/10, rtn, cc
U Pick Blueberries
$5.00 per gallon, bring.
Bring your own containers.
Begins July 10th until, any-
time. Hwy 376 East, Right
on JF Culpepper Rd. approx.
2 miles on right, look for
sign. Questions:
229-316-3434
between 10 & 5
7/15, 7122,ppd



Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rtn, ni/c


1=^^


Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 8amn-5pm M-F
5/6-rtn, n/c
FOR SALE
Hay & Argentine bahia grass
seed 772-519-1340 or
850-973-6066
7/1, 7/8, 7/15, pd

FOR SALE
(2) Haybailers & (1) 6 ft hay
cutter 850-819-6762
7/15, 7/22, pd





I Do Housekeeping
Rentals, Offices, Apartments
and home. Weekly, Bi-
weekly or monthly
850-464-2727
7/15, pd









1997 Ford F-150 4x4
3 inch lift, dual exhaust all
power $4500 FIRM
850-210-2949/ 850-997-5293
5/20, rtn, nc


FREE TO GOOD H
Beagel Mix Pupp
males & female
850-971-2757

White English/Pit
puppies 1 male $
ready now
229-221-3614

White English/Pit
puppies 1 male 1 fe
$100 each ready n
850-342-1162




Mobile Home for
3/2 Doublewide Mc
home in the Lee a
$500.00
850-973-2353

2 bedroom 1 bath m
home $450.00 per m(
security deposi
Call 850-869-09
7/1,
Clean as new. Two st
BR, 2.3 baths, formal
DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. N
Kitchen, Range, Ref,
G/D. Oak Floor down
Heart Pine upstairs. 2 (
H&A. Yard maint. inc
ADULT FAMILY. No
$900 rent and deposit
credit req. 205 NE She]
Madison. Call Georg
8583 or 557-099z


Buy, Sell or T
In The Classil
Call 973-41
To Place
Your Ad To(


Opportunity
rtn, c

CLEAN 3 BR, CH & CA,
new R & Refg, Oak floors.
ADULT FAMILY ONLY.
Rent $685 plus deposit.
No pets. Good credit req.
432 NE Horry Ave., Madi-
son. Call George 973-8583
or 557-0994.
rtn, c

Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786-
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
rtn,cc


reenville Pointe

Apartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtin, c
Rentals
North of Perry
3 BR/2 BA D/W
2BR/2 BA D/W with 200 sq
ft comm bldg.
40 x 80 horse barn w/50 ac.
for lease
800 sq ft comm office
Full service RV site
Call 850-838-6124
6/24, 7/1, 7/8, 7/15 c


Modular Sales
F.G.B.C. Certifying A
Pat Riley, is now in L
City 386-344-502z
7

Needs Minor Wor
3 bedroom 2 bath dc
blewide only $9,9C
Call David
386-719-0044


.S
NEW 32 X 80
7/8, 7/15,nc 4 bedroom, loaded
Bull w/upgraded options.
100 Key... ready to move i
cluding well, septic, w
& closing cost on youi
7/8, 7/15, pd land. $533.33 a month
money down & 620 or
Bull credit score Call Ly
male 850-365-5129
low 7
Trade in's & Repos Avw
/8,rtnc Call Eric for a list of
* homes available at disc
ed prices, many to ch
from! (386) 719-55
Rent 7/i
obile "1st time home buyi
We have several program
help 1st time home bu
7/10, 7/15, plus GOUT assistance
$8,000 $$$
mobile Call Eric for detail
onth + (386) 719-5560
t 7/
16 5 Bedroom 3 Bath H,
New with zero dov
7/8, 7/15, $595.00 per month
ory, 3 Mike 386-623-421
1LR & 7
4ew
D/W, HOME BUYERS
stairs, Let my 20 years exper
Central negotiate the best bi
eluded. 386-344-5024
o pets. 7
. Good
lby Ave. New Manufactured H
e 973- Starting at $23.70 sq
4. Guaranted lowest pric
5/8 rtn, c North Florida. Call I
(386) 752-8196
trade
fiedS Want to buy a hon
41 call David for govern]
housing assistance pro
day 386-719-0044 7
iay


Tired of being turned down
because you have no money
or credit score is too low but
you own your own land? I
have solutions
Call Lynn Sweat
386-365-5129
7/15, rtn, c
Own or own home
for less than rent and receive
up to $8,000 bonus! Infor-
mation Call
1-800-769-0952
7/15, rtn, c
"WOW"
$150.00 and your property
puts you in a home today
call Eric at
(386) 719-5560
7/8 7/24, c
Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452
7/8 7/24, c
First Time Home Buyer...
Special financing program I
can help you own a home
Call Bobby at
386-288-4560
7/15, rtn, c
FOR SALE
4 bedroom 2 bath ready to
move in call
386-288-4560
7/15, rtn, c
The Wait Is Over!
Introducing "Mossy Oak"
the most innovative, quality
and affordable manufactured
houses in the industry. Call
Mr. Mott (386) 752-1452
7/8 7/24, c
"JULY HOT DEALS"
Land/Home easy Qualify -
$8000 Tax Credit 5% inter-
est 386-344-5024
7/15, rtn, c
28 X 80 5 Bedroom
Reduced $15,000 for quick
sale call Mike
386-623-4218
7/15, rtn, c
Work for the County or
State?
special financing for home
purchase call
1-800-769-0952
7/15, rtn, c
$361,000 Available to loan
for home purchase at .5 LTV
386-365-8549
7/15, rtn, c
RELETT
FORSAL


.o- For Sale:
)0 House & Lot
In the Town of Suwannee
was $135,000, Now $99,000.
/15, in, c 2 BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Building with
Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
d Trees. 386-719-0421
Turn rtn, n/c
n in- Fantastic Lake
ring, and Mountain Views
r own from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
w/ no Open and Covered Decks,
better Large Screened Porch, Gas
nn FP, CH/A, Oak Floors & Cab-
inets, and Appliances.
7/15, rn, c Offered Furnished at
ailable $179,900. Call BJ Peters at
I bour 850-508-1900
oosent Completely Remodeled
se 3 BR/ 1 Bath, new roof,
8- 7/24, c carpet, central heat & air,
new kitchen cabinets, new
ers" bathroom, new 200 amp
ams to electrical, approximately
buyers 1300 sq. ft. $84,000
up to Oak Estates Sub Division
McWilliams Realty
ls (850) 973-8614
6/3,rtn, c


You loa ae

Ha lt T ffr


Harvey reene IDr.
& Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line, 8 inch wa-
ter main, access to city utili-
ties, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene 850-
973-4141
rtn, n/c






Misc Household Items
dishwasher, washing ma-
chine, mattress, Queen size
sleeper sofa set, futon bed,
computer hutch, computer,
12 X 20 storage shed
850-253-5363

GARAGE SALE
Saturday July 18th
9:00 am Until
Misc household items
160 NE Carter St.
7/15, pd







$$AVON$$
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starter kit! Call Today
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Two Fulltime Positions
available at North Florida
Community College: Grants
Coordinator and Institutional
Effectiveness Coordinator.
See www.nfcc.edu for details


Are You highly motivated?
Are you a self starter?
Do you posses a strong
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If you answered yes to any
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We are currently accepting
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Salary, Bonus, Weekly Pay,
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Interested applicants please
call Kim @ 352-494-4551 or
Laurle @ 386-792-2334
7/15, 7/22,


nign school, ability to type
and experience with Internet
and computer software. Li-
brary experience is desired.
Salary is $7.21 to $10.24 per
hour depending on qualifica-
tions and experience. Inter-
ested applicants may obtain
an application at the Lee,
Greenville or Madison Public
Libraries, or at the Suwannee
County Administrative Ser-
vices Department, 224 Pine
Ave., Live Oak, FL 32064,
telephone (386) 362-6869.
Applicants are encouraged to
submit resumes, letters of
reference and other bio-
graphical information with
their applications. All appli-
cations must be returned to
the Administrative Services
Department in Live Oak. Po-
sition will remain open until
filled. The Suwannee Coun-
ty Board of County Commis-
sioners is an equal
employment opportunity em-
ployer that does not discrimi-
nate against any qualified
employee or applicant be-
cause of race, color, national
origin, sex, including preg-
nancy, age, disability, or
marital status. Spanish
speaking individuals are en-
couraged to apply. All appli-
cants subject to a
pre-employment physical.
"Successful completion of a
drug test is a condition of
employment."
7/15, 7/22,c

Page Designer/Layout
Needed for the Madison
County Carrier and the
Madison Enterprise-
Recorder. Must be a team
player, able to handle multi-
ple tasks, and have experi-
ence with Quark Express
and/or Photoshop. The posi-
tion includes designing and
laying-out approximately 12
pages, per paper. Apply in
person only at the Greene
Publishing/Madison County
Carrier building, located at
1695 Highway 53 South.
Please if you're not sure how
an alarm clock works or you
average more than two dra-
matic incidents in your life,
per week, or simply only
work because you are bored,
or fill that you must com-
plain on a daily basis or fight
with co-workers, please do
not apply.
7/15, rtn, nc



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Saturday, July 25th @ 10 a.m.

* Offered High Bidders Choice
* Commercial and Residential Acreage
* Good Hunting Tract
- 8 Tracts Ranging from 5 to 10 Acres
T 'Two Miles South of 1-10 exit 225
Frontage on U.S. Hs-. 19. Attatulga Road U.S. Hwy. 19,
& \'PA Road (F/oridal Geoigia Pku'-r)
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Wednesday, July 15, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 17A


LEG~AL


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CASE NO. 2008-482-CA
JOHN HENRY AUST, JR. A/K/A JOHN H. AUST, JR.;
KIMBERLYANNAUSTA/K/AKIMBERLYAUST; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIMBERLY ANN AUST
A/K/A KIMBERLY AUST; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
MADISON County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in MADISON
County, Florida, described as:
LOTS 54 AND 55, LAKESIDE TERRACE SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE L, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A
232 SE PARK LOOP
MADISON, FL 32340
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST
FRONT DOORSTEPS OF THE MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
125 SW RANGE Ave., MADISON, FLORIDA 32340, County, Florida, at
11:00 AM, on the 3 0 day of July, 2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Clerk of the Circuit Court




By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, Florida 33619-3128

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should
contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.

7/8, 7/15

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT TO FIND
MADISON COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTS) IN COMPLIANCE
DOCKET NO. 09-CIE1-NOI-4001-(A)-(I)
The Department gives notice of its intent to find the Amend-
ment(s) to the Comprehensive Plan for Madison County, adopted by Ordi-
nance No. 2009-185 on May 20, 2009, IN COMPLIANCE, pursuant to
Sections 163.3184, 163.3187 and 163.3189, ES.
The adopted Madison County Comprehensive Plan Amend-
ment(s) and the Department's Objections, Recommendations and Com-
ments Report, (if any), are available for public inspection Monday through
Friday, except for legal holidays, during normal business hours, at the
Madison County Board of County Commissioners Office, 229 Southwest
Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida 32341.
Any affected person, as defined in Section 163.3184, F.S., has a
right to petition for an administrative hearing to challenge the proposed
agency determination that the Amendment(s) to the Madison County Com-
prehensive Plan are In Compliance, as defined in Subsection 163.3184(1),
FS. The petition must be filed within twenty-one (21) days after publication
of this notice, and must include all of the information and contents de-
scribed in Uniform Rule 28-106.201, EA.C. The petition must be filed with
the Agency Clerk, Department of Community Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak
Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100, and a copy mailed or delivered
to the local government. Failure to timely file a petition shall constitute a
waiver of any right to request an administrative proceeding as a petitioner
under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If a petition is filed, the purpose of
the administrative hearing will be to present evidence and testimony and
forward a recommended order to the Department. If no petition is filed,
this Notice of Intent shall become final agency action.
If a petition is filed, other affected persons may petition for
leave to intervene in the proceeding. A petition for intervention must be
filed at least twenty (20) days before the final hearing and must include all
of the information and contents described in Uniform Rule 28-106.205,
FA.C. A petition for leave to intervene shall be filed at the Division of Ad-
ministrative Hearings, Department of Management Services, 1230
Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3060. Failure to petition to
intervene within the allowed time frame constitutes a waiver of any right
such a person has to request a hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
ES., or to participate in the administrative hearing.
After an administrative hearing petition is timely filed, media-
tion is available pursuant to Subsection 163.3189(3)(a), ES., to any affected
person who is made a party to the proceeding by filing that request with the
administrative law judge assigned by the Division of Administrative Hear-
ings. The choice of mediation shall not affect a party's right to an adminis-
trative hearing.

-s- Mike McDaniel,
Chief of Comprehensive Planning
Department of Community Affairs
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100
7/15



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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOUISE M. BOOTH,
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-36-CP
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The ancillary administration of the Estate of Louise M. Booth,
deceased, whose death was March 18, 2008 is pending in the Circuit Court
for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post
Office Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341. The names and addresses of the
Co-Personal Representatives and the Co-Personal Representatives' attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims
or demands against Decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OFA COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against Decedent's estate must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is July 1, 2009.


Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives
/s/ Scot B. Copeland
Scot B. Copeland (FBN 0156681)
Law Offices of Scot B. Copeland, P.L.
Post Office Drawer 916
Madison, FL 32341
Ph: (850) 973-4100



7/8, 7/15


Co-Personal Representatives:
/s/ Albert K. Booth, III
Albert K. Booth, III
1229 3rd Street, S.E.
Moultrie, Georgia 31788

/s/ James M. Booth
James M. Booth
121 Suwannee Road
Moultrie, Georgia 31788


NOTICE OF SALE

Date of Sale: July 30, 2009
Time of Sale: ll:00a.m.
Location of Sale: 125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida 32341 at the
front West door of the Courthouse.
Property (legal description)
Begin at the Southwest comer of the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4) of North-
west Quarter (NW 1/4) of Section 27, Township I North, Range 9 East,
Town of Madison (now City of Madison), and thence run East 210 feet,
thence run North 315 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run East
105 feet, thence run North 105 feet, thence run West 105 feet, thence run
South 105 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, being part of the Northwest
Quarter (NW1/4) of the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4) of Section 27, Town-
ship 1 North, Range 9 East, as recorded in the Office ofihe Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court, Madison County, Florida, in Deed Book "0-2", page 635,
containing 1/4 acre, more or less.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2007-116-DR
ROBERT CHARLES ARNOLD,
Husband,
Vs.
MARIE RICHARDSON ARNOLD, a/k/a
MARLE RICHARDSON, n/k/a MARIE MOORE
Wife.

ORDER GRANTING SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION
UPON CONSIDERATION of Petitioner's Motion to Set Date of Sale at
Public Auction, the Court, having reviewed the file and otherwise being fully
advised in the premises, finds that:
1. A Final Order on Equitable Distribution was entered by the Court on
November 18, 2008.
2. Said Order Granted Petitioner's request for Partition of the parties'
property, more specifically described as that property located at 147 SW
Crosby Ave, Madison, Florida 32340.
3. Said Order required the property to be sold within one hundred eighty
(180) days or be sold at public auction to the highest bidder.
4. The subject property has not sold within the ordered time frame.
NOW THEREFORE IT IS ORDERED AND ADJUDGED
A. Petitioner's Motion to Set Date of Sale at Public Auction is GRANTED,
B. The Clerk of this Court shall sell the above described properly at a pub-
lic sale on July 30, 2009 at 11:00 a,m.
C. The Clerk shall set the sale date between 20 and 35 days from the date of
this order.
D. The Court reserves jurisdiction for the enforcement of this order and all
other matters not disposed of herein.
DONE AND ORDERED, in chambers, at Madison County Courthouse,
Madison County, Florida, this 6th day of July, 2009

Original signed by:
GREG PARKER Circuit Judge

7/15, 7/22












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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
CASE NO. 2008-CA-000633
DIVISION;
v.
DANIEL L. CAREY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANIEL L. CAREY,
et al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgement of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause, in the Circuit Court of MADISON County,
Florida, I will sell the property situated in MADISON County. Florida
described as;
COMMENCE AT AN IRON ROD MARKING THE NORTHWEST COR-
NER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 EAST, MADI-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00'5'2' EAST. A
DISTANCE OF 927.56 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 89'04'22'
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1491.51 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CEN-
TERL1NE OF AN 80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND
DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329), THENCE RUN SOUTH 06'40'39'
EAST. ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE OF 546.69 FEET TO
A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 07'57'43' EAST ALONG SAID CEN-
TERL1NE, A DISTANCE OF 270.71 FEET FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING. THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND
LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE, RUN NORTH 89'06'09' EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1078.19 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH
00'21'00' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 436.00 FEET TO A POINT. THENCE
SOUTH 89'06'09 WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1020.00 FEET TO A POINT IN
THE CENTERLINE OF AFOREMENTIONED 80 FOOT WIDE ROAD-
WAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329), THENCE
NORTH 07'57'43' WEST, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE
OF 439.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 10.50
ACRS, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AN 80 FOOT WIDE
ROADWAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329) OVER
AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 40 FEET THEREOF ALSO SUBJECT
TO A 10 FOOT UTILITY EASEMENT ALONG THE SIDE AND REAR
LOT LINES,
and commonly known as: TRACT #13 AUCILLA PLANTATION,
GREENVILLE. FL 32331 at public sale. to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, at the West Front Steps of the Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW
Range Avenue. Madison, Florida 32341 at 11:00 a.m. on July 30, 2009.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE. IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to Ac
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Nancy K. Nydam, Court
Administrator, P.O. Box 1569.
Dated this July 7, 2009
TIM SANDERS
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

7/8, 7/15








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AROUND MADISON COUNTY


AIRC/PDS Enjoys Fourth Of July Cookout


On July 1, ARC/PDS Madison- Jefferson
went to Yogi Bear's Jellystone Camp Resort
for their annual fourth of July cookout.
Basketball, hula hoops, sing-a-longs, and
food were enjoyed by all, along with an un-
forgettable train ride.
The group would like to thank the fol-
lowing people and businesses for their much
appreciated contributions; Leigh Barfield,
Property Appraiser; Tim Sanders, Clerk of
the Court; Frances Ginn, Tax Collector; Ben
Stewart/Sheriff'; Wachovia Bank; Winn
Dixie; Harveys; Browning and Sons, Inc.;
Lilla Anderson for the beautiful cake; Mary
Ann and Dan Graves (T-shirts and guides);
and please do not forget Mary Ellis, who
worked so tirelessly behind the scenes shop-
ping for supplies, baking beans and making
coleslaw, and of course, the folks at Yogi
Bear's Jellystone Camp Resort.
"Thank you for helping to make this day
possible for us. Friends like you make our
world a better place to be," said Marty
Sheffield, from ARC/PDS.


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* 2x4 Interior Walls
* Porcelain Sinks in Baths
* Ipc. Fiberglass
* Tubs & Showers
* 40 Gallon Water Heater
* 6 Panel Steel Front Door
* Metal Faucets
* Metal Drawer Guides
* Knock-Down Ceilings
* Overhead Ducts
* 2" Blinds
and MUCH MUCH MORE!


Deputy J. Davis Lane, Lake City

888-293- 6810


18A Madison County Carrier


Wednesday, July 15, 2009




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