Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00169
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: July 8, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00169
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

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y w Madison Coun]


VOL. 45 NO. 46 1., Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


FIRES BLAZE



Over July 4th


Blaze Consumes
Trailer
According to the City
of Madison Fire Depart-
ment report, a late-after-
noon structure fire
extensively damaged a
doublewide mobile home
located at 1404 Boundary
St. (pictured right).
Madison Fire Rescue per-
sonnel, supported by offi-
cers of the Madison
Police Department, Madi-
son County Sheriff's De-
partment and Madison
County EMS, responded
to the call at 5:03 p.m.
The home was unoc-
cupied at the time of the


blaze, although furniture
and other items were
stored there. There were


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo, July 4, 2009


Photo Submitted by Pat Lightcap

no reported injuries and
the State Fire Marshall
has been notified.

Fire Causes
$23,000 Damage
The City of Madison
Fire Department reports
that a fire has caused an
estimated $23,000 worth
of damage to a trailer lo-
cated at 143 Cannon Trail
(pictured left), which is
near the intersection of
SR 360 and 1-10. The Inde-
pendence Day fire is
under investigation, al-
though no reports of
wrongdoing have been is-
sued. The call came in at
11:15 p.m. on July 4.


Photos Submitted
The Honda ATV driven by Eduardo Fernandez crashed into a tree along-
side Camelot Way in Lee on July 3. Eduardo (inset) was pronounced dead at
the scene. He was a student at Madison County Central School.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Florida Highway Patrol an-
nounced on Friday, July 3, that Ed-
uardo Fernandez, an 11-year-old
Madison County resident, died after
the four-wheeler he was driving
struck an embankment and over-
turned alongside Camelot Way in
Lee near his home.
According to the FHP report,
Fernandez and passenger Leonardo
Tamayo, 26, were traveling north on
SE Camelot Way on a Honda ATV,
when Fernandez passed a vehicle on
the left side. As he crossed back in


front of the vehicle, the front right
tire of the four-wheeler struck a
small embankment on the north-
east, which jerked the wheel to the
right, causing the vehicle to swerve
into a large tree near the roadway
Witnesses noted that when the
four-wheeler jumped the embank-
ment, it swerved northeast and
caught the edge of the tree, tipping
on its nose and then turning in its
axis, resting upright against several
nearby smaller trees. As the four-
wheeler did so, Fernandez' head
struck the tree and Tomayo went
Please see Eduardo, Page 4A


Help Needed For Fire Victims


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Firefighters from Sirmans,
Greenville, New Home and Madi-
son responded to a fire at 415 SW
Wabasso Terrace on Friday, June
26.
According to reports, the fire
destroyed the home of Francis and
Judy Hand. A shed was also lost in
the fire.
No one was at home at the time
the fire erupted. A neighbor spot-


Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis. July 1. 2009
EMT Supervisor Lisa Jordan points to the
toxic black mold on the ceiling of the central
room in the EMS building. Dozens of areas like
this one are currently being crudely covered by
pieces of plastic to attempt to slow the spread
of harmful spores.

By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
It's an ugly irony, but those who specialize
in rescuing others are now in need of rescue.
The headquarters for Madison County Emer-
gency Medical Services (EMS) is contaminated
with toxic black mold and county officials are
scrambling to find them a new facility. The bro-
ken down, blue metal building beside the jail
that they call home which also houses the
Thrift Store and other storage has been well
past its prime for years, although Juan Botino
Please see Black Mold, Page 4A


ted the fire and immediately called
911.
The Hands and four other fam-
ily members (including an 11-year-
old granddaughter) lived in the
home, which was comprised of two
singlewide trailers joined with a
roof over them.
The family did not have any
homeowners' insurance and both
families suffer from poor health.
Rocky's Store in Shady Grove
has proven to be good neighbors.


Local Seniors Need

Help From The

Community

By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
While everyone enjoys the comfort of their own
home, it gets tough for seniors. Many seniors be-
come dependent on their loved ones and the services
that help keeping them along. That's where the Se-
nior Citizens Council of Madison County comes into
the picture. The Senior Center works diligently
year-round to help prolong their stay at home by
working to meet the needs the seniors may have.
A list of items is available at the Senior Center
Please see Seniors, Page 4A


Madison

Neighborhood Watch

Program Organizing

Citizens meeting set for July 13 with
Sheriff Ben Stewart and Chief Rick Davis
In an effort to support neighborhood safety
and quality living in Madison, citizens are orga-
nizing a Neighborhood Watch Program. Accord-
ingly, organizers have arranged a question and
answer period with Madison County Sheriff Ben
Stewart and City of Madison Police Chief Rick
Davis.
Please see Neighborhood Watch, Page 4A


Alisa Pullum, the manager of the
store, had provided drinks and food
for the family, as well as for the fire
department personnel, who were
on the scene doing mop-up work.
Alisa and her husband have
firsthand knowledge of how devas-
tating a fire can be. Two years ago,
they lost their home in a fire.
Rocky's has also set up a dona-
tion bucket and are taking clothes
donations. Alisa can be reached at
Rocky's at (850) 584-2596.


Carter's

Questioning Leads

To Arrest

On July 1, at 9:25
p.m., Officer Reginald
Alexander was dis- ,
patched to SE Pride '
Street in Madison for
battery.
According to a
police report, the vic-
tim was at her
friend's house when Charles Carter arrived and
knocked on the door. Carter then entered the res-
Please see Carter, Page 4A


Charlie H. Moore,

Jr., Passes

Deacon Charlie H. Moore,
Jr. (affectionately known as
"Junior" by some) was born
April 4, 1926, in the Hamburg
Lovett community of Madi-
son County to the late Charlie
H. Moore, Sr., and Lillie
Smith Moore. Charlie was the
youngest of eleven children.
His parents and siblings pre-
ceded him in death.
He was converted at an early age and joined
Please see Moore, Page 4A


I Locl Weaher


Around Madison
Classifieds
Legals
Bridal


2 Sections, 26 Pages
5-7A Obituaries
16A CARES Dinner
17A Fun Page
10A Health & Nutrition


5A Wed 90/72 Thu 87/72 Fri 88/72 Sat 93/74
8-9A 7/8 7/9 7/10 7/11 -
11A Scattered thunderstorms in the Scattered thunderstorms possible. A few thunderstorms possible. Scattered thunderstorms. Highs in
12-14A morning becoming more wide- the low 90s and lows in the mid
spread in the afte. 70s.


IIne





2A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 8, 2009


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


I Didn't


Know That!


(Wi WIY I$ SAY IN 1


I IHIN\ G Ifl! SYI!)

"Spit Fire"
"I had no idea you were such the little spitfire."
I felt certain it wasn't a compliment. But I couldn't
say for sure.
Not to be confused with the World War II fighter
plane by the same name, spitfire is not an unfamiliar
label for women in the South. In essence, it's a eu-
phemism (big word meaning you go polite when
you'd much prefer to use the "b" word... Our South-
ern equivalent of "Bless his heart" spoken just be-
fore we say what we really think.)
But try to find the origin on this one, and you'll
have to dig.
In case you aren't familiar, the word refers to one
with a feisty, fiery, spunky spirit, most often a female.
(Personally, I prefer to call it "passionate concern,"
but I don't get to decide these things.)
One source traces the word to Elizabethan roots,
crediting its source as one, Lord Spitfire, (but since
Lord Spitfire is not a woman, I question the accuracy
of this, thus we move on.)
Digging deeper we find that the word was first
used in the 1600s, no doubt from someone (I'm guess-
ing a woman) whose feisty spirit made her forever
synonymous with one who spits fire from her mouth
when she needs to get something done.
I was told my great-grandmother was a spitfire.
I'm thinking this may be genetic.
But whatever the true story, I prefer the defini-
tion of "a person subject to strong emotion" as op-
posed to what we all know it really means.
"Burning The Midnight Oil"
Here of late we have a theme, but to be sure (as I
get asked about these things if I don't follow up)
burning the candle at both ends has nothing to do
with burning the midnight oil (save for the fact that
both expressions convey a message of wakefulness).
Otherwise, they are different expressions entirely.
One hails from England; the other straight from the
Bible.
Yes, both phrases engage primordial light-burn-
ing devices, and it is true that burning the midnight
oil is often used to mean one who works well into the
night. But scripturally, the connotation goes much
deeper, having to do with being awake, aware and
ever watchful for the return of the Messiah, repre-
sented by the bridegroom in the story from which
this expression hails.
In the parable of the ten virgins, Jesus likens the
kingdom of heaven to those who are eagerly await-
ing their bridegroom. Five wise, five foolish, the lat-
ter took no oil for their lamps while the wise (like
responsible girl scouts) were always prepared.
From the book of Matthew (25: 6 10) we read:
"And at midnight there was a cry made, Behold,
the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him. Then
all those virgins arose, and trimmed their lamps.
And the foolish said unto the wise, Give us of your
oil; for our lamps are gone out. But the wise an-
swered, saying, No so; lest there be not enough for us
and you: but go ye rather to them that sell, and buy
for yourselves. And while they went to buy, the
bridegroom came; and they that were ready went in
with him to the marriage: and the door was shut."
A passage more about being prepared than work-
ing late, the story is a reminder for Christians every-
where to be on your toes and ever watchful for the
Lord's return. Johnny
"Johnny Cakes"
As if Talking Turkey and cooking High on the
Hog wasn't enough to make your kitchen banter bet-
ter, I am now researching everything from the histo-
ry of strawberries (once believed to cause
birthmarks) to the naming of the sandwich (John
Montagu, fourth earl of Sandwich). In a nutshell, I
never knew cooking could be this fun.
But as this is a Southern cookbook we're baking
up, there are certain stories that I cherish...like the
naming of the Johnnycake (those skillet greasy corn
cakes that will only clog one artery).
Truth be told there are two stories tracing the
name.
The first suggest that the original johnnycakes
came to us via the Shawnee Indians, who taught the
white man how to make them and how to eat them.
From this, the original "Shawnee Cakes" were mis-
interpreted, and over time, slurred into the johnny-
cake today.
But the more likely story, credits the name not to
Johnny but to the journey for which these cakes
were made. A staple for the trail rides and hunting
expeditions of our earliest settlers making their way
cross country, these journey cakes were soon the hit
of the great frontier at a time when flour variation
was likewise making the scene, (hence the phrase
Selling like Hotcakes). Because they were easily
transported and kept even better than flour, these
journeycakes that we now call johnnycakes, were as
American as apple pie.

I Interested in

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4 E-Mail
jlyons57@gmail.com


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word,
comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.
PROTESTING THE PRO I tb I ORS
Two letters protest the hospital administra-
tion requirement for staff uniforms. I protest
the protesters. We are fortunate that we
could hire a hospital administrator for the hos-
pital rescue underway as we sales-tax and gov-
ernment-grant our way to a new hospital. If
buying a uniform is a financial hardship for cur-
rent staff, they may consider the example of an
army lieutenant colonel who grew up in
Louisiana. His appearance for Staff College
classes in Norfolk, Virginia was always inspec-
tion ready and his wife explained: he did his
own laundry, not trusting the base laundry Part
of his college degree requirement was teaching
one semester in her high school her senior year.
He was as neatly dressed then although he wore
the same shirt every day. Every night he washed
and ironed the only shirt he had. (There were
many other good reasons to marry him, of
course.)
9Marianne Qreen



rRed, White &"

True Mysteries


Jackie was born
in Los Angeles in 1914.
There didn't appear to
be anything wrong
with the baby at first.
Jackie was some-
what of an oddball.
Jackie would often
fish ... using dyna-
mite; only had one out-
fit, which was a big
black overcoat; and al-
ways kept a cannon in
the bedroom. Yes, a
cannon.
But wait, there's
more!
As an adult, Jack-
ie had a treehouse in
the backyard. Also
rode a motorcycle.
And was bald, with
bulging eyes unlike
anything you have
ever seen.
Jackie's niece and
nephew referred to
Jackie as an uncle.
Speaking of the
nephew, he was a bit
odd, too, as evidenced
by the fact that he had
a pet octopus. In fact,
the whole family was a
little, how shall we say
it, weird. But that was
part of what made
them so appealing.
Their neighbors
thought they were
strange, yet this fami-
ly thought their nor-
mal neighbors were
strange. Again, it's
part of what made
them so appealing.
The entire family
had a few unusual
pets, including hawks,
bats and an alligator.
Not to mention that
the cat was a lion, and
they also had spiders,
two piranha and a vul-
ture, as well as a man-
eating plant.
This was no ordi-
nary family that Jack-
ie was a part of; in
fact, it was something
that you would expect
to see on a television
sitcom.
There's one other


thing you should
know about Jackie: He
was once married to
actress Betty Grable.
She was his first wife,
and he would later
marry three more
times.
You see, Jackie
was the actor known
as Jackie Coogan, but
he was best known as
Uncle Fester on The
Addams Family show!
It was in his role
as Uncle Fester that he
did all of the above
strange things on The
Addams Family. He
also played many oth-
er memorable roles
during his career, in-
cluding that of Char-
lie Chaplin's sidekick
in "The Kid" and the
title role in Oliver
Twist. He was one of
the very first child ac-
tors to become a big
star, and he was the
first star to get a major
merchandising deal,
with his likeness ap-
pearing on numerous
products.
In addition to his
Addams Family lega-
cy, Jackie Coogan
played a role in get-
ting the California
Child Actor's Bill
passed into law. Jackie
earned more than $4
million as a child ac-
tor, but his mother and
stepfather took most
of it.
By the time Jackie
sued, most of the mon-
ey had already been
spent. He received
only $126,000 after his
legal expenses. Char-
lie Chaplin, who dis-
covered Jackie
Coogan as a child ac-
tor, helped Jackie fi-
nancially. The Child
Actor's Bill, which
gave child actors cer-
tain rights over their
contracts and their
money, is often re-
ferred to as the
Coogan Law.


&Mcrac I s


9CM 6BOSC


Emerald Greene
Publisher


AID RIE OL2O W
I love excuses to get together with friends
and family and make memories/have fun. The
4th of July weekend was no different.
We started the fun-filled weekend out by go-
ing tubing down the Ichetucknee Springs. Chelt-
sie, Brooke, their two boyfriends Corey and
Trent, and myself all left my house Friday
morning at 7:00 a.m. to head to the river. We
rented our tubes, sat in line for over an hour, fi-
nally made it into the park, they then had to sit
and wait on me for another hour while I had to
drive the car back to the "south entrance" and
catch the van back to the "north entrance," and
then finally we were off. Put our tubes in the
COLD water, around 11 a.m. and off we
went.....tubing down the river/springs.
About 20 minutes into the float.... The thun-
der started, and then the rain. (No one told me it
was going to rain that day.) For the first one and
a half hours of the float it was cloudy, windy,
and raining. I was miserable. You see I HATE
cold. I was floating in cold water, the cloudy day
and the wind was making me colder and then
the rain started.... I had chill bumps and was
shivering. My mind wondered, "How in the
world will I be able to float for three hours in
this?" But I continued to smile and tell the girls
how much fun I was having.
But God heard my prayers (and I'm sure
everyone else's floating down that river at the
time), and it eventually cleared up. The sun
came out and the last half of our float was ab-
solutely perfect (except the fact I lost my sun-
glasses in the river.)
We eventually came to the end of our float-
ing adventure, climbed out of the river and then
stood in line while waiting on the tram to take
us back to our car. The rain did hold out....until
we got to our car to start unpacking our picnic
lunch. No problem.... We sat on towels and start-
ed our trip home, instead. The "kids" unpacked
the cooler and passed the lunch out, and we ate
while driving home, in the car.
I still had/was having a great time with the
kids. I guess I was more worried about them and
what they were feeling/experiencing and if they
were having fun. But all the worrying was in
vain. They are teenagers, for gosh sakes. They
can have fun no matter where they are, just as
long as they are all together.
We got back to the house and the four of
them swam in the pool, shot basketball, played
pool and just "hung out" together. No worries.
The rest of the weekend found us hanging
out with friends, eating more food, watching
fireworks, going to Valdosta to see a movie, and
watching a DVD movie at home.
It ended up being an absolutely perfect
weekend. Even with the rain I couldn't laugh
then.... But I can laugh at it now. I have a quote
taped above my computer at work that says,
"Life is not what it's supposed to be. It's what it
is. The way you cope with it is what makes the
difference."
My Mother has always taught me to find the
silver lining in everything, to always make the
best of everything that comes across my path,
but most importantly..... to make memories.
I try my best to make as many memories as I
can. There WILL come a day when all we have
left is memories.
Hug your children. Tell them you love them.
And by all means....go do something with them.
When our final days are upon us, we won't wish
we had worked more during our life....we will
wish we had spent more time with our loved
ones.
Until then..... I'll see you around the town.


isT w0ffK's Online Poll



Which is your preferred news source?


Internet

TV

Newspaper

Radio

Magazine

Word of mouth
0 5 10 15 20

This week's question: Where did you celebrate July 4th?

To view and participate in our weekly online poll, visit www.greenepublishing.com.





Wednesday, July 8, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 3A


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Birthdays And


Barbecues


I hope that everyone
had a happy and safe In-
dependence Day and
took time to thank God
for the freedoms we all
enjoy as Americans.
Lee Worship Center
held a cookout and
gospel sing on Saturday.
Lots of local folks set off
fireworks and lit up the
night sky over Lee.
Glen and Revonda
Frith and Elvoye and
Betty Thomas hosted
their fifth anniversary at
Studstill Lumber last
Wednesday. They also
held the open house in









In Re: Forfei-
ture of $14,900.00 -
other civil
Nathaniel C.
McClain vs. Florida
Parole Commission
other civil
John T. Acerra
vs. Melissa E Acer-
ra other civil
Stacey M. Han-
kins vs. Andre
Hatchett domestic
injunction
Name change -
other civil
STB Recovery,
Inc. vs. Pauline P
Shiver contracts
De 1o r e s
Sanchez vs. Chris
Sanchez dissolu-
tion of marriage
Rachel Fulmer
and Department of
Revenue vs.
Michael Buxen-
baum- support
Voncile Mattair
and Department of
Revenue vs. Ben-
jamin Mitchell -
support
Alice Haviland
and Department of
Revenue vs. Allen
Haviland support
Grace Ander-
son and Depart-
ment of Revenue vs.
Luther Fleming -
support


Got something you really want
to sell? Put it in front of the
faces of thousands of readers
everyday in the Classifieds.
Call today to place your ad!


GREENEr,
Publishing, Inc. j

15 S Ma


the newly-renovated
building. Congratula-
tions to them.
Tiffany Phillips will
celebrate her birthday
on Thursday, July 9.
Brad Forrest will cele-
brate his big day on
Monday, July 13.
That's all the news
for this week! Have a
great week and a beauti-
ful forever! May God
bless each and every one
of you!
A note from co-
writer Bryant Thigpen:
Please remember Jacob
in your prayers. As
many of you know, Ja-
cob's brother Danny was
taken to the hospital on
Friday, had heart
surgery Monday morn-
ing, and has been diag-
nosed with severe
Coronary Heart Disease.
Danny came
through the surgery
okay, but is experiencing
complications from post
surgery Please remem-
ber Jacob and his family
in your prayers.


Did yoai Know...


Ifyou stretch a

standard

Slinky out flat,

it measures 87

feet long.


Phantom


For about 10 years of
my military career, I F
flew the McDonnell-
Douglas F-4 Phantom II.
Developed originally by
the Navy as a fleet de-
fense fighter, the Air
Force adopted the F-4 as G
its mainstay tactical
fighter in 1962. Still, the
aircraft retained at least three el-
ements of its original Navy de-
sign: two engines, heavy landing
gear, and a strong tailhook.
The Phantom was an ungain-
ly looking aircraft with wingtips
bent upward and a horizontal sta-
bilizer bent downward, but those
two big J-79 turbojet engines
would get the machine moving in
a hurry proving the old adage
that "with enough power, even a
brick can fly."
In fact the Phantom was a
Mach 2 fighter, capable of flying
more than twice the speed of
sound. The fastest I ever flew was
Mach 2.05, a little over
1400 miles per hour true
airspeed. Of course, as
fast as the airspeed
gauge was increasing,
the fuel gauge was de-
creasing, so that type of
speed wasn't too practi-
cal.
One of the most
amazing things to me
was how quickly the big
aircraft could acceler-
ate. With both engines
in full afterburner and
the aircraft unloaded,
you could gain a hun-
dred knots in seconds. It 1975
would literally run away Phantom
from you.
Dry, the aircraft weighed
about 29,000 pounds and we could
double that weight to 58 thousand
with fuel and ordnance. The en-
gines produced about 25 thousand
pounds of thrust at military pow-
er. In full afterburner, they pro-
duced 35 thousand pounds so
when we reduced our fuel below
6000 pounds, our thrust to weight
ration exceeded 1:1 we could
climb vertically, literally the
world's fastest elevator.
Inside the cockpit, I sat on a
Martin-Baker ejection seat which
fortunately, I never had to acti-
vate. I had to make 11 separate
connections to "strap in" to the
egress and life support system of
the aircraft.
The cliche "jack of all trades,
master of none" is a good de-


National

Security
Joe Boyles
3uest Columnist


scription of the F-4. We could
haul every type of ordnance in
the Air Force inventory and ac-
complish any mission: air inter-
cept; close air support;
interdiction; nuclear attack.
Nine weapon stations permitted
us to carry guns, missiles, and a
wide variety of bombs and muni-
tions. Armed with a tactical nu-
clear weapon, I sat alert in
England, Germany, Italy, Turkey,
and Korea. Probably the most
ordnance I ever carried was eight
thousand pounds of bombs, about
twice the bomb load of a World
War II B-17. That's a lot of iron.


- Intrepid aviator climbs aboard the trusty


In 1972, I flew 121 combat mis-
sions in the F-4, first from DaNang
Airbase in Vietnam and then Ko-
rat Airbase in Thailand. These
missions ran the gamut of close
air support, interdiction, and air
defense. On a "Linebacker" mis-
sion, I might be one of more than
a hundred fighters approaching
North Vietnam from the west
while the Navy sent a like number
from the east. Generally, we flew
in 4-ship formations.
When the Navy designed the
aircraft, the prevailing wisdom
was that a gun was unnecessary;
all future air-to-air engagements
would be fought with missiles.
Consequently, the F-4C and D
models had no gun we could
carry a 2000 pound gun pod on
the centerline station, but that


S wasn't very practical.
The Air Force corrected
that misconception
with the E model by in-
stalling a 20 millimeter
cannon in the nose be-
low the radome. While
not very practical for
air-to-ground work, the
gun was an ideal close-
in weapon during air-to-air
fights.
For its day, the aircraft was
quite maneuverable. A clean jet
with less than 6000 pounds of fuel
was capable of 8.5 Gs, but again,
that wasn't too practical. Six Gs
at corner velocity was a much
more practical figure. The F-4E
was retrofitted with leading edge
slats that reduced the corner ve-
locity to about 380 knots.
Against the multi-layered air
defense threats of the old Soviet
Union, we practiced a lot of low
level, high speed attacks. I can't
describe how bumpy a ride it is at
540 knots and 75 feet alti-
Stude across a hot desert
floor. I have a lot of
dents in my helmet to
prove the point. Not sur-


prisingly, we lost more
than a few jets and crews
practicing such tactics.
The F-4 was an all-
weather aircraft, so we
had radar and a blind
bombing system. It also
proved to be a good plat-
form for add-on sensors
in the 1970s as the Air
Force began its early ex-
periments with preci-
sion guided weapons. At
this point, we began to
trade in quantity for


quality. For example, if ten
"dumb bombs" give you a proba-
bility of kill (pK) of 50 percent,
then one "smart bomb" may im-
prove the pK to 80 percent.
By the mid-1980s when I last
flew fighters, the Air Force had
begun to phase out the F-4 for
more modern and capable Eagles,
Falcons, and Thunderbolts. By
that time, McDonnell-Douglas
had built 5076 Phantoms at its
Lambert Field, St. Louis facility. I
cannot foresee another produc-
tion run that large for a military
aircraft. Today's combat aircraft
are much more capable and enor-
mously expensive. Besides, the
future trend is toward unmanned
aircraft flown from a remote con-
sole thousands of miles from the
battlefield.


o rida Press Assooi4

2008
Award Winning Newspaper






Chosen one of Florida's Three Outstanding Newspapers
P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Web Site:
www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
news@greenepublishing.com
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bryant@greenepublishing.com
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
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classifieds@greenepublishing.com

Publisher
Emerald Greene
Editor
Jacob Bembry
Production Manager
Heather Bowen
Staff Writers
Michael Curtis and
Bryant Thigpen
Graphic Designers
Stephen Bochma and
James Sutter
Advertising
Sales Representtives
Mary Elen Greene,
Dorothy McKinney,
Jeanette Dunn
and Chelsea Bouley
Classified and Legal Ads
Laura Little
Deadline for classified is
Monday at 3 p.m.
Deadline for Legal Advertisement
is Monday at 5 p.m.
There will be a $3 charge
for Affidavits.
Circulation Department
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
Subscription Rates
In-County $30 *
*Out-of-County $38*
(State & local taxes included)

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper
[USPS 324 800] designed
for the express reading
pleasure of the people of its
circulation area, be they
past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing Inc.,
1695 South SR 53, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post
Office in Madison, FL
32340.
POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to MADI-
SON COUNTY CARRI-
ER, P.O. Drawer 772,
Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper re-
serves the right to reject any
advertisement, news matter,
or subscriptions that, in the
opinion of the manage-
ment, will not be for the
best interest of the county
and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investi-
gate any advertisement sub-
mitted.
All photos given to
Greene Publishing Inc. for
publication in this newspa-
per must be picked up no
later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off.
Greene Publishing, Inc. will
not be responsible for pho-
tos beyond said deadline.





4A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 8, 2009


CRIME BLOTTER & FROM PAGE ONE


Madison County

CRIME BEAT
ALL SUSPECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED
INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY IN A
COURT OF LAW

McQuay Arrested
On July 3, at approximately 6 p.m., Patrolman
Gilbert was dispatched to SW Georgetown Rd., in ref-
erence to a trespassing after warning call.
According to the police report, Gilbert responded
to the call on Georgetown Rd. Upon arrival, Gilbert
spoke with the victim who reported that her ex-
boyfriend, Lugene McQuay, came over and took the
keys to her house. He then questioned the victim of
who he was and where he lived, and was informed
that McQuay had a trespassing warning for the entire
Madison Heights Complex. Gilbert was then informed
of where he was and what he should be wearing.
Gilbert went to the residence of McQuay, where
he said he had been to the residence, but did not have
her house keys.
McQuay was then placed under arrest for tres-
passing after warning and was transported to the
Madison County Jail.

Gonsalves Arrested
According to the police report, On July 2, at ap-
proximately 8:38 p.m., Patrolman Joseph Agner was
dispatched to the Madison Heights Apartments in
reference to a trespassing.
An anonymous caller notified dispatch that
Donovan Malachi Gonsalves was at the apartment
complex, but had been issued a trespassing warn-
ing. Agner was advised that there was a trespassing
warning that was issued by Sgt. Chris Cooks of the
Madison Police Department on Sept. 10, 2008.
When Agner arrived at the complex, he spotted
Gonsalves walking toward the E-building. Agner
then made contact with Gonsalves and placed him
under arrest for trespassing after warning.
Agner was then advised Gonsalves was on coun-
ty probation in Madison County
Gonsalves was charged with trespassing after
warning and violation of probation.



Carter

Continued from Page 1A

idence and requested that the victim come outside.
Carter refused to go outside and Carter reached over
the coffee table and grabbed the victim by her clothes.
The victim used much force and snatched the victim's
clothes off, leaving scratches and bruises on the arm.
Witnesses were present confirming the victim's testi-
mony
According to a separate police report, on July 2, at
approximately 3:31 p.m., Patrolman Jeff Rosenberg
was at the intersection of Moore and Thompkins St.
Rosenberg was looking for a blue or purple Chevrolet
vehicle. The car was believed to contain Carter, who
was wanted for questioning in the battery case.
Rosenberg observed a car that matched the de-
scription, and at the intersection of Armwood and SE
Farm Road, he activated the emergency lights, signal-
ing the car to stop. The vehicle continued on Arm-
wood and did not stop until he turned onto County
Camp Road.
Rosenberg then made contact with the driver, and
observed that Carter was sitting in the passenger seat.
The patrolman then asked for the passenger's name
and he replied Ron John and provided a false social se-
curity number. Rosenberg had Carter's driver's li-
cense photo in the patrol vehicle. The person in the
passenger seat was the same person in the photo.
Officer Reginald Alexander arrived at the scene
and verified that it was in fact Charles Carter. Alexan-
der advised Carter to step out of the vehicle. Carter
was then placed under arrest.
While searching Carter's personal belongings,
Rosenberg found a white powdery substance wrapped
in a five dollar bill. Also inside Carter's pocket were
two straws approximately two inches in length.
Carter was charged with battery, resisting with-
out violence, possession of cocaine and possession of
drug paraphanalia.
Carter was transported to the Madison County


Tn Madisonrrorr the corner of the Enterprise-
Recorder building every Wednesday.
Tilapia, Shrimp,
Spicy Shrimp, Catfish...........$7.50
Oysters, Crab Cakes,
Mullet (when available)................$8.50
Combine any of the 2 above ...$10.00
Combine any of the 3 above ...$12.00
Pork Chop or
Chicken Tenders.......................$6.50
Above served with hushpuppies and
choice of 2: Fries, Slaw, or Cheese Grits
Weekly Salad Special
We Start Serving at 11:00 am,
Weather permitting
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in Geenill wih aspeialmeu


Neighborhood


Watch

Continued from Page 1A
The session will be held on July 13, at 7 p.m., at
the Public Safety Academy at North Florida Com-
munity College. The facility is located at #35 Anhin-
ga Lane, which can be easily accessed from Highway
53 North (Washington), by taking the first left after
Oak Ridge Cemetery, just out of downtown.
Organizers further stated, "Everyone's invited.
We need residents from all districts to attend." For
additional questions, please call (850) 445-7755.



Black Mold


Continued from Page 1A


and his staff have managed to provide exceptional
services in spite of the less than desirable digs.
Those conditions have now passed a point of no
return, however, and the mold is beyond cleaning or
cost-effective treatment. Illnesses have occurred as a
result, so health officials have given the order to re-
locate. The question is "Where to move them?"
During their board meeting of July 1, county
commissioners were presented a few preliminary
suggestions, including rental of temporary space at
North Florida Community College, the purchase
and renovation of a building near downtown Madi-
son, and/or temporarily splitting crews between the
fire and rescue stations in Lee and Greenville.
Indoor air quality is regulated under the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency, as well as other
health agencies, and while there is a prevailing sen-
timent that these organizations sometimes interfere
with business unnecessarily, all close to this situa-
tion acknowledge the urgency
"Black mold" or "toxic black mold," is frequent-
ly associated with poor indoor air quality that aris-
es after fungal growth on water-damaged building
materials, which simple visual observation con-
firmed throughout the facility After mold forma-
tion, it needs nutrition to grow, which it obtains by
degrading the surface it is growing on. During the
process of degrading surface for nutrition, mold
causes formation of Volatile Organic Compounds
(VOCs). These VOCs are harmful to human respira-
tory and nervous systems.
Symptoms of black mold poisoning can be very
serious and include:
Development of rashes and hives on skin
Nausea
Memory loss
Bleeding in lungs
Allergic respiratory reactions
Irregularity in blood pressure
Damaged digestion and respiratory system
Infections of urinary tract, problems in uri-
nation
High level or prolonged exposure to mold
can lead to infertility
The Board of County Commissioners intends to
move the process forward quickly, targeting their
meeting of July 15 for review and follow-up.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.



Seniors

Continued from Page 1A

that the elderly have requested they desperately
need. Some items that seniors are urgently needing
consist of fans or air conditioners, Ensure/Boost,
lift chair, walking canes, a vacuum, sofa or love seat,
mops and mop buckets, brooms, other cleaning sup-
plies, and incontinence supplies (pull-ups or adult
diapers, poise pads).
The Senior Center is also looking for volunteers
to facilitate and organize a group to do chore ser-
vices for the elderly three to four times a year. This
group will perform house duties for the elderly, such
as minor repairs, painting, yard work, etc.
The food pantry at the Senior Center is running
low on food, and they are seeking individuals or
groups who would be interested in sponsoring a
canned food drive for the seniors.
Also, the activities coordinator is searching for
an individual who would volunteer their time to
host a birthday party once a month at the center for
seniors who had a birthday in that month.
If you wish to donate the needed items, or to vol-
unteer your time for the much needed cause, please
call Sharon Underhill at the Senior Citizens Center
at (850) 973-4241.


CUINR


-Im-


SUWANNEE- i
HAMILTON,
TECHNICAL CENTER


Eduardo

Continued from Page 1A

airborne, hitting the tree with his full body.
Fernandez died at the scene and Tamayo was
taken to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital with seri-
ous injuries.
"This is a tragic loss for the family Eduardo was
a very responsible young man and had only driven
the four-wheeler on the family property prior to the
accident. Their property is right next to the spot
where the accident took place. We believe he was
taking his father a cell phone, which his father had
left behind when leaving to bring a mutual friend to
visit my chicken farm," Jesus Martinez explained.
"Family and friends were visiting for the Fourth
of July Leo (Fernandez-the boy's father) was just
leaving his driveway, when Eduardo pulled around
him to get his father's attention. We believe he was
trying to motion for his father to stop when the four-
wheeler struck the embankment. The family has al-
ways taken great care with Eduardo, and this
unfortunate accident is very hard on them," he
added.
Comments from the public have been numerous
and mixed, with some harshly condemning the fam-
ily for allowing the young man to drive the four-
wheeler even with adult supervision which
was used in the family farming business. Friends
close to the family urge the public not to rush to
judgment, stating that the family's contribution to
the community and each other is noteworthy, rein-
forcing that the loss was a tragic accident.
Memorial Services will be held on Thursday,
July 9, at 7 p.m. at the Fernandez residence on
Camelot Way, with signs posted for convenience.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.



Moore

Continued from Page 1A

New Canaan Missionary Baptist Church. Charlie re-
mained faithful and dedicated senior Deacon at New
Canaan until he was stricken with illness. He served
in every capacity as needed such as arriving first to
make the sanctuary comfortable for the congrega-
tion, leading devotion during service, chairing the
deacon board and superintendent of Sunday school.
At the age of 19, Charlie enlisted in the U.S.
Army and served in World War II. He was decorated
with a Victory Medal and Army Occupation Medal
before he was honorably discharged in 1946.
Upon his return to Madison County, he married
Ezell Lauria and to this union five children were
born. He was employed at the Stern Mill in
Greenville, and a full-time farmer to support his
family. In 1966, Charlie gained employment at Proc-
tor and Gamble (Buckeye) in Perry, and retired in
1992.
Charlie was a very active member of the com-
munity and a champion for community progress. He
was a member of the Widow Son Masonic Lodge #9,
Big Bend Rural Healthcare Network and Madison
County Chamber of Commerce. He was also a for-
mer member of the Board of Directors of Madison
County Memorial Hospital and a current member of
the Board of Directors for the Madison County Com-
munity Bank and several other local organizations.
God called this good and faithful servant home
on July 6, 2009. Mourning his passing, yet rejoicing
in knowing that he is with the Lord, his faithful and
loving wife of 60 years, Ezell L. Moore, daughters:
Wanda Moore-Williams(Ozell) Miami; Frances
Moore-Phillips ( Ben) Las Vegas, NV; sons Charles
Moore (Elizabeth) Atlanta, Ga.; Ronnie Moore
(Rhonda) Greenville; Kenneth Moore (Cassandra)
Miami. Eight grandchildren: Antionette Moore,
Kristin Williams, and KeAundra Moore of Miami,
FL; Kendra Moore of Tallahassee; Brandon and Jes-
sica Phillips of Las Vegas, Nev.; Capt. Marques
Moore, Ft. Carson, Colo.; 2nd Lt. Ashley Moore,
Camp Johnson, N.C. Seven great-grandchildren:
Marquita, Tyresha, Jovan, Justin, Kaylin, Kyra and
Amani Miami; two nieces: Louise Moore-Campbell
(Willis) Tampa and Dorothy Moore-Singletary
(Charles) Merritt Island; god-son Raymond "Chook-
ie" Stephens (Beatrice) Madison, and host of sor-
rowing relatives and friends.
Viewing will be held at New Canaan Missionary
Baptist Church July 10, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Services
will be held July 11, at 2 p.m., at Van H. Priest Audi-
torium, NFCC.


Complete Body Repair Frame Repair






615 NE Colin Kelly Highway
Madison, FL 32340


Under New Ownership


Tony & Indy Kelley



Day Phone: 850-973-6280
Fax: 850-973-3794


a





Wednesday, July 8, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 5A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


L FwtObfuay


Elizabeth

Winderweedle

Hinton
Elizabeth Winderweedle Hinton, 87, resident of
105 Windsor Oaks Ct., widow of Lawrence Van Hin-
ton, died June 30, 2009, at her home.
Born in Day, Sept. 17, 1921, she was a daughter
of the late William E. and Mary Frances Culbreth
Winderweedle. She was a graduate of Florida State
College for Women and taught in the Florida public
school system for 43 years. She retired from Pinetta
Elementary School. Formerly of Pinetta, Mrs. Hin-
ton had made her home in Greenwood since 2006.
A member and former treasurer of Pinetta
United Methodist Church, she also served in vari-
ous other leadership roles within the church.
Surviving are three daughters, Sandra Gail H.
Fischer of Charlotte, N.C.; Mary Van H. and hus-
band, Phil Ellenberg, of Greenwood; and Susan H.
and husband, Gary Leive, of Black Mountain, N.C.;
two grandchildren, Winde Ellenberg and Philip El-
lenberg, both of Charleston, S.C.
Graveside services will be conducted at 1 p.m.,
Thursday, in Mt. Horeb Cemetery in Pinetta, with
Rev. Lee M. FerDon officiating.
The body is at Blyth Funeral Home. The family
will receive friends at the home in Windsor Oaks
until 8 p.m., Wednesday.
In lieu of flowers, memorials are to be made to
Pinetta United Methodist Church, Pinetta, FL
32350.
For online condolences please visit www.blyth
funeralhome.com.
Blyth Funeral Home & Cremation Services is
assisting the Hinton family.


'CtOi-uar


Gussie Norris O'Neal-Smith


Gussie Norris O'Neal-
Smith, of Greenville, age 90,
died Thursday, in Tallahassee.
She was born Dec. 18, 1918, in
Madison County
Funeral services were held
Sunday, July 5, at 3 p.m., at Beg-
gs Funeral Home in Madison,
with burial at Harmony Ceme-
tery
Visitation was held Satur-
day, July 4, 6-8 p.m., at Beggs
Funeral Home.
She was a life-long resident
of Madison County Her joy in
life was family, friends and most
of all, her God. She was an ac-
tive Sunday school teacher at
Harmony Baptist Church. She
enjoyed cooking homemade
chicken and dumplings, co-
conut cake and peanut brittle.
When she found out she had to
have surgery on her heart, her
goal was that she would be able
to teach Sunday school and
make her chicken and
dumplings again.
She was loved by many and
will be missed. She was a mem-
ber of Harmony Baptist Church
in Cherry Lake.
She is survived by one
son, Jimmy O'Neal (Dot) of
Cherry Lake; three step-
sons, Russell Smith (Joan) of
Redlands, Calif., and Glen


Smith (Florida), and Freddie
Smith (Mary Kay) of Madison; a
step-daughter, Linda Poppell
(Fain) of Madison; two sis-
ters, Lorene Darville (Walter) of
Tampa and Louise Morgan
(Harvey) of Day; two brothers,
Donald Norris and Johnny
(Sandra) Norris of Madison;
three sisters-in-law, Martel Nor-
ris of Soddy Daisy, Tenn., Wil-
lette Norris of Bryceville, and
Kathryn Norris of Huntsboro,
Ala.; two grandchildren, Lynn
Key (Vernie) of Monticello and
Cindy Williams (Lee) of Madi-
son; seven step-grandchildren,
Ricky Smith, Richard Smith
(Krista), Becky McClure
(Jonathan), Ben Smith (Juana),
Margaret Ann Bunch (Scott),
Beth Poppell and Melissa Quin-
ton (Lincoln); four great-grand-
children, Kalyn Key, D.J. Key,
Josh Williams and Scott
Williams; and a host of nieces
and nephews.
She was preceded in death
by her husband of 48 years,
Willie O'Neal; husband of five
years, Russell Smith; daughter,
Myrtice Marie O'Neal; son,
William Jack O'Neal; her par-
ents, Reno and Mamie Lou Nor-
ris; sister, Rilla Norris; and five
brothers, Wilbur, Charles, Billy,
James and Jack Norris.


Henry

"Hank" Randell

Stallings
Henry "Hank" Randell Stallings
passed away on Thursday, July 2,
2009, in Valdosta, Ga. Mr. Stallings
was born on July 30, 1962, in Madi-
son.
The Service of Remembrance
was Sunday, July 5, at 4 p.m., at the
First United Methodist Church in
Madison.
Donations may be made to First
United Methodist Church, PO Box
294, Madison, FL 32341.
He worked as a cardiovascular
surgeon's assistant in Houston,
Texas, and Atlanta, Ga., before mov-
ing to Quitman, Ga., in 2008. He was
a graduate of NFCC, FSU, and two
years' Surgical at University of Al-
abama. He was a member of First
United Methodist Church in Madi-
son.
He is survived by his mother and
step-father, Ann and Rudy Hamrick
of Madison; a grandmother, Rachel
Reichmann; two brothers, Nat Nor-
fleet (Monica) of Tuscon, Az., and
Mike Norfleet (Nida) of Madison;
two nieces, Lindsay Fico (Damon)
and Kristen Norfleet; two nephews,
Eric Norfleet and Tre' Norfleet; and
many other relatives and friends.
He was preceded in death by his
father, Henry Alison Stallings.


IbFor tceaa0w rp he compl te c lendaridsit ww.gre ishingcom.


July 11
Big Bend Horseman's Associa-
tion's first open all breed horse show
will be held July 11. For more infor-
mation, please visit www.bigbend
horse.com.
July 11
LifeSong will be in concert at Sir-
mans Baptist Church in Greenville
on Saturday, July 11, at 6 p.m. Admis-
sion is free; a love offering will be re-


ceived during the concert. For more
information, please call (850) 948-
4228.
July 12-15
Madison Church of God an-
nounces a revival with Evangelist
Bennie Jones, an ordained bishop
who has been in full-time ministry for
over three decades. The revival will
be held July 12-15; 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.,
Sunday, and 7 p.m., Monday thru


Wednesday; at Madison Church of
God, located at 771 Colin Kelly Hwy,
in Madison. For more information,
please call (850) 973-3339.
July 14-17
The Salvation Army Youth V-
Team Shining God's Light will
host Crocodile Dock, a Vacation Bible
School, July 14-17, 5:30 p.m. to 8:15
p.m. A picnic supper will begin the
evening at Greenville Haffye Hayes


park with bible school activities in
the Senior Citizen Center for ages 5 to
95 following. Pre-register with George
or Gale Blevins at (850) 948-2119.
July 17
Excellence Dance Studio Inc. pre-
sents a youth essay challenge. Pick up
a pen during your summer break and
earn up to $100 or studio time. The es-
say deadline is July 17. For more in-
formation, call (850) 322-7673.


A0 A

HA LT NOTFIC00IO


A major name brand hearing aid provider wishes to field test a remarkable new digital hearing
instrument in the area. This offer is free of charge and you are under no obligation.

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*'Wa e





6A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 8, 2009


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Madison Residents Join Taylor TEA Party


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Starting with protests that began
immediately after President Barack
Obama's election, the national Taxed
Enough Already TEA Party cam-
paigns continue, with a regional gath-
ering on July 4 in Perry Aligning with
the national themes associated with
Independence Day and the Boston Tea
Party, protesters rallied around con-
cerns ranging from government
spending, taxation and health care, to
gun control and morality.
Organizers made no apologies for
the anti-Obama sentiment, as was evi-
denced by statements on posters and
banners, and although there were few
black participants, one black organiz-
er noted that regardless of race, he is-
n't against Obama's spending policies
so much as he opposes what he be-
lieves are decisions that "oppose con-
servative Christians."


Regardless of race or party, how-
ever, it was obvious that many pre-
sent genuinely believe that current
federal policy will conclude in finan-
cial disaster and the destruction of
private enterprise, concluding in a so-
cialist state. And while many agree
that President George W. Bush and
many corrupt business executives -
many of who are Republicans as well
- are also responsible for the current
state of the economy, they passionate-
ly hold that, left unchecked, Obama
will be the proverbial "nail in the cof-
fin."
Held at Forest Capital State Park,
the TEA Party was one among hun-
dreds that have been conducted na-
tionally There was an estimated 200
visitors, which included residents
from Madison, Jefferson and sur-
rounding counties.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, July 4, 2009
Madison County residents Jimmie and Latrelle Ragans are joined by Mike
Williams (center) at the Taylor TEA Party held on July 4 in Perry.



Teen Advocate

Launching Second Book

Word From My Kings & Queens
author seeking stories of triumph


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, July 4, 2009
Nelson Pryor stands on the corner of US 27 and 19 in Perry to direct traffic
to the Taylor TEA Party held on July 4 at Forest Capital State Park.


The Southern Pine


[ n Y


PREVENT

Beetle Prevention S) )


Cost-Share Program


2009 Sign-Up Period: July 1st Aug 12th


Apply for incentive payments or cost-
share assistance with:

Thinning Mechanical underbrush removal

Prescribed burning Planting longleaf pine

For guidelines and application materials, contact your
local Florida Division of Forestry office or visit:


www.fl-dof.com


U


A message from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division
of Forestry, Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner. Funding supplied by the USDA Forest
Service; an equal opportunity provider.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Teen advocate and
author Merv Mattair is
undertaking a new book
and is seeking input
from those he wishes to
serve with this new writ-
ing effort. Emphasizing
the theme of "Overcom-
ing Seemingly Insur-
mountable Odds," is also
the name of the book.
"Now, it's time to
hear a 'Word From My
Kings & Queens' to show
readers how to overcome
seemingly insurmount-
able odds that keep them
from renewing their
minds," Mattair ex-
plains. "This is an oppor-
tunity to be a Blessing to
others around the world
by sharing your story
with them in my upcom-
ing book that's going to
top the charts. I only
have a few slots avail-
able; therefore, if you
think that your story can
benefit someone else, I
would love to review it
and possibly reveal it to
the world."
The author further
declares, "Overcoming
Seemingly Insurmount-
able Odds are only obsta-


cles that we think
are impossible to:
overcome."
"By applying
for a space in my
next book, you will
be able to share
your Web site, your
business, your
email address, and
your life changing
story to the
world," he contin-
ues.
Mattair be-
lieves in renew-
ing youth and
young adults,
and is therefore
looking for those sto-
ries that capture the
theme most effectively.
He, again, reminds po-
tential contributors that
only a select number of
slots are available, so if
interested, please con-
tact him at www.kings
queens.org or by e-mail at
royalty@myexcel.com.
Mattair can also be
reached by phone at (850)
673-7481, where either
Mattair or his publisher
will be available for
more information. Last-
ly, this opportunity is for
anyone, no matter age or
race.


Word from My
..ings & Queens


'I"
?* .* .. .
? L^


Teen advocate and
author Merv Mattair is
following his first book,
Word From My Kings &
Queens, with a comple-
ment book, Overcoming
Seemingly Insurmount-
able Odds.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at michael
@greenepublishing.com.


Serving Madison,

Jefferson, Taylor &

Lafayette Counties


Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King Agent Glen King Agent

233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071

Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St.* Monticello (850) 997-2213


Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399


FAR

BUREAU

I INSRANCE





Wednesday, July 8, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 7A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Officials Honor Jim Stanley ^. ,-.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Jim Stanley has
been making contribu-
tions to Madison Coun-
ty for over half a
century From the early
days, helping his father
run the family busi-
ness, to the years man-
aging T.J. Beggs Men's
Store; from his stretch
with the Florida High-
way Patrol, to his elec-
tion as city
commissioner of Madi-
son, where he is cur-
rently mayor; Stanley
has touched the lives of
thousands, many of
whom came out on
June 30 to celebrate his
retirement after 18
years as Emergency
Management Director.
Held at the court-
house, the retirement
reception featured a
number of state and lo-
cal officials, in addition
to family and friends,
who traveled to Madi-
son to recognize Stan-
ley for the enormous
strides the emergency
management depart-
ment has realized dur-


ing his tenure. Recall-
ing exceptional
achievements and
memorable milestones,
each congratulated
him, but none more
than his program coor-
dinator, Vicki Brown,
now succeeding him as
director.
"I nominated Jim
for Boss of the Year a
few years ago, which he
won," said Brown. "It
was a very special mo-
ment for me as well, be-
cause it gave me an
opportunity to let oth-
ers know what a won-
derful boss he was to
me, and what a friend
he is to everybody I will
miss him so much and
thank him for all he has
taught me," she an-
nounced tearfully
Board of County
Commissioners Chair
Wayne Vickers echoed
the sentiments, pre-
senting Stanley a hand-
some plaque in
recognition of his ser-
vice. State Emergency
Response Team officials
were also in atten-
dance, also honoring


Stanley with a certifi-
cate for outstanding
achievement. To put
these associations in
perspective, Craig Fu-
gate, currently the U.S.
FEMA director is
among colleagues who
expressed personal
praise for Stanley's
emergency manage-
ment leadership.
As Stanley stepped
forward to address the
gathering, his family
surrounded him, which
visually captured the
feature that perhaps
best describes Stanley's
management style:
Treat everyone like
family Whether one is a
judge or a fraternity
brother, a citizen with a
complaint or a political
opponent, Stanley al-
ways has an ear to lend
to his great sense of


fair play
"I want to thank
everybody for coming. I
appreciate all of your
support and the won-
derful recognition I
have received today,"
Stanley said. "I want to
especially thank my
wife, Sandra, for her
support and sacrifice ...
as well as Vicki Brown,
who I know is going to
make an excellent di-
rector. I complement
the commissioners on
choosing her to replace
me and thank them
again for all they've
done to support the de-
partment over the
years. Of course, I also
give thanks to the Lord
who is the provider of
all things."
Michael Curtis can
be reached at michael
@greenepublishing.com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, June 30, 2009)
Wayne Vickers (left), chair of the Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners of Madison County, presents
Emergency Management Director Jim Stanley a
handsome plaque for eighteen years of outstanding
performance.


III.1
rro n n Ff


tanes tel Rdaos Bttr es un ar.. Io


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, June 30, 2009)
Jim Stanley is joined by his family during his retirement reception at the Madison County Courthouse
on June 30. Pictured back row left to right: Ben and Shawn Godwin, Jim and Sandra Stanley, Terra Godwin,
and Jennifer and Jason Stanley. Front row: J.B. Godwin and Sam Stanley.


CROSSWINDS

PUTLS OUT THE

OLE RED HATS


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Crosswinds Nursing
and Rehabilitation Cen-
ter in Greenville hosted
their first Red Hat Soci-
ety meeting in nearly
two years on Wednesday,
June 24, in the cafeteria
of the center.
"Back when I was
here in 2006, we became
members of the Red Hat
Society," stated Dianne
Sullivan, the activities
director for the center.
"When I left for a short
time, no one did any Red
Hat meetings, to my
knowledge. Now that I'm
back, I, along with Tracy
Smith, plan to start hav-
ing the meetings again."
"The women love
it," she said. "These
women need something
that will make them feel
special." And the pur-
pose of the Red Hat Soci-
ety is to do just that.
According to redhat
society.com, the objective
of the society is to help
mothers, daughters and
grandmothers enjoy life
to its fullest. The pro-
gram is a network for
women who are ap-
proaching the age of 50
and beyond, and who are
interested in joining red-
gloved hands and


1.

Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Bryant Thigpen, June 24, 2009
Lyvonne Taylor, (center) was crowned Queen
during the Red Hat Society meeting, and is pictured
with Activities Director Dianne Sullivan (right) and
CNA Christina Allmendinger.


spreading joy and com-
panionship found within
and among the chapters.
The Red Hat Society
throws most rules to the
wind, and believes in
having a good time,
while remembering
manners.
People who haven't
reached the age of 50 are
welcome to the organiza-
tion as the "Pink Hats."
Crosswinds enjoyed
the Red Hat meeting that


386-719-0421

Jimmy Lyons -
Lake City, Florida
jlyons57@gmail.com n


consisted of fun music, a
little bit of dancing, and
strawberry shortcake.
along with fruit punch.
"The residents had a
wonderful time with the
music and the entertain-
ment," Sullivan stated.
The queen for this
month was Lyvonne
Taylor, who was robed
and honored during the
gathering. "Next month
we'll select a new queen,
so that we are sure to
honor each member par-
ticipating," said Sulli-
van.
Ten ladies partici-
pated in the party, which
is open to all members of
the Red Hat Society If
one is interested in par-
ticipating in next
month's meeting, please
call Dianne Sullivan or
Tracy Smith at (850) 948-
4601.


Local Cardiology Office


Now Open

at 293 West Base Street

Call 973-8600 for an appointment



Florida Coastal Cardiology

Now Open to Schedule

Appointments


Get your heart and vascular tests

and evaluation done locally


Services performed in office


Nuclear stress test to check for blockages
in the arteries of the heart


Evaluation for the risk of a heart attack


Ultrasound of the heart and heart valves


* Ultrasound of the
brain


* Ultrasound of the


blood supply to the



blood supply to the legs


* Ultrasound to check for aneurysms


* Monitors for heart rhythm problems

Help Wanted: Medical Assistant or LPN
Fax: 850-653-4135
or email: floridacoastalcardiology@yahoo.com




8A Madison County Carrier


Gordon Tractor, Inc.
Come See Us For Sales & Service of
New Holland Equipment

Congratulations To All Our
Area Farmers Who
Received Recognition
491 SW Range Ave. Madison, FL
850-973-2245
INEW HOLLAND


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"Proudly Supporting Conservation"


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Congratulations To All 1
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8349 SR 6 West Jasper, Florida 32052
386.792.2929 w


Wednesday, July 8, 2009


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Specializing in small grains




AGNER FARMS
4572 N.E. County Road 255
Lee, Florida 32059
850 971- 5648
Willie Agner Owner
Rye and Rye Grass Available
Congratulations to all
Recipients of Honor and
Thank You for Your
Conservation Efforts!


Madison County Carrier 9A


MADISON FARMERS HONORED AT CARES SUPPER AND CELEB


RATION


LIVE OAK
June 30, 2009
Twenty-six local
farmers who help pro-
tect the environment
were recognized for
their efforts as part of
the County Alliance
for Responsible Envi-
ronmental Steward-
ship (CARES)
program on June 25.
The Florida Farm
Bureau and the
Suwannee River Part-
nership created
CARES to highlight ef-
forts by farm owners
to improve natural re-
source management
in the Suwannee and
Santa Fe river basins.
At the event, held
at the Dwight Stansel
Farm and Nursery in
Suwannee County,
CARES farmers were
recognized and con-
gratulated by Florida
Agriculture Commis-
sioner Charles Bron-
son and Florida Farm
Bureau President
John Hoblick.
The event drew
hundreds of folks, in-
cluding farmers, local
officials and others
from both the Suwan-
nee and Santa Fe river
basins.
Before supper was
served, some partici-
pants sat on bales of
hay and listened to a
local band, while oth-
ers enjoyed tasty appe-
tizers, including
boiled peanuts, corn
on the cob and fried
gator tail. Members of
the partnership
manned the dinner


cal growers and pro-
ducers.
Kelly Philman, a
farmer who was rec-
ognized this year,
spoke in favor of the
program.
"We need to not
only protect our water
resources, but need to
let people know out-
side the farm that we
are doing our best,"
said Philman, of
Gilchrist County "We
want to let the public
know that we are tak-
ing care of the land
and we are protecting
our resources."
CARES farmers
are committed to im-
proving the environ-
ment by imple-
menting Best Manage-
ment Practices
(BMPs). BMPs help
conserve water and re-
duce nitrate pollution
in groundwater that
can result from ani-
mal wastes and from
fertilizers that aren't
applied properly
The following
were recognized at the
9th Annual CARES
dinner : Timmy and
Mickey Tuten, Madi-
son; Coggins Farms,
Hamilton; Michael
Dukes, Union; David
Echeverria, Levy;
Gary Jones, Dixie;
Jack Meeks, Levy;
John Parrish, Levy;
Roland Parrish,
Union; Kelly Philman,
Gilchrist; Don
Spradley, Columbia;
James Tallman, Brad-
ford; Big Trees Planta-
tion, Inc., Alachua;
Bud and Judy
O'Quinn, Columbia;
Ross, James and
William Terry, Colum-


bia; Bryan and Wendi
Jennings, Columbia;
John and Donna
Risoli, Madison; Cor-
rence Fields, Madison;
Jerry and Vicki
Fletcher, Madison;
Jesse and Beulah
Cone, Madison; Paul
and Almera Blount,
Madison; Mike and
Debra Knowles, Madi-
son; WH. and Emo-
gene Fletcher, Mad-
ison; Henry and
Tanya Terry, Madison;
Irma and Fidenacio
Torres, Madison;
Harold and Troy Platt,
Madison; and Howard
Mobley, Suwannee.
For more informa-
tion about the CARES
program, call the
Suwannee River Part-
nership at 386-362-
0431. You may also call
your county Farm Bu-
reau office or Scot Eu-
banks, Florida Farm
Bureau Federation, at
352-384-2633.


Farmers recognized

for environmental

stewardship


Irma and Fidenacio Torres, of Madison County, Harold and Troy Platt, of Madison County, were rec-
were recognized for environmental stewardship at the ognized for environmental stewardship at the 9th An- J d Beulah Cone, of Madison County, were
9th Annual CARES dinner on June 25. Pictured from nual CARES dinner on June 25. Pictured from left, recognized for environmental stewardship at the 9th
left, Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bron- Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bronson, Annual CARES dinner on June 25. Pictured from left,
son, Irma Torres, Fidenacio Torres and Florida Farm Bu- the Platt family and Florida Farm Bureau President Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bronson,
reau President John Hoblick. John Hoblick. Jesse Cone and Florida Farm Bureau President John
Hoblick.


Iimmy and Mickey luten, ot Madison County, were recognized tor environmental
stewardship at the 9"t Annual CARES dinner on June 25. Pictured from left, Florida
Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bronson, the Tuten family and Florida Farm Bu-
reau President John Hoblick.


John and Donna Risoli, of Madison County, were recognized for environmental stewardship at the
9th Annual CARES dinner on June 25. Pictured from left, Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles
Bronson, the Risoli family and Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick.


Corrence Fields, of Madison County, was recog-
nized for environmental stewardship at the 9th Annual
CARES dinner on June 25. Pictured from left, Florida
Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bronson, Fields
and Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick.

-VB


W.H. and Emogene Fletcher, of Madison County,
were recognized for environmental stewardship at the
9th Annual CARES dinner on June 25. Pictured from
left, Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bron-
son,W.H. Fletcher, Emogene Fletcher and Florida Farm
Bureau President John Hoblick.


ULFORD FAMILY

FARMS, LLC.
Monticello, Florida

Producers of green peanuts
for boiling since 1945 1.
Gary Fulford (850) 997-3780
Stephen Fulford (850) 997-3733 ,'
Bury Fulford (850) 997-2982
Ernest Fulford (850) 997-1122 '


Paul and Almera Blount, of Madison County, were
recognized for environmental stewardship at the 9th
Annual CARES dinner on June 25. Pictured from left,
Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bronson,
Paul Blount, Almera Blount, and Florida Farm Bureau
President John Hoblick.


NORTH FLORIDA
PHARMACY
OFM ADI S


th CARES Poga


u'r inlluls, olium
W ] W ;,l III (]II l tO] I( ;]o, I llI
TH LOCA FDI n 'L FARMERS OF] 01
TIS Cl"][OMMUNLITY.ib'


We Support All Our Area Farmers


FARM BUREAU A
Serving Madison, Jefferson, Taylor & Lafayette Counties
Freddy Pitts AgencyManager
Jimmy King Agent Glen King Agent
233W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071
Freddy Pitts
105W.Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213
Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371
Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399
St 24/7 Claim Service: 1-866-275-7322
"Helping You Is What We Do Best."


.JEMILLE TJEMOLIVE
Proudly supports & Salutes
The Farmers & Ranchers
of Madison County.
Come See Us
For All Your Pharmacy Needs!









Proudly Supports the

CARES Program

13293 W Hwy 90 Greenville, FL 32331
850-948-2968
Charles Roland Owner Earlene C Roland Manager


We Congratulate the

Honored Farmers in

Madison County!







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Call or visit our website
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I OA Madison County Carrier


Wednesday, July 8, 2009


*towLI~k
clr&hot #4W




Wednesday, July 8, 2009


www.2reenepublishin2.com


FUN PAGE


Madison County Carrier 11A


m a-


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::: :Syndicated Content

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12A Madison County Carrier


www.2reenepublishin2.com


Wednesday, July 8, 2009


HEALTH


Three Madison County Youth Attend Leadership Suinmmit


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
There is a growing
sentiment in America
that few possess real
leadership skills.
Merely being the boss
or owning the compa-
ny or running the gov-
ernment doesn't mean
one is a leader. Today's


leaders must reflect
character and be will-
ing to steer clear of so-
cial temptation.
But experts agree,
good habits don't just
appear. They must be
taught and nurtured;
and today the learning
better be interesting
or kids just won't con-


nect to it.
At their recent sum-
mit, titled, "Eagle Not
a Vulture," three
Madison County
youth, Jalon Sheffield,
Bevery Oro and
Michael Robinson -
who are part of the
Students Working
Against Tobacco pro-


CiLAUIDIEIFIE' IIIR\VllNIE NAMIEIuID:

CNA I IF I IHIE IYIEAIII
By Bryant Thigpen fers a sense of security serve my residents the:
Greene Publishing, Inc. to the residents during best I can. It's an honor
In recognition of the night shift that to serve people and to:
National Certified helps the them feel at help them when some-:
Nursing Assistant ease," stated activity di- times they can't help
Week, Madison Nursing rector Mattie Hackle. themselves."
and Rehabilitation Cen- Having worked at Irvine is originally
ter holds an open vote Madison Nursing Cen- from Miami, but lived in
for staff and residents ter for over two years, Tallahassee for seven:
on their favorite CNA. Irvine counts it a joy to years. She moved to
:With much excitement, serve in this capacity. "I Madison in October of:
:Madison Nursing is love helping people and 2006, and began work-
pleased to announce the being there to serve oth- ing at Madison Nursing
winner of this year's ers," stated Irvine. Center in 2007.
Certified Nursing Assis- Irvine has spent her en- Irvine is married to:
tant of the Year award. tire working career Madison native Joseph:
Having over 23 years of serving in capacities Irvine, and is the moth-:
:experience as a caregiv- that reach out to people er of four children,:
:er, this CNA was the in need. Irvine is also a Tony, James, Christo-:
popular choice because certified phlebotomist. pher and daughter Brit-
of her character. The "I'm excited be- tanie (deceased). "My:
:winner is Claudette cause it came so unex- family has always been:
Irvine. pectedly," she said supportive of my work:
S Out of a total of 40 about winning the schedule and helping:
CNAs, choosing Irvine award. Irvine was at- others," she said.
was a clear choice for tending a mandatory Congratulations on
ithe award. "She pro- staff meeting when the this prestigious award
:vides that one-on-one award winner was an- from this reporter, and:
]relationship that resi- nounced. "It's a great the staff at Greene Pub-:
dents need, and she of- honor because I try to lishing, Inc.














d' r
P*



: Photo Submitted
Peggy Powers (left) was on hand to recognize Claudette Irvine as the
:winner of the Certified Nursing Assistant of the Year award.


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choke? Safe Sitter classes have helped thousands of adolescents
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gram traveled to
Panama City, where
they were introduced
to a number of leader-
ship themes, particu-
larly "Vision,
Commitment and Per-
severance." Topics in-
cluded: the power of
choice; dealing with
peer pressure; bully-
ing; following heroes,
not bad guys; the abil-
ity to make a positive
difference in some-
one's life; and we don't
know what other peo-
ple are going through.
The summit also
dealt with good health
habits, with an em-
phasis on avoiding to-
bacco use. The group
learned that globally,
there are 1.3 billion
smokers, and 73 per-
cent of smokers live in


developing countries.
They also learned the
alarming fact the
world is on pace to be-
gin losing 10 million
smokers annually by
2010.
The event provided
training on media,
helping the youth de-
termine the message
and target audi-
ence. They were also
introduced to the con-
cept of "truth in ad-
vertising," creating a
test demonstration of
the "Sham WOW." It
was revealed to the
group that the carpet
used in the infomer-
cial was paper thin
with no backing,
which is why the prod-
uct appeared to soak
up the spilled cola so
effectively. The con-


clusion, of course, is
that the product
wouldn't likely per-
form at home under
normal circum
stances.
When the school
year starts back for
these and other youth
that participate in the
SWAT program, lead-
ership development
activities will be em-
phasized as much as
healthy lifestyles. Or-
ganizers expressed
their appreciation to
the schools and com-
munity for their sup-
port, adding that
parents are essential
partners in the
process. Appreciation
was extended to them
as well, as all look for-
ward to similar events
in the future.


Photo Submitted
Attending the leadership summit,"Eagle Not a Vulture," the SWAT kids from
left to right are: Jalon Sheffield, Beverly Oro and Michael Robinson.







































...- .. .
,i




























Is an accredited Stroke Center and designated Brain & Spinal Cord Injury Acute Care Center.
Is an accredited Stroke Center and designated Brain & Spinal Cord Injury Acute Care Center.





Wednesday, July 8, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 13A


HEALTH


PROTECTING FLORIDA'S HEALTH ACT BEGAN JULY 1


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The 2009 Florida
Legislature passed
"Protecting Florida's
Health Act," which
levies a surcharge on
both cigarettes and to-
bacco products, exclud-
ing cigars. The
surcharge on both ciga-
rettes and tobacco prod-
ucts will be
administered, collected
and enforced by the De-
partment of Business
and Professional Regu-
lation's Division of Al-
coholic Beverages and


Tobacco (ABT).
In preparation for the
July 1 effective date, ABT
launched a new web
page to help educate cig-
arette manufacturers,
distributors, whole-
salers, retailers and
the public. The
new Web page
(http://www.myflorida.c
om/dbpr/abt/surcharge
/) provides helpful infor-
mation about the new
legislation, including
frequently asked ques-
tions, payment options,
required documents and
much more.


The new surcharge
on cigarettes is at the
rate of one dollar per
standard pack of 20 cig-
arettes, or five cents per
cigarette. The sur-
charge on other tobacco
products is 60 percent of
the wholesale sales
price.
The surcharge on
both cigarettes and to-
bacco products will be
administered, collected,
and enforced in the
same manner as the ex-
cise taxes on these
products. The mission
of ABT is to keep alco-


hol and tobacco out of
the hands of underage
persons, to ensure that
licensed establishments
are in compliance with
the laws and rules regu-
lating the industry in
Florida, and to collect
taxes and fees related to
these industries.
Florida's previous
34-cents-a-pack ciga-
rette tax was among the
nation's lowest. It's go-
ing up to $1.34 through
what's called a 'sur-
charge' in the Protect-
ing Florida's Health
Act. The law also in-


creases a 25 percent tax
on the wholesale price
of other tobacco prod-
ucts except for cigars,
which are exempt, to 60
percent.
That's on top of
higher federal tobacco
taxes consumers began
paying April 1. Ciga-
rettes went up by 62
cents a pack, bringing
the federal tax to $1.01.
The federal tax also in-
creased from 5 to 40
cents on large cigars
and a bit less for small-
er ones.
Besides raising
more than $900 million
a year for health care,
sponsors say they hope
Florida's higher tobac-
co taxes will encourage


smokers to kick their
often fatal habit and
discourage young peo-
ple from taking it up.
The higher tobacco tax
is one of several new
revenue sources needed
to pay for the $66.5 bil-
lion in spending during
the budget year begin-
ning July 1.
Others include $5.3 bil-
lion in federal stimulus
money and about $1 bil-
lion in fee increases.
A conforming law al-
ready has gone into effect
to raise court-filing fees,
but a wide range of mo-
tor vehicle fees won't go
on the books until Sept. 1.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael
(,greenepublishing.com.


k' INL t611


Question: Is it true that George Washington
had wooden teeth?

Answer: OK, you got me with this question. I have
no idea. I can say I must have missed that day in
Dental School. So, with the help of Google, I have
done a little research.
From what I gather George Washington had
a great deal of dental trouble in his lifetime. By the
time of his inaugural address as our first President at
the age of 57, he only had one remaining tooth.
Apparently he did have false teeth, 5 sets we know
about. They were not made from wood, his false teeth
were made from ivory, lead, gold wire, with implanted
human and animal teeth, and springs. The springs in
the back attached the upper and lower teeth.
Surprisingly to me the dentures were mail order. His
favorite Dentist, Dr. John Greenwood, made him three
different sets of dentures. There are records of 5 sets
of teeth made for Pres. Washington which are now on
display in various museums.
I can only imagine the sore spots under
these mail order dentures. I have often wondered
if teeth like these would be anything other than
cosmetic. I doubt they would have been functional
for chewing purposes. If you want to see 18th
Century cosmetic dentistry at its finest.... see:
www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6875436/. Thank
goodness cosmetic dentistry has come a long way
since 1776.

Roderick K Shaw III, DMD, MAGD
Master of the Academy of General Dentistry
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmail.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of Dentistry.


By Michael Curtis wearing glasses. In fact,
Greene Publishing, Inc. most children are accept-
Kids who wear glass- ing of needing glasses
es used to be easy targets because someone among
for the classroom bully. their friends or siblings
Today, they are making wears glasses.
as much of a fashion Unlike the very large
statement as an improve- or horn-rimmed glasses
ment to their vision, from decades ago, to-
Reports indicate that day's frame styles and
fewer and fewer children thinner lenses have
are disappointed about made glasses more at-


tractive for kids, espe-
cially pre-teens. Now,
ironically, some children
want them who may not
necessarily need them.
One optometrist
explains, "I can tell if
they are not trying hard
enough when reading
the eye chart. At the
end of the exam, I give
them plain lenses with-
out a prescription.
Most of the time,
they are able to read it
better because they
want to demonstrate to
their parents the glass-
es helped them see bet-
ter."


who are properly trained
to fit glasses for chil-
dren.
Make sure a child's
eyeglasses are adjusted
frequently Walker says
children's frames are
typically made of plas-
tic, and in time, facial
heat could make them
stretch out and not fit
properly.


KIDS THESE DA!S S GLA SSES ARiE COOL


--
I i i





14A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 8, 2009


HEALTH


president Signs Jistoric 9bobacco cLegislation


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
President Barack
Obama, who still strug-
gles with his own addic-
tion to cigarettes,
signed into law the most
sweeping federal anti-
tobacco legislation to
pass Congress in
decades. The law gives
the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration broad au-
thority to regulate the
marketing and manu-
facture of tobacco prod-
ucts. It bans fruit- and
spice-flavored ciga-
rettes, slaps expansive
new warnings on pack-
ages and gets rid of the
monikers "light" and
"low-tar."
The new law also al-
lows the FDA to order
manufacturers to re-
duce though not elim-
inate the amount of
the addictive chemical
nicotine that's in ciga-
rettes.
With children on-
stage and sprinkled in
the audience at the Rose
Garden ceremony, and
with the new play-
ground for the presiden-
tial daughters in the
distance, Obama said
that the Family Smok-
ing Prevention and To-
bacco Control Act
would curtail the "con-
stant, insidious" adver-
tising that tobacco
companies targeted at
children.
He pointed out that
nearly 90 percent of
smokers start before
age 18.
"I know; I was one
of those teenagers,"
Obama said in his
speech. "I know how
hard it is to break the


habit once you've start-
ed."
Tobacco-related dis-
eases cost an estimated
$100 billion a year to
treat, and kill nearly
400,000 Americans an-
nually "FDA oversight
over tobacco products
will fundamentally
change the entire tobac-
co industry and will
save countless lives in
the decades to come,"
said Stephen J. Nolan,
the chairman of the
American Lung Associ-
ation's board of direc-
tors.
Among those at the
White House on Mon-
day was Rep. G.K. But-
terfield, a Democrat
from Wilson, N.C.,
where auctioneers used
to rattle off leaf prices
after harvest each fall.
He represents one of the
heaviest tobacco-farm-
ing districts in the na-
tion.
"This has been a
very difficult issue for
me," Butterfield said.
"But when I take a step
back and look at it ob-
jectively, there's no
question we need to re-
duce smoking ... We
need to be realistic
about the issue."
Also present was
Rep. Henry Waxman, D-
Calif., one of the mea-
sure's primary propo-
nents, but another
prominent backer, Sen.
Edward Kennedy, D-
Mass., who's undergo-
ing treatment for brain
cancer, was not.
"Decade after
decade, Big Tobacco has
seduced millions of
teenagers into lifetimes
of addiction and prema-


ture death," Kennedy
said in a statement. "En-
actment of this legisla-
tion will finally put a
stop to that. It is truly a
lifesaving act, and a wel-
come demonstration
that this Congress is ca-
pable of enacting major
health reform."
Tobacco companies
spent millions opposing
the bill, though the
country's top tobacco


company, Latria, the
owner of Philip Morris
of Virginia, supported
it in what opponents la-
beled a cynical move to
use the measure's re-
strictions on advertis-
ing to maintain the
market dominance of
Philip Morris' leading
brand, Marlboro.
In a sign of tobac-
co's waning power, how-
ever, the legislation


passed with overwhelm-
ing bipartisan support,
even as a Gallup Poll re-
leased Monday found
that 52 percent opposed
the law, while 46 percent
approved. The tele-
phone survey was con-
ducted June 14-17 and
had a margin of error of
3 percentage points.
Senators Richard
Burr, a Republican, and
Kay Hagan, a Democrat,
both of North Carolina,
fought the legislation
fiercely. Burr, whose
hometown of Winston-
Salem is the headquar-
ters for the Reynolds
American tobacco com-
pany, stretched debate
on the Senate floor to
nearly two weeks in an
effort to slow the bill. He
argued that the FDA
was ill equipped to han-
dle new regulatory du-


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ties. Hagan, whose
hometown of Greens-
boro is home to the Lo-
rillard tobacco
company, was the only
Democrat in the Senate
who voted against the
bill. She argued that it
would cost manufactur-
ing jobs and hurt tobac-
co farmers.
Obama and other
supporters said that the
law was a victory over
the deceit and power of
tobacco companies' lob-
by on Capitol Hill.
"Since at least the
middle of the last centu-
ry, we've known about
the harmful and often
deadly effects of tobac-
co products," the presi-
dent said.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
Michael(agreenepublish
ing.com.


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www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 15A


MONEY


AMERICA'S DEBT LEGACY BEGAN WITH FOUNDING FATHERS


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Founding Fa-
thers left one legacy not
celebrated on Indepen-
dence Day, but which af-
fects us all. It's the
national debt.
According to his-
torical records, the
country first got into
debt to finance the Rev-
o u t i o n a r y
War.Growing ever
since, the debt stands
today at a staggering
$11.4 trillion equiva-
lent to about $37,000 for
each American, and it
continues to grow at
over one trillion dollars
per year, not to mention
the stimulus spending.
"Unless we demon-
strate a strong commit-
ment to fiscal
sustainability in the
longer term, we will
have neither financial
stability nor healthy
economic growth," Fed-
eral Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke recently
told Congress.
Higher taxes, or re-
duced federal benefits
and services or a
combination of both -
may be the inevitable
consequences. Addi-
tionally, the debt is
complicating efforts by
President Barack Oba-
ma and Congress to
cope with the worst re-
cession in decades as
stimulus and bailout


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Let's start with the
basics. A budget is a sys-
tematic plan for the ex-
penditure of a usually
fixed resource, such as
money or time, during a
given period. Wait a
minute! What kind of
language was that? I
know: The kind that
makes reading articles
about starting a budget
almost unbearable. So,
let's start again.
As a single mother,
you might groan at the
thought of putting to-
gether a household bud-
get with all your
expenses, but it's easy to
do and will also help
you become very finan-
cially organized. Shap-
ing up your finances is
particularly important
if you are experiencing
a life altering experi-
ence such as a mar-
riage, divorce, new baby,
or any other event that
changes your finances
dramatically. Whatever
the state of your finan-
cial life, developing a
sensible household bud-
get will allow you to be
in charge of your mon-
ey
How to Create a
Simple Budget
Budgeting as a sin-
gle mother is simply
about understanding


WACHOVIA

Ruthellen Caldwell
Financial Specialist
City President
Wachovia Bank, N.A.
Madison Financial Center
200 W. Base Street, FL0408
Madison, FL 32340
850-973-8714
fax 850-973-8723
ruthellen.caldwell@wachovia.com


spending combine with
lower tax revenues to
widen the gap.
Interest payments
on the debt alone cost
$452 billion last year -
the largest federal
spending category after
Defense and Medicare-
Medicaid. It's crowding
out other government
spending and the Trea-
sury indicates it's hard-
er to find new lenders.
The United States
went into the red the
first time in 1790 when
it assumed $75 million
in the war debts of the
Continental Congress.
Alexander Hamilton,
the first treasury secre-
tary, said, "A national
debt, if not excessive,
will be to us a national
blessing."
Since then, the na-
tion has only been out
of debt in one year,
1834-1835. The national
debt typically expands
during times of war
and usually contracts
in times of peace, while
staying on a generally
upward trend.
Over the past sever-
al decades, it has
climbed sharply, with
the exception of the
last two years of the
Clinton Administra-
tion, when there were
annual budget surplus-
es. The debt soared
with the wars in Iraq
and Afghanistan and


monthly spending needs
and habits. The purpose
of a household budget is
to track personal cash
flow, where personal
cash flow is how much
money comes in, and
how much goes out.
Adding up monthly
income is easy, but total-
ing up all expenses
takes a little more ef-
fort.
First, collect all
bills, credit card state-
ments, checkbook regis-
ter, and receipts for
groceries, gas, or any-
thing else bought with
cash. If you haven't
been keeping good
records, you may have
to get a receipt of every
dollar you spend for a
month before you can
put together an accu-
rate budget.
Next, track expens-
es by making entries in
a notebook, or better
yet, learn how to do it in
a spreadsheet program
on the computer (don't
worry, first graders are
doing it). There are also
inexpensive programs
such as Quicken or Mi-
crosoft Money or a pro-
gram that comes with
the computer.
Now, divide your
spending into fixed
costs and variable costs.
Fixed costs include such
things as utilities, mort-


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economic stimulus
spending under Presi-
dent George W Bush,
which has only expand-
ed under Obama.
This year's deficit
is now estimated at
about $1.85 trillion.
The debt gap is
"something that keeps
me awake at night,"
Obama says. He
pledged to cut the bud-
get deficit in half by the
end of his first term.
But "deficit" just
means the difference
between government
receipts and spending
in a single budget year.
In other words,
deficits don't reflect the
debt that carrys over
from previous years.
Some spending items -
such as appropriations
for Social Security -
aren't included, either,
although they are part
of the national debt.
Moreover, the national
debt is a more revealing
way to look at the gov-
ernment's balance
sheets than just consid-
ering a particular


gage payments, rent, or
loan payments. Variable
costs include such
things as clothing, car
repairs and entertain-
ment.
How to Stick
to a Budget
Once spending is
measured and managed,
you can easily decide
which costs as a single
mother you can cut and
which you cannot. In
most cases, as soon as
you see how much you
are spending on your
morning breakfast
items, you will be moti-
vated to cut back. Stay
motivated by setting
goals.
Here are a few
budgeting tips
to get started:
Budgeting isn't dif-
ficult, but getting start-
ed does take motivation.
Promise yourself a re-
ward for your efforts.
Gather three
months of bills or, if
possible, all of the past
year's bills, and add up
how much is spent
every month. Divide
them into categories
such as housing, enter-
tainment, and food.


,


Take a good look at
what can be spared. En-
tertainment expenses
are easy to cut, but utili-
ty bills are not. Keep a
daily journal of what is
spent each day. This
may sound obsessive,
but it can be helpful.
Once you know where
your money goes, you
can spot your unneces-
sary costs. It is really
not that hard to give up
morning coffees or
bring lunch from home.
Pay bills as soon as
they come in. Avoid de-
stroying your budget
with late fees.
Decide what you
can cut, and then cut it
out. Track what you are
saving, and you will be
pleased with the results
Lastly, don't hesi-
tate to get the kids in-
volved in a constructive
way. It makes things
work better and kids are
amazingly helpful given
the right opportunity to
support mom when they
understand the impor-
tance.
Michael Curtis
can be reached at
michael(@greenepublishi
ng.com.


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year's deficit, especial-
ly the next few years.
According to the Trea-
sury Department,
which updates the num-
ber to the penny every
few days, the
national debt was
$11,518,472,742,288 on
July 1. This figure rep-
resents over 80 percent
of the annual output of
the entire U.S. economy,
as measured by the
gross domestic product.
By historical stan-
dards, that number is
not proportionately as
high as during World
War II, when it briefly
rose to 120 percent of
GDP. Also, the United
States is not the only
nation struggling un-
der a huge national
debt. Among major
countries, Japan, Italy,
India, France, Ger-
many and Canada have
comparable debts as
percentages of their
GDPs. So, where does
the government borrow
all this money from?
The debt is largely
financed by the sale of
Treasury bonds and
bills. Even today, on a
global scale, they are
still seen as one of the
world's safest invest-
ments. That's one of
the rare upsides of U.S.
government borrowing.
Treasury securities are
purchased by individ-
ual investors and very


popular with other
countries, especially
China, Japan and the
Persian Gulf oil ex-
porters the three top
foreign holders of U.S.
debt.
Unfortunately, as
the U.S. spends trillions
to stabilize the reces-
sion economy, it forces
down the value of the
dollar, so Treasuries be-
come less attractive as
investments. Some ma-
jor foreign lenders are
already paring back on
their purchases of U.S.
bonds and other securi-
ties. And if major hold-
ers of U.S. debt were to
quit buying, it would
send shock waves
through the global
economy and
sharply force up U.S. in-
terest rates. As time
goes by, population
trends will only lead to
worse conditions, as
more baby boomers re-
tire and begin collect-
ing Social Security and
Medicare benefits.
While the president
remains personally
popular, polls show
there is rising public
concern over his han-
dling of the economy


SIMPLE MO S HArV



CuOUt4H TO WORiRYI ABOUT


How Do Mutual Funds
Compensate Investors?

Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones

As you probably know, a mutual fund may contain many
different types of investments, such as stocks, bonds and
government securities. But as an investor, you need to pay
attention not only to what goes into your mutual fund, but also
what comes out of it namely, the three ways in which a
fund can compensate you.

Let's take a look at these three avenues:

Dividends and interest A mutual fund earns income
from dividends on stocks and interest on bonds. The fund
pays out nearly all the income it receives over the year, in the
form of a distribution, to you and the other fund owners.
Usually, you have the choice of taking the distribution check
or reinvesting the earnings to purchase more shares. If you
don't actually need the income to boost your cash flow, you'll
certainly want to consider the reinvestment option, because
it's an easy and cost-efficient way of building your share own-
ership. Keep in mind, though, that whether you take the dis-
tribution as a check or reinvest it, you will still owe income tax
on the dividends.
Capital gains distributions You will receive your
share of any net profits the fund makes from selling invest-
ments. Mutual funds usually make these capital gains distri-
butions annually or semi-annually. You can choose to auto-
matically reinvest these distributions back into your fund,
thereby purchasing more shares. Even if you reinvest the pro-
ceeds, you'll incur taxes, but as long as the gains are long-
term, you'll only have to pay the capital gains rate, which will
likely be 15 percent for you.
Increased share value Generally speaking, you invest
in a mutual fund because you are hoping its price will rise
over time. When its price per share its net asset value -
does rise, you can sell your shares for a profit. As long as
you've held them for more than a year, you'll just pay the cap-
ital gains rate, rather than your normal income tax rate.

Of course, there are no guarantees when it comes to earning
a profit from mutual funds; some funds decline in value and
never recover. So, when choosing a mutual fund, you'll need
to carefully evaluate a number of factors, including these:
What are the fund's overall objectives? Has its management
team been in place long? Does it have a good track record?
While past performance can't guarantee future results, you
can get a sense of how a fund has done in different econom-
ic environments by looking at its history over five or ten years.

To sum up: You'll need discipline and patience when investing
in mutual funds. You'll need the discipline to continually rein-
vest your dividends and capital gains distributions so that you
can accumulate more and more shares. And you'll need
patience to wait for an increase in share value, which is not
guaranteed, and which, in any case, may take years to devel-
op.

But if you have this patience and discipline, you may find that
mutual funds can help you make progress toward your finan-
cial goals. So, look for quality funds that are appropriate for
your situation and risk tolerance. Your search may well be
worth the effort.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local
Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Mutual funds are offered and sold by prospectus. You should
consider the investment objective, risks, and charges and
expenses carefully before investing. The prospectus contains
this and other information. Your Edward Jones financial advi-
sor can provide a prospectus, which should be read careful-
ly before investing.


Brad Bashaw EdwardJones
Investment Representative

114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631 Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204
Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


Y~p~r~i


and the government's
mushrooming debt -
and what it might mean
for future generations.
If things can't be
turned around, includ-
ing establishing a more
efficient health care
system, "We are on an
utterly unsustainable
fiscal course," said the
White House budget di-
rector, Peter Orszag.
Some budget ac-
tivists claim even the
debt understates the na-
tion's true liabilities.
The Peter G. Peter-
son Foundation, estab-
lished by a former
commerce secretary
and investment banker,
argues that the $11.4
trillion debt figures
does not take into ac-
count roughly $45 tril-
lion in unlisted
liabilities and unfund-
ed retirement and
health care commit-
ments. That would put
the nation's full obliga-
tions at $56 trillion, or
roughly $184,000 per
American, according to
this calculation.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
michael(@)greenepublish
ing. com.






16A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 8, 2009


LASDS3:0 .m. Every Monda
SERICS" WE OMS EA ETAE EL
- -'I ORRET I FRS-EI O -L A P F-RD


DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts
Senior Citizen Discounts

850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340
ANYTHING LEFT OVER 7 DAYS
WILL BE SOLD
rtn, n/c
SS Painting
Contractor &
Pressure Cleaning
Services
(850) 673-7754
Sandy Sanderson (Owner)
Free Estimates
Over 35 Years Experience
4/28 7/3, pd
1 BUILD SHEDS & DECKS
Call Bob
850-242-9342
Now selling steel
buildings, garages,
barns and carports
6/10, rtn, cc



Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rtn, n/c



Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-rtn, n/c
FOR SALE
Hay & Argentine bahia
grass seed
772-519-1340 or
850-973-6066
7/1, 7/8, 7/15, pd
Perry Scooters
New Motor Scooter $775,
ATV'S, Dirt Bikes, Go Carts
and Bicycle Engines
1302 N Jefferson St. Perry,
Fl 850-584-2979
7/1,7/8, c








A 8
1997 Ford F-150 4x4
3 inch lift, dual exhaust all
power $4500 FIRM
850-210-2949/850-997-5293
5/20, rtn, nc
1987 Ford Bronco for sale.
Super hot engine! 58k
original miles. Auto trans.
Differential doesn't leak.
Only rolled over once but
never "mud bogged." Upper
body has no glass but engine
and running gear awesome!
Now painted camo $500.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c


FREE TO GO
Beagel Mix
males & i
850-971

White Englis
puppies 1 ma
$100 each r
229-221

White Englis
puppies 1 ma
$100 each r
850-342




Rent
North of
3 BR/2 B
2BR/2 BA D/WV
ft comm
40 x 80 horse b
for le
800 sq ft coi
Full service
Call 850-8


2 bedroom 1
home $450.00
security


C &'outhem /llas of

C(adison partments



Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c

CLEAN 3 BR, CH & CA,
new R & Refg, Oak floors.
ADULT FAMILY ONLY.
Rent $685 plus deposit.
No pets. Good credit req.
432 NE Horry Ave., Madi-
son. Call George 973-8583
or 557-0994.
rtn, c

Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
rm,cc


1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c


(2) 14x66 3 bedroom 2
single wide 850-290-61
386-362-1171
7

24x56 3/2 extra clean w
den 850-290-6192 (
386-362-1171
7

24x52 3/2
850-290-6192 or
386-362-1171
7
1999 28x64 hinged roo
with Great Room
850-290-6192 or
386-362-1171
7
Used Double and Sin
Wides 850-290-6192
386-362-1171
7


)OD HOME


bath
92 or
/1, 7/8, c

vith a
or

/1, 7/8, c



/1, 7/8, c
)f 3/2


/1, 7/8, c
gle
or
/1, 7/8,c


Puppies "Brand New""
females 1500 sq. ft. 3/2 to many
-2757 upgrades to list, all this
7/8,7/15, 1n for only $42,843.00 Call
sh/Pit Bull Eric to set up appoint-
le 1 female ment (386) 719-5560
eady now 7/8 -7/24,
3614
7/8, 7/15, pd "WOW"
$150.00 and your property
sh/Pit Bull puts you in a home today
le 1 female call Eric at
eady now (386) 719-5560
-1162
7/8, rtn,nc 7/8 7/24, c
Trade in's & Repos Available
Call Eric for a list of our
homes available at discount-
als ed prices, many to choose
SPerry from! (386) 719-5560
A D/W 7/8 7/24, c
/ with 200 sq "1st time home buyers"
bldg. We have several programs to
)arn w/50 ac. help 1st time home buyers
ase plus GOUT assistance up to
mm office $8,000 $$$
e RV site Call Eric for details
38-6124 (386) 719-5560
7/8 7/24, c
6/24, 7/1,7/8, 7/15 c New Manufactured Homes
Starting at $23.70 sq. ft.
bath mobile Guaranted lowest prices in
per month + North Florida. Call Rick
deposit (386) 752-8196


Call 3u-86o-u yi
7/1,7/8,7/15,c
Clean as new. Two story, 3
BR, 2.3 baths, formal LR &
DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. New
Kitchen, Range, Ref, D/W,
G/D. Oak Floor downstairs,
Heart Pine upstairs. 2 Central
H&A. Yard maint. included.
ADULT FAMILY. No pets.
$900 rent and deposit. Good
credit req. 205 NE Shelby Ave.
Madison. Call George 973-
8583 or 557-0994.
5/8 rtn, c


7/8 -7/24, c

The Wait Is Over!
Introducing "Mossy Oak"
the most innovative, quality
and affordable manufactured
houses in the industry. Call
Mr. Mott (386) 752-1452
7/8 -7/24, c
Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452
7/8 -7/24, c


Best Cash Deals on Mobile
Homes. NO ONE BEATS
MY PRICES
386-719-0044
rtnc
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/
2 BATH Excellent Shape;
Need Chas, Priced to sell,
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
rtn,c
Brand Spanking New
2009 5 BR/3BA; 2004 Sq Ft;
$594.31 Per month. Seller
pays $3,500 toward closing
cost. Call Mike at
386-623-4218
rtn,c
Modular Home for sale in
town. Save $20,000.00. Turn
Key Deal; Owner says make
an offer. It Must Go!
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
rtn,c

PRICE REDUCED!
Spacious Mfg home with 4
BR, 3 BATH, Bonus Room
with lots of windows. Discon-
tinued floor plan. Fore More
info call Sarah. 386-288-0964
rtn,c
Become a Homeowner for
the same monthly payments
you are throwing away on
rent. Call Sarah for more info.
386-288-0964
rtn,c

MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00
Call 386-288-4560

WE PAY CASH..... FOR
YOUR USED MOBILE
HOMES 1980 OR NEWER.
LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129
rtn,c
First Time home Buyer
$7,500.00 CASH
IN YOUR POCKET
Call David for details
386-719-0044
rtn,c
Low Credit Scores???
I may be able to help you
buy a home.
386-288-4560
rtn,c
Need More Space
for a growing family?
2001, 5 BEDROOM, 4
BATH TRADE-IN.
Excellent condition.
For more info call Sarah.
386-288-0964
rtn,c

FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY
AND LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE
ZONED COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT
rtn,c

NEW 4 BR 2 BATH READY
TO MOVE IN. CALL 386-
288-4560
rtn,c

HOME ONLY LOANS
No mortgage on your land.
Put a home on your land,
family land, state land or
rental lot. Singlewides start at
$350.00 month and Dou-
blewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn,c
Home Owners....
Guaranteed Financing
Thru B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044
rtn,c
ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00
P&I per mo, Doublewide your
land $422.00 P&I per mo.
Singlewide & $30,000.00 for
land $520.00 P&I per mo. or
Doublewide with $30,000.00
for land $602.00 P&I per mo.
Our land your land or buy
land. I specialize in credit
challenged customers. Appli-
cations over the phone, credit
decision next business day.
Let me help make your new
home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn,c





OFFICE BUILDING
FOR RENT
across street from
Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder Office)
111 SE Shelby St., Madison;
Newly renovated
back to the 1920's era
Call 973-4141
rtn,n/c
Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highwayfrontage.
Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Dr.
& Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line, 8 inch wa-
ter main, access to city utili-
ties, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to


1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene 850-
973-4141
rtn, n/c


Completely Remod
3 BR/ 1 Bath, new r
carpet, central heat 6
new kitchen cabinets
bathroom, new 200
electrical, approxim
1300 sq. ft. $84,0
Oak Estates Sub Div
McWilliams Real
(850) 973-8614


Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Vie
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth
Open and Covered D
Large Screened Porch
FP, CH/A, Oak Floors
inets, and Applianc
Offered Furnished
$179,900. Call BJ Pel
850-508-1900


FOR SALE/
OWNER FINANCE
ALL LAND BELOW
IS HIGH AND DI
5 acres Lee, North o
6, Cayenne Rd., rolling
restrictions, $39,995
down, $325/mo
10 acres Beulah Me
Rd, DWMH and house
lowed, $49,500, $5,000
$459/mo
10 acres Old Blue S
Rd. access, DWMH and
es allowed, $49,500,
down, $459/mo
25 Acres on Hwy 9(
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)
Larger tracts availal
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116

FOR SALE
Across from Rocky S
Church 1.87 Acres $2
.Call 678-389-18


For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suwa
was $135,000, Now $9
2 BR/1 BA. Fully Fur
New Metal Roof, and
Paint. Utility Building
Washer and Dryer. Nic
Trees. 386-719-04


If you are 18 or older
and have been laid-
offfrom your job, con-
tact us now! We can
assist you in assessing your
interests and setting career goals, as
well as looking for a new job. We
may also assist qualified individuals
with career training funds! You
may still be eligible to receive Un-
employment while in training.



An Equal Opportunity Program Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals
wvith dabilitics. All voice phone numbers on this brochure mnay be reached by persons using
TIY/TID equipmennt vathe Florida Relay Service t 711.

i jJJ.U iJidJ .iJJJJ ,[ ULnitl 1

,AUCTION' il


Florida Land Auction

Saturday, July 25t @ 10 a.m.
* Offered High Bidders Choice c
* Commercial and Residential Acreage
* Good Hunting Tract /
* 8 Tracts Ranging from 5 to 10 Acres
* Two Miles South of 1-10 exit 225
* Frontage on U.S. Hwy. 19, Attatulga Road U.S. Hwy. 19,
& WPA Road (Florida Georgia Pkwy)
Monticello, FL


M las s ifieds



$12 (for 20 words or less)
Wednesday and Friday.

Your ad will also
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FREE of charge

www.greenepublishing.com


leled $$AVON$$
roof, Earn 50%, only $10 for
& air, starter kit! Call Today
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amp www.youravon.com/tdavies
amp 5/13 rtn, c
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00 THIRD JUDICIAL COURT
vision GENERAL COUNSEL
ty Closing Date: July 15, 2009
For more information:
6/3,rtn, c www.jud3.flcourts.org

Advent Christian Village
ews Current JOBS Line Advertise-
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)ecks, www.acvillage.net
, Gas 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
& Cab-
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ters at
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NG strongly desired.
)W
1Y Marketing Specialist
f Hwy PT position to assist in mar-
g hil keting housing, services, and
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S Village; Bachelor's degree in
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eadows evant field plus two to five
ses al- years proven, relevant experi-
down ence required. Must possess
strong customer service and
springs communication skills; PC pro-
d hous- ficiency required with
$5,000 experience In MS Office (in-
cluding Access); experience
0, Lee, with REPS a strong plus.

ble FT positions indude health,
dentat, life, disability, supple-
mental insurance; 403b
retirement account; paid time
rtn,c off, access to onsite daycare
and fitness facilities. Apply in
person at Personnel Office
n,000 Monday through Friday from
59 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or
fax resume/credentials to (386)
5/6-rtn, cc 658-5160. EOE/Drug-Free
Worbplace / Criminal back-
ground checbs required.
annee
)9,000. Two Fulltime Positions
nished, available at North Florida
New Community College: Grants
g with Coordinator and Institutional
:e Fruit Effectiveness Coordinator.
21 See www.nfcc.edu for details
rtn, n/c


Assemble Christian
dollhouse items at
home. Visit
http://www.ChristianM
iniatures.com or call
us, toll-free, at (800)472-
9887 for more informa-
tion! Get started today!


Announcements
Pp Cal- ne
VICES, IA C.













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Cars for Sale

Buy Police Impounds!!
97 Honda Civic $400! 97
Honda Accord $500! for
listings call (800)366-9813
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Employment






Wednesday, July 08, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 17A


LEG~ALI


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CASE NO. 2008-482-CA
JOHN HENRY AUST, JR. A/K/A JOHN H. AUST, JR.;
KIMBERLYANNAUSTA/K/AKIMBERLYAUST; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIMBERLY ANN AUST
A/K/A KIMBERLY AUST; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
MADISON County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in MADISON
County, Florida, described as:
LOTS 54 AND 55, LAKESIDE TERRACE SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE L, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A
232 SE PARK LOOP
MADISON, FL 32340
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST
FRONT DOORSTEPS OF THE MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
125 SW RANGE Ave., MADISON, FLORIDA 32340, County, Florida, at
11:00 AM, on the 3 0 day of July, 2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Clerk of the Circuit Court




By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, Florida 33619-3128

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should
contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.

7/8, 7/15


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CASE NO. 2009-CA-115
DANNY A. ROBINSON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANNY
A. ROBINSON; MARY ROBINSON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF MARY ROBINSON; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED/AND IF DECEASED/ THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; NORTHWOOD PROPERTY
OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR
PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS/ OR TRUSTEES OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARY ROBINSON; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH/ UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFEND ANT(S);
Whose residence are/is unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if
any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court/ and to serve a
copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney/ Law Offices of Daniel C. Consue-
gra/ 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-
8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of
this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of
mortgage against the following described property, to wit:
LOT 3, BLOCK F, NORTHWOOD SUBDIVISION, UNIT ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE N,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
To include a:
2006 FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME, VIN GAFL635A917065C21 and
97970640
2006 FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME, VIN GAFL635B917065C21 and
97971054
A/K/A
1062 NE FORD DRIVE
MADISON, FL 32340
If you fail to file your answer or written defenses in the above proceeding,
on plaintiffs attorney, a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or Petition.
DATED at MADISON County this 26 day of June, 2009.
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should
contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800)955-8771 (TDD) or (800) 955-
8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.
7/1, 7/8





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I AANF


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-11-DP


IN THE INTEREST OF:
O.P. DOB: 03/03/1996
FP. DOB: 04/14/2000
M.P. DOB: 09/19/2002
M.V. DOB: 12/23/2003
MINOR CHILD

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: G. P.
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition under oath has been filed in
the above -styled court for the termination of parental rights and the per-
manent commitment of O.P., a male child born on 03/03/1996, in Maryland;
F.P., a male child born on 04/14/2000, in Lowndes County, Georgia; M.P., a
female child born on 09/19/2002, in Leon, County, Florida; M.V, a female
child born on 12/23/2003, in Leon County, Florida to the State of Florida,
placing agency, for subsequent adoption and you are hereby to be and ap-
pear in the above court at the Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Flori-
da 32340 on Thursday, July 23, 2009 at 1:00 P.M., for a Termination of
Parental Rights Advisory Hearing and to show cause why said petition
should not be granted. You must appear on the date and time specified.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING
CONSTITUTES YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL
LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THESE CHILDREN.

6/17, 6/24, 7/1, 7/8


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 03-16-CJ
IN THE INTEREST OF:
B.P. D.O.B. 10/31/2002
MINOR CHILD

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: W. G.
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition under oath has been filed in
the above -styled court for the termination of parental rights and the per-
manent commitment of B.P., a female child born on 10/31/2002, in Alachua
County, Florida to the State of Florida, placing agency, for subsequent
adoption and you are hereby to be and appear in the above court at the
Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida 32340 on Thursday, July 23,
2009 at 1:00 P.M., for a Termination of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing
and to show cause why said petition should not be granted. You must ap-
pear on the date and time specified.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING
CONSTITUTES YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL
LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THESE CHILDREN.
6/17, 6/24, 7/1, 7/8



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOUISE M. BOOTH,
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-36-CP
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The ancillary administration of the Estate of Louise M. Booth,
deceased, whose death was March 18, 2008 is pending in the Circuit Court
for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post
Office Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341. The names and addresses of the
Co-Personal Representatives and the Co-Personal Representatives' attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims
or demands against Decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against Decedent's estate must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is July 1, 2009.


Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives
/s/ Scot B. Copeland
Scot B. Copeland (FBN 0156681)
Law Offices of Scot B. Copeland, P.L.
Post Office Drawer 916
Madison, FL 32341
Ph: (850) 973-4100



7/8, 7/15


Co-Personal Representatives:
/s/ Albert K. Booth, III
Albert K. Booth, III
1229 3rd Street, S.E.
Moultrie, Georgia 31788

/s/ James M. Booth
James M. Booth
121 Suwannee Road
Moultrie, Georgia 31788


It's your right to know.


Read the public notices in this newspaper and be informed.




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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,
Phnntiff,
CASE NO. 2008-CA-000633
DIVISION;
v.
DANIEL L. CARET; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANIEL L. CAREY,
et al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plain-
tiff entered in this cause, in the Circuit Court of MADISON County, Flori-
da, I will sell the property situated in MADISON County. Florida
described as;
COMMENCE AT AN IRON ROD MARKING THE NORTHWEST COR-
NER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 EAST, MADI-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00'5'2' EAST. A
DISTANCE OF 927.56 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 89'04'22'
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1491.51 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CEN-
TERL1NE OF AN 80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND
DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329), THENCE RUN SOUTH 06'40'39'
EAST. ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE OF 546.69 FEET TO
A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 07'57'43' EAST ALONG SAID CEN-
TERL1NE, A DISTANCE OF 270.71 FEET FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING. THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND
LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE, RUN NORTH 89'06'09' EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1078.19 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH
00'21'00' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 436.00 FEET TO A POINT. THENCE
SOUTH 89'06'09 WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1020.00 FEET TO A POINT IN
THE CENTERLINE OF AFOREMENTIONED 80 FOOT WIDE ROAD-
WAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329), THENCE
NORTH 07'57'43' WEST, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE
OF 439.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 10.50
ACRS, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AN 80 FOOT WIDE
ROADWAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329) OVER
AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 40 FEET THEREOF ALSO SUBJECT
TO A 10 FOOT UTILITY EASEMENT ALONG THE SIDE AND REAR
LOT LINES,
and commonly known as: TRACT #13 AUCILLA PLANTATION,
GREENVILLE. FL 32331 at public sale. to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, at the West Front Steps of the Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW
Range Avenue. Madison, Florida 32341 at 11:00 a.m. on July 30, 2009.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THFSURPLUS FROM
THE SALE. IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to Ac
provision of certain assistance. Please contact N Administrator, P.O. Box 1569.
Dated this July 7, 2009
TIM SANDERS
Cterk of Ihe Circuit Court
Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

7/8, 7/15


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For guidelines and application materials, contact your
local Florida Division of Forestry office or visit:
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A message from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of
Forestry, Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner. Funding supplied by the USDA Forest Service;
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18A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Wednesday, July 8, 2009


Mosquito-Borne Disease Advisories for Madison County


Mosquito-Borne
Illness Advisory
for Madison County
This is to advise
that there has been in-
creased mosquito-borne
disease activity in the
area of Madison Coun-
ty. Two horses have test-
ed positive for EEE
(Eastern Equine En-
cephalitis) virus. The
risk of transmission
to humans has been
increased.
Madison County
Health Department re-
minds residents and vis-
itors to avoid being
bitten by mosquitoes
that may cause disease.
Madison County Mos-
quito Control and the
health department con-
tinue surveillance and
prevention efforts and
encourage everyone to
take basic precautions


to help limit exposure
by following the Depart-
ment of Health recom-
mendations.
Your personal
mosquito protection
efforts should
include the "5 D's"
for prevention:
Dusk and Dawn -
Avoid being out-
doors when mosquitoes
are seeking blood. For
many species this is
during the dusk and
dawn hours.
Dress Wear clothing
that covers most of your
skin.
DEET When the po-
tential exists for expo-
sure to mosquitoes,
repellents containing
DEET (N,N-diethyl-
meta-toluamide, or N,N-
diethyl-3-methylbenzam
ide) are recommended.
Picaridin, oil of lemon


eucalyptus, and IR3535
are other repellent op-
tions.
DEET is available for
FREE at the Madison
County Health De-
partment.
Drainage Check
around your home to rid
the area of standing wa-
ter, which is where mos-
quitoes can lay their
eggs.
Elimination of
breeding sites is one of
the keys to prevention.
Tips on Eliminating
Mosquito Breeding
Sites
*Clean out eaves,
troughs and gutters.
*Remove old tires or
drill holes in those used
in playgrounds to drain.
*Turn over or remove
empty plastic pots.
*Pick up all beverage
containers and cups.


*Check tarps on boats or
other equipment that
may collect water.
*Pump out bilges on
boats.
*Replace water in bird-
baths and pet or other
animal feeding dishes at
least once a week.
*Change water in plant
trays, including hang-
ing plants, at least once
a week.
*Remove vegetation or
obstructions in


drainage ditches that
prevent the flow of wa-
ter.
DOH continues to
conduct statewide sur-
veillance for mosquito
borne illnesses, includ-
ing West Nile virus in-
fections, Eastern equine
encephalitis, St. Louis
encephalitis, malaria,
and dengue. Residents
of Florida are encour-
aged to report dead
birds via the web site


http://myfwc.com/bird.
For more informa-
tion on mosquito-borne
illnesses, visit DOH's
Environmental Health
web site at
http://www.doh.state.fl.
us/environment/commu
nity/arboviral/index.ht
m ,or call the West Nile
Virus Hotline at 1-888-
880-5782, or call the
Madison County Health
Department at 850-973-
5000.


CALLING ALL FANS

Electric fans needed for seniors

suffering from local heat wave


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The residents of
Madison County, along
with communities
throughout the region,
are banning together to
help seniors that are
suffering from the se-
vere heat that is con-
suming the area.
Locally, the Senior Citi-
zens Center is joining
community partners to
provide electric fans to
any senior in the county
that can't afford one.
These types of fans
can be picked up at any
home store or local dis-
count store for $20 or


less. Organizers grate-
fully request any dona-
tions be delivered as
soon as convenient, as
the situation is urgent
and the health risks as-
sociated with heat relat-
ed illness can be very
serious, especially for
seniors.
"The Senior Center
is asking businesses, in-
dividuals, churches, and
organizations to donate
fans for our seniors, to
help keep them cool.
The drop off site is at
the Senior Center locat-
ed at 486 SW Rutledge
Street, Madison," noted
Sharon Underhill, who


can be reached at (850)
973-4241. "Box, round, or
fans on stands would be
great."
The Madison Coun-
ty Senior Citizens Coun-
cil is devoted to the
support of needy se-
niors everywhere. The
council and its commu-
nity supporters express
immense appreciation
for every type of contri-
bution time, money
and encouragement,
and now fans.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
michael(agreenepublishi
ng.com.


SALVATION ARMY VBS

SET FOR JULY 14-17


The Salvation
Army is scheduled to
hold its much-ac-
claimed Vacation
Bible School, titled,
"Crocodile Dock." Pre-
sented by
the Salvation Army
Youth V-Team, the pro-


gram will feature,
"Shining God's Light"
The VBS is sched-
uled for July 14-17
from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. daily There will
be a picnic supper in
Haffye Hayes Park,
with the bible school


activities taking place
in the Senior Center in
Greenville. Ages 5 to 95
are welcome.
To pre-register or
for more information,
phone George or Gale
Blevins at (850) 948-
2119.


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