Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00168
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla
Publication Date: June 24, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00168
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text







Madison Coun-





Sance 1964

Wed., June 24, 2009Te Sp f Madison Count
VOL. -45 0o.45


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Health GuidPae B Section


Pathof Faith C Section
Bridal 11A
Money & Finance 12-13A


FWC Recognizes Heroic


And Outstanding Service

Three Madison County Rescuers Honored By FWC


Photo Submitted
Madison County rescuers were recognized by the FWC for their efforts during the recent flood. Pictured left to right: Jason Ar-
chambault Lee VFD, Edwin McMullen Lee VFD, Alan Whigham MCSO, Sheriff Ben Stewart MCSO, and Rob Goley FWC.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The life-saving efforts of three Madi-
son County rescuers, two volunteer fire-
fighters and one law enforcement officer,
earned the men recognition from the Flori-
da Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC). For their efforts during the
recent flood, Jason Archambault and Ed-
win McMullen, volunteers with the Lee
VFD, along with Cpl. Alan Whigham, from
the Madison County Sheriff's Office, re-
ceived Service Commendations.for their
noteworthy assistance.
At the time of the rescue, the three


were involved in the search for drowning
victim J.D. Waters, when a call came
through for them to assist in reported
stranded resident. Joining Rob Goley, offi-
cer with FWC, the group was directed to a
man clinging to a tree, having been strand-
ed when his boat capsized.
"I couldn't have picked a better crew to
work with on this rescue," Goley said after
the April 6 event, adding that, "McMullin
knew the river like the back of his hand."
He also noted that Whigham the Madison
County Sheriff's Office dive team coordi-
nator and Archambault, a professional
firefighter now volunteering with Lee,


were both invaluable to the rescue as well.
FWC Lt. Bruce Cooper recalls how the
day went from there, saying that an FWC
helicopter crew spotted a second man
while searching the river later. This man
was stranded in his house, waving a white
cloth at the helicopter. Cooper and FWC Of-
ficer Randy McDonald reached the man by
boat, later rescuing him and his three dogs.
In the process of this rescue, Cooper and
McDonald spotted .yet another man who
was shouting for assistance.
The three men and all the dogs were
transported to the Lee Fire Rescue station.
Please see FWC, Page 4A


8 And Under Girls Softball Team

Wins First-Ever District Title


By Jacob Bembry To raise money for
Greene Publishing, Inc. the game, a fundraiser
The Madison County will be held Friday, June
8 and Under Girls Softball 24, at the Shell Station at
team finished second in US Highway 90 and
the District tourna- State Road 53 in Madi-
ment played this son. The girls will
past weekend be selling water-
in Live Oak. melons. Also,
The Madison a drawing will
Stingers won be held to win a
the title in the $100 Shell gas card.
championship game Tickets are $1 each.
played Saturday, June Congratulations to
20. the Madison Stingers on


being the first Madison
County 8 and under girls
softball team to enter the
state tournament as Dis-
trict champions.


.1


The team will travel
to Ponte Vedra Beach,
where action will begin in
the state tournament on
Wednesday, July 1.


Photo Submitted
The Madison Stingers 8 and under girls softball team won the District title.
Pictured front row, left to right: lesha Alkens, Caroline Jennings, Lee Lee Rogers,
Gracle Galbraith, Laila Dickey and Abi Annette. Second row, left to right: Middle
row, left to right: Assistant Coach Kelly ZImmerly, Kenyla Davis, Hannah Zim-
merly, Reese Rutherford and Head Coach Will Rutherford. Back row: Assistant
Coach Chuck Dickey.

Madison County Minor

League All-Stars Finish

Second In District


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County Minor
League All-Stars (10 and under) fin-
ished second in the Cal Ripken Dis-
trict baseball tournament, played
June 19-21 at the Medart Recreation
Park in Wakulla C6unty.
Madison County played a total of
five games in their bracket, defeating
Perry twice and Wakulla County once.
Wakulla County received a first
round bye in the tournament.
Madison County defeated Perry


10-8 in their opening game, before los-
ing 16-13 to Wakulla County.
Madison County put the bats to
work in their third game, belting Per-
ry 22-7.
The Madison County team got a
measure of revenge against Wakulla
County on Sunday morning, beating
them 14-1 but in the championship
game, Wakulla walked away with a 9-6
victory
Congratulations' to the Madison
County Minor League team on their
Please see All-Stars, Page 4A


Correction

Complete Body Repair Frame Repair


The advertisement for Coleburn's Body Shop In
the Family Fun Activity and Puzzle Book In the Fri-
day, June 19, edition of The Madison Enterprise-
Recorder was incorrect. The owner was listed as
Robert L. Blanton (the former owner), but the new
owners are Tony and Indy Kelley. Greene Publishing,
Inc. sincerely regrets the mistake.


615'NE Colin Kejy:Highway
Madison, FL 32340


Under New Ownership

Tony & Indy Kelley


Day Phone: 850-973-6280
Fax: 850-973-3794


I ( _







' U. U *


2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepuljsning.com Wednes




VIEWPOINTS OPINIONS


day, June 24, 2009


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word,
comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.

Re: Madison County

Memorial Hospital
This letter is in regard to recent dress code
changes that have been made mandatory by the ad-
ministrator of MCMH effective July 1, 2009. This is
for all MCMH employees (at employees expense). Ap-
parently the fact that all employees just received a,
5% salary reduction means little to the administra-
tor even though it has been devastating for most of
the employees. With the economy as it is now a 5%
pay cut may seem insignificant to some people but it
is most significant to others. Especially the MCMH
employees who are struggling just,to pay their most
necessary expenses such as groceries, electricity,
gas, water not to mention clothes, shoes and other
necessities for their children and/or grandchildren.
Why does the administrator feel that NOW is the ap-
propriate time to mandate a new dress code policy?
Again, at the expense of the employees. Isn't it
enough that all of the employees and their families
are already helping through payment of taxes and
salary deductions to help raise money for a new hos-
pital? After all of this there is now another adminis-
trative mandate that is reducing the work week by 8
hours adding even more to the salary deductions.
When the 5% pay cut occurred several months ago
the administrator told employees in an open meeting
that the 5% pay cut was being implemented to "save
jobs" and prevent layoffs. However shortly after this
meeting some employees were laid off. In the same
meeting the administrator stated that he had decided
to postpone the new dress code implementation for
the time being. Then in March 2009 he issued a new
dress code revision with an effective date of July 1,
2009 stating that all departments would be in compli-
ance. The employees are being asked to make too
many sacrifices in a time when'some of their family
members are out of work and overall economic con-
ditions are straining the budgets of many of the em-
ployees. A 5 % salary reduction, a loss of 8 hours per
pay period and then come up with the money to pur-
chase '5 to 10 sets of new uniforms when most of
them already have new uniforms that look very neat
and attractive.' The current uniforms actually add
.color to the drab little small town hospital. They give
the place some personality which it badly needs.
This is something that needs to be reconsidered and
implemented with the new hospital which will be
new and professional. I ask the administrator and
the board of directors to reconsider this issue.
J.Wycbff


Are New Uniforms,

Necessary For


Hospital

Employees?
Attn: Editor
Re: Madison County Memorial Hospital New
Employee Dress Code Mandate,
I am writing as a friend of concerned-citizens of
Madison County who have both friends and rela-
tives who are ,employed at MCMH. There is a
mandatory change of dress code for all employees
that is to be implemented on July 1, 2009. This
mandatory change of uniforms is to be totally fi-
nanced by the employees even though it is mandat-
ed by the administration. They have been told if
they show up for work on July 1 non-compliant with
the new dress code they will be sent home. This is
going to be very expensive, for the hourly wage,
workers of the hospital who have already, at the re-
quest of the administration, taken a salary reduc-
tion and most recently had pay periods reduced by
unknown hours, incentive pay removed, etc. It ap-
pears that the faithful workers who work to keep the
hospital operating are the ones .who are being pe-
nalized. A large' portion of these employees don't
have the extra money to invest in new uniforms in
economic times such as we are currently experienc-
ing. Can this not wait to be implemented when the
new hospital is built? Is the board of directors
aware of this mandate? Is this really necessary?
L. Payne


MCMH Employee

Concerned About

Cost For Uniforms
Attn: Editor
Re: Madison County memorial hospital New
Employee Dress Code Mandate
It has come to my attention that the employees
at the Madison County hospital will need to pur-
chase new uniforms by, July 1, 2009 at there own ex-
pense. These employees had there hours and pay


reduced; which is causing them financial hardship.
They are struggling to pay mortgages, car notes and
other bills. I don't understand why mc m h wants to
put more burdens on their employees who have been
with them for many years and because of them
Madison Hospital is still operating. New uniforms
are not important, but good caring employees are. Is
this the thanks they get for being loyal? I am very
saddened by this.
Elaine Calderon


Wandering With
The Publisher
Mary Ellen Greene
Columnist


Laughter In Life


In the 70 years that I
have lived, I have found.
that there is laughter in
everything. It has helped.
make my life a happy one.
The husband and I
taught our children early
in their childhood that if
something bad happens,
laugh. We, too, have adopt-
ed this way of laughing at
adversity. However, occa-
sionally it has made other
folks think we are crazy
Once, when our son,
Harvey,. hurt his leg in a
football game in high
school, The' husband went
,oui on the field where Har,
vey was lying, and being
seen about by the coaches
and the .paramedics on
duty.. As they carried Har-
vey off the. field, he was
propped on either side by
two men. The husband
yelled to me as I sat wor-
ried in the, stands, and
yelled, "Don't worry, Sweet-'
ie. He still has one leg left."
I could, hear someone
behind me say, "Now, that
is an insensitive father.
He's hot even worried
about his son; he's just
making jokes about it."
I turned to the couple
behind me and explained
that this is just how. our
family reacts to adversity
- we laugh about it. And,
we still do. I think that is
about the only thing that
has kept .our family sane.
Laugh at adversity. It's
certainly better than cry-
ing, because the end, re-
sults will always be the-
same, no matter how you
look at the same situation.
William, too, was in-
jured in his childhood,
when he had to have a cast.
on his arm, and the same
reaction was to laugh
about it and tell him he'd
"get over it." We showed
him how to have friends
write on his cast, and that
amused him.
Emerald, once, at the
age of six or seven, got her
hair caught in a pea
sheller as the husband and
I had the children shelling
peas at the office. The hus-,
band had the foresight to
unplug the pea sheller, as
everyone else panicked.
The pea sheller had pulled
some of her hair out, and
the' husband laughingly,
told everyone around her
who were wanting to baby
hef, ."She'll have many
years for that hair to grow
back," and she did.
Let us be honest, with
ourselves; life is some-
thing which is here to stay
- at least, as long as we


are.


Life involves us


totally


--days, nights and some-
times weekends with prob-
lems.


spect for age or gender, or
social positions, and even
animals are said to have
their problems, too.
What do we do?
Modern research sug-
gests that good or bad situ-
ations are all in the mind,
and can be kept entirely
under control, with an oc-
casional shock treatment.
Rising to this occa-
sion, I am going to suggest
a few of the "brilliant
thoughts" that have come
to mind which just may
help others at a time they
need a necessary psychic
jolt.
Upton Sinclair once
said in his novel, The Jun-
gle, that he aimed at the
public's heart, and hit its
stomach. Sometimes I feel,
as I write my columns. I
have aimed at the public's
brain, and merely h it heir
funny bone, but this is
what I enjoy'
I have read a few of
these quotes in my life-
time. I hope you will find
them humorus as well.
"My picture of the
World keeps changing be-
fore I can get it into focus."
"If you're careful
enough, nothing bad or
good will ever happen to
you."
"Cheer Up! Things
may be getting worse at a
slower rate."
"By doing just a little
every day on a, long, and
hard task, I can gradually
let the task completely
overwhelm me."
"If I don't do .the
things that are not worth
doing, then who will?"
"When I am going
slowly ,on a project, I tell
myself that maybe I'm
lucky to be going so slowly
Because, I may be going in
the wrong direction."
"I am fighting for sur-
vival, in my own sweet and
gentle way.'
"Someday I'll get imy
big chance or have I al-
ready had it?"
"I wish I had more en-
ergy ... orles's ambition."'
"It's very. inconve-
nient to be mortal Youi
never know when every-
thing may suddenly stop
happening." ,
As I close my column
this 'week, I hope you have
found a little humor in life
also. A sense of having'
something in common,,
even 'if it's something silly,
is perhaps the most healthy
andbeneficial of all human
emotional states
"Please join our family,
and laugh at the funny
things in life. Enjoy 'one
another, and always know
that love is within every


laugh we have.
'Nuff said....Bye for


Problems have no re- now.... See 'ya.


Are& New papers

Dy 0 ut?

I Thil No6t!

In today's, world of Internet and high speed
knowledge, there is talk that the printed newspaper is
dying out. Some think that the newspapers of this
world are standing on their last leg and their life-span
is limited.
I think not!
It is true that many newspapers have folded, and
gone out of business in the last few years. But so have
many other businesses.
Newspapers are like any other business if they
.lose enough money for long enough, they will go out of
business. Despite popular belief, newspapers are a
business just like any other business. To survive, they
must show a profit. With the economy being what it is,
for the last few years, there are businesses all over this
nation, newspapers and non-newspapers, feeling the
crunch of the times.
I read a column a few months ago that paid when
the AM radio came along; people had predicted that
the days of the newspaper were numbered. Radio
could get a story out in minutes; newspapers took
hours.
Then when FM radio came along, people had pre-
dicted that the days of the AM radio were numbered.
Then came television. The talk was that televi-
sion would take the place of radio; for TV had both
sound and pictures.
When cable television came along, it was predict-
ed that the days of the local networks were numbered.
Cable TV offered more channels and had movies with
no commercials.
And now....., the Internet is here and -the talk is
that the days of the newspaper are numbered.
I think not!
", It is true; some people have turned totally to the
internet. For others however, it will never happen
when it comes to reading the local news. There's
something about reading that paper, held in your
hands, while eating breakfast, drinking coffee, or en-
joying some quiet time. Being able to look at the pic-
tures and turn the pages. Something is lost when you
turn that into a click of a button.
With a printed version of 'the newspaper, you
hold everything right there in your hands.....your lo-
cal news, school and sports news, crossword puzzles,
movie listings, the local sales at the community
stores, coupons...... all with just a few turning of the
pages.
The Internet is a great thing, however, and all
newspapers seem to now have a version of their print-
ed product on the web also. Some newspapers only
have a few paragraphs of each story on the web
(telling the reader to buy the printed version for the
whole story), some newspapers put only some of the
stories on the web (advising the reader to purchase
the printed version in order to get all the stories), and
yet other online newspapers are viewable at a sub-
scription cost, and the newspaper can be read, in its
entirety on the web.,
Competition keeps us all on our toes in life. The in-
ternet is no different. .
Here at Greene Publishing Inc. (Madison County
Carrier and Madison Enterprise-Recorder) we are con-
tinuing to update our website, and make it more as-
sessable and user-friendly We have added new features
in the last month, such as videos of community events
and picture slideshows of community events.
If you haven't checked us out yet, on the web,
please do so at www.greenepublishing.com and make
sure you vote on the "Weekly Poll" while you're there.
We thank you, our readers, for the years of sup-
port you have given us, and we hope to continue to bet-
tdr serve you in the upcoming months and years to
come, both in print and on the web.
Until then..... I'll see you around the town.


mere)


Emerald Greene
Publisher


TO tErS ,O line Poll0


If you could travel to California any way you wanted
and time was no issue, how would you get there?


Car

Airplane

Train

Motorcycle

0 5 10 15 20

This week's question: Which Florida attraction attracts you?
To view and participate in our weekly online poll, visit www.greenepublishlng.com.


- I








Wednesday, June 24, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 3A


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


I hope everyone had a great weekend. This past
weekend was not as busy for me as the weekend be-
fore, but it was eventful.
On Saturday evening, my cousin, Jamie Wilson,
. .was honored with a small birthday party at his
home. Family members attended and wished Jamie
a happy birthday. Earlier in the day, Jamie had gone
to Blue Springs with our cousin, Michael Keeler, and
Mark Henry and Mark's wife. Happy birthday,
Jamie.
My brother, Danny, was able to return to work
on Saturday after a two-and-a-half month hiatus,
due to his health. God is good and He has blessed
Danny tremendously.
Lindsey English will graduate from high school
pn Sunday afternoon, June 28. The ceremony will be
held at Midway Church of God. Congratulations,
Lindsey!
The Lee Building Blocks program is still going
along well. Children are enjoying the day camp in
Lee. There's still time for your child to participate.
Call 971-5867 for more information.,
Lee Worship Center will host an open micro-
phone sing on July -1, at 7 p.m., featuring the Mc-
Cormick Family. Anyone who can sing or play an
instrument is also Welcome to participate. There
will also be a.covered dish dinner'at the event. For
more information, please call (850) 971-4135.
Happy birthday wishes go out to Lindsey Eng-
lish, who will celebrate her birthday on Tuesday,
June 30.
Belated birthday wishes go out to Erika Hodge,
who turned 18 on June 7; A.J. Doyle, who turned 10
on June 10; Chad Phillips and Bethany Phillips, who
celebrated their big days on June 11; Cody Cline,
who celebrated his birthday on June 16; Dawn
Phillips, whose birthday was on June 18; and Margie
Phillips, whose birthday w, June 19.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great
week aAad beautifull ,forever! -May. God bless'-each
and every one of you!


* I


Bank of America vs. Tony D. Macarages, Jr. -
mortgage foreclosure
Cheri Becker vs. Brian Joe Becker domestic
injunction
State Farm Mutual Auto Insurance vs. Enter-
prise Leasing auto negligence
Farrah S. Sloane-O'Neal vs. Ulysses O'Neal, Jr.
- dissolution of marriage
Billy Joe Bass' II vs. Kristen L. Hardin domes-
tic injunction


.' 0 .A \




i- b ., te witk


y~w~A


Greene Publishing, Inc Photo, October 12,2005


Healthcare Reform


Politicians frequent-
ly use a- tactic where.
they rename an old idea
and come back for an-
other round of political
battle, hoping for a dif-
ferent result. Sixteen
years ago at the start of
the first Clinton Admin-
istration, the old idea
was "universal health-
care." The Obama Ad-
ministration has
repackaged this idea as
Healthcaree reform" for
2009. In the past, the.
goal was health insur-
ance for everyone; now
the mantra is. to reduce
the cost of healthcare.
Reducing the cost of
healthcare 'is a noble
goal;, the devil, is in the
details.
I'm not going to try
to dissect any plan right
now because .there are
numerous plans being
circulated; we just don't
know which one is final-
ly going to surface for a
vote. Rather, I'd- like to
talk about some princi-
pals that might be im-
portant in the final
outcome.
We are told that
there are about 48 mil-
lion uninsured in our
country That means
that more than 250 mil-
lion or about 85 percent
are covered by health in-
surance. Whatever we
do to help the 15 percent
should not be done at the
expense 'of the 85 per-
cent. We don't want to
"throw the baby out
with the bath water.".
One of the things
you don't see when dis-
cussing the uninsured is
to break down the 48
million and identify why
they might not be cov-
ered. About half of
these uninsured are
very ..healthy people
(ages 22 to 40) who could
afford coverage but have
higher priorities than
health insurance such
as paying off, college
loans, buying their first
car and home, and estab-
lishing their career
path. Hard to believe
that these young people
might have something
more important in their
lives than paying $10,000
a year for health insur-
ance.
In normal times,
President Obama might
be able to get his health-
care reform ideas into
law, but these are not


National

Security
Joe Boyles
Guest Columnist


normal economic condi-
tions and paying for it is
the rub. The deficit this
year will be close to $2
trillion. Last week, the
non-partisan Congres-
sional Budget Office
(CBO) scored the
Kennedy-Dodd bill at
$1.6 trillion over the
next ten years. Not only
is that figutrein' all'Vrob-
ability low', "'w don't"
have the money
Taxes are going to
have to be raised to pay
for this healthcare re-
form. Raising taxes on
the rich won't get the job
done so the politicians
are going to have to tap
the middle class. Taxing
healthcare benefits
might get the job done
but will be very unpopu-
lar with the 85 percent
who have coverage and
are generally pleased
with their situation.
A big point of con-
tention is the so-called
public option. This
would interject the gov-
ernment into the market
to cover about one-
thirds of the uninsured.
Obama says that this
will interject competi-
tion into the market, but
itwon't. All you need to
do is look at the history
of Medicare and closer
to home, home-owners
insurance in Florida, to
realize that government
intervention drives pri-
vate insurance out of
the market. The latest
estimates indicate that a
public option would dri-
ve somewhere between
half and two-thirds of
those: who currently
have private insurance
into a single-payer, gov-
ernment systeni within
ten years. ,.
With something as
important as healthcare,
which is about one-sev-
enth of our economy,
you would think that it
would be important to
seek some bi-partisan
solution to the issue, but
the president and his fel-
low Democrats are ready
to go it alone, rejecting
any ideas from the oppo-


sition. This means they
will try to ram this
through in record time.
Obama feels that he
must strike while the
iron is hot.
There are dozens of
pitfalls which are going
to bother the American
people and will cause
the Democrats to lose
fppd:W.' -dtri't 'Want-
to see our taxes rise, es-
pecially in troubled eco-
nomic times. We aren't
going to like govern-
ment mandates, such as
you will buy insurance
or be fined. We're going
to be very suspicious of
a "trojan 'horse" public
option that will drive.
private competition-
away. We're not going'to
like healthcare 'ra-
tioning like the horror
stories we hear from
Great Britain and Cana-
*da. We won't under-.
stand why healthy
people will pay the same
rates as others who en-
gage in personal choices
that jeopardize their
health like smoking, al-
coholism, obesity and
drug abuse.
'There are ways to
reduce healthcare costs
and as a result, make in-
surance less expensive
and more available to
the uninsured. For ex-
ample, we could, allow
individUals to buy low-
cost, high-deductible
catastrophic policies.
We could increase the
value of health savings
accounts. We could lev-
el the playing field in
the tax code for insur-
ance., We could limit
punitive damages that
are awarded for mal-
practice.
If our political lead-
ers would listen to the
healthcare profession-
als doctors, nurses,
hospitals, pharmaceuti-
cals, insurers, etc. we
could have a meaningful
and rewarding dialogue
on the subject. But as it
stands right now, this is
a mess, and a potentially
expensive and damag-
ing mess at that.


Taylor McMullen,
left, and Chase Gur-
ley, right, took top
honors in the first
grade division for the
poster contest.


"1 p~ _PressASoS ]


20Aard Wi Newsaer
Award Wirning Newspaper


P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Web Site:
www.greenepublishing.com
.E-mail Information:
News
news@greenepublishing.com

bryant. greenepubllshing.com
Advertisemet ,t,
ads@greenepiubiishtng.com
Classifieds / Leaal
classifeds@greenepublishing.com

Publisher
Emerald Greene
Editor
Jacob Bembry
Production Manager
Heather Bowen
Staff Writers
Michael Curtis and
Bryant Thigpen
Graphic Designers
Stephen Bochnia and
James Sunter
Advertising
Sales Representatives
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy MNcKinney,
Jeanene Dunn
and Chelsea Bouley
Classified and Legal Ads
Laura Little
Deadline for classified is
Monday at 3 pm.
Deadline for Legal Adversement
is Monday at 5 p.m.
There will be a $3 charge
for Affidavits.
Circulation Department
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
Subscription Rates
In-County $t30
SOut-of-Counry $38
(State & local taxes included)

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper
[USPS 324 800] designed
for the express reading
pleasure of the people of its
circulation area, be they
past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing Inc.,
1695 South SR 53, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post
Office in Madison, FL
32340.
POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to MADI-
SON COUNTY CARRI-
ER, P.O. Drawer 772,
Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper re-
serves the right to reject any
advertisement, news matter,
or subscriptions that, in the
opinion of the manage-
ment, will not be for the
best interest of the county
and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investi-
gate any advertisement sub-
mitted.
All photos given to
Greene Publishing Inc. for
publication in this newspa-
per must be picked up no
later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off.
Greene Publishing, Inc. will
not be responsible for pho-
tos beyond said deadline.






U. U P


4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepuDllsning.com Wednesday, June 24, 2009




LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


MCldison County

SRIM9E BEAT
" SECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED INNOCENT UNTIL
SPOVEN QUILTY IN A COURT OF LAW


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Syndicated Content
* Available from Commercial News Providers
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All-Stars

cont from Page 1A
second place finish in tournament play.
Congratulations to all of the players, coaches and parents.


7-

Photo Submitted
The Madison County Minor League All-Stars (10 and under) finished second in the district tournament.
Front row, kneeling (left to right): Jacob Johnson, John Flournoy, and Steven Walden; Middle row, standing
(left to right): Jim Flournoy III, Dylan Bass, Dillon Burns, Dustin Bass, Jay Mitchell, J'Vontrey Mitchell, and
Jarrett Briggs; Back row, standing (left to right): Assistant Coach Steve Walden, Assistant Coach Scott Bass,
Head Coach Jim Flournoy, and Assistant Coach Doug Bass. Not pictured: Drew Herring.


Senior Center

cont from Page 1A


1161 SW Harvey Greene Drive, Madi-
son just off SR 14, near the new
Emergency Operations Center.
Richardson and her fine staff have
made the most of the current facility,
but are thrilled to be expanding and
improving services for their clients.
The new facility is both larger and
much better equipped to serve.
An estimated 380,000 seniors visit
Florida's senior centers every year,
with hundreds receiving vital services


Pilgrim's Pri


in. Madison County The center pro-
vides a place where older citizens can
come together to socialize and main-
tain involvement with their communi-
ty, including a wide range of activities
that enhance the daily lives of seniors,
and extend beyond traditional pro-
grams and events to that of a family
Call (850) 973-2006 or 973-4241 for
information and program details.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


cont from Page 1A


member. It is not prepared according to,
U.S. generally accepted accounting,
principles that earnings reports filed
with the Securities and Exchange
Commission follow; however, it com-
plies with the requirements of the
court.
In May, the Pittsburg, Texas-based
company said in a filing with the SEC


that it lost $58.8 million, or 79 cents a
share, in the fiscal second quarter that
ended March 28. That's about half of
the company's year-earlier reported
loss of $111.4 million,'or $1.67 a share.
Overall, sales fell 19 percent to $1.7 bil-
lion.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


FWC

cont from

lub Page lA
archl5e where a shelter had been
established. "Working
with Madison County
Sheriff Ben Stewart has
At been tremendous. He
and his folks are very
professional," Cooper
added.
This reporter joins a
very grateful communi-
ty in thanking all the
brave volunteers from
throughout the county
la that sacrificed so much
t I *eet during the flood, and
chase congratulations to Jason
Archambault, Edwin
McMullen and Alan
Whigham for their
much-deserved recogni-
tion.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
michael@greenepublishi
ng.com.


0 f




I


VAT I y n A i-I l' I-


I









W\l-hst blay, June 24, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 5A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


ForI JTY ~ L~ 0 I ~I *thecmleecledr i s it wIrenpbish ingcom


June 24
Three Rivers Legal
Services will offer free
civil legal services to
low-income and other
eligible citizens at the
Madison County Cour-
house on Wednesday,
June 24, noon-3 p.m.
Please call 1-800-495-0039
to schedule an' appoint-
ment. Areas of practice
include landlord/ ten-.
ant, foreclosure, unfair
sales practices, con-
tracts, social security,
medicaid/medicare, liv-
ing and legal wills, and
family law (limited).
June 25
The Area Agency on
Aging for North Florida
Inc. will host its board
of directors meeting on
Thursday, June 25, at
10:30 a.m. The meeting
will be held at the,
agency's office at 2414
Mahan Dr. in Tallahas-
see.
June 26
NFCC invites the
community to its EMS
Bed Race fundraiser
event on Friday, June 26,
The event begins at 10
a.m. at the NFCC tennis
courts. Enter to race or
be a spectator ... but
don't miss the fun. For
more information,, con-
tact Mac Leggett at (850)
973-1673 or Gail Hackle
at 973-1617.
June 27
The Monticello
Opera House presents
Hot Dogs and Cool Cats,'
a children's musical the-
ater production, Satur-
day, June 27, at 11:30
a.m. Watch Detective
Sam Spadenneuter. as
he solves the mystery of
the three kittens who
lost their mittens! This
is musical and mystery
fun for all ages! Tickets,
available at the door, are
just $5 for adults and $2
for children. Call 997-
4242 for more informa-
tion.
July 4
The American Le-
gion 224 will host a
cookout on Saturday,
July 4, at 4 p.m., for
members and guests.
There will be a, fire-
works display at dusk.
July 12-15
'Madison Church of
God announces a re-
vival with Evangelist
Bennie Jones, an or-
dained bishop ,who has
been in full-time min-
istry for over three
decades. The. revival
will be held July 12-15;
11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Sun-
day, and 7 p.m., Monday
thru Wednesday; at
Madison Church of
God, located at 771 Col-
in Kelly Hwy., in Madi-'
son. For more
information, please call
(850) 973-3339,




;


July 20-23
Camp Weed Sum-
mer Camp for Children
with Parent(s) in Prison
will take place July
20-23. Visit www.camp
weed.net for a brochure,
registration and schol-
arship forms. Join in
the Fun in the Sonshine
at our 85th consecutive
summer, camp. A min-'
istry of the Episcopal
Diocese of Florida for
children and young
people of any (or no) de-
nomination. Scholar-
ships available for
qualified applicants. For
information, please call
888-763-2602, Ext. 16.
July 25
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park will host a Sum-,
mer Herb workshop on-
SSaturday, July 25. Par-,
ticipants will learn how
to grow and propagate
warm weather herbs.:
The second half of the*
workshop will cover,
cooking .with herbs.
Participants will learn
how to make herb salts
from; marinades. Bring
your pruners and take
home some cuttings.
This is a hands-on work-
shop and fees are $5 per
workshop, including`
park admission. For ad-'
ditional information or
to register for the work-
shops, please call (386)
397-1920 or visit www.
stephernfosterCSO.org.
July 26-August 1
Camp Weed Sum-
mer Camp for Rising 5th
and 6th graders will-
take place July 26-Aug.
1. Visit www.campweed
.net for a brochure, reg-
istration and scholar-
ship, forms. Join in the
Fun in the Sonshine at
our 85th consecutive
summer camp. A min-
istry of the Episcopal
Diocese of Florida for
children and young peo-
ple of any (or no) de-,
nomination. For more
information, please call
888-763-2602, Ext. 16.
July 31-August 2
The Mosley/Hodge
Family Reunion II will
be held in Madison, July
31-Aug. 2, at the United
Methodist Church
recreation: center. All
descendants and rela-'
tives of Tom Mosley and
Rosa; Hodge (of West
Farm) are: invited to
this event.
August 2-8
Camp Weed Sum-
mer I Camp for Rising
7th, 8th and 9th graders
will take place Aug. 2-8.
Visit www.campweed
.net for a brochure, reg-
istration and scholar-
ship forms. Join in the
Fun in the Sonshine at
our '85th consecutive
summer camp. A min-
istry of the Episcopal
Diocese of Florida for
children and young peo-
ple of any (or no) de-
nomination. For more
information, .call 888-


ENROLL NOW

Class Schedule available at:
WWW.NFCC.EDU
SCALLOR VISIT OUR CAMPUS
850.973.2288
325 NW Turner Davis Dr I Madison, FL

North Florida
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SmallCoffege. Big (Possibi6ties.


763-2602, Ext. 16.
August 29
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park will host a Con-
tainer Gardening Work-
shop on Saturday, Aug.
29. Participants will
learn how to avoid
many of the pests and
diseases associated with
summertime gardening
in containers and .ex-
plore -'warm weather
flower and vegetable
gardening. The class
will cover proper group-
ing of plants, choosing
the right container, se-
lecting the right plants
to grow for each season
and touch' on annuals,
perennials and ferns.
Bring your pruners and.
take home some cut-
tings. This is a hands-on
workshop and fees are
$5 per workshop, includ-
ing park admission. For
additional information
or to register for the
workshops, please call
(386) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.
org..
Thursdays-Mondays
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park will host an ongo-
ing wood Carving work-
shop on Thursdays
through Mondays, from
noon until 4 p.m. Partic-
ipants can create figure
carvings, wood spirits,
spoons, bowls, relief
carvings and more dur-
ing this four-hour class.
Workshop fees are $15
per session and include
park admission. For ad-
ditional information or
to register for the work-
shops, please call (386)
397-1920 or visit www.
stephenfosterCSO.org.
Each Weekday Except;
Tuesday
The' Senior Citizens
Center offers computer
classes to seniors 60 and
older each weekday ex-
cept Tuesday. For more
information or to sign
up, please call (850) 973-
4241. A regular instruc-
tor is needed to teach
these classes. Interested
individuals should ask
to speak with Sharon
concerning the opening
at the number above.
Every
Tuesday-Saturday
The Diamonds in
the Ruff Adoption Pro-
gram at the Suwannee
Valley Humane Society
is open every Tuesday
through, Saturday from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is lo-
cated on 1156 SE Bisbee
Loop, Madison, FL
S32340. For more infor-
mation, or directions,
call (866) 236-7812 or
(850) 971-9904.
First Saturday of
Each Month


Everyone is invited
to gospel (open mic)
sings at Lee Worship
Center the first Satur-
day night of each
month, beginning at 7
p.m. The church is locat-
ed at 397 Magnolia Dr. in
Lee. Everyone is asked
to bring a dish for the
pot luck supper. There
will be great musicians,
so those who can play
an instrument are wel-
come, to come and join
in. Bring a friend with
you. For'more informa-
tion, call Allen Mc-
Cormick at (850)
673-9481.
Second and Fourth
Saturday of Each
Month
The Madison
Church of God hosts a
free soup kitchen the
second and fourth Sat-
urday of each month at
the Greenville Senior
Citizens Center. Lunch
is served from noon to 1
p.m.
Third Tuesday of
Each Month
The Greater
Greenville Area Dia-
betes Support Group is
a free educational ser-
vice and support for dia-
betes and those wanting
to prevent diabetes. The
group meets the third
Tuesday -of each month
at the Greenville Public
Library Conference
Room at 312 SW Church
St., Greenville, 11-11:30
a.m. Everyone is wel-
come!
Every Wednesday and
Friday
The Senior Citizens
Center's sewing club for
seniors 60 and older
meets every Wednesday
and Friday. For more in-
formation or to sign up,
please call (850) 973-4241.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison Coun-
ty Health Education
Club is holding a free
educational service and
support group for peo-
ple interested in pre-
venting or controlling
diabetes, high blood
pressure, elevated cho-
lesterol levels, obesity
and other chronic
health conditions. The
club meets the third
Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
12:15-12:45 p.m. Every-
one is welcome to bring
their own lunch.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison Coun-
ty Diabetes Support
Group is a free educa-
tional service and sup-
port group for diabetes
and those wanting to
prevent diabetes. The
group meets the third


Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
11:45 a.m.-12:10 p.m.
Everyone is welcome is
bring their own lunch.
For details, contact
Marcia Kazmierski at
(386) 752-2461 or Lor-
raine Miller at (386) 752-
6439.
Fourth Wednesday of
Each Month
An informational
meeting for those in-
jured and needing help
returning to work will
be held the fourth
Wednesday of each
month from 12-3 p.m. at
the Madison County Ex-
tension Office located at


184 College.Loop, Madi-
son. The meeting is free
and open to the public.
For more information,
please call (850) 245-3489.
Fourth Tuesday of
Each Month
Big Bend. Hospice's
adult Grief Support
Group meets on the
fourth Tuesday of each
month at the Madison
County Senior Center,
located at 4886 SW Rut-
ledge. The group is open
to anyone in the com-
munity who has experi-
enced the death of
someone in their life.
The support groups are
a free community ser-
vice. For more informa-
tion, please call Casey
Shaffer at 566-6189.


Stella Jean Parker
Stella Jean Parker, age 73, passed away on Thurs-
day, June 18, 2009, at All Saints Catholic Nursing
Home in Jacksonville. She was born m Greenville to
the late Micah Steele Letchworth and late former
Anna Bell Bishop. Mrs. Parker was raised here as a
young lady, then married Mr. Thomas Elton Parker,
who joined the Navy and lived in many places
throughout the United States. She was a member of
Grace United Methodist Church, a past Girl Scout
Leader, and a member of the Navy Wives Club. Mrs.
Parker was a bookkeeper for 15 years. She enjoyed
swimming, fishing, camping, boating and cooking.
Her husband, Thomas Elton Parker; a son, Guy
Thomas Parker; and two brothers, Johnny Steele
Letchworth and Jerry Raymond Letchworth, preced-
ed her in death.
She is survived by. a son, the Honorable Circuit
Judge Greg Parker and wife, Pam, of Perry; a daugh-
ter, Gale Parker-Hall and husband, Hugh, of Jack-
sonville; a brother, Jack Milton Letchworth, of
Crawfordville; five grandchildren, Jason Hall,
Chelsea Parker, Ben Tuten, Danielle Hall and Kate Da-
ley-Parker; and a host of nieces and nephews also sur-
vive. .
Funeral services were held at Joe P. Burns Funer-
al Home in Perry onr Tuesday, June 23, at 11 a,m. with
Pastor James Taylor and Pastor Matt Wallis officfat-
ing. The family received friends at 10 a.m. (one hour
prior to the service) at the funeral home. Interment
followed at Pirieview Memorial Gardens.
Friends may sign the guestbook at www.joep
burnsfuneralhomes.com.
















*Black Buck Antelope
Axis
Fallow


*Red
'Whitetail
Black Buck Antelope


TiUCLCA t SALE

Feed, Fertilizer, Post and Wire Prices


3 SOUTHERN STATES
Brands You Trust.
People Who Know.


12% Multi Stock Sweet Feed 50#
12% Stocker Pellets 50#
SS 21% Dog Food 40#
Shelled Corn 50#


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RAINBOW FERTILIZER


5-10-15 RB 50#
10-10-10 SRB 50#
16-4-8 SRB 50#


$12.95
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SATURDAY
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Every Saturday
Morning Until
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Get Your 20#
Cylinder Filled
For Only
$8.95


WOOD PR SORVi
2.5" to 3" x 6.5' $2.75
3" to 3.5" x 6.5' $3.25
3.5" to 4" x 6.5' $3.90
5" to 6" x 8' $8.50
6" to 7" x 8' $13.50
1"x 6"x 16' RT Lumber $7.65
6.5' Steel Fence Post $4.89

FENCE WIRE


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1047 Hi Ten Redbrand,14.5 GA
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FARMERS COOPERATIVE, INC
748 SW Horry Ave.* Madison, FL 32340 850-973-2269
Call For Delivery Details. Sales Tax Not Included. While Supplies Last. Prices Good Until 6-30-2009


d






U U. U *


6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepuDlslng.com Wednesday, J



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


une 24, 2009


Healthy Start Recognizes


Women' s Health Ministries


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On June 15, the Greenville Woman's Club was filled
with guests, catered hors d'oeuvres and a lot of praise
for the representatives of the Women's Health Min-
istries of Jefferson, Madison and Taylor Counties. Ex-


Greene Publishing. Inc. Pholo By Michael Curtis, June 15, 2009
Guests were treated to special dishes prepared
by Brenda Graham of Grace Manor Bed and Break-
fast on June 15 at the Greenville Woman's Club.
ecutive Director of the Healthy Start Coalition for this
tri-county area, Donna Hagan, was extremely pleased to
host the gathering, which recognized the contributions
of the faith-basqd community toward achieving health


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, June 15, 2009
Healthy Start Executive Director Donna Hagan
thanked Reverend Robert Holmes of Architillery M.B.
Church for his continued commitment and contribu-
lion to the Women's Health Ministry.


The Southern Pine


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, June 15, 2009
The Healthy Start Coalition of Jefferson, Madison and Taylor counties hosted at recognition dinner for
the Women's Health Ministries that are assisting the coalition in addressing the health disparities through-
out the region.


equity, in the region.
In Madison, as in surrounding counties, there ex-
ists a significant racial disparity in all health indica-
tors, from heart disease to infant mortality. In an
effort to combat this condition, the Coalition in co-
ordination other agencies promoting similar pro-
jects, like the Madison County Health Department
that sponsors the Health Disparities Task Force in
Madison reached out to local churches to provide
resources and training to develop "health min-
istries."
After guests enjoyed the exceptional treats pro-
vided by Brenda Graham, owner of Grace Manor Bed
and Breakfast in Greenville, the church representa-
tives from the tri-county area were watched an im-
pressive computerized presentation on the subject of
fetal and infant mortality. In addition to the devastat-
ing family anid social as-
pects of the issue, when
-I combined with the con-


PaagEVYuoest


: PREVENT
Beetle Prevention


Cost-Share Program M

2009 Sign-Up Period: July 1st-Aug 12th

Apply for incentive payments or cost-
share assistance with:

Thinning Mechanical underbrush removal

a Prescribed burning Planting longleaf pine

For guidelines and application materials, contact your
local Florida Division of Forestry office or visit:


Swww.fl-dof.com I


A message from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division
of Forestry, Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner. Funding supplied by the USDA Forest
Service; an equal opportunity provider,


cerns of premature birth and low-birth weights,
there is an enormous financial burden on society as
well. This combination of consequences is central to
the formation of the health ministries.
Hagan also extended extra kudos to her staff for
their dedication and excellent services in the face of
budget cutbacks and for wearing so many hats. The
ministries of Architillery Missionary Baptist
Church, under Robert Holmes, and Shiloh Mission-
ary Baptist Church, under Delvin Boatman, were es-
pecially praised as well;
The Healthy Start Coalition of Jefferson, Madi-
son and Taylor invite community partnerships to.
combat the health conditions that challenge the coun-
ty, especially those areas suffering from deep poverty.
chie faith-based partnerships continue to play a vital
role in this process, andthe coalition may be contact-
ed at (850) 948-2741 foir additional information.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Reunite With

Classmates Online


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Technology has taken over and
now with the convenience of the
Internet, people can communicate
all over the world. Life takes peo-
ple in all different di-
rections after high
school and now it's in-
expensive to keep in.
touch through the In-
ternet.
Myschoolreunit-
ed.com is the perfect
place for Madison
County High School
graduates to keep up
with former class-
mates and to stay in-
formed of upcoming
class reunions. The
service is free to
everyone, and one can
upload photos and in-
formation on a person-


al profile.
On myschoolreunited.com, all
high schools in the state of Florida
are listed, allowing people across
the state the access of keeping up
with classmates.


Law Offices of

Monica Taibl, P.L.

Personal Injury

Worker's Compensation

Civil Bankruptcy

Family Law

Wills & Probate

(850) 973-1477
125 NE Range Avenue
Madison, FL 32340

The hiring ofa lawyer is an important decision that should not be, based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.







Wedinsday, June 24, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 7A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Stu-d-utifLub Cmwy Cetekmatin*

AiVw U71MA^R mon iw h~fAtf


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Glenn and Revonda Frith would like to invite
the great people of Madison County to Studstill
Lumber Company on July 1 and 4, as they celebrate
their fifth anniversary as owners of Studstill Lum-
ber, as well as recognition of the new building reno-
vations.
Since taking ownership in 2004, Glenn and
Revonda have worked hard to take the business from
being primarily a lumber store, to now carrying a
wide variety of home supplies such as lumber, hard-
ware, appliances, garden, and even limited flooring
supply. The company carries anything you could
possible need from pool supplies, pool testers, sports
equipment, paint, pesticide sprays, to cleaners and
much more!
"If there is something we don't have in stock
that a customer needs, we can order it and have it to
them in a couple of days. And if we get a couple of
people asking for it, we'll start carrying it," Glenn
said. "It has been a wonderful experience, people
have been really great to us, we just love it."

Senior Ci


Glenn (right) and Revonda Frith will be celebrat-
Ing five years as owners of the Studstill Lumber
Company on July 1 and 4. Since they took ownership
of the store, they have upgraded and now offer a wide


On Wednesday, July 1, join them for complimen-
tary coffee and doughnuts from 7:30-10 a.m. At 11
a.m., a special ribbon cutting will be held, followed
by free hotdogs from 12-1:30 p.m.
On Saturday, July 4, Studstill will again have
complimentary coffee and doughnuts from 7:30-10
a.m., with free hotdogs from 12-1:30 p.m.
All donations raised will go to the Madison
County High School Band. "We've been a band
booster for many years," Glenn said. "It started out
when one of our employee's son was in the band,
and they were in need. We helped them, and have
been supporters ever since." The high school band
is noted for their performances at the football games
and parades, but count on local businesses and band
parents for support to maintain instruments and
travel costs. "They have been very grateful, and we
help them every chance we get."
Studstill Lumber has been servicing Madison
for nearly 67 years, and look forward to many years
to come.
Watch for their inserts in the coming week's


variety of supplies. newspapers.


tzens healthh Expo


dHiaf 5 rTurn-Out


Photo Submitted
While informing citizens of different programs,
the seniors participated in sitting exercises. J.B. De-
Laughter is pictured with a stretch band, provided by,
the Madison County Extension Office.




386-719-0421


Jimmy Lyons
Lake City, Florida
jlyons57@gmail.com


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The senior citizens of Madison County turned out for
the Health Expo, presented by the Senior Citizens Council
of Madison County which was held at the First United
Methodist Church in Madison. On Friday June 12, at 10
a.m., seniors began gathering in the Fellowship Hall of the
Methodist church to learn about the many different ser-
vices that are available to them.
Informational vendorsfrom the north Florida region
came out to inform seniors of their programs, as well as
give away free stuff. Vendors also donated snacks and lunch
for the seniors. Big Bend Cares, Big Bend Hospice, Bryn-
wood Nursing Center, Ceflter for Senior's Stress, Conve-
nient Hospice, Home Respitory Solutions, Lake Park of
Madison, Nature Coast Eye Care, North Florida Pharmacy
Tallahassee Memorial Stroke Center, Radiology and Asso-
ciates, Madison County Memorial Hospital and many more
were on hand to make presentations and pass out informa-
tion.
Many notable donations were made to make the event
a success such as Nestle, who made the event a success;
Tuten Farms, who donated watermelon and canteloupe for
the guests; and Avon, who provided door prizes.
"The event was awesome," stated Sharon Underhill,
who was responsible for coordinating the event "The
turnout was great."
She went on to say "I would like fo thank the seniors,
vendors, and all volunteers for making this event a great
success," Underhill stated. 'And, we would especially like
to thank the First United Methodist Church in Madison for
allowing us to use their facility"
The purpose of the Health Expo is clear. The Senior
Citizens Council is doing everything they can to help in-
form seniors of what services are available to them in the
community and the surrounding areas.


The Senior Center will
be bringing the health expo
to local towns on August 21
at the Senior Center in
Greenville, from 10-1 p.m.,
aiftd at the Lee City Hall on
September 25, from 10-1 p.m.
For more information,
please call the Senior Citi-
zens Council of Madison
County at (850) 9734241, and
ask for Sharon Underhill.


Serving Madison,
Jefferson, Taylor &
Lafayette Counties


Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King Agent Glen King Agent

233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071

Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213

Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399


Seniors spent Friday morning at the Health Expo
learning about services that are available to them.
Deloris Chuff is pictured visiting the.booth of Nature
Coast Eye Care, obtaining as much information as
possible.


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across the country learn basic lifesaving and safety techniques.
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SAFE SITTERS learn:
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8A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 24, 2009


REGIONAL NEWS


Rotary Club Charity Golf Tournament


The Quitman Rotary Club of Quit-
man, Ga., held its successful second
annual charity golf tournament at the
Quitman Country Club Wednesday,
June 3.
This year's winning team was The


Citizens National Bank of Quitman,
, with an 18-hole score of 53. Team
members were Sammy Watson, Den-
nis Brady, Thad Mitchell, and Scott
Smith. The longest drive went to Sam-
my Watson.


This year's winning team in the Quitman Rotary
Club annual charity golf Tournament was The Citi-
zens National Bank of Quitman, with an 18-hole
score of 53. Team members were Sammy Watson,
Dennis Brady, Thad Mitchell and Scott Smith.
- ---------------------------- q

Do YOU Have

The HOT Factor?
The HOT FACTOR is an innovative event
backed by the dynamic Digital Music Academy
located in Tallahassee and promoted by Talla-
hassee's HOT 104.9 FM. The local search for the
HOT Song of the Year and HOT Performance
of the Year is underway.
Participants must be between the ages of
I 10 and 17 and have a passion for exercising cre-
ative expression through music. Interested in-
dividuals should contact Digital Music
Academy at digitalmusiclOl@aol.com or 1-888-
849-7415 for more information on how to par-
ticipate in this mind-blowing contest, or visit
www.hotl049.com and click on the Hot Factor
for more information on how to uplpad your I
video or MP3.
The deadline for entries is July 31, 2009.
The winner will receive a professionally
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played prominently on HOT 104.9 FM.
S "Who will be in the spotlight and chosen as '
having the HOT FACTOR? Tune in to find out.
---------------------------- ------ ------- a


Of special interest,
was a father and son
team that represented
Dr. Charlene Blache. It
was comprised of Dale
Armstrong and sons
Dowling, Dawson and
Davis. Closest to the pin
winner was Dawson
Armstrong. Each of the
Armstrong family is a
fine golfer, having won
many tournaments in
the area.
The Quitman Rotary
Club wishes to express
its appreciation to each
of the corporate teams,


hole sponsor and prize sponsor.
The Quitman Rotary Club looks
forward to an even bigger event next
spring. The Club invites any merchant
or individual interested in participat-
ing in next year's event to contact the
Club.
The Quitman Rotary .Club meets
each Wednesday at noon at the Presby-
terian Home board room. Please come
as a guest for a free meal and consider
becoming an important part of our
community by joining our Quitman
Rotary Club.
The Quitman Country Club has
expanded to 18 holes. Don and Amy
Holley' and their staff went the extra
mile to prepare the course. Don would
'be glad for those who haven't seen the
new back nine to come by 'for a free
tour.
Come play the course. Member-
ship is inexpensive and includes ac-
cess to the pool and lake.


Photo Submitted
Dale Armstrong and sons Dowling,
Dawson and Davis represented Dr.
Charlene Blanche in the Quitman Ro-
tary Club golf tournament.


Jasper Resident Creates Winning

Television Advertisement For Hardee's

Little Thickburger Campaign

Kathy Spearman's Original Creation Chosen
Out of 30,000 User-Created Submissions


Hardee's has a new
TV advertisement,
thanks to the creative ge-
nius of Kathy Spearman,
a resident of Jasper.
Close to 30,000 fans
across the country
thought they could write
clever new commercials
for Hardee's highly pop-
ular Little Thickburger
advertising campaign ...
and some were right.
Spearman, along
with 15 others, had the
honor of watching her
commercial idea come to
life.
Hardee's; introduced
tile Little Thickburger
last fall, along with a se-
ries of commercials that


NORTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Sustainable Horticulture
(HOS 1010) three-credit hour course
MON-THURS
Sustainable Horticulture Overview
June 29-Aug.l10 *Growing Methods (all types of plant material)
5:30,-- PM "* Landscape Plants & Tree Culture Practices
5:30-7:30 PM Fruit, Vegetables & Nut Culture Practices
Green Industries Institute Organic Systems for Crop Production
Monticello, Florida' Integrated Pest Management


illustrated the size dif-
ference between the clas-
sic Thickburgers and the
new Little Thickburgers
in humorous ways.
The commercials
proved to be such a hit
with viewers, the chain
created a Little Thick-
burger online "Ad Gen-
erator" at www.hardees
.com. Fans had the op-"
portunity to unleash
their creativity by devel-
oping their own humbr-
ous Little Thickburger
commercials.
The application al-
lowed users to put their
copywriting skills to the
test by writing new
scripts for the ad. They
could then. view. their
personal version of the
ad 'and share their cre-
ations with friends. In
addition, the budding
creative directors could
submit their ads to
Hardee's to be consid-
ered for upcoming tele-
vision commercials
slated to air in the
spring.
Spearman's submis-
sion stood out from the
crowd. Her commercial
- More thanta Mouthful
(big), Perky (little) -
was viewed across the
country.
Spearman was not
alone in 'her creative
passion. With no big
cash prize or other in-
ducement to participate,
close to 30,000 entries
were submitted. The
quality of the ads far ex-
ceeded expectations -
so much so, that 16 origi-
nal user-designed com-
mercials hit the


airwaves,
instead
of just
one or More than a
two, as
was the
original
plan.
S"We
have a
reputa-
tion for
edgy and
humorous advertising,
and 'the Little Thick-
burger campaign was a
great example of that
approach," said Brad
Haley, EVP of market-
ing.for Hardee's. "When
the campaign started to
produce a lot of re-
sponse from viewers, we
wanted to let people
have more fun with it, so
we created the online Ad
Generator app."


The television com-
mercials, as well as some
-of the othersubmissions
that made the cut for In-
ternet including'some
other amusing creations'
that may be too hot for
prime time are cur-
rently 'available on
YouTube.
For, a direct link to
Spearman's commercial,
visit www.greenepub
lishing.com.


BLg bed~t A jict t.&A. ...

"I didn't know how to 'A i. my son about the death of his
an.i,.ijljh.er The Caring Tree Program )..-e me information on
how to help him, even though we never used hospice services"
Based on letters to the Caring Tree program


Short Courses: community
C'ornrunity


Education


* June 30, July 1, 7 and 8 (Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30 p.m.)
"SUSTAINABILITY-WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO ME?"

* July 14,15, 21, and 22 (Tuesdays .& Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30 p.m.)
"VEGETABLES, FRUITS & NUTS"
* July-28, 29, Aug, 4 and 5 (Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30 p.m.)
"SPECIALTY CROPS, PESTS & MANAGEMENT"

* July 20-23, 8 a.m.-12 noon (Monday-Thursday, Ages 4th-8th Grade)
Kids in College "Science Can Be Fun"

* Aug. 3-6, 8 a.m.-12 noon (Monday-Thursday, Ages 4th-8th Grade)
Kids in College "Kids Cooking Camp"


-)"- ENROLLNOW:
s/Green Green Industries I
I indnustrieS 2729 W Washington Stn
NSTITTE 1702
850,973.1702 1 GamerP


1 ".


institute NFCC
eet | Monticello, FL
'@nfcc.edu


NFCCADMISSIONS: 850.973.16221 Admissions@nfcc.edu


GATEWAY CINEMAS
Thomasvlle, Ga. 229-226-6060


THE HANGOVER (R)


m i',v]' 1E5l:30400,: 00, 9 30

MY SISTER'S KEEPER (PG-13)
S -. 1:15,4:15,71.:05,9:40

THE PROPOSAL (PG-13)
.12:10, :45,5:15,7:45,10:15

THE TAKING OF PELHAM 1 2 3 (R)
l'.'t *. 1:45, 4:30,7:20,9:50

TRANSFORMERS: REVENGE OF THE FALLEN (PG-13)
12:15, 3:30,6:45,10:00

YEAR ONE (PG-13)
12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 7:40, 10:05

UP (PG)

- - - - -


June 24-July 21








Wednesday, June 24, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 9A


SCHOOL & EDUCATION




Central School Students Visit Madison CSI


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Friday, May 22, a group of approximately 15
middle school students attended a workshop spon-
sored by Skip James, public safety director for North
Florida Community College, where students were in-
troduced to the fascinating world of Crime Scene In-


vestigations, now famously known as CSI.
Crime Scene Investigation advances such as DNA
identification and the increase in computing power
have revolutionized the application of science and
technology to the process of investigating and prose-
cuting crime. Breakthroughs in Crime Scene Investi-
gation have inspired popular TV shows because


Aucilla Christian Academy

Honor Roll 6th Six Weeks 2008-09


K-5 (Clark)
Honor Roll
Xander Ames, Jus-
tice Barrs-Black, Abi-
gail Bowen, Cole
English, Riley Hamrick,
.James Austin Hightow-
er, Hunter Hughes, Joan
MacNeill, Jackson O1-
son, Sarah Plain, Riley
Rowe, MaryRose
Schwier, Maddie Sears,
Tyler Slaughter, Wyatt
Stafford, Megan Vann,
Travis Wheeler
K-5 (Wheeler)
Honor Roll
Jeb Beshears,
Joseph Davis, Lindsey
Davis, Selina Drawdy,
Keira Evans, Dean Fore-
hand, Kolton Gram-
bling, Jared Grant,
Cheyenne Hilbert, Kris-
han Patel, Alissa
Roland, Jarrett Roland,
Will Sullivan, Jordan
Swickley, Olivia Walton,
Ginger Whiddon
First Grade (Roberts)
All A's:
Kinsey Clark, Car-
son Leigh Olson, Mylie
Rogers, Austin Wheeler,
Ben Wurgler
All A's and B's
Jacob Barker,
Jamieson Dalzell,
Nathan Green, Lydia
Hall,,Alex Haselden,
Taylor. Kjnecht, Gant
Lee, Hope Randle, Abby
Reams, Frank Roberts
First Grade
(Stephens)
AllA's
AbbiGayle Cope,
Ansley.English, Carl
Hall, Pierce Powers
All A's and B's
Dawson Bishop,
Hailey Clark, Kash Con-
nell, Joshua Eades,
Brandon Hannon,
Austin Hebert, Julianna
Lindsey, Bailey McLeod,


Elizabeth Scheese
Second Grade (Bass)
All A's and B's:
Alexis Alexandrou,
Brandon Bates, Grace
Beshears, Emily Fore-
hand, Gabe Rouse,
Megan Schofill, Dilyn
Stowers, Katherine
Whichel
Second Grade (Love)
All A's
R.B. Bowen
All A's and B's
Andrew Burrus,
Ryan Jackson, Levi
Stafford, Nicolas Swick-
ley, Mackenzie Wirick
Third Grade (Aman)
All A's:
Timothy Finlayson,
Camryn Grant, Joe Wal-
ton
All A's and B's:
Jessica Giddens, ,
Elizabeth Hightower,
Rylee Hudson, Carly
Joiner, Ryals Lee, Can-
non Randle, Brandon
Slaughter
Third Grade
(Whiddon)
All A's and B's
Lanzy Cribbs, Elliot
Dalzell, Andrew Hall,
Katie James, Summer
Jenkins, Haley Jones, D.
J. Key, Abigail Morgan,
Grace Rouse, Mickaela
Whiddon, Daniel Wur-
gler
Fourth Grade (Brown)
All A's:
Stephanie English,
Kirsten Reagan, Ramsey
Sullivan
All A's and B's:
Dena Bishop, Cali
Burkett, Cassie Davis,
Hannah Lewis, Cole
MacNeill, Gaflin
Nennstiel, Jackie Walk-
er
Fourth Grade (Falk)
All A's
Traynor Barker,


CUINR 1A RTS


. Sarah Hall, Joe Hannon,
Brittany Hughes, Jenny
Jackson, Lindsey Law- .
son
All A's and B's
Meagan Beaty, Faith
Demott, Summerlyn
Marsh, Sarah Riley,
Hank Wirick, Kate
Whiddon
Fifth Grade (Hughey)
AllA's:
Taylor Copeland,
Abby Hettinger, Sam
Hogg, Erin Lee, Taylor
McKnight, Tomas
Swickley, T.J. Swords,
Sarah Tharpe, Emma
Wititer
All A's and B's:
Meagan Giddens,
Savannah Jenkins, Ally
Mall, D. J. Wilkinson,
Courtney Watts, Justin
Welch, Gaige Winches-
ter
Sixth Grade (Burkett)
All A's:
Winston Lee
All A's and B's:
Austin Bishop,
Ricky Finlayson, Sarah
James, Carson
Nennstiel, Bryce
Sanderson, Cole
Schwab
7th Grade
All A's:
Cole Davis, Aimee
Love, Jessica Webb, An-
nie Yang
All A's and B's:
Payal Chaudhari,
Hunter Horne, Ashlyn
Mills, Jessica Welch
8th Grade
All A's:
Ashli Cline, Kaley
Love, Hadley Revell, Au-
drey Waters, Wendy
Yang
AllA's and B's:
Jay Finlayson,
Jared Jackson, Whitney
McKnight, Ashley
Schofill, Pamela Watt
9th Grade
All A's:
Josh Funderburke,
Tyler Jackson, Vicki
Perry, Shelby Witmer
All A's and B's:
Levi Cobb
10th Grade


All A's:
Taylor Baez-Prid-
B SUWANNM geon, Anna Finlayson,
TECHNICAL CENTE Tiffany Funderburke,
Kaitlin Jackson, Caro-



SOUTHERN GUNSLINGERSk
Wild West Show
At Fort Mack


.[ll l.


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Augustine Rd Come Past Jelly Stone RV Park till you see Fort Mack on left. Come take a
step back in time to the days of the old west Enjoy the day watching the Bank Robbery,
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Shows Start JULY 4&5
Saturday: 9:00 11:00 Call Bill Todd 229-977-1400 or
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,, SdAy: 9:00 11:00 information or visit our website.
1:00 3:00 www.southern-gunslingers.com


line Mueller, Ceira
Rolanh, Sarah
Sorensen, Abigail
Vasquez
All A's and B's:
Clark Christy, Taryn
Copeland, Jessica Ha-
gan, Nikki Hamrick,
Katherine Hogg, Kent
Jones, Cheltsie Kinsley,
Lisa Kisamore, Brittany
O'Brian, Nathan
Williams
11th Grade
All A's:
Tiffany Brasington,
Tyler High, Jessica
Hunt, Wilson Lewis,
Sydney Plummer, Ryan
Pricher Dana Watt
All A's and B's:
Kalyn Brown, AleX
Duinkle, Lane Fraleigh,
Ashlyn Morgan, Saman-
tha Roberts, John
Stephens, Brooke Stew-
art, Koal Swann, Katlyn
Watts
12th Grade
All A's:
Chelsea Dobson,
Aaveh Green, Erin Kel-
ly, Nikki Kisamore, By-
ron Love, Mallory
Plaines, Michaela Roc-
canti, Savannah
Williams
All A's and B's:
Rhegan Clark,
Stephen Dollar, Ashley
Echols, Katelyn Levine,
Savannah Reams, Mi-
randa Wider, Luke Wit-
mer


evidence can make the
difference between a vio-
lent criminal being con-
clusively tied to a crime
scene and apprehended,
and the perpetrator going
undetected and re-offend-
ing.
This increased appli-
cation of science and
technology to law en-
forcement has also inten-
sified the demand for a
variety of Crime Scene
Investigation specialists.
Accredited colleges and
universities now offer
various Crime Scene In-


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Michael Curtis, May 22, 2009
NFCC Public Safety
Director Skip James
speaks to a class of Cen-
tral School students re-
garding the field of Crime
Scene Investigation.


vestigatibns courses and programs at the Certificate
and Bachelor's degree levels. Typical coursework for
degree students includes a solid foundation in math,
statistics, chemistry, biology, and physics. Crime
Scene Investigations courses can cover topics such as
basic crime scene investigation, forensic toxicology
and pathology, forensic microscopy, principles of
criminal evidence, computer forensics and forensic
psychology
Career opportunities in Crime Scene Investiga-
tions include, but are not limited to: Forensic Toxicol-
ogists, Forensic Accountants who investigate fraud
and embezzlement, Forensic Psychologists who profile
offenders at-large to. help police anticipate their next
move, and Computer Forensic Specialists who uncov-
er and preserve digital criminal evidence.
The first part of the workshop was therefore dedi-
cated to understanding the elements of a crime, in-
cluding handling evidence, which is how to collect and
preserve it. The program then moved to a mock crime
scene where police have been called to a shooting. The
students witnessed how police arrive and secure the
crime scene. Later, an ambulance arrived and para-
medics worked on the victims, where one of the vic-
tims was transported to the hospital and the other was
left at the scene.
Students then become Crime Scene Investigators,
collecting evidence to build a case for homicide. They
collected shell casings for evaluation, fingerprints for
classification, footprint evidence for comparison, and
DNA evidence for identification, as well as watching
the scene be photographed and videoed. The evidence
was then taken to the Science Learning Center for
analysis. Lastly, notes were kept in police-style note-
books, so the information could be used for future
writing assignments should it be required,...
$Nori h Florida Coinum ity College las been'an ex-'
ceptional community and academic partner of Madi-
son County Schools. This modern application is a
strong addition to that ongoing effort.


Ca re


It's one less worry for parents!


Is Your Child Covered?

Florida KidCare is affordable health insurance
for newborns through age 18.


To ensure a brighter future for your child,
apply online at

www.floridakidcare.org or

call toll-free 1-888-540-5437.




Need access to a computer to apply?
Need assistance with the application process?





Visit Genethel McQuay
Eligibility Specialist at the Madison County Health Department
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
(850) 973-5000, ext. 101


FlI rida







10A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com



FUN PAGE


Wednesday, June 24, 2009


ACROSS
1. Iota
6. Goya's "Duchess
of "_
10. Language of
Lahore
14. Dance music
15. Cashmere, e.g.
16. "High" time
17. Fixing deeply
19. Forte
20. Old World wading
birds with white-
and-black
plumage
21. Oolong, for one
22. "_ quam videri"
(North Carolina's
motto)
23. Fix firmly
25. Absolute.
26. Ancient Italian
deity in human
shape, with
horns, pointed
ears and a goat's
tail
30. Out-and-out
32. Charge a public
official with an
offense while in
office
35. Large log


traditionally
burned at
Christmas
39. Render verbally,
"recite a poem"'
40. Harangue
41. Breathing device
for a swimmer
43. Elects
44. Hindu festival in
October/
November
celebrating the
end of the
monsoon
46. Mar, in a way
47. Birchbark
50. Directory
contents
53. Acknowledge
54. Infomercials, e.g.
55. Out of working
order
60. Ask
61. Disposition to
laugh
63. Cambodian
money
64. "Idylls of the
King" character
65. Hyperion, 'for one
66. Romantic
interlude


67. Long, long time
68. "South Pacific"
hero
DOWN
1. The Beatles'"_
Leaving Home"
2. Bridge, in Bretagne
3. "Cogito sum"
4. "The Alienist"
author
5. Uniform shade
6. Barley bristle
7. Hang around
8. Without a trace of
moisture
9. Aquatic plant
10. Having little
acquaintance with
writing
11. Fowl place
12. Drench
13, Anesthetized
18. Denotes a state or
condition, belief
or principle
24. "_, humbug!"
25. Dark -
26. Various evergreen
trees of the genus
Abies
27. "Absolutely!".
28. "What've you
been ?"


29. Cad
31. Mercury, for one
33. Person who
drinks alcohol to
excess habitually
34. Evidence that
helps to solve a
problem
36. Beam intensely
37. Father of Balder
38. Chap
/42. Act of coming to
land after a
voyage
43. Animation
45. Unmarried girl or
young woman
47. Bay of Naples isle
48. Bypass
49. Offensively curious
or inquisitive
51. "Chicago" lyricist
52. Hotel offering
54. Length x width
56, Small in quantity
57. South American
monkey
58. And others, for
short
59. Fraction of a
newton
62. Driver's lic. and
others.


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Andrew Bonar Law
Anthony Eden
Arthur Balfour
Clement Atlee
Earl Gray
Earl of Chatham
Earl of Derby
George Canning,
Harold Wilson


Henry Pelham
Herbert Asquith
James .Callaghan
John Major
Lord Grenville
Lord John Russell
Lord North
Tony Blair


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Wednesday, June 24, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com



BRIDAL GUIDE


Madison County Carrier 11A


By Susan Hawkins
What is the one small detail you've over-
looked in your wedding planning? You've
been thorough, so this may keep you up a
while. Have another cup of coffee and think.
You've remembered to order the wedding
flowers and hire a wedding photographer for
the ceremony When the photographer is tak-
ing the money shot of you on the happiest
day of your life, in your exquisite wedding
gown and veil, in front of the most beautiful
background imaginable, and the photogra-
pher says "Smile," will you want to?
How can you express the joy you'll feel on
your wedding day if you're reluctant to re-
veal your less-than-pearly-white smile? Re-
lax. Here are some tips and remedies that
will have you wearing white with confidence.
Be aware of the habits, foods and drinks
that produce stained, yellow teeth. Cigarette
smoke turns teeth an unflattering brown. We,
love cherry and blueberry pie, but those
rich, dark colors turn your teeth, as do other
sugary foods and soy sauce. Drinks like red
wine, coffee, tea and dark-colored juices also
stain teeth.
Carbonated drinks have a double nega-
tive they stain your teeth and they contain
phosphoric acid which, over time, thins the
layer of enamel that protects your teeth anad
iets the yellqw dentin show through. Recent
.-Oiies, confirm that sports drinks, energy
;id fitness waters also contain acid. Using a
"-'sraw for carbonated and sports beverages
will diminish their negative effects. Sucking
on lemons or any citrus fruit with high acid
content will also damage teeth severely.
You'd be amazed how simply brushing
daily for-two minutes after every meal will
remove plaque and up your bright-smile fac-
tor significaj Bleaching trays are a mod-
erately inexiBensive whitening method. The
rubber trays, custom-fit by your dentist, are
filled with a bleaching solution that interacts
with oxygen to decrease stains. Wearing


them one-to-two hours a day can make your
teeth up to five shades lighter in two weeks.
Though somewhat costly, ultraviolet
whitening is the speedy way to whiter teeth.
This safe ahd easy cosmetic dental proce-
dure can whiten your teeth by up to ten
shades in one visit. Dentists apply a gel with
whitening agents on the surface of your
teeth and then use a special light to activate
the gel.
For do-it-yourselfers, whitening strips
are over-the-counter, affordable options for
home use. However, they only bump your
whiteness factor up two or three shades -
mitch less noticeable than professional pro-
cedures. Another in-home option is brush-on
gels. Similar in effect to white strips, brush-
on. whitening gel is applied to the teeth be-
fore bedtime. Though easy and convenient,
you may wake up with a chalky taste in your
mouth. Keep in mind that any bleaching so-
lution or gel-based whitening method you
use will only last six months to a year.
A high-end electric toothbrush, when
used correctly, can produce amazing results.
Clinical studies showed an 849% reduction in
cola and coffee stains over a four-week peri-
od.
If your teeth problems go beyond stains,
there s an answer for you, too. Ultra-thin
porcelain veneers, or covers, can be placed
over your teeth to 'correct a number of im-
perfections the size or shape of your tbeth,
or no tooth at all. Porcelain veneers musTh'be
professionally applied, so talk to your.den-,
tist.
When all else fails, the right lipstick can
do the trick. Stay away from orange shades,
because they'll bring out the yellow in your
teeth, even if your teeth are a healthy white.
Use lipsticks with pink or purple tones to
bring out the white in a magnificent smile
you'll want to flash joyfully to friends, fami-
ly and photographers. on that momentous
day!


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McCulloch-Meadows

Wedding Announced


Mr. and Mrs. Michael R. McCulloch of Moulton, Ala., are proud to announce the
wedding of their daughter, Ashley Brooke McCulloch, to Steven Richard Meadows, Jr.,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Steven R. Meadows, of Opelika, Ala.
The bride-elect is the granddaughter of MAir. and Mrs. Lyndon Ray McCulloch of
Decatur, Ala., and the late Mr. and Mrs. James Claud Dyar of Moulton. She is the
graduate of Auburn University with a bachelor's degree in English secondary education.
Ashley is currently a 10th grade teacher at Opelika High School.
The prospective bride-groom is the grandson of Air. and Mrs. Gene Meadows and
the late Mrs. Bobbie Fay'e Meadows of Opelika, and Mr. and Airs. John Gordon Ashley
of Madison. He is the graduate of Auburn University with a bachelor's degree in
bidsystems engineering. He is currently pursuing his master's degree in forestry at
Auburn University i
A June 27, 2009, wedding is planned for 6:30 p.m. at Downtown Courtland
Park in Courtland, Ala.


III


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12A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 24, 2009


MONEY & FINANCE


Obama's Federal Budget For 2010 Explained In Plain English, Part 2


The US Federal Budget for 2010 was released in
February Overall, roughly half of spending goes to the
US Department of Defense with the remaining money
divided among 22 other departments (DOD money in-
cludes most of available discretionary spending). Few
have read the 140-page document summarized below.
Please note that Departments, like Agricul-
ture, show great detail, while other departments, like
that of State, use broad language and provide few clues
into what programs will actually receive the billions.
And, the National Intelligence Agency has no details
about either total budget or allocation.
The 2009 Federal Budget money currently being
spent was established by President George Bush,
which is the first figure shown after the department
names below. The Recovery Act money is the shown,
and added to those dollars to show current expendi-
tures. In the 2009 budget as well, over 40 percent of the
budget is with the Department of Defense. When the
funds from the Recovery Act are added in, the Depart-
ment of Education budget grows significantly in a
stated effort to improve public schools and increase ac-
cess to higher education. The Department of Trans-
portation also saw a great deal of money for programs
to improve air traffic control and create an efficient
and green fast interstate rail system.
Summaries by department continue (see the June
17 Madison County Carrier for Part 1):

DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND
OTHER INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
The United States needs to renew its leadership
role in the world. The 2010 budget for the Depart-
ment of State and Other International Programs
aims to increase foreign aid to help education chil-
dren in some of the poorest nations, increase global
"food supply and security, and stabilize post-conflict
areas. The budge also includes an increase in fund-
ing for global health programs and non-military as-
sistance to Afghanistan and Pakistan. No exact
numbers are given in the budget as to where the



Choose Mutual Funds Carefully
to Help Diversify Portfolio
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones

If you're somewhat familiar with investing, you probably
have heard that owning mutual funds is a good way to help
diversify your portfolio. Is this.true? And, if so, how should you
go about selecting the right mutual funds?
To begin with,' let's quickly review the importance of
diversification- By owning a variety of investments- such as
stocks, bonds and government securities you. can help
reduce the effects of volatility on your portfolio. And while
diversification by itself cannot guarantee profits nor protect
against a loss,.a diversified portfolio can help you reduce the
impact of market downturns that may hit one asset class par-
ticularly hard. '
Because an individual mutual fund invests in many dif-
ferent securities, it automatically brings a certain degree of
diversification to your portfolio. And yet, you can't just pur-
chase any combination of mutual funds and expect good
results. Consider this: There are more than 8,000 mutual
funds 'in the financial marketplace, according to the
Investment Company Institute, the trade group for the mutual
.fund industry. About 60 percent of these funds are stock
funds, with the rest being "hybrid" or "'balanced" funds (which
invest in a mix of stocks and bonds), taxable bond funds,
municipal bond funds, and money market funds. With such a
large number of funds available, and with a finite amount of
stocks, bonds and other securities in which these funds can
invest, it's easy to see that there is going to be considerable
duplication among many of these mutual funds and dupli-
cation is the opposite of diversification. Consequently, when
you invest in mutual funds, you can't just adopt a philosophy
that can be boiled down to '"the more,.the merrier."
Furthermore, it isn't just a matter of one "large-cap
growth" fund looking like another. You might find that the
large-cap fund (a fund that invests in stocks of large c6mpa-
nies) is also quite similar to a "technology" fund.
So, what's the solution to avoiding "overlapping" funds?
There's no magic formula you have to do your homework.
Before purchasing a new fund, look closely at its holdings,
which will be posted on the fund's prospectus. (Also, while
you're looking at the prospectus, make sibre-you understand
the fund's investment objective; risk, charges and expenses.)
Then compare these holdings to the ones listed on your exist-
ing mutual funds if you see too many redundancies, you
may want to take a' pass on this particular fund.
Ultimately, your first step in 'diversifying a mutual fund
portfolio is to identify your. individual risk tolerance and invest-
ment objectives. Are you a conservative, moderate or aggres-
sive investor? Do you need growth, income or a combination
of both?. Once you've answered these questions, you can
then begin selecting the right mix of mutual funds to help you
achieve your financial goals. Of course, with all the variables
involved, both in y6ur personal situation and in the funds
themselves, you may want to enlist the help of a profession-
al financial advisor someone with the experience to help
you choose those funds that are right for you.
Many people have successfully incorporated mutual
funds into their investment strategy and with the proper
effort and assistance, you can too.
Mutual funds are offered and sold by prospectus. You
should consider the investment objective, risks, and charges
and expenses carefully before investing. The prospectus con-
tains this and other information. Your Edward .Jones financial
advisor can provide a prospectus, which should be read care-
fully before investing.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


Edward Jones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631 Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204
Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Sin&e 1871


money will go. There is a very large discretionary
budget.
Plan Highlights
Foreign Policy Goals
* Increase funding for global health programs that
combat HIV/AIDs, malaria and TB no specific
amount given
* Funding the first year of a multi year counterter-
rorism and law enforcement program no spe-
cific amount given
* Promotion of safe civilian uses of nuclear energy
no specific amount given
International Support
* Expansion of diplomatic and development ties by
increasing the number of state and USAID For-
eign services officers no specific amount given
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
$42.7 Billion + $2.8 Billion
From the Recovery Act
The Department of Homeland Security budget
focuses on safeguarding transportation systems,
strengthening border security and immigration ser-
vices and increasing research and development for
cyber security.
Major Department of Homeland Security
Expenses >
Transportation
15 new Visual Intermodal Protection Response
teams to increase in random force protection ca-.
pability $50 million
DHS and DOT Planning and modernization of
freight infrastructure linking coastal and inland
ports to highway and rail networks $25 million
Cyber security and Technology R&D
Increase resilience and security of private and
public sector cyber infrastructure $355 million
Ongoing support and improvement of surveil-
lance technologies to detect biological threats -
$36 million "
Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Ser-
vices
Expansion of exit pilot and key land points of en-
try and general border security priorities $45
million
Support of existing Customs and .Border Protec-
tions $368 million
Expansion of electronic employment verification
system, E-Verify that helps US employers to com-
ply with immigration laws $110 million
State Homeland Security Activities'
Addition of state and local level intelligence ana-
lysts $260 million.
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
$26 Billion + $6.9 Billion
From the Recovery Act
The $26 billion budgeted for the Department of
Agriculture is aimed at helping family farmers and
rural Americans. Some of the more notable plans
are expanding broadband to rural ar-
eas, development of renewable energy and to pro--
vide strong support for childhood nutrition.
Major Expenditures
Rural and Farm Economic Growth
Five Rural Development Programs $61 million
Increase rural broadband $1,300 million
Increase national supply of home-grown renew-
able fuels $250 million
Rural teaching incentives and lands grants for mi-
nority-serving institutions $70 million
US Natural Resources ,
Forest Protection $50 million
Wildfire Protection $1,382,000,000
Land conservation $119 million
Food Safety and Nutrition Assistance
Child Nutrition Reauthorization $1 billion
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
$26.5 Billion + $4 Billion
From the Recovery Act
The Department of Justice budget addresses
funding for National Security and crime fighting
agencies like the FBI and COPS. It also ensures that
prison and detention programs receive adequate
funding..
Major Expenditures Budgeted for the
Department of Justice
Law Enforcement
Funding for the FBI billionn
Hire an additional 50,000 police officers exact
amount not provided
Strengthens funding to combat racial, ethnic, sex-,
ual preference, gender and religious discrimina-
tion through the Civil Right Division $145
million
Prisoner and Justice Programs
Bureau of Prisons billionn
Office of the Detention Trustee, which ensiures
criminals and detainees are housed in safe, hu-
mane and secure facilities $1.4billion
Prisoner re-entry programs $109 million
Expansion of Office of Justice Programs autho-
rized by Second Chance Act to provide job train-
ing, counseling and drug treatment $75million
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
$13.3 Billion + $4.8 Billion
From the Recovery Act
The 2010 budget for the Department of labor fo-
cuses on modernization and reform on the Unem-
ployment Insurance system, building green jobs and
the improvement on American working conditions.
Highlights From the 2010 Department of
Labor Budget
Improve Unemployment Insurance System
Reduce improper payments and employer tax eva-
sion by more than $4 billion over the next 10 years
through modernization of system no monetary
value given


Increase labor standards
* Increase funding for OSHA no monetary value
given
* Increase funding for Office of Federal Contract
Compliance no monetary value given
* Increase funding for the Wage and Hour Division
no monetary value given


DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
$13.8 Billion + $7.9 Billion
From the Recovery Act
To help the Department of Commerce with its
mission to create jobs, Obama's proposes a budget
increase for the Department of Commerce from $9.3
billion in 2009 to $13.8 billion in 2010. Money will be
divided among several projects like an increase in
funding for weather satellites and climate centers,
Technology Innovation Program and Manufactur-
ing Extension Partnership to fund regional econom-
ic development and entrepreneurship in distressed
areas.
Expenditure Highlights
Competitiveness and Innovation
* Technology Innovation Program $70 million
* Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership -
$125 million
* Initiative to create new businesses in distressed
areas $50 million
Environmental Monitoring and Management
* Weather forecasting and global climate monitor-
ing $1.3 billion
2010 Census
* Resources to conduct Census efficiently $7 bil-
lion
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE
ADMINISTRATION $18.7 Billion + $1 Billion
From the Recovery Act
NASA is allocated nearly $20 billion (including
funds from the Recovery Act) to do more than just
explore space. NASA is partially responsible to help
the US understand the effects of climate change on
the planet.
NASA budget allocation
Climate change research and monitoring
Development of new space-based sensors to con-
duct global climate research exact amount not
provided
Space Exploration
T Additional robotic space exploration missions -
exact amount not provided
Completion of the International Space Station -
exact amount not provided
Continuous support of the International Space
Station exact amount not provided
Additional research in air transportation to sup-
port future aircraft
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
$10.5 Billion + $7.2 Billion
From the Recovery Act
The funds budgeted to the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency are for the restoration of the Great
Lakes, additional funding for the Clean Water State
Revolving Fund,.the Drinking Water Supply, Revolv-
ing Fund, the Water Security Initiative, and the Wa-
ter Alliance for Threat Reduction. It also allows for
more than billionn to clean up the most contami-
nated sites in the Superfund Program.
Highlights of the US Environmental
Protection Agency Budget
Clean Water
Funding of clean water initiatives through the
Clean Water State Revolving Fund and the Drink-
ing Water State Revolving Fund $3.9 billion
Acceleration of the restoration of the Great Lakes
$475 million,
Greenhouse Gas Reduction
Lay groundwork for a reduction in greenhouse
gases and develop a' comprehensive climate
change plan to reduce 2005 greenhouse gas levels
by 14 percent by 2020 and 84 percent by 2050 -
$19million
Water Safety and Security
Fully funding the Water Security Initiative and
Water Alliance for Threat Reduction which creat-
ing drinking water contamination warning sys-
tems $24 million
Superfund Program
Cleaning up the most toxic and contaminated
sites in the US $1 billion *
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
$12 Billion + $3 Billion From the Recovery Act
The Department of the Interior budget supports
programs that expand environmental education ac-
tivities, strengthen Native American communities
and promote renewable energy. Obama's budget also
includes provisions to close loopholes that give oil
companies excessive royalty relief.
Major Programs Receiving Money From
.U.$. Department of Interior Budget
US Natural Resources
National Park Service will receive funds to protect
and maintain natural resources $25 million
Land and Water Conservation Fund- $420 million
Create a dedicated funds to fight wildfires $75
million
Clean Energy
Research and testing for renewable energy $50
million
Wetlands conservation $10,000 budget increase
Strengthening Native American Communities
Increase funding to the Bureau of Indian Affairs
for law enforcement and education $100 million
DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY
$13.3 Billion + $300 Million
From the Recovery Act
The Department of the Treasury exists to pro-
mote economic prosperity and financial security of
the United States. The 2010 budget supports the Fi-
nancial Stability Plan, emphasizes transparent and
accountable program management. In addition to
the 2010 Budget, there is a $250 billion contingent re-
serve for further efforts to stabilize the financial
system.
Highlights of the Department of Treasury


Budget
IRS Services
* Additional funds to assist the IRS with tax collec-
tion abroad exact amount not specified
* Improve quality of taxpayer experience exact
amount not specified
Please see Budget, next page







Wednesday, June 24, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 13A


MONEY & FINANCE


Budget

Continued from Page 12A
Lending and Community Development
* Double funding for the Community Develop-
, ment Financial Institutions Fund to help locally
based financial institutions offer small business,
consumer and home loans exact amount not
specified
Additional Point of Interest
* Funds are set aside as a reserve to be used in and
when necessary to stabilize the financial system
$250 billion
SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
$11.6 Billion + $1.1 Billion
From the Recovery Act
The Social Security Administration is indis-
pensable to seniors, survivors, workers and the
disable, but unfortunately the SSA can only pay
full benefits until 2041. The 2010 Federal budget
does not plan for 2042, but instead provides a 10%
increase to help process claims more quickly. The
budget also intends to help improve framework to
extend the viability of the program as best possi-
ble. Of course, this doesn't include SS benefits,
which are not part of the federal budget.,
Highlights of the 2010 Social Security
Administration Budget
Program Integrity and Operation
* Increase staffing at the SSA to help process
claims and appeals more quickly exact
amount not disclosed
* Increase Social Security card processing and So-
cial Security Number distribution exact
amount not disclosed
* Increase integrity of SSA to ensure efficient gov-
ernment spending $759 million
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
$7 Billion + $3 Billion From the Recovery Act
Climate change is an integral part of several
departmental budgets, including the National Sci-
ence Foundation. Other goals, for the NSA 2010
budget include increased high-risk, high-reward
research and increased graduate research fellow-
ships.
National Science Foundation Budget
Highlights
Research in Global Climate Change
* Support for research to improve, the, ability to
predict future environmental conditions and de-
velop strategies to respond to global environ-
mental changes exact amount not specified
* Establishment of a climate change education
program exact amount not specified
High-Risk, High-Reward Research
* Increased support for exploratory and high-risk


research proposals that could alter our under-
standing or nature, revolutionize the fields of
science or radically change new technologies
* Graduation Research Fellowships and Early-Ca-
reer Researchers
* Substantial increase to NSF's Graduate Re-
search Fellowship and Faculty Early Career De-
velopment programs exact amount not
specified
* Increased support for the Advanced Technologi-
cal Education program exact amount not
specified
CORPS OF ENGINEERS CIVIL WORKS
$5.1 Billion + $4.6 Billion
From the Recovery Act
The 2010 Obama Administration budget gives
the Corps of Engineers Civil Works a $5.1 bil-
lion discretionary budget. It should help to
strengthen the Nation's water resources infra-
structure and restore Gulf Coast wetlands
Budget Emphasis for the Corps of
Engineers Civil Works
Construction on High-Return Investments
* Facilitate commercial navigation discre-
tionary
* Reduce the risk of flood and storm damage -
discretionary
* Restore significant aquatic ecosystems discre-
tionary
* Phasing out of excise tax on diesel fuel for in-
land waterways and replace it with a lock usage
fee discretionary
Maintenance
* Safe and reliable operation of facilities dis-
cretionary
* Gulf Coast Commitment discretionary
* Continued funding to restore Louisiana coastal
wetlands discretionary
* Restoration of wetland affected by the Mississip-
pi River Gulf Outlet discretionary
SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
$700 Million + $700 Million
From the Recovery Act
Between the Recovery Act and the 2010 federal
budget, the SBA is given $1.4 billion, which can be
used for distributing capital through guaranteed
loans and investment products. It also strives to
improve Federal contract opportunities for small
business. Although compared to other depart-
ments, this is not a large amount, but the Federal
government does provide for small businesses dur-
ing the credit crisis through Section 504 of Guar-
anteed Loan Program.
Details about the Small Business
Administration Budget
Agency Operations
* Improve technological infrastructure of the SBA
to help it remain transparent amount not giv-
en.


* Purchase of modern loan accounting system -
amount not provided
* Streamline and automate lending and contract-
ing systems amount not provided
Contract Opportunities for Small Business
* Provide additional counseling and business de-
velopment experts to assist small businesses -
amount not provided
* Improve Women's Business Centers, SCORE,
and Small Business Development Centers -
amount not provided
* Increase small business access to Federal prime
and sub-contracting opportunities amount
not provided
Small Business Assistance Covered in Other Parts
of the Budget
* Guaranteed Disaster Loan Program amount
given to small businesses not provided
CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL COMMUNITY
SERVICE $1.1 Billion + $200 Million
From the Recovery Act
The Corporation For National Community
Service provides opportunities for Americans to
volunteer and serve their community The $261
million budget increase will help to create a new
Social Innovation Fund and expand service learn-
ing in American schools.
Highlights from the Corporation For
National Community Service 2010 Budget
Expansion of National Service
* Expand AmeriCorps from 75,000 funded slots
250,000 exact amount not specified
* Increase the amount of the Eli Segal Education
Award exact amount not specified
* Expand and improve Senior Corps programs al-
lowing more retirees to help meet the needs in
their communities exact amount not specified
* Grow service-learning in US schools by provid-
ing additional research for Learn and Serve
America exact amount not specified
Strengthen Management Capacity of the Corpora-
tion For National Community Service
* Increase funding for administration and
strengthen capacity to manage programs, mea-
sure performance and conduct evaluations ex-
act amount not specified

S[ i TRY OUfR FONxious
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SVegetarian Items
Daily Specials
Full Bar With Tropical Drinks
Healthy Kids Menu
Covered Patio Overlooking
Kids Play Area
Watch Your Favorite Sporting Event

Open 7. Days A Week







Ole Tiies Country Buffet



Hand Cut Top Sirlain Steaks On Buffet Nightly!
Banquet Fadcilities Available

9 (229) 253-1600
1193 N. S(. AuguitIe Ruad. ValdoMsa.GA
Lake Cti Mall. Hw WI. in Like CUt. IL
MasterCwd,'\JSavAmenlcan Exprss'ODLucover


to


a:


1874 Clubhouse Dr.
Valdosta, GA
229-242-7700





ctwswii
ow^ib









14A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday,June 24, 2009


DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340
ANYTHING LEFT OVER 7 DAYS
WILL BE SOLD
FOR SALE
Boat Motor inboard/outboard
4 cylinder complete
MISCELLANEOUS
Boat parts for sale
tn, n/c

SS Painting
Contractor &
Pressure Cleaning
Services
(850) 673-7754
Sandy Sanderson (Owner)
Free Estimates
Over 35 Years Experience
4/28 -7/3, pd
I BUILD SHEDS & DECKS
Call Bob
850-242-9342
Now selling steel
buildings, garages,
barns and carports



Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IP NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rtn; n/c



Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-rtn, n/c
An amish model wagon
$25.00, Golf Balls .50 .75
cents each, Antique Spool
Bed $125.00, Fire Place
Screen & Glass Door $60.00,
Solid State Portable Record
Player, plays 78 & 45 size
,records, 2 speakers with ex-.
Stended wires $75.00
850-973-8548




Visit The Attic /
Indoor yard sale at Ashlyn's
Rose Pedal Florist (The Old
Rosery Building)'224 SW
Range St. Open every Fri-
day & Saturday
850-973-2050 For Info




Dryer, Microwave, (2) Twin
Beds complete with head-
boards, sheets and com-
forters and other misc items
good condition, negotabile
850-929-2070 or
850-464-3027

VEHICLESH
FOR SALE^^


1997 Ford F-150 4x4
3 inch lift, dual exhaust all
power $4500 FIRM
850-210-2949/ 850-997-5293

1987 Ford Bronco for sale.
Super hot engine! 58k .
original miles. Auto trans.
Differential doesn't leak.
Only rolled over once but
never "mud bogged." Upper
body has no glass. but engine
and running gear awesome!
Now painted camo $500.
850-464-1165
tn, n/c



AKC ENGLISH BULL-
DOGS-(2)
For adoption, if interested
please contact me at
Allenlescott@gmail.com
6/10, 6/17, 6/24, pd
AKC Greatdane puppies
2 weeks old, now accepting
deposits, 4 females & 1 male
Asking $800.00/each
850-971-5815
6/24,c



House For Rent
4 BD/LBA
388 Church Ave. Call Mrs.
Washington at 850-948-2540
6/17, 6/24, cc
Mobile Home in Lee
Weekly rentals available
now! Furnished and unfur-
nished, utilities included.
850-973-4606 /
850-973-9564.
6/10, 6/17, 6/24, c


House for Rent
in Greenville, FL
(near elementary school).
All Electric, Newly remod-
eled 3 bedrooms, 1 bath
$575/mo. 1st & security de-
posit. Housing Choice
Vouchers Accepted
Call 617-922-9984 or
617-437-1905

For Rent:
Doublewide Mobile
Home
3 BR, 2 Bath,
great room with fireplace,
large grilling deck,
off Hwy 6 near Blue
Springs, Lee School Dis-
trict no pets, 1 year lease,
references required.
$600 month /
$600 security deposit.
Call 423-538-1206
or 423-845-0590
5/13- rtn,
Clean as new. Two story, 3
/ BR, 2.3 baths, formal LR &
DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. New
Kitchen, Range, Ref, D/W,
G/D. Oak Floor downstairs,
Heart Pine upstairs. 2 Central
H&A. Yard maint. included.
ADULT FAMILY. No pets .
$900 rent and deposit. Good
credit req. 205 NE Shelby Ave.
Madison. Call George 973-
8583 or 557-0994.
5/8 in, c
Rentals
North of Perry
3 BR/2 BA D/W
2BR/2 BA D/W with 200 sq
ft comm bldg.
40 x 80 horse barn w/50.ac.
for lease
800 sq ft comm office
Full service RV site
Call 850-838-6124
6/24, 7/1, 7/8, 7/15 c
Madison Heights '
Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed
for low income families
150 SW Bumrngardner Dr.
Madison, FL'
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833
ext. 485
Equal Housing
Opportunity
S rtn, c


00outhcn 1 a of

CBadison (partmlents


Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, &.3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711.315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
tn, c

CLEAN 3 BR, CH & CA,
new R & Refg, Oak floors.
ADULT FAMILY ONLY.
Rent $685 plus deposit.
No pets. Good credit req.
432 NE Horry Ave., Madi-
son. Call George 973-8583
or 557-0994.
tn,C


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973,3786-
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer


EQUAL HOIJEOI, V O
OPPORTUNITY
sin,cc



Greenville Pointe

.Apart ents

1,2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
sin,c


"1st time home buyers"
We have several programs to
help 1st time home buyers
plus GOUT assistance up to
$8,000 $$$
Call Eric for details
(386) 719-5560

6/3,6/10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/1, c


"Brand New""
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 to many
upgrades to list, all this
for only $42,843.00 Call
Eric to set up appoint-
ment (386) 719-5560

"WOW"
$150.00 and your property
puts you in a home today
call Eric at
(386) 719-5560


Trade in's & Repos Available
Call Eric for a list of our
homes available at discount-
ed prices, many to choose
-from!
(386) 719-5560


New Manufactured Homes
Starting at $23.70 sq. ft.
Guaranted lowest prices in
North Florida. Call Rick
(386) 752-8196


The Wait. Is Overl
Introducing "Mossy Oak"
the most innovative, quality
and affordable manufactured
houses in the industry. Call
Mr. Mott (386) 752-1452


Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452


Best Cash Deals on Mobile
Homes. NO ONE BEATS
MY PRICES
386-719-0044
rtn.c
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/
2 BATH Excellent Shape;
Need.Chas, Priced to sell,
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
itnc
Brand Spanking New
2009 5 BR/3BA; 2004 Sq Ft;
$594.31 Per month. Seller
pays $3,500 toward closing
cost. Call Mike at
386-623-4218
rtn,c
Modular Home for sale in
town. Save $20,000.00. Turn
"Key Deal; Owner says make
an offer. It Must Go!
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
rtn,c

PRICE REDUCED!
Spacious Mfg home' with 4
BR, 3 BATH, Bonus Room
with lots of windows. Discon-
tinued floor plan. Fore More
info call Sarah. 386-288-0964
rtn,c

Become a Homeowner for
the same monthly payments
you are throwing away on'
rent. Call Sarah for more info.
386-288-0964
rn,c


MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00
Call 386-288-4560
rtn.c

WE PAY CASH..... FOR
YOUR USED MOBILE
HOMES 1980 OR NEWER.
LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129
rtn,e
Need More Space
for a growing family?
2001, 5 BEDROOM, 4
BATH TRADE-IN.
Excellent condition.
For more info call Sarah.
386-288-0964.

First Time home Buyer
$7,500.00 CASH
IN YOUR POCKET
Call David for details
386-719-0044
stn,c
Low Credit Scores???
I may be able to help you
buy a home.
386-288-4560
rnn,c"

FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY
AND LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE
ZONED COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT
tn,c

HOME ONLY LOANS
No mortgage on your land.
Put a home on your land,
.family land, state land or
rental lot. Singlewides start at
$350.00 month and Dou-
blewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn,c

Home Owners....
Guaranteed Financing
Thru B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044
rtn,c

NEW 4 BR 2 BATH READY
TO MOVE IN. CALL 386-
288-4560
nn,c


ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00
P&I per mo, Doublewide your
land $422.00 P&I per mo.
Singlewide & $30,000.00 for
land $520.00 P&I per mo. or
Doublewide with $30,000.00
for land $602.00 P&I per mo.
Our land your land or buy
land. I specialize in credit
challenged customers. Appli-
cations over the phone, credit
decision next business day.
Let me help make your new
home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
Call Steve 386-365-5370





OFFICE BUILDING
FOR RENT
across street from
Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder Office)
111 SE Shelby St., Madison;
Newly renovated
back to the 1920's era
Call 973-4141'
rtnn/
Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highwayfrontage.
Comer lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Dr.
& Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line, 8 inch wa-
ter main, access to city utili-
ties, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene 850-
973-4141
rtn, n/c




FOR SALE/
OWNER FINANCING
ALL LAND BELOW
IS HIGH AND DRY
5 acres Lee, North of Hwy
6, Cayenne Rd., rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995 $5,000
down, $325/mo
10 acres Beulah Meadowvs
Rd, DWMH and houses al-
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down
$459/mo
10 acres Old Blue Springs
Rd. access, DWMH and hous-
es allowed, $49,500, $5,000
down, $459/mo .
25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)
Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
rtrc


For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suwannee
was $135,000, Now $99,000.
2 BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Building with
Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
Trees. 386-719-0421
Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Views .
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
Open and Covered Decks,
Large Screened Porch, Gas
FP, CH/A, Oak Floors & Cab-
inets, and Appliances.
Offered Furnished at
$179,900. Call BJ Peters at
850-508-1900

FOR SALE
BY ROCKY SPRINGS
CHURCH
1.87 Acres $22,000
Call 678-389-1859


$$AVONA$
Earn 50%, only $10 for
starter kit! Call Today
850-570-1499 or visit
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Therapist
Mental Health Service for a 30
bed female Juvenile Justice
program in Greenville, FL.
Applicants must have graduat-
ed from any accredited college
or university with a master's
degree in social work, counsel-
ing and guidance, psychology
or human services.- Candi-
dates must pass a DJJ back-
ground screen, drug screening
and physical in order to be
considered.
Contact Mrs. Pender @ 850-
948-4220 of fax resumes to
850-948-4227
TRIAL COURT LAW CLERK
www.jud3.flcourts.org


/ORMORCC



If you are 18 or older
and have been laid-
off from your job, con-
"ds's tact us now! We can
assist you in assessing your
interests arid setting career goals, as
well as lOoking for a new job. We
may also assist qualified individuals
with career training funds! You
may still be eligible to receive Un-
employment while in training.


Magnolia Bay Plantation

Thursday, July 9 @ 10 a.m.


r U.S Hwy. 221, Greenville, FL
3 Miles South of Brooks County




Magnolia Bay Lodge, Sleeps 6-8, Overlooks Lake SheeHee
@ 8,400 sf Equipment Shed with Walk-in Cooler
Two 750 sf Cabins Offered Separately
2 Acre duck pond and irrigated 30 field |
Hunt-Fish-Farm-Invest, Your Choice!
Offered Dmded, High Bidders Choice
5 tracts: ranging from 62 to 228 acres '

Florida land Auctions Florida land for sale ONLY AT AUCTION, Offered to the highest and best bidders!
Contracts will be written the day of the Auction; be prepared and prequalify Call the
Certified Real Estate Auctioneers today at 800-711-9175 and get your Free Auction Information now.


C Ceried eal4ta 1000ti15.c01m


800-11-9715 Myes Jckso Aucioner/Boke
Myr( etfi utoia il ao


Deadline For Classifleds


ICLASSIFI DS (850) 973-4141
3:00 p.m. Every Monday


m


0


Cope "ntililr'o









Wednesday, June 24, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 15A


NOTICE OF SALE
BY THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the
Circuit Court. of Madison County, Madison, Florida, will on July 16, 2009,
at 1t:00 a.m. on the front steps of the Madison County Courthouse, Madi-
son County, Madison, Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash the following described property situated in
Madison. County, Florida, to-wit:
LOT 8, FOREST GLEN SUBDIVISION, FIRST ADDITION AS RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 8, OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF'
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
And
At the time of the sale, as set forth hereinabove, the successful high bidder
shall post with the Clerk a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final
bid. The deposit shall be applied to the sale price at the time of payment.
The balance of the sale price shall be paid in full to the Clerk by 4:00 p.m.,
on the same day as the sale.
This sale is made pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending
in the Circuit Court of Madison County, Florida, the style of which is:
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EDWARD F. SIMMONS a/k/a EDWARD SIMMONS;
VERA L. WATKINS a/kIa VERA WATKINS; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF EDWARD F. SIMMONS; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF VERA L. WATKINS; MOTT BUCK
COMPANY; ROYW. FLOYD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ROY W. FLOYD as of November 30,2005; UNKNOWN
OCCUPANT A residing at 414 NE Country Kitchen Road,
Madison, Florida and UNKNOWN OCCUPANT B residing
at 414 NE Country Kitchen Road, Madison, Florida,
Defendants.
and the docket number of which is 08-223-CA
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at
the Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida
32340,at (386)758-2163 within 2 working days of your receipt of this Notice;
if you are hearing impaired, call 1 (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired,
call 1(800)955-8770.
IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE
ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PER-
SONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PRO-
CEEDS PURSUANT TO THE FINAL JUDGMENT.
IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT
TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE EN-
TITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS.
WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court on June
17, 2009.
Tim Sanders
Clerk, Circuit Court
Madison County, Florida

By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
6/24,7/1


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-11-DP


IN THE INTEREST OF:
O.P. DOB: 03/03/1996
.EP. DOB: 04/14/2000
M.P. DOB: 09/19/2002
M.V. DOB: 12/23/2003
MINOR CHILD

NOTICE OF ACTION
TOi G. P.
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition under oath has been filed in
the abose -styled court for the termination or parental rights and the per-
manent commitment of O.P., a male child born on 03/03/1996, in Maryland;
F.P.. a male child born on.04/14/2000. in Loundes County, Georgia; M.P,, a
female child born on 09/19/2002. in Leon. County, Florida; M.V., a female
child born on 12/23/2003. in Leon Count). Florida to the State of Florida,,
placing agency, for subsequent adoption and you are hereby to be and ap-'
pear in the above court at the MadisofnCounty Courthouse, Madison, Flori-
da 32340 on Thursday, July 23, 2009kat 1:00 P.M., for a Termination of
: Parental Rights Advisory Hearing and to show cause why said petition
should not be granted. You must appear on the date and time specified.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING
CONSTITUTES YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL
LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THESE CHILDREN.

6/17, 6/24, 7/1, 7/8

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 03-16-CJ
IN THE INTEREST OF:
B.P. D.O.B. 10/31/2002
MINOR CHILD

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: W. G.
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition under oath has been filed in
the above -styled court for the termination of parental rights and the per-
manent commitment of B.P., a female child born on 10/31/2002, in Alachua
County, Florida to the State of Florida, placing agency, for subsequent
adoption and you are hereby to be and appear in the above court at the .
Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida 32340 on Thursday, July 23,
2009 at 1:00 P.M., for a Termination of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing
and to show cause why said petition should not be granted. You must ap-
pear on the date and time specified.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING
CONSTITUTES YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL
LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THESE CHILDREN,
6/17,6/24,7/1,7/8


NOTICE: The District School Board of Madison County, Florida will hold
a public hearing on Tuesday, July 21, 2009, at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will
be held in the School Board Meeting Room of the Superintendent's Office,
210 NE Duval Ave. Madison, Florida.
Code of Student Conduct
The proposed document may be viewed at the School Board Office, 210 NE
Duval Ave, Madison, Florida.
Statutory Authority: 1001.41, 1001.42
IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE
BOARD, WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS
MEETING OR HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED. A RECORD OF THE
PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE/SHE MAY NEED TO
ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF.THE PROCEEDINGS IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVI-
DENCE UPON WHICH TIE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.

6/24

Public Notice
ESE Department
of Madison District Schools will submit the following applications to thq
Florida Department of Education for the FY 2009-2010.
IDEA B-Entitlement Grant -$779,192
IDEA B ARRA $ 665,341
IDEA PreK Entitlement Grant $ 53,841
IDEA B Prek ARRA $ 20,949
If you wish to provide parental input in the development of this grant,
.please contact Ramona Guess, ESE Coordinator at 850-973-5022 ext 315.
Once these grants are approved by the Department of Education they will
.be put on the agenda for Madison County School Board Approval. Expect-
ed date of award will be in July 2009.
6/24






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$200 minimum order required to receive $10 acscount Enter code min
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Sivjoeveral Parcels Selling By Court Order!
l From 1 acre to 196 Acres Different Sizes
See Webste For Locations Some with Creeks, Springs. Timber
Selling ABSOLUTE House on Tennessee River


Fisherman's Paradise & Hunter's Haven
Take a look at the flUnitcd
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Man Hurls Polecat 63 ft.

BEXAR COUNTY After using Thera-Gesic on his sore shoulder,
Tom W. was able to rid his property of the varmint last Thursday.
When asked if the polecat lived or died, he pain-
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The Solithern Pine Bbetle


PREVENT
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2009 Sign-Up Period: July 1st Aug 12th aag m

Apply for incentive payments or cost-share assistance With:
Thinning Mechanical underbrush removal
Prescribed burning Planting longleaf pine

For guidelines and application materials, contact your
local Florida Division of Forestry office or visit:

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A message from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of
Forestry, Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner. Funding supplied by the USDA Forest Service;
an equal opportunity provider.


LEGALS


11


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s9anm


L,







16A Madison Count carrier www.greenepUblishing.com Wednesday, Ji


AR UND MADISON COUNTY


une 24, 2009


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, June 12, 2009
Clients and friends of the Celebration House
gather around the table to enjoy a little dessert after
a great meal consisting of baked tilapla, rice pilaf and
a mess of greens they grew in their own garden. Pic-
tured left to right around the table: Virginia Cherry,
Wllma Dickey, Leon Strickland, Audrey Lamb, Cheryl
Register, Ruth Yates and hla WvI .








By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
When Lee United Methodist Church opened the
Celebration House a safe and affordable senior
center offering a very special blend of healthy and
stimulating activities, along with nourishing meals
- Cheryl Register and Audrey Lamb made- sure
every client received a warm arnpersonal welcome.
Now, months later, those clients have planted a gar-
den, made and sold quality ciafts, gathered round
the piano just about anything that strengthens
the mind and refreshes the soul.
On Friday, June 12, the golden gang enjoyed a
tasty, fresh lunch consisting of baked tilapia, rice pi-
laf, fresh greens from their own garden, and an Oreo
pie that would have fetched a fortune at a political
fundraiser. More than that, clients were treated to a
delicious take-home meal as well. .
Following lunch, a sing-a-long was suggested.
Acting as guest pianist,
Virginia Cherry led the
group in a festive round '
of "What a Friend We
Have In Jesus." Visitors
and clients sang loudly
and proudly together,
which in addition to the
fun and entertainment,
is proven to slow and
even reverse the adverse
mental effects of aging.
Earlier, guests enjoyed a
craft session, thanks to
the gracious contribu-
tion of visiting instruc- -
tor, Ila Willis
For more informa- G W Ih C tIi
tion, simply call Cheryl,"
Register at (850) 971-5380.
Although promoted 9
mostly through word of
mouth, organizers al-
ways welcome care- A
givers and their beloved "V, Auto,
senior family to drop by CD, AC,
anytime, and take a few cruise, Till
,moments to see how Cel-
ebration House feeds the ,ikb#T9045
body, mind and soul. ` --
Celebration House is
located at the northern MSRP
corner of Lee. UMC on 1 7
County Road 255, just
south of US 90 in Lee.v


Question: Help! My filling just fell out.
How long before my tooth is going to start
hurting?
Answer: How long do you have before it
hurts, who knows? I can tell you this. It reminds
me of the story of the woman driving ,around on
a bald tire with three patches and asking the
mechanic "how much longer can I drive on that
tire before the tire will have a blowout?"
Mechanic, "I don't know when it is going to
blowout, 'mam, but from looking at the shape
that tire is in I can tell you it's gonna be a doozy."
The truth is a lost filling is not a fun way to start
a day. I can give you good news, bad news.
The good news is that the filling coming out is
giving you a warning shot fired across your bow
to let you know something is wrong before it has
started to hurt. The bad news is that there is
something wrong which allowed the filling to
come out. Maybe there is decay which has
loosened an older filling and it is passed time to
have it replaced. Maybe the tooth is cracked and
can not hold the old filling. It could be a
number of causes so count your blessings that
the tooth hasn't started to ache. The tooth could
have just begun to hurt with out that warning.
Don't wait for your tooth to have a "blow out."
Get the tooth looked at as soon as possible.


THE FORD DIFFERENCE .


R ANDD DR1eI TFORD DimoNcE AT LNGDALE FRD


22935

985


2009 FORDFCUS
SE DIbR


4 Cyl, Auto,
All Power


r MSRP 18,125

3 3,996


All997 PowerV,9Aut35
Equipment, CD
V8, Auto, CD, AC, Cruise,
Cruise, Tilt
Loaded!
Stk#T904l
Stk#T9128
MSRP s35,180 MSRP 26,535
$28 997 $20,935


Stk#ESP9013


Stk#FN9000


MSRP 23,025 MSRP 122,510

' -i9,996 16,99-2


Price Includes all Ford Factonr Rebates, Ford Motor Credit Incentives Requires Ford Motor Credit
SPrice excludes all taxes, tag & title fees. Offer ends 6/30/09.


Finan ing with approved credit.


No Dealer Fees Guarantees Best Picel


229-333-2300 215 W. Magnolia St Valdosta, GA


MedicareComplete
from SecureHorizons

AARP United Healthcare
will conduct another Medicare
Educational Meeting on
61/30/2009,
at the Senior Citizen Center,
486 S.W. Rutledge St.,
Madison, FL 32341.
The Meeting is at 10:30 AM.
No reservations are necessary.
Please come, bring a friend,
enjoy the meeting,
and the refreshments.
A licensed AARP United
Healthcare agent will attend.


luBoQ"


RD F150=
AR CAB^^^^^


_


'1 10 1 - -




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