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Madison County carrier
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00167
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Portion of title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla
Creation Date: June 17, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID: UF00067855:00167

Full Text






'\ Madlson Coi


Since 1964
The Spirit Of Madison County


VOL. 45 NO. 44


lDeit. or
21 Srna ec ac
Gias O le sib
" G Glnesvij I


cL~.zzr~zz~.LLeo-.ir1


21


Out Uui

Web Site


Swww.greenepublishing.com
Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


I


Free School
Immunizations
At Health-

Department
Parents reminded
child immunizations
must bepup to date to
enroll in kindergarten
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County
Health Department
wants to remind parents
with children enrolling
in kindergarten that
shot records for the child
must be up to date.
These required im-
munizations are provid-
ed for free any time the
facility is open, although
an appointment is re-
quested.
Contact the Madison
County Health Depart-
ment at (850) 973-5000 to
make an appointment
and for more details. The
department recom-
mends parents to make
an appointment as soon
as convenient to avoid
the rush.
And again, Florida
statutes require immu-
nizations be up to date to
attend public schools.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
m icaheli a'reenepublsh i
ng.com.


INSIDE

TODAY:
* Beaumont
Market Opens
* Prison K-9
Corp Trains
* FDA Bites
Into Tobacco
* Path Of Faith

Lee Bar
Cited For
Gambling
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing. Inc.
Last month, the Red
Cow Saloon in Lee post-
ed a sign saying. "We
Welcome ATE" The sign
was a lighthearted at-
tempt at a joke following
an investigation by the
state's Bureau of Alco-
hol and Tobauco.
According to a
spokesperson at ABT,
the investigation re-
vealed a NASCAR bet-
ting pool that was going
on. The saloon was cited
for it and ordered to stop.
The bar reportedly
complied with the ABT's
order
6 97/77
Some clouds and possibly an iso-
ilj thunderstorm in the after-
Thu
' P n, cloudy, chance of a thunder-
Fri .
6/19 8 --8
A few clouds. Highs in the upper
90s and lows in the upper 70s.

More sun than clouds. Highs 98 to
102F and lows in the upper 70s.
* 2Sections. 22Pages

S Classifieds 14A
Obituaries 5A
Path of Faith B Section
Money & Finance 12A


Manslaughter


Charges Dropped


By Grand Jury


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Manslaughter charges were
dropped against Begel St.-Juste. A
grand jury indictment was unsealed
Friday afternoon, June 12, at 2:15 p.m. in
a Madison manslaughter case.
The grand jury decided that St.-
Juste had only acted in self-defense and
so the charges were dropped against
him:
Judge Greg Parker sealed the in-
dictment at the request of State Attor-
ney Skip Jarvis.
According to the Madison Police
Department report, one man died and
the other was charged with manslaugh-
ter as the result of a brawl on Saturday,
May 9. On Saturday evening, officers
from the City of Madison Police Depart-
ment received a call in reference to a
fight occurring in the Madison Heights
Apartment Complex Parking lot.
When the officers arrived, they
found Aralieus Robinson lying on the


Lee V


Begel St.-Juste
ground with a wound to the chest. Offi-
cers called for Madison County EMS,
who transported him to the Madison
County Hospital, where he subsequent-
ly died.
Officers of the City of Madison Po-
lice Department conducted an investi-
gation, resulting in the arrest of Begel
St.-Juste.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Self Contained Breathing Appara-
tus, or SCBA, is a device worn by firefight-
ers, to provide breathable air in a hostile
environment. The term "self-contained"


Eddie Hale: Million-

Mile Mailman
" i , . _ =7 -- ,' . _II CI: [


Seminoles


6Or


Brewers?
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Jacobbi McDaniel
has tough decisions
ahead, as he recently
learned Thursday, June
11, that he was drafted in
round 33 to the Milwau-
kee Brewers. This FSU
commit was at his home
in Madison when he re-
ceived a call informing
him of the draft. Jacobbi McDaniel
Because of his com-
mitment to Florida State, he was surprised to learn
he had been drafted. McDaniel had previously been
in contact with a scout from Milwaukee before'sign-
ing with FSU.
McDaniel was offered an $800 thousand, signing
bonus to play for the Milwaukee Brewers. On Febru-
ary 4, he signed with Florida State to play football
and baseball. And while the large lump sum offered
Please see McDaniel, Page 4A


FD Showcases


means that the breathing set is not depen- sure tank (22
dent on a remote supply (through a long regulator, ai
hose). If designed for use under water, it is (mouthpiece
called SCUBA (self contained underwater connected tc
breathing apparatus). An SCBA typically trying frame.
has three main components: a high-pres-


Mary Santerfeit, Lee Postmaster, is shown pre-
senting rural route carrier Eddie Hale a plaque for
completing his "Million Miles" of travel for the post
office. Eddie has been with the post office 35-plus
years. He has done this million miles accident free.
He is starting his second million. Congratulations,
Eddie.
'*\


200 psi to 4500 psi), a pressure
rnd an inhalation connection
, mouth mask or face mask),
together and mounted to a car-
Please see Lee VFD, Page 4A


D id YouSmenll
tht

Something?


Just past noon on
N. r Saturday, June 13, City
of Madison workers re-
sponded to a report of
.. water coming out of the
pavement in the middle
of South Range Ave at
Jordan Street. The run-
ning water looked-
clear, but had the odor
of sewer water. The
area around the leak
was blocked to prevent
traffic from damaging
the roadway.


Photo submitted by Pat Lightcap


Advanced Equipment



I *40LUT-


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, June 13, 2009
The.Lee VFD showcase their SCBA system. Pictured front row, left to right: Joe Odom, Leroy Rutherford, Jr., Ted Thomas, Shirley von-
Roden, Jim vonRoden: back row left to right: Robert Sanders, J.P. Pryor, Victoria Taylor, Reese Thomas, Angel Donaldson and Aaron Beck.


,� .... . - -, * . *; ""', F Fo r







2A * Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 17, 2009


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Wandering With
R The Publisher
.. Mary Ellen Greene
Columnist



.----.-----





This Sunday is Father's Day, a day dedicated to
the men in the world, and all the ones who have
shaped somany lives.
It was Shakespeare, in The Mer-
chant of Venice, who said... "It is
a wise father that knows his
own child."
And, it was Robert
Frost who said, "You don't
ha veto deserve your moth-
er's love. You have to de-
serve your father's. He's
JW more particular."
'* ft I am fortunate to have a
T n .loving and kind father who
a loved our mother dearly, and
William ford all five bf his children. My
Selman Dad, William Buford Sel-
* man, is still living today,.
and at 95 years old, he has left us so many examples
of how a Christian father should be. And, by his ex-
ample, he has children who have been able to carry
that love into their lives, their children's, and their
families. :
I was lucky to marry a man who
also had that deep, abiding love.
for his mother and father, his
children, and his grandchil-
dren, and they, too, have
carried it into their lives.
So, today-... I wish all
Fathers a Happy Father's,
Day, and to my father, my
husband, ,our two .sons,
our son-iri-law, and my two
,brothers, I.wish them a spe-
cial and happy day Sunday. I
also remember, fondly, Tom-.
my's, .fthe;r, Thomas Har- Tho y
vey Greene,. Sr.,who was Greene, Sr.
such a big influence on..us
both, as were all of my uncles, and my Grandfather
Jonah Selman.
Fathers, everywhere, I salute.you today!
You deserve our praise, and we applaud you.
:."Nuff said .. Bye for now... See 'ya.,
2 ,,)


* Hooray.' Ama'ron Deonte' Choice-Moore
. would ke to announced Jinem 1, 2000,
he will be turning one year old.
Ama'rion Is the proud sen of
Alexis D. Choice and Jeremy Moore.
His maternal grandparents are
SDarene (Marris) Choice and Craig Jackson.
His paternal grandparents are
Gertrude Edwards Gandy and
the late Robert Moore. Amarion is loved by
his great-grandfather, known as great buddy Dock Choice IlL
Ama'rlon's love Is shared by many 40 .- A
family members and they are his - i
auntie, MyEshia; Yasmin and o,
Uncle; DeAngelo Tucker;
Antonio Choice (who ialso Ika un)*,o .. * we)
great aunt, Darlene Choice; D a Illar i '
great-uncles, Damon, Dallas a nlel Choice;
his favorite cousins, John Ner .
Sand JaOhn Jackson, who calls hi
He has several nicknoe , o








T t 0k Of

fiditel' D al,


Father's Day, contrary to popular misconc
tion, was not established as a holiday in order
help greeting card manufacturers sell more card
In fact.when a "father's day" was first propo
there were no Father's Day cards!
Mrs. John B. Dodd, of Washington, first p
posed the idea of a "father's day" in 1909. Mrs. Di
wanted a special day to honor her father, Willi
Smart. William Smart, a Civil War veteran, was v
owed when his wife (Mrs. Dodd's mother) died
childbirth with their sixth child. Mr. Smart was
to raise the newborn and his other five children
himself on a rural farm- in eastern Washing
state. It was after Mrs. Dodd became an adult t
she realized the strength and selflessness her fat
had shown in raising his children as a single par
The first Father's Day was observed on June
1910 in Spokane Washington.
. At about the same time in various-towns
cities across American other people were begin
to celebrate a "father's day.".
In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge supported
idea of a national Father's Day Finally, in 1966, P
ident Lyndon Johnson signed a presidefitial pro
nation declaring the third Sunday of June
Father's Day
Father's Day has become a day to not only ho
your father, but all men who act as,a father figi
Stepfathers, uncles, grandfathers, and aduilt n
friends are all honored on Father's Day.


:ep-
to
s.
sed
)ro-
odd
iam
rid-
I in
left
1 by
ton
hat
her
ent.
19,
and
ing


er~(cJ' s


eTrm


Emerald Greene
Publisher


HaPPy%

Father s Ray
This Sunday is Father's Day. I would just like to
wish all the fathers, a happy and prosperous day, on
this day that is totally dedicated to them.
Any man can be a father, but it takes a SPECIAL
man to be a Dad - and my Dad has been such a big
part of my life. I'm blessed that I still have my Dad.
with me, in this world, and I thank God everyday for
that fact.
So, this Sunday, please take the time to go see
your Dad, or call him, or do something special for
him. Time flies by too fast, in this life. Your Dad
gave years and years of his life dedicated to you -
can't you give him one day???

W1jf37ather
By Ann Landers
When 5 was Jourj ears old: Tfy daddy can
do anything,
When 5 was ive ears old;: . daddy
knows a ,whole lot,
When J was Six 'ears old, lj dad is


smarter than .your dad,
When 5 was Fghtjears
n't know exactly everything,
When � was 10 ears


old; Thy dad does-

old, Jn the olden


Ire days, when my dadgrew up, things were sure
cla. different,
as .When 5 was 12 years old; Oh, well, natu-
nor rally, Dad doesn't know anything about that, Tfe
hale is too old to remember his childhood,
lWhen 3 was 14years old: Don't pay any at-
tention'to mj dad, 'ife.is so old-fashioned,
When 5 was 21 'years old;, Tim? fly' ford,
he's hopelessly out of date,
. When S was 25 years old: Dad knows about
it, but then he should, because ,he has been
around so long,
When 3 was 30 years old* .laybe we
should ask Dad what he thinks, -ffter all, he's
had a lot of experience,
When 5 was 35 ears old; 5'm not doing a
single thing until 5 talk to Dad,
When 3 was .40 years old: 5 wonder how
Dad would-have handled it, Tfe was so wise.
When Swas 50,years old: i'dgive anything
if Dad were here now so 5 could talk this over
with him, Too bad 5 didn't appreciate how
smart he was, 5 could have learned a lot from
him,


rWES Online Poll


Do you have health insurance?



Yes



No

0 3 6 9 12 15

This week's question: If you could travel to California any way
. you wanted and time was no issue, how would you get there?
To view and participate in our weekly online poll, visit www.greenepublishing.com.


ZBesc








Wednesday, June 17, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier * 3A


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee Worship


Center Hosting,


Independence


Day


Oospel Sing

The Lee Building Blocks program is still going
along well. Children aie enjoying the day camp in
Lee. There's still time for your child to participate.
Call (850) 971-5867 for more information.
Lee Worship Center will host an open mic sing
on July 4, at 7 p.m., featuring the McCormick Fami-
ly. Anyone who can sing or play an instrument is
also welcome to participate. There will also be a cov-
ered dish dinner at the event. For more information,
please call (850) 971-4135.
Everyone had a great time at the Midway
Church of God 2009 Youth Retreat. It was a tiring,
but rewarding and fun, weekend for all involved. A
big thanks to James and Margie Phillips; Annie Lau-
ra Thomas; Carol Sue Brooks; Rev. Retis and Janice
Flowers; Jason and Dawn Phillips; Jed Phillips; Len
and Betty Fortner;. Tommy and Lenora Pate; Roy
and Bertha Jean Phillips; Abbie; Bobby, and Danny
Bembry; Danny and Lori Blount; Edna Doyle; Brad
and Regina Forrest; Julian Penny; Janie Ruth Penny
and all of the adults involved in making the event a
success. I am so sorry if I forgot the name of anyone
who helped.
That's all the news %for this week! Have a great
week and a beautiful forever! May God bless each
and every one of you!


Chase Home Finance vs. Joseph Todd Richard- :.
son - mortgage foreclosure
Renada Bryant vs. Fredrick Wiggins - domestic
injunction
Eshara Morris vs. Twin Oaks Juvenile Develop-
ment - other civil
First Federal Bank of Florida vs. Carl E. Lee -
mortgage foreclosure
Ray Anderson vs. Kim Anderson - dissolution,
of marriage
Damon Choice vs. Twin Oaks Juvenile Develop-
ment - other civil
Susan McCool vs. Raymond Gagnon - bther do-
mestic
Milagro P. Blesy vs. Michael A. Blesy II - disso-
lution of marriage
Linda Curtis and Department of Revenue vs.


Mark Timmons -- support


press ASSoci1


2008
Award Winning Newspaper









Publisher
Emerald Greene
Editor
Jacob Bembry
Production Manager
Heather Bowen
Staff Writers
Michael Curus and
Bryant Thigpen
Graphic Designers
Slephen Bochnia and
James Suner
Advertising
Sales Representatives
Man Ellen Greene,
Doroihv McKinnev,
Jeanetie Dunn '
and Chelsea Bouley
Classified and Legal Ads
Laura Little
Deadline Ifo clasliedis i
MonLi) dat 3 p.m. .
Deadline for Legal Adienisement
is Monday at 5 p m.
There will be a $3 charge
Ior Affidaius.
Circulation Department
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
Subscription Rates
* In-.Counn, $30.
* Oui-of-County $38
iSlato & Ioa lta\es included)


P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850).973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Web Site:
www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
news@greenepublishing.com
Sports
bryant@greenepublilshng.com
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
Classifieds / Leaals
classflieds@greenepublishing.com
Established 1964
A w"ekly newspaper
[LISPS 32- - S00] designed
for the express reading plea-
sure of the people of its, cir-
culation area, be the\ past.
present or future residents.
Published w'eekil by
Greene Publishing Inc .
1695 South SR 53. MNadi-
son. FL 32340. Penodicals
postage PA.D at the Post
Office in Madison. FL
32340.
POSTMASTER- Send
address changes to MADI-
SON COUNTY CARRIER.
P.O. Drawer 772. Madison.
FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper re-
serwes the right to reject an\
adrentsement, ne.,ws mniaer.
or subscriptions that. [n the
opinion of the management.
w ill not be for the best inter-
est of the count\ and,'r the
owners of this ne. paper.
and to inestigaie any ad\er-
usement submitted
All photos gi cn to
Grecne Publishing [nc for
publication in this newspj-
per mut be picked up no lat-
er than 6 monLhs Irom the
daje the\ are dropped off.
Greene Publishing. Inc w ill
not he responsible for photos
beyond said deadline.


Pete Studstill And Iwo lima


I sat down recently
with Pete Studstill to
talk with him about his
experience 64 years ago
on the island of Iwo
Jima. In the late winter
of 1945, 100,000 Marines
and Japanese battled to
the finish for control of
this small volcanic is-
land in the Western Pa-
cific. It was an epic battle
that lasted for more than
a month.
Pete was born in
Lakeland, Ga., in 1923
during that win-
dow of time
from / on


The island of Iwo
Jima lies about 900 miles
south of the home is-
lands of Japan. It isn't
very big - about eight
square miles. It's a volk


1919-26,
where the Suribuchi, a
chance of a 600 foot vol-
boy being in Corporal Pete cano on the
uniform by Studstill in 1945. . . southern tip
1945 was of the island.


about 95 percent. Gradu-
ating from high school in
1942, Pete didn't wait to
be drafted. At the Ma-
rine recruiting office in
Valdosta, he - volun-
teered, and by October,
he was on his way to
boot 'camp at 'Parris Is-
land, NC,. "I couldn't
wait to join and do my
part to help win this
war," says Pete.
Moving to the west
coast and Camp Pendle-
ton, he, continued train-
ing until departing for
the Central Pacific The-
ater and Kwajalein Atoll.
The battle for Kwa-
jalein lasted less than a
week in early 1944 and
was relatively easy since
"the island was only de-
fended by about 3500
Japanese soldiers that
had already been written
off by the Japanese high
command. A year later,
-Iwo would be a far differ-
ent story.
Stops in Hawaii and
Guam were next on the
agenda for Pete's unit,
the 2nd Separate Engi-
neer Battalion. This unit
operated light artillery
and Pete's job was to
help defend these batter-
ies. The next engage-
ment for .this battalion
would be Iwo Jima and
toward'the end of 1944,
they trained in earnest
for the upcoming battle.


To American strategic
planners, the value of
Iwo Jima- was all about
three airfields on the is-
,land. As a halfway point
between the 20th Air
Force airfields in the
Marianna Islands and
Japan, the airfields were
needed to recover dis-
abled or fuel-starved B-
29 bombers. For Japan,
this was their first home
.territory that they would
be called to defend.
The Marine plalt
called. for ten days of
preparatory bombard-
ment (the Navy gave
'them only four) before
assault by three rein-
forced Marine divisions,
about 80,000 troops divid-
ed into the 3rd, 4th, and
5th Marine Divisions..
Pete's battalion was
assigned .to the "Fight-
ing Fourth" Division
that began landing on
Feb. 19, 1945, on the
northern-most assault'
beaches. Pete landed by
LST on the second day
and would spend more
than a month in the bat-
tle.
What was it like on
Iwo? Listen to Pete. "The
LST practically dropped
me on the beach. I had to
wade through little wa-
ter, but immediately
bogged down in -about
eight feet of volcanic
ash. I actually lost my M-


1 rifle in the sand it was
so deep, but fortunately, I
quickly found a replace-
ment rifle. I had to climb
a 45 degree rise to get off
the beach. It was very
tough going since I was
carrying all of my gear
and 300 rounds of
ammo."
"One of the first fox-
holes I dug in the vol-
canic ash caved in on me
because it was so loose.
A buddy named Bill
Stratton saw I was in
real trouble and gave me
a hand to pull me out of
that mess. Otherwise, I
might still be in that
hole."
"It was February (at
24 degrees north lati-
tude) so I was cold the
whole time. I went for
two weeks without a
bath or shower. For the-
32 days I spent on Iwo, I
never had a hot meal --
just K-rations in a hole
with my buddies, trying
to survive the battle. I re-
ally never knew'.the big
-picture - I just moved
when my sergeant told
me, dug in and defended
my hole."
When thinking of
the Battle of Iwo Jima,
the famous image of the
squad raising the flag on
Mount Suribuchi comes
to mind. This was actual-


Lee
Limelight
Jacob Bembry
Columnist


Monticello's Boots Thomas recieves congratula-
tions from Lieutenant General Holland M. "Howling
Mad" Smith


ly the second American
flag (they needed a
larger, .'more visible
symbol) raised on the
mountain. The first flag-
raising was led by a-
young man from nearby
Monticello, Earnest
"Boots" Thomas.
Finally, the battle
was over. Nearly seven
thousand Marines (in-


was a pretty crazy par-
ty" The elation was sort
of like a condemned
man getting a reprieve
from the governor at the
last moment.
In mid-September,
the Marines did land on
the southern-most is-
land of Kyushu at the
port of Sasebo. Things
were pretty peaceful by
that time for Pete and his
mates. He did get a good
look at Nagasaki, the
site of the second atomic
bomb attack. By Christ-
mas 1945, Pete was fin-
ished with occupation
duty and headed back
home to civilian life. Af-
ter 39 months, most of it
overseas, Pete Studstill's
wartime service was
over.
Pete insists that he
isn't a hero, that the real
heroes were the ones
who didn't come home. I
understand what he's
saying, but here is the
important thing to recall
from this recount: the
Battle of Iwo Jima was
one of the most desper-
ate, pivotal battles in
American history and
Pete Studstill had a
front-row seat to history.
In the words of Ad-
miral Chester Nimitz,
"uncommon valor was a
common virtue."


cluding Boots Thomas)
perished in the fighting
and another 19 thousand
were wounded -- about
one in three who partici-
pated in the battle were
casualties. The Japanese
began the battle with
about 22 thousand
troops. Only a thousand
were alive to surrender
when the battle conclud-
ed.
Was the victory
worth the terrible sacri-
fice? Over the next six
months of operations,
nearly 2400 B-29s recov-
ered on Iwo carrying
some 26 thousand air-
men. Now, some of these
aircraft- could . have
limped back to the Mari-
anna's, but many of
them would have come
up short. The "bomber
boys" were grateful for
the sacrifice made by the
Marines.
Pete headed back to
Guam to spend the next
four months training for
the coming invasion of
Japan. The fanatical re-
sistance on Iwo and Oki-
nawa promised. that the
next invasion would be
exceedingly bloody.
It didn't happen. In
early August, the two
atomic weapon attacks
signaled the coup de
grace of World War II.
This, along with the sub-
marine attacks on ship-
ping and fire-bombing of
Japanese cities, finished
what. Pearl Harbor had
begun. What was it like
on Guam when word of
the Japanese surrender
came? "We celebrated
for days," said Pete. "It


The second flag raising on Mount Suribuchi Feb. 23,1945.
"The second flag raising on Mount Suribuchi Feb. 23, 1945.


[3Coli EwEE






' U. U *


4A * Madison County Carrier www.greenepuDllsmng.com Wednesday, June 1/, 2009



LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


Man Arrested For

Trespass After

Warning
A Madison man.was arrested for trespass after
warning and violation.of probation on Friday after-
noon, June 12.
According to a Madison Police Department re-
port, Ptl. Joey Agner received a call from dispatch,
regarding a trespass warning at the Arbors against
Kendrick Marcel Collins.
When Agner met with Collins, he was told that
he had, been given permission by an officer to help
his mother move into the Arbors. When Agner con-
tacted the fellow police officer, he was informed that
the officer had never spoken with Collins.
Agner made contact with Collins again and ar-
rested him for trespass after warning.


-APilot Cost-Share Program
Treatment of CogongrasI
2009 Sign-up Period: June 15- July
Apply for the cost-share assistance With spraying her
this non-native grass, called one of the world's w
* Increase land management options
* Protect your property value
* Decrease fire hazard
For guidelines and application materials, contact your
Division of Forestry office or visit: www.fl-dof.
A message.from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Divi,
H. Bronson, Commissioner.Funding supplied by the USDA Forest Service, an equal


- z


It. your daily dose


,. Feel as though you're never
. really in the know? Treat
ma yourself to a daily
^ dose of Greene Publishing,
Inc. News and meet your
informational requirements .
100%.

, Call 973-4141 to start your "
.subscription today? "
.' '- ., ,,.. ,.-.^-" " "" "" " ,' ,,


Ibert Zimmerman
ontenced To More
"han 24 Years For
'oduction Of Child
Pornography
J.S. District Judge Susan C. Bucklew sentenced
rt Andre Zimmerman (age 41), the former
esman for the Florida Department of Children
Families, to 24 years and four months in federal
n on a charge of production of child pornogra-
;immerman, formerly of 'Tallahassee and Lake-
had pleaded guilty on January 21, 2008.
immerman was arrested on a federal complaint
bbruary 11, 2008, and was indicted on April 16,
according to Zimmerman's plea agreement,
October 2004 until December 2007, in Hillsbor-
and Orange Counties, Zimmerman became
dly with six minor males, one under the care of
Florida Department of Children and Families.
merman persuaded these minors to engage in
ally explicit conduct and then send him pictures
e conduct via email. At times, Zimmerman in-
ted the .minors concerning the poses they
.d assulhe for the photos. Zimmerman told the
rs that he would pay them money for the pic-
, and he did indeed pay some of the minors. Zim-
Smerman also told some of
the minors that he was
selling the pornographic
photographs to another
individual, who would in
turn sell them overseas.
This case was investigat-
ed by the Federal Bureau
of Investigation's Jack-
sonville Division, U.S.
Immigration and Cus-
toms Enforcement, Flori-
da Attorney General Bill
- * McCollum's CyberCrime
SUnit, the Florida Depart-
Sfor ment of Law Enforce-
ment, and the Tampa
sS Police Department. As-
3sistant United States At-
31 torney Colleen
bicide to control Murphy-Davis prosecut-
vorst weeds. ed the case.
This case was
brought as part of Pro-
ject Safe Childhood, a na-
tionwide initiative
launched in Mlay 2006 by
local Florida the Department of Jus
corn tice to combat the grow-
ing epidemic or child
sion of Forestry. Charles sexual exploitation and
opportunity provider, abuse.


ureene ruDIisning, inc. rnioo ny micnael iurus, June 13, 2uuo
The SCBA utility trailer features large refill tanks,
a generator, and a host of customized equipment and
storage essential to efficient use.
RaptorCFS by Eagle Air - an innovative single-appli-
ance breathing air system designed to re-fill SCBA
cylinders (personal tanks). It also allows the state-of-
the-art system to be especially flexible and portable.
As home to a large force of junior firefighters in
training, Lee VFD leadership provided them addi-
tional SCBA orientation during the weekend gather-
ing as well.
"This is an important addition to the depart-
ment, and gives us more and better ways to serve the
community," Chief Reese Tomas noted.
Many of the volunteer departments experienced
significant growth over the past several years, adding
key equipment, including firetrucks, through grant
funding. At the end of the day though, more so than
updating and expanding equipment; it"has been their
exceptional history of
quality service that has
built their great reputa-
tion.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@gre-


McDaniel

cont from Page 1A
by the Brewers is nice, McDaniel has stated that he's
not sure he is willing to give up football just yet.
For the Madison County Cowboys, McDaniel
was a standout, recording 95 tackles, 28 tackles for
loss, as well as nine sacks and three fumble recover-
ies.
While his repertoire was dominating at Boot
Hill Stadium, McDaniel also led the way for the Cow-
boys baseball team to a District Championship, with
12 homeruns and 54 RBIs, while batting .492.
"He has worked really hard to get where he's at,"
stated Cowboys' head coach Frankie Carroll.
Off the field and away from the diamond, Mc-
Daniel was also a star on the court, playing a major
role in the team's success.
"The Lord has blessed him to be able to do any-
thing he wants," stated Carroll. "I spoke with him
last night, and just told him to let God direct him,
and whatever God tells him to do, do that."
McDaniel was the 1,006th overall pick in the Ma-
jor League Baseball Draft, and was ranked number
five in ESPN's National Top 150 Recruits.


Lee VFD

cont from Page 1A
On June 13, the Lee Volunteer Fire Department
took a moment to demonstrate the extensive SCBA
system they recently acquired through a grant desig-
nated for that purpose. The Portable Cascade System,
as it is referred, is contained in a customized utility
trailer-that will be hauled by a heavy-duty SUV the
department picked up last year. There is also a
mounted generator, along with large refill tanks.
The system the department has acquired is the
| * - stf -^ ^5 �g :a s ''1


T A T I I nnnn


4


.. \








Wednesday, June 17, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 5A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


l*UNI I0


June 15-19
Kids, ages 3-12,
come explore Bible
stories, do fun activi-
ties, songs, crafts,
games, snacks . ,and
outdoor cookouts with
our Forest Friends
during the Friendship
Trek Vacation Bible.
School at the Hanson
United Methodist
Church, June 15-19,
.6-8 p.m.
June 15-19
Vacation Bible
School will be in ses-
sion at Mt. Zion
A.M.E. Church, Cher-


ry Lake, from 6 to 8:30
p.m.,, nightly. Classes
will be provided for all
ages (children
through adults). Par-
ticipating fellowship
churches are Mt. Zion
A.M.E.C., St. Thomas
A.M.E.C., Jeslamb
A.M.E.C. and High An-
tioch Antioch
A.M.E.C.
June 17-20
Camp Weed Sum-
mer Camp for Rising
3rd and 4th graders
will take place June
17-20. Visit
www.campweed. net for


'Gwendolyn "Gwen"

B. Willis


Funeral services for
Gwendolyn "Gwen" B.
Willis, 82, of Longview,
Texas, were held .at 2
p.m., on Tuesday, June 9,
2009, at First Presbyter-
ian Church, with the
Rev. Jonathan Jehorek
and Dr. WD. O'Neal offi-
ciating. Interment
followed in
Rosewood .
Park. Ser- .,
vices were
under the
direction of .'
Rader Fu-
nera 1 '-
Home of
Longview.
Mrs. Willis
passed, away
Friday after-
noon at a local
assisted-living fa-
cility.
Mrs. Willis was born
Dec. 30, 1926, in Chula,
Ga., and had been a resi-
dent of Longview since
1947. Upon graduating
from high school, she
entered Jackson Memor-
ial Hospital school of
Nursing in Miami in Oc-
tober' 1943 and' graduat-
ed in October 1946. She.
passed the state board
exam and became a reg-,
istered nurse in March
1947. She married "Van"
Willis, deceased, in June
1947, and they moved to
Longview in September
of that year.
She was an office
nurse of Dr. WP. Farrar
from 1948-51. After. an
eight-year absence from
nursing, during which
time she had three chil-
dren, she returned to
work for Dr. Farrar for
five more years and then

91.7 FM
kwwmpb~e)


became a full-time
housewife and mother.
She 'and her husband
were active members of
First Presbyterian
Church in Longview.
Gwen was an avid
bowler for many years.
She served on the board
of directors for the
S Longview
Women's
Bowling As-
sociation
(LWBA),
served as
., the city
secretary
- of LWBA
f r o m
1976-80 and
was. a, dele-
gate to both
state and na-
tional tourna-
ments. In 1984, she
was awarded a perma-
nent membership in the
Women's International
Bowling Congress, and
in 1988, was named a lie
member of LWBA.
She is survived by a
daughter, Kristie Harp-
er and her husband,
Bobby, of Greenville;
son, Paul Willis and his
wife, Robin, of
Longview; and son,
David Willis and his
wife, Darrell, of Tyler,
Texas. Also surviving
are nine grandchildren;
16 great-grandchildren;
one brother, W.A.
Barfield and his wife,
Barbara, of Madison;
and a host of brothers-
in-law, sisters-in-law,
nieces and nephews.
The family requests
memorial donations be
made to the First Pres-
byterian Church, PC.C
Scholarship Fund, P.O.
Box 1096, Longview, TX
75606; or to the charity of
your choice.
A memorial guest-
book may be signed at
www.raderfh.com.


a brochure, registra-
tion and, scholarship
forms. Join in the Fun
in the Sonshine at our
85th consecutive sum-
mer camp. A Ministry
of the Episcopal Dio-
cese of Florida for
children and young
people of any (or no)
denomination. For
more information, call
888-763-2602, Ext. 16.
June 19 & 20
The 59th Annual
Watermelon Festival
will be held June 19
and 20 in downtown
Monticello. Events in-
clude a fashion show,
an arts and crafts
show, a children's mu-
sical performance, the
annual street dance,
the Kiwanis Melon
Run, the watermelon
parade, and a car
show.
June 19, 20 & 27
The Monticello
Opera House presents
Hot Dogs and Cool
Cats, a children's mu-
sical theater produc-
tion, Friday, June 19,
at 7 p.m., .Saturday,
June 20, at 11:30 a.m.
(after the 10 a.m. Wa-
termelon Festival Pa-
rade) and Saturday,
June 27, at 11:30 a.m.
Watch Detective Sam
Spadenneuter as he
solves the mystery of
the three kittens who
lost their mittens!
This is musical and
mystery fun for all
ages! Tickets, avail-
able at the door, are
just $5 for adults and
$2 for children. Call
997-4242 for more in-
formation.
July 4
The American Le-
gion 224 will host a
cookout on Saturday,
July 4, at. 4 p.m., for
members and guests.
There will be a fire-
works display at dusk.
July 20-23
Camp Weed Sum-
mer Camp for Chil-
dren with Parent(s) in
Prison will take place
July 20-23. Visit
www.campweed.net for
a brochure, registra-
tion and scholarship
forms. Join in the Fun,
in the Sonshine at our
85th consecutive sum-
mer camp. A ministry
of the Episcopal Dio-
cese of Florida for
children and yofing
people of any (or no)
denomination. Schol-
arships available for
qualified applicants.
For information,
please call 888-763-
2602, Ext. 16.
July 26-August 1
Camp Weed Sum-


0


mer Camp for Rising
5th and 6th graders
will take place July
26-Aug. 1. Visit
www.campweed.net for
a brochure, registra-
tion and scholarship
forms. Join in the Fun
in the Sonshine at our
85th consecutive sum-.
mer camp. A ministry
of the Episcopal Dio-
cese, of Florida for
children and young.
people of any (or no)
denomination. For
more information,
please call 888-763-
2602, Ext. 16.
July 31-August 2
The Mosley/
Hodge Family Re-
union II will be held
in Madison, July
31-Aug. 2, at the Unit-
ed Methodist Church
recreation center. All
.descendants and rela-
tives of Tom Mosley
and Rosa Hodge (of
West Farm) are invit-
ed to this event.
August 2-8
Camp Weed Sum-
mer Camp for Rising
7th, 8th and 9th
graders will take place
Aug.. 2-8. Visit
www.campweed.net for
a brochure, registra-
tion and scholarship
forms. Join in the Fun
in the Sonsh'e at our
85th consecutive sum-
mer camp. A ministry
of the Episcopal Dio-
cese of Florida for
children and young
people of any (or no)
denomination. For
more information, call
888-763-2602, Ext. 16.
Thursdays-Mondays
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk


SOUTHERN STATES
Brands You Trust.
People Who Know.


12% Multi Stock Sweet Feed 50#
12%-Stocker Pellets 50#
SS 21% Dog Food 40#
Shelled Corn 50#


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RAINBOW FERTILIZER


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10-10-10 SRB 50#
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SATURDAY
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Every Saturday
Morning Until
Labor Day Weeken
Get Your 20#
Cylinder Filled
For Only
$8.95


Culture Center State
Park will host an ongo-
ing wood carving
workshop on Thurs-
days through Mon-
days, from noon until 4
p.m. Participants can
create figure carvings,
wood spirits, spoons,
bowls, relief carvings
and more during this
four-hour class. Work-
shop fees are $15 per
session and include
park admission. For
additional information
or to register for the
workshops, please call
(386). 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO
.org.
Each Weekday
Except Tuesday
The Senior Citi-
zens Center offers
computer classes to
seniors 60 and older
each weekday except
Tuesday. For more in-
formation or to sign
-up, please call (850)
973-4241-. A regular in-
structor is needed to
teach these classes. In-
terested individuals.
should ask. to speak
with Sharon concern-
ing the opening at the
number above.
Every
Tuesday-Saturday
The Diamonds in
the Ruff Adoption
Program at the
Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society is open
every Tuesday
through Saturday
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
It is located on 1156 SE
Bisbee Loop, Madison,
FL 32340. For more in-
formation, or direc-
tions, call (866)
236-7812 or (850) 971-,


9904.
First Saturday of
Each Month
Everyone is invit-
ed to gospel (open mic)
sings at Lee Worship
Center the first Satur-
day night of each
month, beginning at 7
p.m. The church is lo-
cated at 397 Magnolia
Dr. in Lee. Everyone is
asked to bring a dish
for the pot luck sup-
per. There will be
great musicians, so
those who can play an
instrument are wel-
come to come and join
in. Bring a friend with
you. For more infor-
mation, call Allen Mc-
Cormick at (850)
673-9481.
Second and Fourth
Saturday of Each
Month
The Madison
Church of God hosts a
free soup kitchen the
second and fourth Sat-
urday of each month
at the Greenville Se-
nior Citizens Center.
Lunch is served from
noon to 1 p.m.
Third Tuesday of
Each Month
The . Greater
Greenville Area Dia-
betes Support Group
is a free educational
service and support
for diabetes and those
wanting to prevent di-
abetes. The group
meets the third Tues-
day of each month at
the Greenville Public
Library Conference
Room at 312 SW
Church,.: .i.., - St.,
Greenville, , :1-11l30
a.m. Everyone is wel-
come!


GReaT SOUTHeRnl
WOOD P ReSRVllG
2.5" to 3" x 6.5' $2.75
3" to 3.5" x 6.5' $3.25
3.5" to 4" x 6.5' $3.90
5" to 6" x 8' $8.50
6" to 7" x 8' $13.50
1" x 6" x 16' RT Lumber $7.65
AL 6.5' Steel Fence Post $4.89

FENCE WIRE


1047 Red Brand 12.5 GA
5" Gaucho Barbwire
1047 Hi Ten Redbrand 14.5 GA
1348-2 12.5 GA No Climb
Horse Wire 200 Ft. Roll


$164.95
$46.95
$129.95

$275.00


Refrigerator .

Break ;,


Your favorite i
show goes to a
commercial, and
what do you do?
That usually
meons it's snock
time. Why Invest
In a TV ad when
you can have
the classified?
Customers con't skip
them for brownies and milk.


* TCUCIICAD SALE

Feed Fertilizer, Post and Wire Prices


oi n t corner of th Enterprise-
Recorder building every Wednesday.
* Tilapia, Shrimp, .
Spicy Shrimp, Catfish............$7.50
* Oysters, Crab Cakes,
Mullet (when available)................$8.50
Combine any of the 2 above ...$10.00
Combine any of the 3 above ...$12.00
* Pork Chop or
Chicken Tenders................ $6.50
Above served with hushpuppies and
choice of 2: Fries, Slaw, or Cheese Grits
Weekly Salad Special
We Start Serving at 11:00 am,
Weather permitting
Lok*orusatth 4h- f ul een


FARMERS COOPERATIVE, INC
748 SW Horry Ave. * Madison, FL 32340 * 850-973-2269
Call For Delivery Details. Sales Tax Not Included. While Supplies Last. Prices Good Until 6-30-2009


0 1 Ka s*~ s"T i f i e


SGREENE
Publishing lf-o-.

fmS Publishing, Inc. -^


nd


4A^M^







' 10 ~ *


6A * Madison County Carrier www.greenepuDIlSning.com Wednesday, J




AROUND MADISON COUNTY


une 17, 2009


District Deputy Grandmaster V'isis Home Lsodges


.. Photo Submitted
Right Worshipful John Sirmon makes his first official visit to Madison Lodge No. 11 F.&A.M. Pictured left to right with him are his committeemen: Brent Whit-
man, Michael Curtis, Don Love, Bruce Thames, John Sirmon, Roy Hibbs, Bert Waldrep and Ashley Day.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Masonic Lodges of Madison and Greenville
share a heritage that has created a long legacy of irater-
nity and community service, with many of the brothers
being plural members of both lodges. Now, to the enor-

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The Southern Pine


mous fraternal pride of both lodges, a new chapter has
been written into that history with the selection of John
Sirmon as District Deputy Grand Master of the Eighth
Masonic District - which includes Madison Lodge No.
11 E&A.M. and Greenville Lodge No. 28 F&A.M.
Now humbly holding the fraternal title of Right
Worshipful, Sirmon grew up in Greenville, where his fa-
ther, the late Wiley Sirmon, was a dedicated and accom-
plished Mason, and well-respected county educator.
This Masonic heritage was especially exhibited during
Sirmon's visit to the Greenville Lodge on June 9, as at-
tention was drawn to his father's picture on the lodge
wall.
"Your father's smiling at you," it was said, noting
how proud his dad would be, regarding his son's
achievement. All agreed that Sirmon possesses a rare
degree of character and commitment.
Similar affection was shared at the'Madison Lodge
the night before, where he had been raised to Master


Fm-RaneVEou


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2009 Sign-Up Period: July 1st,- Aug 12th


Apply for incentive payments or cost-
share assistance with:

* Thinning * Mechanical underbrush removal

* Prescribed burning a Planting longleaf pine


For guidelines and application materials, contact your
local Florida Division of Forestry office or visit:
i!^^ , i SS


www.fl-dof.com


A message from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division
of Forestry, Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner. Funding supplied by the USDA Forest
Service; an equal opportunity provider.


Mason only a few \vears be.
fore, and where he also
holds plural membership,
although Greenville re-
mains his home lodge. In
fact, Sirmon served 'two
consecutive terms as Wor-
shipful Master in
Greenville prior to being
tapped as District Deputy
Grand Master. . .
To launch his term in
office, and to introduce the
program priorities set by
the. Grand Master of the
State of Florida who he
represents, Sirmon and
his lovely wife, Lynette,
are, touring the district.
Traveling with his com-
mitteemen, the district
deputy will make two offi-
cial visits to each of the
seven lodges that comprise
the-district - Greenville,
Madison, Perry, Day, Mayo,
Shamrock and Joppa - as
well as a number of events
and personal visits,


Volunteers across
Northern Florida are orga-
nizing a T.E.A (Taxed
Enough Already) party to
be held on the 4th of July at
Forest Capital Park in Per-
ry Florida, on U.S. 19, from
10:30 a.m. until noon.
The T.E.A party is a na-
tional movement to protest
the spending of trillions of
dollars "which will leave fu-
ture generations with a
huge debt they must pay"
according to one of the lo-
cal organizers, Jan Hop-
kins: "It's time to let the
voice of-the silent majority
in this country be heard
across the country"
Another organizer,
Bob Root, added "that fin-
controlled spending and the
trend towards bigger gov-
ernment are contrary to
our Constitution and the in-
tent of America's founding
fathers. As Americans, our
elected leaders can do bet-
ter than this."
Nationwide, rallies are
being promoted through


The District Deputy immediately extended this ex-
cellent reputation as he outlined his objectives after din-
ner. He laid out his intention to hold four community
fundraisers to raise funds for the'various Grand Master
charities, and to expand the awareness of masonry in
the community. These scheduled events include a golf
tournament, horseshoe competition, clay pigeon shoot
and a fishing tournament.
I


- -
Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, June 8, 2009
Right Worshipful John Sirmon, right, the newly
appointed District Deputy Grand Master for the
Eighth Masonic District, joins Greenville Lodge No.
28 Worshipful Master Jimmy Sherrod during his offi-
cial visit on June 9.

Sirmon also gave both lodges an entertaining and
informative presentation regarding Alzheimer's disease
and the Masonic Home. The slide-show included a few'
humorous videos, although the message really drove
home the sobering details of just how devastating the ef-
fects of the disease can be. All agreed that is was a very
worthwhile cause to support, especially through dona-
tions to the Johnnie B. Byrd Alzheimer's Center and Re-
search Institute, which was selected as the Grand
Master's official charity
Locally, many also know Sirmon professionally for
his key contribution to running the computer systems
at North Florida Community College, and Lynette,
through her real estate business, All Realty Services.
This reporter joins the Masonic community in congrat-
ulating John Sirmon and extending a warm thanks to
his entire family for their support and generosity.


grassroots organizers and
volunteers, all to be held oft
Independence Day - July
4.,
. The rallies are expect-
ed to occur across the na-
tion. This one is being held
for residents of Jefferson,
Madison, Suwannee,
Lafayette, Dixie, Levy and
Taylor Counties.
For more information
from a national perspective,
visit www.teapartyday.com.
Locally those interest-
ed in participating can visit


www.taylorteaparty.com or
call the organizing commit-
tee at 850-584-4404, 850-584-
4455, or 850-223-1266 X-0028.
Volunteers are welcome to
help organizing efforts by
meeting at Hardee's Restau-
rant in Perry each Monday
at 9:00 a.m.
Local organizer,
Charles Parker, summed tip
the effort best by stating,
"When it comes to actions
by our Government - Si-
lence is Consent - and it's
time to be heard."


TROY'S AUTOMOTIVE
MACHINE SHOP

tPlyD



(' C Troy Swann V
\ �Owner
324 NE Conner St. Day (386) 362-5655
SLive Oak, FL 32060 Night (386) 362-55933


North Florida Plans July 4

"TEA PARTY"


I A T 1 1 T







Wednesday, June 17, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier * 7A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


B8taLtowt


Mwtktt Opnit

By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A new produce stand has recently opened just a
few miles east of town. Beaumont Market is located
exactly three miles east on State Road 6, starting at
the fork on US 90, where the "old Cason place" used
to sit. You can't miss the pole barn with its bright
green tin roof, and brown picket fence with sun-
flowers growing in front of it. - 4
Debe and Patrick Gabriel are new to the busi-
ness, and welcome any suggestions from the com-
munity "We are fortunate to live in this unique area
of north Florida, with so many growers. But unless
we run around to buy or pick the local produce, it's
not been readily available to us. Most of the pro-
duce, here in the Madison area, has been trucked-
in, which means higher, prices and less quality in
freshness,"' says Debe. 'At our market we want to
carry mostly local produce, and to be the liaison be-


Debe Gabriel offers a warm smile and fresh pro-
duce to everyone who drops by the Beaumont Market
on US 6, located only a few miles outside Madison.

tween the community and the local growers," she
added.
"We've recently found some wonderful local
food that couldn't get any fresher or cheaper. There's
Hilda's U Pick Blueberries, (850) 973-8592, located by
Country Kitchen Rd. and liusty Miller Rd.; Madison
Peach Farm is not far from Hilda's. We picked some
delicious peaches last week. Then, there's Tuten's
Farm, (850) 948-4816, located off CR 360, between,
Madison and Greenville. Located off Midway
Church Rd., there's Tanya's U Pick, (850) 971-5362.
Mr. Zail Lawson brought by some beautiful tomatoes
and potatoes. He has cantaloupe and watermelon
available soon, (850) 464-0739. And don't forget about
O'Tooles Herb Farm, (850) 973-3629. These are just a
few of the local growers we found last week. I'm sure
there's many more to discover. We should all support
these folks. We'd be helping, our neighbors and sav-
ing a lot of money, too," she went on to say.
Beaumont Market is open Tuesday through Sat-
urday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. In addition to fresh
fruit and vegetables, fresh cut sunflowers will soon
be available, and hot boiled peanuts ,are cooked
fresh every day If you would like to sell local pro-
duce to the market, please contact the Gabriel's at
(850) 971-5828.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Telesis Equiderma: Striving

To Make A Difference


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
At some time or other, one will finally'find their
niche in life. For Bethany Padgett, she found it while
working at Telesis Animal Rescue, Inc., in Braden-
ton. Through the animal rescue center, she devel-
oped a commitment of doing anything she could for
the betterment of animals, using her knowledge of
research and chemistry, creating medicines for
them. She didn't start
out in a lab, but rather in
the rescue barn, where
she served as president.
'A horse named Sa-
hara was brought to our
horse rescue center and ,
had fallen into badly ne-
glectful hands., The
horse's biggest problem
was her skin. She was
highly allergic to insect
bites and had been kept
in a field near a swamp.
Mosquitoes, deer flies
and gnats had been feast-
ing on her for months,"
Padgett explained. "Sa-
hara was insanely itch-
ing and pain covered -
with raw oozing scabs.
"I was doing every-
thing I could, but with-
out success," she said. Bethany Padgett uses
'After trying everything istry and science to resc
the feed stores and vets for animals.
had to offer without suc-
cess, I decided to take matters into my own hands.
With a lot of research and trial and error, I finally
found the things I needed to help her."
This resulted in the first product being released:
Equiderma Skin Lotion for horses.
With the success of that product, many more fol-
lowed. Word began to spread rapidly about the solu-
tion Padgett produced for the horse. Inquiries began,
followed by requests of the product for their use. As
time progressed, the demand grew stronger. It wasn't
long before Padgett realized she had a business in
the making, a business that could help and support
animal rescue.
Equiderma slowly developed steady business,
while she was still working for animal rescue.


U


"As more animals came in, they were doctored,
and went on to good homes, I became an expert
through experience in what worked and what did
not," Padgett stated. "If I needed a better alternative,
I researched until I found one. Sometimes, when I
couldn't find something existing to fill our needs, it
was necessary to develop my own formulas."
In 1994, with the help of Autumn Blum of Or-
ganix South, Telesis Equiderma's line of products
evolved. The product line
has developed.into a col-
9A election of the best and
most effective products
on the market today. Pad-
gett's products are sold
worldwide, and the com-
pany services approxi-
mately 1,000 clients
regularly.
"Many years later, I
find myself looking at
where the word "rescue"
S ' has taken me. We have a
beautiful animal health
, ' ^ company and are able to
S ,- help more animals in
need," Padgett said.
She went on to say, "I
'.. , 'feel so blessed and thank-
S ful, and am honored to of-
fer this same love with
Photo Submitted every bottle of Equider-
her knowledge of chem- ma products."
Je and provide medicines With a passion for
finding better solutions
for animal care needs,
Padgett is able to offer an experienced realistic per-
spective while always striving for natural solutions.
She has developed a line of earth-friendly natural
products made with only the best human grade, nat-
ural and organic ingredients.
Equiderma is dedicated to providing the best
products for the marketplace, and improving the life
of animals.
Born and raised in Palm Valley, Padgett moved
to Greenville about five years ago, to be with her
mother, Merline Mickler Jobes; sister, Wanda Lang-
ford; and one brother, David Plumber, all who live in
Madison.
Padgett has two grown children, Timbo and
Ryan.


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Tuesday, June 9, from 10-11
p.m., the Madison County Public
Library held its kickoff to the Be
Creative summer program. The
programs are designed to provide,
children of all ages with summer
fun, while encouraging them to.
read and broaden their horizon.
Throughout the summer, the
Madison Library will host short, in-
teractive programs during the day.
Afternoon Adventures on
Monday from , 3-4 p.m. Children
will be amazed and entertained
with adventurous stories.
On Tuesday, Be Creative Fun
will be held from 10-11 a.m. Be Cre-
. ative at the Library provides chil-
dren with exciting events filled


with books, stories, music, pup-
pets, creative dramatics and lots of
other fun activities, plus specials
guests during the event.
Wednesday will be movies at
the Library from 2-3:30 p.m. This
event is open to friends and family.
Please check with the Library on
which movie will be showing.
Thursday will be a busy day
with Preschool Story Time from
10:30-11:30 a.m., and Fun Day from
3-4 p.m. Preschoolers will be daz-
zled with stories, puppets, crafts,
creative dramatics and a variety of.
fun activities.
Come join the fun. Library
cards and programs are free.
Greenville Public Library will
be hosting the same programs on
different days. Fun Days'will be on


Tuesday from 3-4 p.m. Be Creative
Fun is on Wednesday's from 10-11
a.m., Movies at the Library will
take place on Wednesdays from
2-3:30 p.m. On Thursdays from
10-11 a.m. will be Preschool Story
Time and Express Yourself Teens
will meet from 2-3 p.m. Game Days
will be on Fridays from 3-4 p.m.
Lee Library will host Be Cre-
ative Fun on Mondays from 10-11
a.m., and Express Yourself Teens
will meet from- 3-4:30 p.m. Game
Days will be on Wednesdays from
3-4 p.m. Fun Day will be on Fridays
from 3:30-5 p.m.
For more information, please
call the Madison Library at (850)
973-6814, Greenville Library at
(850) 948-2529, and Lee Library at
(850) 971-5665.


NFCC Enrolling Now, For

Summer And Fall Classes

Class schedules available at www.nfcc.edu


North Florida Community College is enrolling
now for summer and fall classes. Class schedules for
both terms are available at.wwwnfcc.edu or from
NFCC Enrollment Services. Register now for Summer
Term B; classes begin June 29. Open registration for
Fall Term 2009 begins July 13; classes start Aug. 24.
The admission and enrollment process at NFCC
is easy Whether you are looking to take one course or
deciding on a college career path, NFCC academic ad-
visors are available to assist with course selection
and career planning. And, NFCC has a variety of pro-
grams and courses to choose from including new fire-
fighter training classes and. a new Business
Operations certificate program with specializations
in Accounting/Budgeting Operations, Management,
Retail Management or Marketing.
For more information and a complete list of avail-
able courses and programs, call (850) 973-1622, stop by


II6XV& jL FOODH OU[T LETlJ
WE[CEP' I , EST, A [M CRPS


WESLIICS.PU.0 35DYSAYA


the NFCC campus located at 325 NW Turner Davis
Drive (off US Hwy 90) in Madison, or visit
www.nfcc.edu. NFCC's summer hours are Monday
through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (open Fridays af-
ter Au1g. 17).


ENROLL NOW

SClass Schedule available at
S* WWW.NFCC.EDU
CALL OR VISIT OUR CAMPUS
850,973.2288
325 NW Turner Davis Dr I Madison, FL

* North Florida
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
. , . SmaffColfge. Bi Possib6itties.


Madison County Library Hosts

Summer Kickoff







8A * Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 17, 2009


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Former Madison Resident

Heading To Law School


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Tommy Lee Thigpen, a native of Madison, is on his
way to law school after recently completing his Bache-
lor of Liberal Studies from Barry University in Talla-
hassee.
Thigpen graduated from Madison County High
School on May 18, 2001, and immediately began work-
ing at Keiser College on
his Associates of Arts de-
gree in Paralegal Studies
with a Legal Studies Spe-
cialization. In December
of 2002, he graduated with .
high honors, having a
GPA of 3.85, and was a
member Phi Theta Kappa
Academic Honor Society
While studying to achieve
the degree, he was em-
ployed at Pelham & Asso-
ciates in Tallahassee,
where he began his career
in the field of law.
. Thigpen returned to
his studies in January of
2003, and started working
on his Bachelor of Liberal
Studies. Due to the birth of
his son, Noah, he took a Tommy Thigpen (left)
break from college for a school in 2010. Thigpen
short period of time. After Noah Thigpen.
resuming classes, he grad- .
uated in December of 2007 with honors (GPA of 3.5).
Law strongly became his passion while taking legal
studies in high school.
"I took a legal studies class taught by Coach Rod
Williams and that's what sparked a desire to learn the
law and become a lawyer," he said. Williams' class is
what inspired him to set his goals to become a lawyer.
"This is the biggest compliment a teacher can have.

SWATKINS


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S Carolyn Williams
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(850) 929-2345
S* crshaw7@yahoo.com
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..............................................eee


I'm glad I could be a source of inspiration to him," stat-
ed Williams. "If you could make an analogy, seeing my
former student go to law school and be successful would
be like a coach seeing a former athlete go to the NFL. It's
awesome. I'm very excited for him."
Thigpen began working for Smith, Hannah and
Parker in Valdosta, Ga. on January 3, 2008, and cur-
rently works while he steadily prepares for the Law
School Admission Test
(LSATo), which he is sched-
uled to take in September.
"He showed me in
fourth grade that he want-
ed to be a lawyer," stated
Retis Flowers, who was
Thigpen's teacher at Madi-
son Primary School. "I re-
member the students
writing an essay about
what they wanted to be,
and he wrote about being
a lawyer," he went on to
say "He was a good stu-
dent. He set his goals and
has stuck with it all these
years, and that's great."
In 2010, Thigpen will
begin the journey of en-
Photo Submitted tering law school. "Pri-
is preparing to enter law marily I'm hoping to
s pictured with his son, attend law school at Flori-
da Coastal School of Law
in Jacksonville, but M~r-
cer in Macon, Ga., and John Marshall School of Law in
Atlanta, Ga., would be alternatives," Thigpen stated.'
"My future goals are to work at a firm that will en-
able me to gain experience in handling cases, which
will ultimately allow me to start my own firm specializ-
ing in family law and personal injury cases."
Thigpen married the former Allison Yeomans on
July 13, 2002, and currently resides in Statenville, Ga.
They have one child, Noah Aaron, who is three years
old. His parents and biggest supporters are Tommy and
Marie Thigpen, who encourage him to keep going
strong. His grandparents are Thomas and Grace Thig-
pen, both of Madison. This reporter is proud to be his
brother.


*Black Buck Antelope


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo, June 8, 2009
Todd Richardson, standing, and. Donnie Bass,
kneeling, train with K-9 BR. The training was done in
downtown Madison this past Monday. Dogs are used
at the prison to sniff out drugs and to help find pris-
oners in case of their escape. The prisoner has also
helped area law enfobrc~'nht authorities find missing
persons.

t-te- TiMes ARe
CH-ANqI NC,

AND So Ape We.

Loc ON To
WWW.TRI.eENEPLIwSH+iNcj.COM
Fop. Thw LAT-ST 4LtPAT--eS ON
Youi0 LocAL News, WeAThn-,
SPOR.TS ANI >ve-myr T HN
IN PeSTWeEN.


FISHinG FOR A


Why Not Subscribe To The
Madison County Carrier and Enterprise-Recorder!
It's only $30 a year and such a great deal!

That's 2 newspapers a week

for a whole year,

saving you over



40% Off
the news stand price.

Call us at (850) 973-4141 or
Write to:

P.O. Box 772

Madison, FL 32341


}i








Wednesday, June 17, .2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier * 9A


HEALTH & NUTRITION


Tobacco RegulI
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Regulating the tobacco industry is actually a re-
cent concept, and although smoking has a long h is-
tory of addiction, disease and deaths, government
efforts to control it have come relatively recently. To-
bacco began spreading around the worldafter
Christopher Columbus first encountered Native
Americans, who smoked and chewed the leaf. Not
'until the 20th century, though, did cigarettes become
the main form of tobacco consumption - and the
most lethal legal product on the market.
Their popularity grew rapidly in this country
after giveaways to American soldiers in World Wars
I and 1, and the introduction of sophisticated mar-
keting campaigns. In the early 1950s, the medical re-
. searcher Dr. Ernst L. Wynder published landmark
studies linking smoking to lung cancer and showing
that tars from tobacco smoke could cause skin can-
cer when brushed on mice.
Steps on the path to federal regulation include
the first surgeon general's report on smoking, in
1964. Congress banned smoking on most airplane
flights starting in 1988.
In 1994, the chief executives of the nation's sev-
en largest tobacco companies appeared at a House
hearing overseen by Henry A. Waxman, Democrat
of California, and swore under oath that tobacco
was not addictive and did not cause cancer. The six-
hour hearing, carried live on national television,
was considered a turning point in public perception
of the tobacco industry.
"We had hearings on tobacco for decades," Wax-
man, chief sponsor of the House version of the to-


bac-
co legisla-
tion, said in an
interview Wednesday. W
"But it was not until 1994, after 4-
tobacco executives testified and lied.
to us, saying cigarettes weren't harmful, Cm
nicotine wasn't addictive, they didn't manipulate
the nicotine and of course they didn't target kids -
it wasn't until then that that we started getting the
inside information from tobacco companies and
found the opposite was true.:
In 1998, seven tobacco companies agreed to a
"master settlement agreement" with 46 states to re-
solve suits for $206 billion and to change marketing
practices, including those appealing to youth. But
subsequently, cigarette companies nearly' doubled
their, marketing expenditures, peaking at $15.1 bil-
lion in 2003, and increased advertising in stores.
Last month, the federal appeal court in Wash-
ington upheld a landmark racketeering verdict
against five major tobacco companies in a lawsuit
filed in 1999 by the Department of Justice. The ap-
peals court, saying consumer fraud continues to
this day, ordered the companies to publish "correc-
tive statements" about health risks.
The FDA has previously tried on its own to reg-
ulate tobacco, most recently in 1996 when it asserted
that cigarettes were medical devices and nicotine a
drug. Philip Morris and other tobacco companies
sued, and the Supreme Court ruled by a 5-4 vote that


Tobacco Warriors Join Forces

"'Tobacco is the only legal product that hills one-third of
its users when used as directed" (CDC, 1996)


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
For most smokers,
the reasons for quitting
are obvious, but the de-
sire to smoke is simply
too strong. Unfortunate-
ly, this leaves many stuck
in a tug-o-war between
what they should do and
what they can do. After a
few mind games, the user
is saying things like, "OQh
well, you're going to die
of something," as though
the horrible ravages of
tobacco related disease


were a fate that couldn't
be avoided.
Preston Mathews
would disagree. He un-
derstands, but he would
disagree, because he
knows the score, and has
a. game plan for everyone
who is ready to make a
small commitment of
time - a pain-free, cost-
free commitment of time.
. As,the Smoking Ces-
safion Specialist with
Big Bend Area Health
Education Center (Big
Bend AHEC), Mathews


has many. who
reached the -critic
year tobacco free

Tobacco Fri
:6 Florida

stone. The result
nothing short of
ing for the client
their families.
The good rii-st
ter. The Quit Smi
Now! class that Ma
offers is now offe


al


re


ts
a1
it
-ot
ioh
ati
re(


have Wednesday evenings in
one- partnership with, the
nile- Madison County Health
Department, where To-
bacco Prevention Spe-
e cialist Doug Freer is
Already busy with local
programs, several of
which target youth pre-
are vention and second hand
maz- smoke awareness.
and ."The Quit Smoking
.Now! program 'was.,de-
bet. veloped by ex-smokers
king for those who want to be-
hews come ex-smokers. The
d on class will meet weekly
for six weeks, starting
Wednesday, June 17, at 6
p.m., in the Health De-
partment Conference
Room. As always, there is
no cost to attend," Math-
ews explained.
,For more informa-
tion or to enroll, phone
Preston Mathews at (850)
728-5479, or email him at
pmathews@bigbendahec
.org.


' the FDA
0000lacked spe-
cific Con-
gressional
authority. Since
then, the Senate and
House have each voted to give
the FDA that authority, but in differ-
ent years. And President Bush had threat-
ened to veto anti-tobacco legislation. But President
Obama, who himself has admitted difficulty quit-
ting smoking, has promised to sign it into law.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greene
publishing. com.


Question:
Does bleaching harm my teeth?

Answer: No you can't use household
bleach! I have seen patients that tried
laundry bleach and it is not pretty. Dental
Bleaching has been researched
extensively and has been found to be safe
when supervised by a dentist. The
October 2007 issue of Operative Dentistry
reports one more study which concluded
that 15% carbamide peroxide does not
cause long term harm to dental enamel
when used for bleaching over a 14 day
regimen. The main problems we see with
bleaching are sensitivity and burns to the
gums. Good fitting bleaching trays made
in a dental office are essential to maximize
the whitening and minimize the risk of the
caustic bleach burning the gums.
Temporary tooth sensitivity can be treated
iri'the dental office or will go away on its
own by discontinuing bleaching for a few
days.


Roderick K Shaw III, DMD, MAGD
Master of the Academy of General Dentistry
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmait.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of Dentistry.


;SITTER



,L June 19, July 9,

l July 17 OR July 31


Parents, would your babysitter know what to do if your child began to
choke?,Safe Sitter classes have helped thousands of adolescents
across the country learn basic lifesaving and safety techniques.
Register Now for Safe Sitter! South Georgia Medical Center is offering
this ONE DAYSafe Sitter course for boys and girls ages 17 to 13.

SAFE SITTERS learn:
* How to entertain children and keep them safe SAFE
* Basic child care skills (diapering, feeding, etc.)
* What to do when a child chokes
* Safety for the sitter +
* How to call for emergency helpS G M
* Babysitting business skills Medicine is our life. sgmc.org

Classes are $25 per child. To enroll your sitter or your own son or
daughter, call 229-333-1610, ext. 5.
The Safe Sitter program may save someone you love!


ies New Teeth To The FDA


FI rrida dMdC

It's one less worry for parents)

















Is Your Child Covered?
Florida KidCare is affordable health insurance
for newborns through age 18.

To ensure a brighter future for your child,
apply online at
www.floridakidcare.org or
call toll-free 1-888-540-5437.



Need access to a computer to apply?
Need assistance with the application process?




Visit Genethel McQuay
Eligibility Specialist at the Madison County Health Department
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
(850) 973-5000, ext. 101


% ZA ITl








10A * Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com




FUN PAGE


Wednesday, June 17, 2009


ACROSS
1. Lying, maybe
5. Junk E-mail
9. Strong woody
fibers obtained
from the phloem of
various plants
14. Checker, perhaps
15. Easter flower
16. Depth charge
target.
17. "-zoic" things
18. Something
expected
20. Game keeper?
22. Auction offering
23. White
24. Large, densely
populated urban
areas
28. Describe
29. "The Joy Luck
Club" author
30. Auspices
34. "A jealous
mistress":
Emerson
35. Beam
37. European capital
39. -Ethical or moral
codes that apply
more strictly to
one group than to
another
42. Golden


43. The "A" of ABM
44. Criticize, slangily
45. Coaster
46. "Walking on Thin
Ice" singer
47. Assayers' stuff
49. Magical spells
54. _ Today
57. A hand
58. Volcanic island in
the Tyrrhenian
Sea at the north
end of the Bay of
Naples
59. Bin for rubbish
63. Honky-_
64. Smallest
detectable
sensation
65. Chill
66. Fungal spore sacs
67. Short poems
descriptive of
rural or pastoral
life
68. Baltic capital
69. " go!"
DOWN
1. Elite military unit
2. Roll in which the
plane follows a
spiral course
3. Quality of being
exact


Render harmless
"The sweetest gift
of heaven": Virgil
Snaps
Matterhorn, e.g.
White fatty
substance attached
to a computer in
order for it to use
protected software
Montana city
. "The _ Daba
Honeymoon"
. Princes, e.g.
Bell
. Charon's river
. Comedian Bill,
informally
. Electronic device
that must be
attached to a
computer in order
for it to use
protected
software
. "Miss_
Regrets" .
. Flowering shrub
. "Buona "
(Italian greeting)
. Used to watering
a lawn
. Not clearly
defined
. Back talk


34. Bothers
36. - judicata
37. Atlanta-based
station
38. Expressions
whose meanings
cannot be inferred
from the -
meanings of the
words that make
them up
40. Dwell
41. Any day now
46. "My!"
48. Of or involving
the rectum
50. Leavened breads
baked in a clay
oven in India
51. Butt
52. Skin problem
53. Small arboreal
monkeys of
tropical South
America
54. fruit
55. Aforementioned
56. brat
60. _ canto
61. Computer
Generated
Imagery
62. Calendar abbr.


2 96

4 2

7 8 4

7 2 3 4 9

9 5 8 1 7

8 7 9 " 6 2

s 5 9 2

5 8

6 3 8


Amaui
Anhinga
Argus
Auk
Bali Myna
Batis
Black Baza
Chukar
Comet
Cormorant


Crow
Emu
Guan
Heron
Huia
Ibisbill
Jacamar
Jay
Kagu
SKea


Kioea
Kiwi
Koel
Lark
Little Stint
Loon
*Lory
Murre
Nene
Omao


Ou
Owl
Parrot
Pitta
Ptarmigan
Rail
Rhea
Ruby
Shikra
Skua


Smew
Spotted
Forktail
Swan
Teal
Tit
Tui
Tyrant
Wren


Ewing Construction

ROOFING
New Horn-., Addt ans Sur Floomn Screen Roome
Ca pris: Deck M85 -915 S ingi oo t
Srsip Certirwea SuJiding Confrarfor or-d RO' Fdg CorFUO,.Jf

BEN EWING 850-971-5043


LAOSt~e Cowd/



tep x I .
D coryY


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Business here!

Call 973-4141


m r s
Full Ser ice liierne Provider * Computer Repair
Wide Area Ne,\working
(850) 973-8855
883 Hwvy.90 West' Madison. FL
bcrncen Piz.,i Hut & Brenda',i Si\l


Burnette
Plumbing & Well Service
Drilling & Repairs
Iliinil ng In pair. I'* I ' liriI l atIlJ
Autr A \\. lr ( iinciwo lul .' ti Ih.IIt r R dt'r H.ir
\tll- Drildi I u'-iiUpS HRpt.i t
alkl, Hli llJ.l[,111 Alll , I)dll
Carlton Burnette I WV, sih\ ' .
850-973-1404 "'"n "
"7 -. - ' tl '*


T L K B P I T T A K G K OE L
U I I B A L I M Y N A T L I P
I TW SUTM B AGN FAAA
CT I M Z E I U I A K T R U N
J L E ERAG SR SK AKAW
A E S W H LT OX R B SGO I
C SWR ENM POA E I R U B
A TA YAR J F AMMC L V L
MI NRO N DAQRAA D L A
A NY C Y EG JAY RU I C
R T L R TN T T N K.UO U I K
NW.O T I E P O"1 I B H T L B
0 L OH M-F RHAO Y B I U A
I P N OO E S EK ER A U K Z
SA C C H UK A RAR GU SA


5 8 1
9 1
Z 6
t ,L

s c
6 5


IL 9 .Z


S6C
Z L 9
9 1
6 Z V


Fort Madison

Storage
Located on Hwy. 53 South
Sizes: 5x10'* 10x10'* 10x20'
-- For More Information --
Call 973-4004 or 973-4141
and ask for Latrelle







Madison County Carrier * 11A


www.greenepublishing.com


BRIDAL GUIDE


EXPfNSES:


WIO PAYS WMAT?


Today, the 'groom and his family often offer to
share some of the wedding expenses that tradition-
ally have been paid by the bride's family This is a
significant change of custom, as the costs of tradi-
tional weddings have become too prohibitive for
many families to absorb. However, if the groom's
family does not offer to share expenses, the bride's
family should plan a wedding in accordance with
their means.
The traditional division of expenses is listed be-
low. In addition to the change noted above, it should
be kept in mind that there are numerous exceptions
and variations depending on religion, ethnic, or lo-
cal custom. Many items may be omitted without di-
minishing the ceremony in any way.


Wedding ring for groom
Wedding gift for groom
Gifts for attendants
Lodging for. out-of-town attendants


Bridal consultant, if needed
Invitations and announcements
Flowers for the church and receptions


p h- o ,t o g r p h y

2475 Ay>>a.'ici'Pky
. T. -athassee, TL 32301
* (850) 877-4259

SCall or visit our website
www.luedunsjh,,rce,,rt.nr


Bouquets for the bridesmaids
Bouquet for bride (sometimes given by groom)
Music for the ceremony, including organist or choir
fee
Transportation of bridal party to church or syna-
gogue and reception
Sexton's fee (church fee)
Reception dinner
Music at reception


Wedding ring for bride
Wedding gift for bride
Gifts for groom's attendants
Marriage license
Bride's bouquet, mothers' corsages and bouton-
nieres for men in wedding party
Lodging for out-of-town best man and ushers
Blood test
Clergyman's fee
Honeymoon expenses


Traveling expenses and lodging, if applicable
Reception beverages (any alcohol, 'soda, ice, -bar
help, etc.)


Reception hors d'ourves
Gift for bride and groom
Optional: rehearsal dinner or
they wish to assume


any other expense


Dress and accessories
Transportation to and from town of wedding
Gift to the couple and contribution to a gift from all
bridesmaids to the bride


Transportation to and from town of wedding
Rental of wedding attire
Gift to the couple and contribution to a gift from all
ushers to the groom
Bachelor dinner (optional, and often given by
groom)


Transportation and accommodations
Gift to the couple.


Tate of th Town/


Interested in trying some delicious local flavor?
These restaurants are only minutes away and ready to delight
your palate with offerings from some of the best kitchens around. .
Experience "home" cooking as the name implies,
as these great eateries literally are part of your home;
the North Florida and South Georgia area.


O NEAL S
COUNTRY BUFFET
No Oen7- Das A Wek


3008James Rd. * Valdosta, GA
229-247-8362
(1-75 exit 18, next to Sleep Ion).
Seafood


Steaks, Chicken & Burgers
Vegetarian Items
Daily Specials
Full Bar With.Tropical Orinks
Healthy Kids Menu ,'
Covered Patio Overlooling .
Kids Play Area


Watch Your Favorite SportingqEvent

Open 7 Days A Week
Lunch & Dinner
www.st o ume-all' staxcm



l0e Times Countr Buffet


Hand Cut Top Sirilin Steaks On Buffel Nightly!
Banquet Fadlities Available

S (229) 253-1600
11 q N. St. Aumultine Riiad.'ldosia, GA
Likcc Ci' Mall. Hv 90. in Lake CA v. FL
Ma.sle' hr.LI' A .iAmenoan Expiess,'DtcoM r


Lisa's
Bartenders, LLC


Call 850-321-7398
Email: lisasbartenders@yahoo.com
www.LisasBartenders.com


Wednesday, June 17, 2009


^








12A * Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 17, 2009


MONEY & FINANCE


Obama's Federal Budget For 2010 Explained In Plain English, Part 1


The US Federal Budget for 2010 was released in
February Overall, roughly half of spending goes to the
US Department of Defense with the remaining money
divided among 22 other departments (DOD money in-
cludes most of available discretionary spending). Few
have read the 140-page document summarized below.
Please note that Departments, like Agricul-
ture, show great detail, while other departments,'like
that of State, use broad language and provide few clues
into what programs will actually receive the billions.
And, the National Intelligence Agency has no details
about either total budget or allocation.
The 2009 Federal Budget - money currently being
spent - was established by President George Bush,
which is the first figure shown after the department
names below. The Recovery Act money is the shown,
and added to'those dollars to show current expendi-
tures. In the 2009 budget as well, over 40 percent of the
budget is with the Department of Defense. When the.
funds from the Recovery Act are added in, the Depart-
ment of Education budget grows significantly in a
stated effort to improve public schools and increase ac-
cess to higher education. The 'Department of Trans-
portation also saw a great deal of money for programs
to improve air traffic control and create an efficient
and green fast interstate rail system.
Summaries by department follow:
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
$46.7 Billion + $81.1 Billion .
From Recovery Act
Obama's commitment to bettering the US Educa-
tional system can be seen through the $81.1 billion he
dedicates to education. in the Recovery Act as well as.
$46.7 billion in the 2010 federal budget.' He has stated.
that he wants to strengthen public schools, reward ef-
fective teaching and expand opportunities for higher
education.
DOE Budget Highlights
Innovative Solutions
* Expand access to high quality early childhood edu-
cation - no monetary value given



Don't Let Your Investments

* � * ,
Provided by TaBrad BVacation
Provided by Brad Basha,. Edward Jones


Summer is almost here. And for many people,
summer-is synonymous,with "vacation." If you have.
children or grandchildren, they're, most- likely on
Vacation from school, 'and if you've got the time and
motivation, you may take a family vacation over the
next few. months. But there's one part of your life
that should never go on vacation - and that's your
investment portfolio.

How can you keep your investments working
for you in all seasons? Here are a few suggestions
to consider:

* Don't stop investing. If you want your invest-
ment dollars to continue working, you can't pull
them out of the "work force." Unfortunately, many
people.try to do just that by jumping.out of the finan-
cial markets when they're- slumping. By doing so,
these investors reason*,they can'avbid taking heavy
losses' while they bide their time until the.market
recovers. But if you make a habit out of trying to
avoid th.e.market's bad days, you may end up miss-
ing some of its good ones. No one can predict when
a bull market will begin, so if you're out of the mar-
ket when it starts, your "vacation" from investing
could prove expensive. "
* Don't rely too much on "lazy" investments.
Some investments, by their nature, are going to
work harder to help you- achieve your long-term
goals. To be; precise, stocks and stock-based
accounts have the potential to help provide the
growth, you need, though of course the value of
these securities can constantly fluctuate.
Conversely, "lazy" securities such as certificates of
deposit may produce returns that barely keep up
with inflation. That's not to say there's no place for.
these types of.investments in'your portfolio - after
all, they provide both current income and a high
degree of preservation of principal - but you sim-
ply can't rely on them to offer the long-term returns
that' can help you retire comfortably or attain other
objectives.
* Don't let your portfolio drift. If you buy a few
investments here and there, without rhyme or rea-
son, your portfolio may never work as hard for you
as it should. And that's why you need to develop a
solid, .cohesive, long-term investment strategy -
one that accommodates your. risk tolerance, time
horizon and specific goals. Once you've established
such a strategy, you can use it to determine the
right investment mix for your portfolio. Over time,
you may need. to adjust that. mix in response to
changes in the financial world and your.own life, but
overall it should stay true to your strategy.

As you go through life, you'll find it important to
take a vacation now and then, to escape from the
pressures of work and to enjoy extratime with fam-
ily and friends. But there's no reason to ever give
your investments a day off - so do what you can to
keep them gainfully employed.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


Edwardjones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631 * Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 * Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204
Toll Free 866-973-8334.,
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


* Funds education research - no monetary value giv-
en
* Increase funding for charter schools - no monetary
value given'
College Access and Completion
* Access and Completion Incentive Fund, which sup-
ports state efforts that help low-income students fin-
ish college - $2.5 billion over 5 years
* Increase maximum Pell Awards - $5,500 as new
maximum
* American Opportunity Tax Credit made permanent
- $2500 per credit
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
$663.7 Billion + $7.4 Billion
From the Recovery Act
The Department of Defense receives the lion's
share of the Federal Budget to be used both internally
and externally $533.7 billion is requested for specific
programs with another $50-100 billion earmarked
should the Department of Defense need it. The budget
will cover the draw down of US troops from Iraq, the
aid of struggling states like Pakistan and the funding
of programs that help to monitor cyber, biological and
nuclear threats. Overall, a large amount of funds are
not detailed
DOD Major Budget Allocations
Military Operations'
* Military Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan - $130
billion
* Money that currently has no allocation but is bud-
geted should the Department of Defense need it -
$50 billion
Soldiers
* Pay for service members that will keep pace with or
exceed private sector jobs - exact amount not pro-
vided.
* Expansion of military retired pay and Veterans Dis-
ability Compensation to all retirees receiving dis-
ability retired pay - exact amount not provided
* Expansion on integrated mental health profession-
als with deployed unites - amount not provided
* Improved medical care and housing for Wounded, Ill
and Injured Service members - amount not provid-
ed
* Quality of life improvements for American Soldiers,
Sailors, Airmen and Marines include moderniza-
tion of barracks - amount not provided
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
$72.5 billion + $48.1 billion
From the Recovery Act
The Department of Transportation is to use their
budget to improve safety and reduce congestion as
well as provide a financially viable system for the gov-
ernment. These improvements should also lead to-new
jobs for Americans. The money under the authority of
the DOT increases from $17 billion to $70 billion. Over-
all, very few details are given as to why and exactly,
where the money is going.
DOT Major Expenditures
Modernize Traffic Control
* Improve rural access to the aviation system as de-
mand for subsidized commercial airspace increases
-$55 million
* Improve the efficiency safety and capacity of air
traffic control through the Next Generation Air
Transportation - $800 million
* Supports moving from ground-based radar surveil-
lance to satellite surveillance - no amount provided
High-Speed Rail Networks
* Creation of a high speed rail network as an environ-
mentally friendly alternative to flying or driving -
$5billion over 5 years
DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
$76.8 Billion + $22.44 Billion
From the Recovery Act
Most agree that the US health care system must be
dramatically improved. Obama's 2010 budget attempts
to lay the groundwork for a full scale American health
care reform. Major points in his plan are: aligning in-
centives towards quality health care, promoting effi-
ciency and accountability, encouraging. shared
responsibility Obama also sets up a $630 billion 10-
year reserve fund to help finance the reform. Interest-
ing provisions include several billion dollars to
improve Alaskan Natives health care.


Highlights from
the Department of'
Health and Human
Services Budget
More Effective Health
Care
C Increase health care
providers in certain ar-
eas - $330 million,
* Increase resources to
detect, prevents and
treat' HIV/AIDs domes-
tically -, no monetary
value stated
Funding for Research
* Support and e eventually
double cancer research
within the National In-
stitutes of Health (NIH)
- $6 billion
* Increase funding for re-
search into cause and
treatments for Autism
Spectrum Disorders -
$211 million
Support for Families and
Youth
* Additional funds for,
the President's Zero to
Five Plan, which pro-
vides health care to
children in need - $1.1
billion
SExpand the Head Start
program - $1 billion
* Expand the Child Care
and Development Block
Grant - $2 billion


FAR

BUREA


, Help low-income families heat and cool their homes
- $3.2 billion
Additional Provisions
* Improvement of Native American and Alaskan Na-
tives healthcare - $4 billion
* Improve access to and quality of health care in rur-
al areas - $73 million
DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
$26.3 Billion + $38.7 Billion
From the Recovery Act
Although Obama's $26.3 billion budget allocation
to the Department of Energy is far less than the $33.9
billion projected to be spent in 2009 it is still $2 billion
over the prior three years. A percentage of the budget
goes to the promotion of a clean energy agenda and
the advancement of Carbon Capture Storage technolo-
gy The plan also focuses on improving the safety and
disposal of nuclear energy
Highlights of Department of Energy Plan
New Energy Infrastructure
* Provide additional funding to the Office of Electric-
ity Delivery and Energy Reliability, which received
$11 billion form the Recovery Act - no monetary val-
ue given for 2010 budget
Clean Air Technology
* Supports loan guarantees for renewable energy pro-
jects and carbon capture store projects. - no mone-
tary value given
* Along with $3.4 billion from the Recovery Act the
2010 budget supports the advancement of low-car-
bon coal technologies - no monetary value given
Increased Nuclear Security
* Supports efforts to secure and dispose of nuclear
material - no monetary value given
* Supports efforts that will deter nuclear smuggling -
no monetary value given
DEPT. OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEV.
. $47.5 Billion + $13.6 Billion
From the Recovery Act
The Department of Housing and Urban Develop-
ment has a lot of ground to cove- with its $47.5 billion
budget. Key goals for the money include creating sus-
tainable communities, combating mortgage fraud and
predatory lending and fully funding the Community
Development Block Grant program. The budget also
provides initial funding for the Affordable Housing
Trust Fund.
Budget Highlights for HUDi)
Safe and Affordable Housing
* Through the Affordable Housing Trust Fund, the
Obama budget tackles development, rehabilitation
and preservation of affordable housing for very low-
income residents - $1 billion
* Increase government funding for rental assistance -
no monetary value given
* Combat mortgage fraud - no monetary value given
* Help communities to invest in anid expand economic
opportunities for low-income families - $4.5billion
DEPARTMENT OF VETERAN AFFAIRS
$55.9 Billion + $1.4 Billion
From the Recovery Act
Over the next five years, Obama plans on increas-
ing funding for the Department of Veterans Affairs by
$25 billion. Unfortunately the budget does not focus on
the exact details of where this $25 billion will go. The
budget focuses on increasing high-quality health care
for veterans, the developments of Centers of Excel-
lence and increased access to mental and cognitive
health care. It also provides for a pilot program with
non-profit organization. to help veterans avoid home-
lessness.
Major Department of Veterans Budget
Highlights
Increased Funding and Benefit Expansion
* General expansion of services and.budget increases
- $25 billion increase over 5 years
* Restoration on health care eligibility for modest in-
come veterans - no amount provided
* Enhanced outreach and services related to mental
health and cognitive injuries for veterans - no
amount.provided
* Supports quick implementation of comprehensive
education benefits - no amount provided
* Supports effective implementation of post-9/11 GI
Bill- no amount provided


Serving Madison,

Jefferson, Taylor &

Lafayette Counties


Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King - Agent Glen King Agent

233 W. Base St.* Madison * (850) 973-4071


Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St. * Monticello * (850) 997-2213


Freddy Pitts * Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. * Perry * (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County * Mayo, FL * (386) 294-1399


=*







Wednesday, June 17, 2009


SFamily Dining
For A Tasty Experience!
Join us for this Special Holiday Sunday Brunch,
where Fathers are treated like Kings.
Lunch Thurs - Sat 11:00am - 2:30pmr
Dinner Thurs - Sat 5:30pm - 9:30pm
Express To Go Drive Thru
To Go Orders & Catering Always Available
850-973-6405
y/ 379 West Base St. e Madison, FL 32340


www.greenepublishing.com


Fish Day
Now Is The Time For Stocking
*4-6" & 6-8"Channel Catfish
*Largemouth Bass *Black Crappie (If Avail.)
*Bluegill (Coppernose & Hybrid) *Redear
*8-11" White Amur Grass Carp *Fathead Minnows
We will service you at:

Farmers Co-op of Madison, FL.
Tues., June 23 - From: 4-5 p.m.
To Pre-Order, Call:
Arkansas Pondstockers 1-800-843-4748
Walk Ups Welcome


Jimmy Lyons
Lake City, Florida
jlyons57@gmail.com


DO.iL &CooCet: Tr440L L4A t A Go-Lo V,4n 5144
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Bible says to train a child in the way that he go
should go, and when he is old, he will not depart
from it. That is exactly the command David Cooper
lives by, striving to be the example his son Justin
David Cooper can follow.
Justin was born on Aug. 22, 2005, and is three -
years old. Justin is a bright young man who comes P - -
from a country-raised family He has a deep passion
for tractors, and can name the many different types -.-
of tractors and farming equipment.
"The day Justin was born was a life-changing
experience for me," stated David: "I knew at that mo-
ment I had something to look forward to the rest of
.my life. Raising my child has been one of my most joyous experiences."
David spends every Sunday in church with his son, Justin, at Bible Deliverance Church in Madison, be-
ing the example that his son can follow, and training his child in the way that he should go. "I'm proud every
time I hear Justin singing gospel songs at the age of three," beamed David.

J4oh4yk &arrC A Proo Pa0ra
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Kodak moment a "
Usually happens once in
a lifetime, but, for John-
S. ny Carroll, that Kodak
moment can be captured
every Sunday morning,
when he is joined by his
She-. sad family, at Sirmans Bap-
tist Church in
Greenville, to worship
God with his wife, Jean,
and his two grown
daughters, Kelly and Tracy and their families.
"Being with all my children and family in church and worshipping the Lord
are my most treasured moments. All of my children are saved, and I thank God
for that," stated Carroll.
"Kelly and Tracy make me most proud by the way they handle themselves.
They are real responsible; they've never been in trouble. They're great chil-
dren," he stated excitingly. He went on to say, "I'm proud of their accomplish- -
ments. They both set out to help people, and they do that through their work.
They both have humble and loving hearts, and that makes me most proud."
Kelly is married to Dwayne O'Quinn, and Tracy is married to Ritchie Kelly



Over the years
JUNE. 021,As we grow old,
We remember our
SAT. son Bo9-5 &aN. 1 father
So brave and bold.
In the garden,
Leaning on the plow.
He would listen to

(On eMetiglace)I see himnow.
BU -" EL TR E He would give advice
And understand;
563- 27- 176He was always there
To lend a hand.
God made fathers but some th
TMStrong and firm. Give D
For he knew our lives
Would have great
concerns.

So he gave us fathers
To teach us to pray,
NORTH AMERICA And guide our lives,
And show us the way. G IR
Madison Bottling Plant .
So, on his day Diamond
Happy Father's Day Let's take the time
" To say "Thanks. dad. 229.242.8546
and Best W ishes mgladyou're 229.22.8546
to all Fathers !!!


-Mary Frances Bogle


Madison County Carrier * 13A





1386.719.0421 I


,27-. ' - 1 ,



--- -- 1812 Thomasville Rd.
-- ' I - Tallahassee. FL 32301
:, 850.671.2030









14A * Madison County Carrier


www.preenenublishine.com


Wednesday, June 17, 2009


DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 3240
ANYTHING LEFT OVER 7 DAYS
WILL BE SOLD
FOR SALE
Boat Motor inboard/outboard
4 cylinder complete

MISCELLANEOUS
Boat parts for sale
rtn, n/c
SS Painting
Contractor &
Pressure Cleaning
Services
(850) 673-7754
Sandy Sanderson (Owner)
Free Estimates
Over 35 Years Experience
4/28 -7/3, px
I BUILD SHEDS & DECKS
Call Bob
850-242-9342
Now selling steel
buildings, garages,
barns and carports
6/10, rmn, cc


^arkeys,


urkeys,
owl.
rtn, n/c
L


Wanted: Chickens, ti
guineas and peafc
850-464-1165

BAND SAWMIL
CALL 850-973-4004.,
ANSWER,,PLEASE L
NAME, TELEPHONE N
AND INFO ABOUT TH


Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 - 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-nn, n/c

Male Donkey. 3 yrs old.
$225. 850-464-1600
rtn, n/c
An amish model wagon
$65.00, Golf Balls.50 - .75
cents each, Antique Spool
Bed $125.00; Upright like
new Hoover vacuum cleaner
$40.00, Fire Place Screen &
GIf~s~bS6 $0.00, Cabinet
Dwemomety-sizes-make
offer, Ladder Type Anttena
20' plus-make offer
850-973-8548
5/27 rm ne
Dryer, Microwave, (2) Twin
Beds complete with head-
boards, sheets and com-
forters and other misc items
good condition, negotabije
850-929-2070 or
S850-464-3027
6/17, 6/24, c



Queen Mattress Set
Pillow-Top, new in plastic
with warranty, delivery avail-
able 850-222-9876
6/17, c

New
2 piece full or twin mat-
tress set in. sealed plas-
tic $129 each set Can
deliver 850-545-7112
6/17,c
New Leather
Sofa, Loveseat.& Chair set,
espresso, solid oak founda-
tion, n.w still in crates, can
deliver $1100 for set
.6/17,c

Bedroom Set
6 piece set,'all new. Sac-
rifice $550, delivery is'
possible 850-5457112
S ' 6/17,c

Solid Wood
Sleigh Bed, new in box
$249 850-545-7112
6/17,c








1997 Ford F-150 4x4
3 inch lift, dual exhaust all
power $4500 FIRM
850-210-2949/ 850-997-5293
5/20, rtn, nc

1987 Ford Bronco for sale.
Super hot engine! 58k
original miles. Auto trans.
Differential doesn't leak.
Only rolled over once but
never "mud bogged." Upper
body has no glass but engine
and running gear awesome!
Now painted camo $500.
850-464-1165
nn, n/c

87 White Dodge Dakota
5 speed, runs great $600 or
best offer
850-464-0362
6/17, pd


AKC ENGLISH BULL-
DOGS (2)
For adoption, if interested
please contact me at
Allenlescott@gmail.com
6/10, 6/17, 6/24, pd



Mobile Home in Lee
Weekly rentals available
now! Furnished and unfur-
nished, utilities included.
850-973-4606 /
850-973-9564
6/10,6/17, 6/24, c
House for Rent
in Greenville, FL
(near elementary school).
All Electric, Newly remod-
eled 3 bedrooms, 1 bath
$575/mo. 1st & security de-'
posit. Housing Choice
Vouchers Accepted
Call 617-922-9984 or
617-437-1905

For Rent:
Doublewide Mobile'
Home
. 3 BR, 2 Bath,
great room with fireplace,
large grilling deck,
off Hwy 6 near Blue
Springs, Lee School Dis-
trict no pets, 1 year lease,
references required.
$600 month /
$600 security deposit.
Call 423-538-1206
or 423-845-0590
- /13 - tin, c


IF NO Apartments
EAVE 2 & 3 Bedroomstarting .at
UMBER $495.00; Close to North
E MILL Florida Community Col-
a n. n/c lege. Call Mike at Accredit-
' ed Real Estate Services' -
S(386) 288-3596
4/28 - rin, c


Clean as new. Two story, 3
BR, 2.3 baths, formal LR &
DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. New
Kitchen, Range, Ref, D/W,
G/D. Oak Floor downstairs,
Heart Pine upstairs. 2 Central
H&A. Yard maint. included.
ADULT FAMILY. No pets.
$900 rent and deposit. Good
credit req. 205 NE Shelby Ave.
Madison. Call George 973-
' 8583 or 557-0994.
5/5 - n8- , c
House For Rent
4 BD/1BA
388 Church AMe. Call Mrs%
Waslungton at 850-948-2540,
6/17, - 6/24, cc
Madison Heights
Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts..
Section 8 Housing designed
for low.jncome families
1'50 SW Burngardner Dr.
S Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833
ext. 485.
Equal Housing
SOpportunity
*tn, c


Q~utherni 11as6of

Clodison (partments'


Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing.
Opportunity
rtn,

Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435..).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786-
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer


QUAL. HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
rtn,cc


1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
in,
Downtown IBR/1BA apartment.
Newly renovated. $450 per mth.
Call 567-1523
rtn, cc


CLEAN 3 BR, CH & CA,
new R & Refg, Oak floors.
ADULT FAMILY ONLY.
Rent $685 .plus deposit.
No pets. Good credit req..
432 NE Horry Ave., Madison.
Call George 973-8583
or 557-0994.
rtin,.c
House for Rent
2 BR, 2 Bath
NO PETS
$375 month/ $250 securi-
ty deposit ,
Located in Lee
850-971-5809
6/17, c


U


"1st time home buyers"
We have several programs to
help 1st time home buyers
plus GOUT assistance up to
$8,000 $$$
Call Eric for details
(386) 719-5560

- 6/3,6/10,6/17,6/24,7/1,

"Brand New""'
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 to many
upgrades to list, all this
for only $42,843.00 Call
Eric to set up appoint-
ment (386) 719-5560
* 6/3,6/10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/1, c
"WOW"
$150.00 and your property
puts you in a home today
call Eric at
(386) 719-5560
6/3, 6,10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/1, c
Trade in's & Repos Available
Call Eric for a list of our
homes available at discount-
ed prices, many to choose
from!
(386) 719-5560
6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/1, c
New Manufactured Homes
Starting at $23.70 sq. ft.
Guaranted lowest prices in
North Florida. Call Rick
(386) 752-8196
6/3, 6/10,6/17, 6/24,7/1, c
The Wait Is Over!
Introducing "Mossy Oak"
the most innovative, quality
and affordable manufactured
houses in the industry. Call
Mr. Mott (386) 752-1452
. 6/3,6/10'6/176/24,7/1, c
Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452
6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24,7/1, c


Best Cash Deals on Mobile
Homes. NO ONE BEATS
MY PRICES
386-719-0044
rtn,c
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/
2 BATH Excellent Shape;
Need Chas, Priced to sell,
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
- t .rn,c
Brand Spanking New
2009 5 BR/3BA; 2004 Sq Ft;
- $594.31 Per month-. Seller
pays $3,500 toward closing
cost. Call Mike at
, 386-623-4218
Mn.c
Modular Home for sale in
,town. Save $20,000.00. Turn
Key Deal; Owner says make
an offer. It Must Go!
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
rtn.c
PRICE REDUCED!
Spacious Mfg home with 4
BR, 3 BATH, Bonus Room
with lots of windows. Discon-
tinued floor plan. Fore More
info call Sarah. 386-288-0964
rtnc
Become a Homeowner for
the same monthly payments.
you are throwing away on
rent. Call Sarah for more info.
386-288-0964
rtn,c
MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
S $49,900.00,
Call 386-288-4560

WE PAY CASH..... FOR
YOUR USED MOBILE
HOMES 1980 OR NEWER.
LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129


I I I I .

III
You loa ae






19. in,


Need More Space
for a growing family?
2001, 5 BEDROOM, 4
BATH TRADE-IN.
Excellent condition.
For more info call Sarah.
386-288-0964
First Time home Buyer
$7,500.00 CASH
IN YOUR POCKET
Call David for details
386-719-0044
rtn,c
Home Owners....
Guaranteed Financing
Thru B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044
rtn,c
ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00
P&I per mo, Doublewide your
land $422.00 P&I per mo.
Singlewide & $30,000.00 for
land $520.00 P&I per mo. or
Doublewide with $30,000.00
for land $602.00 P&I per mo.
Our.land your land or buy
land. I specialize in credit
challenged customers. Appli-
cations over the phone, credit
decision next business day.
Let me help make your new
home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn,c
FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY
AND LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE
ZONED COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT
rtn,c
HOME ONLY LOANS
No mortgage on your land.
Put a home on your land, family
land, state land or rental lot. Sin-
glewides start at $350.00 month
and Doublewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
SNO HIDDEN CHARGES
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn.c
NEW 4 BR 2 BATH READY


TO MOVE IN.
288-4f

Low Credit7
I may be able
buy a h(
386-288

El


Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highwayfrontage.
Comer lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene.Dr.
& Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line, 8 inch wa-
ter main, access to city utili-
ties, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to
I-10, yia SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene 850-
973-4141
rn, n/c




FOR SALE/
OWNER FINANCING
ALL LAND BELOW
IS HIGH AND DRY
5 acres Lee, North of Hwy
6, Cayenne Rd:, rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995 $5,000
down, $325/mo
10 acres Beulah Meadows
Rd, DWMH and houses al-
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down
$459/mo
10 acres Old Blue Springs
Rd. access, DWMH and hous-
es allowed, $49,500, $5,000
down, $459/mo
25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)
Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
rtn,c
Fantastic Lake
. and Mountain Views
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
Open and Covered Decks,
Large Screened Porch, Gas
FP, CH/A, Oak Floors & Cab-
inets, and Appliances.
Offered Furnished at
$179,900. Call BJ Peters at
850-508-1900
rtn, n/c


CALL 386- For Sale:-
560 House & Lot
rn, c In the Town of Suwannee
Scores??? . was $135,000, Now
to help you $99,000. 2 BR/1 BA. Fully
iome. Furnished, New Metal
-4560 Roof, and New Paint, Util-
n'c 'ity Building with Washer
. Trees. 386-719-0421
,~�tiYn, n/ce
AFOR SALE


OFFICE BUILDING
FOR RENT
across street from
Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder Office)
I 111 SE Shelby St., Madison;
Newly renovated
back to the 1920's era
Call 973-4141
ran/c
Commercial Property
located at 1344 SW Grand
St., Greenville, Fl, 2 story,
commercial buildings = 3741
sqft +/-
Lease Contract worth $270K
w/ Kids Incorporated
through 2016 $299K / con-
tact David Driggers w/ FMB
Greenville 850-948-2626
6/17. 6/19, c

Commercial Property
located at 166 SW US 221,
Greenville, Fl, 2 story, com-
mercial building = 1723 sq ft
+/-, 1st floor / 3 offices and 2
restrooms = 1056 sq ft +/-,
2nd floor / 1 br, 1 bath,
kitchen, dinette and living
room = 667 sq ft +/-, 90K /
contact David Driggers w /
FMB Greenville
850-948-2626
6/17,6/19, c


BY KU Y SPRINGS
CHURCH
1.87 Acres $22,000
� Call 678-389-1859 <


Completely Remodeled
3 BR/ 1 Bath, new roof,
carpet, central heat & air,
new kitchen cabinets, new
bathroom, new 200 amp
electrical, approximately
1300 sq. ft. $84,000
Oak Estates Sub Division
McWilliams Realty
(850) 973-8614
6/3, 6/10,6,17, c




S$$AVON$$
Earn 50%, only $10 for
starter kit! Call Today
850-570-1499 or visit
www.youravon.com/tdavies
__,_5/13 - rtn, c
Trinity Services Group
Food Service Personnel for
Juvenile Correctional Feed-
ing Program. Food produc-
tion experience, clean
background and drug screen-
ing. Includes Benefits
Call 850-948-6940
6/10, 6/17, pd
Therapist
Mental Health Service for a
30 bed female Juvefiile Jus-
tice program in Greenville,
FL. Applicants must have
graduated from any accredit-
ed college or university with
a master's degree in social
work, counseling and guid-
ance, psychology or human
services. Candidates must*
pass a' DJJ background
screen, drug screening and
physical in order to be con-
sidered.
Contact.Mrs. Pender @
850-948-4220 of fax resumes
to.850-948-4227 '
.6/17, 6,24,c'

Now Hiring Full Time:;
LPN, Medical Laboratory
Technologist, Respiratory
Therapist, Temporary Gener-
al Maintenance Worker
Please contact Human Re-
sources at 850-973-2271 ext
1906
,6/17, cc


i 4" ou A


VORKrORCL



If you are 18 or older
and have been laid-
offfrom your job, con-
tact us now! We can
assist you in assessing your
interests and setting career goals, as
well as looking for a new job. We
may also assist qualified individuals
with career training funds! You
may still be eligible to receive Un-
employment while in training.


| An l I Opypommty Pro, Autity alde atnd risc.r- t hij a bt I upo n-airej t ait idtiVKl
| wit <)*sabaitw9. n' 1 cnktd h WnMbucnon di"th wxoc "may bWcx dw by r-pe , no U o
TIY,'I1D nquomnot via tha PkW& aRchy iavict at 711.


Florida Landnitd

1 "'= T .1


nc * Magnolia Bay Lodge, Sleeps 6-8, Overlooks Lake SheeHee
* 8,400� sf Equipment Shed with Walk-in Cooler
* Two 750� sf Cabins Offered Separately.
* 2 Acre duck pond and irrigated 30� field T�
* Hunt-Fish-Farm-Invest, Your Choice!
* Offered Divided, High Bidders Choice
* 5 traces: ranging from 62 to 228 acres M


Florida Land Auctions - Florida land for sale ONLY AT AUCTION, Offered to the highest and best bidders!
Contracts will be written the day of the Auction; be prepared and prequalify Call the
Certified Real Estate Auctioneers today at 800-711.-9175 and get your Free Auction Information now.


Deadline For Classifieds
(850) 973-4141
JCLASSIFI DS 3:00 p.m. Every Monday


MOBILE Hoi
FOR SAL]


/


M -11 I. rl v I ri Ir n r% I' I - r I vi I I--









Wednesday, June 17, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier * 15A


U E 'wku


LEGAL NOTICE
The Madison County Commission announces the availability of Slate Hous-
ing Initiatives Partnership Program (S.H.I.P.) funds for 2009/2010 fiscal
year. Funds in the amount of $315,000 are available for county residents
who meet certain income requirements to construct a new home or pur-
chase a site built home. Applications can be made at Suwannee River Eco-
nomic Council. Inc., 146 5E Bunker Street, Madison, FL
32341.850-973-6709. Applications wilt be accepted beginning July 22,2009.
Consideration will also be given to those who have pending applications.
Applications will be taken without discrimination on the basis of race,
creed, color, religion, age, sex, marital or familial status, national origin, or
handicap.
Home Ownership Strategies
Down Payment/Closing Cost - New
Down Payment/Closing Cost - Existing
6/17



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
� JUDICIAL L CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2009-50-CP,
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF:
LOUISE Z. BROWNING,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LOUISE Z. BROWNING,
deceased, whose date of death was June 1, 2009; is pending in theCircuit
Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 2009-
50-CP; the names and addresses of the Co-Personal Representatives and the
Personal Representatives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have
, claims or demands against decedent's estate, including un-matured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have
claims or demands against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this Court WITH-
IN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH,
ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH ARE BARRED.
. THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE IS JUNE 10,,2009.
Attorney for Personal Representatives: Co-Personal Representatives:
1,5 E. Baile) Bromning. HI /si Edin B. Browning, Jr.
E. Baile. Browning. Ill ' dwin B. Browning Jr.
Ila Bar No.0083630 : 3275 NE Colin Kelley Highway
Davis, Schnitklr. Reeves & Br6wning. P.A. Madison, Florida 32340
Post Office Dramer 652
Madison, Florida 32341
18501 973-4186 /s/ Dorothy B. Brown
Dorothy B. Brown
331 NE Cardambn Way
Pinetta, Florida 32350
6/10, 6/17


LE5AL NOTICE
The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a
meeting of the Board of Directors on Monday, June 29, 2009. 7:00 P.M. at
the Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc., Senior Center in Live Oak,
Florida.
6/17


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-11-DP


IN THE INTEREST OF:
O.P. DOB: 03/03/1996
F.P. DOB: 04/14/2000
M.P. DOB: 09/19/2002
M.V. DOB: 12/23/2003
MINOR CHILD
____________________/
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: G. P.
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition under oath has been filed in
the above -styled court for the termination of parental rights and the per-
manent commitment of O.P., a male child born on 03/03/1996, in Maryland;
F.P., a male child born on 04/14/2000, in Lowndes County, Georgia; M.P., a
female child born on 09/19/2002, in Leon, County, Florida; M.V., a female
child born on 12/23/2003, in Leon County, Florida to the State of Florida,
placing agency, for subsequent adoption and you are hereby to be and ap-
pear in the above court at the Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Flori-
da 32340 on Thursday, July 23, 2009 at 1:00 P.M., for a Termination of
Parental Rights Advisory Hearing and to show cause why said petition
should not be granted. You must appear on the date and time specified.'
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING
CONSTITUTES YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL
LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THESE CHILDREN.

6/17, 6/24, 7/1, 7/8

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Iy AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 03-16-CJ
IN THE INTEREST OF:
BRITTANY PRYOR 10/31/2002
MINOR CHILD

'NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: W. G.
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
.YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition under oath has been filed in
the above -styled court for the termination of parental rights and the per-
manent commitment of B.P.; a female child born on 10/31/2002, in Alachua
County, Florida to the State of Florida, placing agency, for subsequent
adoption and you are hereby to be and appear in the above court ait the
Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida 32340 on Thursday, July 23,
2009 at 1:00 P.M., for a.Teimination of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing
and to show cause why said petition should not be granted. You must ap-
pear on the date and time specified.
FAILURE TO.PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING
CONSTITUTES YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL
LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THESE CHILDREN.
6/17,6/24,7/1,7/8


Your Local Paper

HI Lots Io Offer:
* Community Events
* Sports
* Local News
* Classifieds








el 9734141


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2009-48-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MILDRED CHRISTINE TIBBALS
a/k/a Mildred R. Tibbals, and
a/k/a Mildred Rutherford Tibbals
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MILDRED CHRISTINE TIB-
BALS, deceased, whose date of death was April 24, 2009; is pending in the
Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number
2009-48-CP; the namps and addresses of the personal representatives and
the personal representatives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
nidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS
June 10, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representatives: Personal Representatives:
/s/ Clay A. Schnitker /s/ James Mitchell Tibbals
Clay A. Schnitker James Mitchell Tibbals
Fla Bar No.349143 7522 Snowpea Court, Unit K
Davis, Schnitker, Reeves & Browning, P.A. Alexandria, VA 22306
Post Office Drawer 652
Madison, Florida 32341 Is/ Sandra Christine Tibbals Everett
(850) 973-4186 Sandra Christine Tibbals Everett
8526 Lenox Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32221
6/10, 6/17



SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
INVITATION TO BII) 08109-038 ADM
The Suwannee River Water Management District (referred to as "District")
is requesting sealed bids for Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning
Repair and Maintenance. .
The proposed schedule for this request for bids is shown below:
June 12, 2009 Release of Invitation to Bid
June 23, 2009 Mandatory pre-bid meet at District Headquarters at 4:00
p.m.,
July 16, 2009 All sealed bids must be received at District Headquarters
in Live Oak prior to 2:00 p.m. and bid opening will occur at this time.*
August 4, 2009 Post Bid Conference at District Headquarters at 2:00 p.m.
September 8, 2009� Governing Board meeting at 9:00 a.m. at District
Headquarters in Live Oak.*
*Denotes A public meeting.
Any individual or firm desiring to obtain additional information and a copy
of the bid package including specifications for this Invitation to Bid may do
so by visiting the District's website at www.mysuwanneeriver.com or by
contacting:
Kristel Callahan, Business Resource Specialist 11
Suwannee River Water Management District
9225 CR 49
Live Oak, Florida 32060
Email: kjc@srwmd.org
Phone: 386-362-1001
800-226-1066 (Florida only)
Fax: 386-362-1056
6/17


The Southern Pine Beetle


PREVENT
Prevention Cost-Share Program SJ

2009 Sign-Up Period: July 1st - Aug 12th 1gg j

Apply for incentive payments or cost-share assistance with:
* Thinning * Mechanical underbrush removal
* Prescribed burning * Planting longleaf pine

For guidelines and application materials, contact your .
local Florida Division of Forestry office or Visit:

www.fl-dof.com

A message from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of
Forestry, Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner. Funding supplied by the USDA Forest Service;
an equal opportunity provider.


Need a Section 8 Voucher?


We can help! Find out the


powerful secret and tips to g


getting Section 8 assistance,




section8secret.com










4 Bed/5 full 2 half Bath Lakefront Estate on 14.83 Acres * Hickoy, NC

1/41 mile of frontage on Lake Hickory * Breathtaking lake &

mountain views * Located in private, gated community

* Equestrian Center * Luxurious amenities, wine cellar, pool,

outdoor living area * Perfect for entertaining

[Saturday, July 11 at 11:oo AM (ET)]






RE: Jerry Craig King, Broker; J. P King Auction Company, Inc. Auctioneer: Jerry Craig King, #8052; J. P. King Auction
Company, Inc. #4740


Oenwll�,yad(nIeeGm~ulo ~ll'






www.greenepublishing.com


Retred Circuit Judge
Qyer 4.Year experience

ae ar"as include but not limited to:
Criminal Law * 9A * Family Law
Child Suppdrt * I e ate * 4lts * Trust
Legislative Consultifg
810 Thomasvllie Rad, 2rfdFloor * 850.425.1935
cdmcclurela saojc
Charles D. Mc(i re, ArORNEY AT LAW
"The hiring of a lawyer Is an important decision that should not be based
solely on edvertlsement. Before you decide, ask us to send you free
,writtAn ihfrmatlvn ashbit w nArbllfletiont and s narience."


(Come in andwsRegister to.


* a ,n or D ad!

ELrim


AMERICA's NBUT WARRANTY!
Hyundai's 10-Year, 100,000-Mile Powertrain Protection has you Covered!


(R) yunowil sen YO
si otl a ymetsaf uct

150
thog h ndo teya
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Pictures are for illustration purposes only. All prices plus tax, tag and license.* Includes $3000 rebate, 5500 loyalty, $1UUU military, plus tax, tag and tees.
Must qualify for all rebates and incentives. Must present buyers order signed by dealer management for same vehicle and we'll match price. See dealer for details.
See dealer for Hyundai Assurance program certificate for complete coverage details. Restrictions apply.


Who says color doesn't call attention to
your advertisement?


It just did.

PO Drawer 7723-41Madison, FL 32341
Am.. .n 850-973-4141


Wednesday, June 17, 2009


16A * Madison County Carrier