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Madison County carrier
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00165
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Portion of title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla
Creation Date: June 3, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID: UF00067855:00165

Full Text







R Madison Cou


H -DIGIT 326
University o" Florida Library
Dept. of Special Coll. Fla History 21
21Smrnathers Library
'GrM, ,PuW , Gainesville FL 32611


.. .. - 1 1 .Out Our

- Web Site


I w.greenepublshig.com


www.greenepublishing.com
Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


Greenville Fast Track Robbed At Gunpoint


Madison County deputies are
investigating an armed robbery in
Greenville.
According to the Madison Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office, on Sunday. May
31 at 7:50 a.m., Madison County
Sheriff's Office Deputy Alan
Whigham responded to an armed
robbery at the Fast Track store lo-
cated on US 90 in Greenville.
Upon arrival, Deputy Whigham
met with the victim (store clerk)
and ensured her safety as well as
the integrity of the scene.


Madison

County
Officers
Nab
Robbery/
Kidnapping
Suspects
Two men involved in
an armed robbery in
Hamilton County were
arrested in Madison'
County 'Saturday
evening.
cording
to law
informed by thenforceil-
meriff's Ofe-
ports, on
Sfice thatatu they were in
day, May
30pursuit of a silver Doapdge
pickup involve mateld in a rob-
p.m.. the Madison Coun-
ty Sheriff 's Office was
informed by the Hamil-
ton County Sheriff's Of-
fice that they were in
pursuit of aisilver Dodge
pickup involved in a rob-
bery and shooting in
their county and were
travel-
ing on
SR 6
into-
H i n t 0
Maddi
SCounty.
The
Dominique vehicle
Antonio contin-
Jackson ued to
flee and turned,onto Old
Blue Springs and the
pavement turned to dirt
and the vehicle lost con-
trol and flipped over. The
occupants fled on foot
and a Hamilton County
deputy arrested one sub-
ject on scene. The second
subject fled into a large
cornfield.,
The Madison Coun ty
sheriff's Office respond-
ing deputies set up an
immediate perimeter
and requested assistance
from the Department of
Corrections K-9 Unit,
The K-9 unit re-
sponded and accompa-
nied by Deputy William
Sircy tracked the'subject
Please see Suspects,
Page 4A


Deputy Whigham obtained a de-
tailed description of the suspect
and forward the information to oth-
er officers and surrounding agen-
cies.
The description was as follows:
black male, between 23 - 30 years of
age, approximately 5'10" in height.
180 pounds. brown eyes, black hair.
Clothing: Blue jeans. Black t-shirt.
black ball cap with white writing on
front. Features: Gold framed eye-


glasses,
lace.


gold teeth and gold neck-


The victim (store clerk) stated
that the suspect entered the store
and went to a cooler and returned to
the counter with a drink. Before
paying, the suspect pulled out what
she believed was a .38 caliber hand-
gun and demanded the victim give
him the money from the register.
The victim complied with the
suspects demand and he left with-
out further incident with an undis-
closed amount of cash.
Chief Investigator Mark Joost
is investigating the case.


Man Killed In Rollover Remains


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The occupant of a 2001 Ford
SUV was killed in a traffic acci-
dent on Interstate 10 on Saturday
afternoon, May 30.
According to a Florida High-"
way Patrol report, the driver was
traveling east in the inside lane of
1-10, just west of County Road 14.
The SUV left the roadway and en-


tered the center median.
'he driver overcorrected
across both eastbound lanes and
entered the south shoulder, over-
turning several times. on the
shoulder, before coming to a final
rest on all four wheels. -
Both occupants were ejected
during the crash.
Both men were transported to
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital


by helicopter.
One occupant, Fred Single-,
ton. suffered fatal injuries.
!The other passenger, Larry
Griffin, age unknown, was listed.
in critical condition.
FHP Trooper Manuel
Smyrnios was the investigating
officer..
FHP Cpl.Donnie Pitts was the
homicide investigator.


Serious

After

Shooting
A
man was
shot in a
di.s ute
on Sun-.
day after-
noon,
May 31.

cording Scott
to * the Andrew"
Sheriff's Sapp
Office, .at
approximately 5:40 p.m.,
Madison County Sher-
iff's. Office Deputy Sgt.
'Art Deno, Sgt. Randy
Jansch and Deputy Ja-
son Whitfield responded
to 416 NE Withlabluff
Way in i-eference to an
individual being shot.
According to the'
Sheriff's Office, when of-
ficers arrived at the
scene, it was determined
that the suspect, Scott
Andrew Sapp, 40, of.
Jacksonville was in-
volved in an altercation
Please see Shooting,
Page 4A


Gordon Tractor Suffers Grand Theft


Offering $1,000 reward for inform
By Michael Curtis . perpetrators were target-
Greene Publishing, Inc. ing specific equipment.
When Jason Stanley arrived at Gordon Two work trucks and utili-
Tractor at 6:30 a.m. Saturday morning to ty trailers were also stolen
move several of their high-end mowers to to transport the equipment
Four Freedoms Park for the Farmer and off the premises. The work
Friends Festival,' he instead discovered the trucks were later recov-
business had been robbed. Kubota, Exmark ered.
and Hustler brand mowers and utility vehi- City of Madison Pa-
cles valued at $6000 to $14000 each, had been trolman Reggie Alexander
taken, leaving behind evidence of a highly or- arrived on the scene short-
ganized crime. ly after 6:30 a.m., and was
. According to Stanley, overnight surveil- later joined by Investigator
lance tapes show a box truck pulling up adja- Jimbo Roebuck and Madi-
cent to the main building, and shortly son County Chief Deputy
afterwards a lot.of motion in the northeast Epp Richardson. Investiga-
end of the fenced-in back storage lot. Tracks tor Ben Ebberson will also
and a cut in the northeast section of fence be conductiAg the investi-
confirm; gation.
Surprisingly two Kubota RTV utility ve- Michael Curtis can be
hicles were actually removed from a trailer to reached at michael@
load other equipment, creating belief that the greenejiublishing.com.


leading to conviction
',-.'- -


-' a number OT expensive mowers-- ., i . n
'turn mower shown here with Jason Stafty ,
from Gordon Tractor early Saturday m l ,rik May
_ $1 000 reward is being offered. ii !1~..


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, May 30, 2D09


Four Arrested In GreenVille Disturbance


ur- "menrT urwro arrest


QL eh


Wied ,,,1'for a disturbance in Greenville
ed 87/71 on Saturday, May 31, anarc,
6/3 t m <" " According to a Madison for d
Partly to mostly cloudy with scat- County Sheriff's Office report
tered showers and thunderstorms 'County Sherif Office repor,
red showers and thunderstorms at approximately 1 p.m., offi- warra
Thu 84/70' cers responded to
6/4 ' an anonymous
Scattered thunderstorms possible, caller regarding -
gunshols being fired--f
Fri 84/ .'. 'and several persons
6/5 84/69 involved in a large
Scattered thunderstorms possible, fight. I- -
Sat MCSO Deputy
S 86/71 Maurice Alexander
6/6 was first to respond
Slight chance of a thunderstorm. and Sgt. Randy Jan-
2 Sections, 22 Pages sch, Deputy William Terrance Mutch
Around Madison 5-7A Sircy and Deputy
Fun Page 11A Jason Whitfield immediately followed.
Classifieds 12A
Legals 13A A large crowd was gathered in
Obituaries 5A Greenville at Haffye Hayes Park on SW
Path of Faith B Section Grand Street.
Money & Financen 1A Additional Officers responded, including


fired. Three arrested for
hy and riot. Another arrested
isorderly conduct and on
ints for a weapons charge.,

r[][7i. -- 1


Jamie Hampton Roger. Jones
Deputy Marcus Jones, the Florida highway
Patrol, Sheriff Ben Stewart and Chief
Deputy Epp Richardson.
Deputy Alexander arrested Jamie Hamp-
ton, 29. of Greenville for disorderly conduct


and further learned he had ad-
ditional warrants for failure to
appear on a separate incident
involving a weapofis charge.
IHampton' was transported to
the Madison County Jail.
Other respond-
S. ing officers arrested
three others in-
volved in the inci-
dent'and they were
all transported to
(, the Madison County
jail:
Terrance
Mutch, B/M, 21, of
Greenville, was


Coleman Garrison
arrest and anarchy


charged with Af-
fray/Riot, Resisting'


Roger Jones, 32, of Greenville, was
charged with affray/riot and anarchy
Coleman. Garrison, 38, of Greenville was
charged with affray/riot and anarchy


I-


I , " ' I II H I I


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2A * Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 3, 2009


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word,
comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


Columnist Thankful That


Life In These United There Are People
States Are Amusing Who Are Not Just

Stories From The Heart Really Touch Me !! "Doing Their Job"


Do you remember -the Readers's Digest many
years ago having put out a book on some of their
best stories, and funny editions.
Just this past week, I was looking through a
book I had kept that had many of the interesting sto-
ries in it. I just want to share a few with you, in case
you missed them.
Here are just a few of the "Life In The'United
States" stories that I have enjoyed:
No. 1 - "I hate answering machines," says Nan-
cy Ouellette of Rohnert Park, Calif. "Call me old-
fashioned, but I still prefer to talk to a human
being." (Boy, do I relate to that statement.)
She went on, "However, even I couldn't re-
sist this recording I once heard): "The answering
machine is on vacation. This is the refrigerator
speaking If you leave a message,slowly and clearly,
I will write it down and stick it on myself with one
of these little magnets. Thank You!" --Nancy Ouel-
. lette of Rohnert Park, Cal) )'
The next story that caught my eye went this
way:
"During the mortgage closing on our summer
house, my wife and I were asked to sign documents
containing small print. When I asked if I should
read it, my attorney replied: "Legally, you should.
But, here's the bottom line: If you pay your install-
ments on time, there is nothing in there that could
harm you. Should you stop paying, however, there is
definitely nothing in the small print that can save
you." ----Milllorad Deviak (Chevy Chase Md.)
Another unusual story was: "My wife and I rou-
tinely drill our three young children on proper safe-
ty measures. Discussions about seat belts, house
fires, and strangers are commonplace. During one
drill, I asked our four-year-old Maria what she would
do if a stranger were to drive up and ask her to get
4nto his car. Promptly and proudly, she replied, "I
would buckle up." ...(Paul Delago of Kenai, Alaska)
Also,I, read one that went like this: "On a road
trip through a desolate 'region of New Mexico, my
cousin and found ourselves 60 miles from a town,
with a nearly empty gas tank, Praying and hoping,
we drove on until we reached a small farmhouse
standing alone in a vast field. The farmer filled our
tank and reluctantly accepted the $20.00 we offered.
Grateful, I said, "Without your help,, two young
women might have been stranded tonight. God put
you in this spot for a reason."
"Well, said the farmer, shaking his head and
rubbing his neck, "It might been a-purpose, but he
was mad at me when he done it." '
Then next one I can relate to reminds me of
when our daughter was growing upand beginning
to date. The honest writer told this story: "One
night, after a date with her new boyfriend, our 16-
year-old daughter, Emily, rushed into the kitchen to
share her news, "Mom, he kissed me!" she an-
nouncded proudly.
"My husband and daughter have always been
close, and my husband had been having a hard time
facing the fact that she was growing up. I knew he
might not wish to hear of her first kiss. Emily, how-
ever, had already told him. I was relieved and
touched she had repeated their conversation.
"Dad," she had whispered, "He, kissed me."
"Honey," he whispered back,. "I don't blame
him.
Another story that I found amusing went like
this: "While working on a messy building project on
my family farm, I got my clothes muddy. Asked my
mother if Dad had any old trousers I could borrow.
When I told her I wore a 38-inch waist, she
said Dad had a closet full of that size. As he was con-
siderably more rotund than I was, I questioned him
9n this point. Dad insisted he Wore a 38.
"You can't be a 38, Dad," I reasoned. "What size
do you have on right now?"
"These are 44'9," he replied.
"I thought you just said you wear,38s," I coun-
tered.
"I do," Dad said. "But 44's are more comfort-
able," he added.
One last story that is heart touching goes like
this:
"While working at my secretarial station at
Boston's New England Medical Center, I noticed a
distinguished gentleman and his young son on their
daily visits to the chemotherapy center. Impecably
tailored suits and a head of lush salt-and-pepper
hair made the man stand out. As I admired him and
his smiling five-year-old, I found it impossible to tell
who was receiving treatment.
One day, as they walked past, my attention was
drawn to the boy. The cap he usually wore was miss-'
ing, and I saw a shiny bald head. To my surprise,
the father was a bald as his son.
"Look at my dad!" the boy said cheerfully "He
shaved his head so we'd look the same. We're going
to grow our hair back together."
His father simply smiled, looking more distin-
guished than ever.
That story was sent in by Linda Mango of
Boston, Mass., and it truly shows the love of a fa-
ther to a son.
"Nuff said.. Bye for now. See'ya.!!!


I am writing this letter because you often hear of
the negative but very seldom hear of the positive.
On the afternoon of May 30Th my Husband and
I were on our way to a Family Birthday Party
when we were suddenly faced with an unexpected
vehicle crash that at the moment appeared to be se-
rious. As most of us would be we were shaken and
very upset. We were most concerned about the lady
that we had just hit because it appeared that she was
very seriously injured. Before anyone I must.give Je-
sus Christ the credit for his hand of protection. He
was with us all. Soon Officer Agner arrived and tru-
ly represented the oath that he had taken to serve
and protect. He was great! Paramedics Jimmy Kent
and Kevin Shipp then arrived and they too were of
the utmost respect and concern. We were all trans-
ported to Madison County Memorial Hospital where
we were met with concern and super care! Chief
Davis you should be proud of Officer Agner. Mr.
Botino Jimmy and Kevin, well they represent your
department well. Mr. Abercrombie and MCMH. .you
have a jewel in Tiffany Strickland. I am thankful to
know that we do still have people in this community
who really do care and they're not just " Doing Their
Job". Thank You and May God Bless You All!!
God Bless,
DeWayne and Kelli O'Quinn
Greenville, FL


ars Coming


from China
General Motors (GM) received $20 billion in U.S.
government loans and might need another $50 bil-
lion to survive.
GM plans to close a number of U.S. plants and
lay off thousands of workers. The UAW has agreed
to eliminate or reduce employee benefits to drop the
average wage, including benefits, froit around $75
per hour to near $45 per hour, which is the average
wage of U.S. auto workers at foreign plants in the
U.S. Hopefully, GM will cut management staff and
reduce executive salaries. These actions should
make GM cost competitive and save thousands of
American jobs.
However, to my astonishment, GM plans to in-
crease imports from Mexico, South Korea, Japan
and China from 15% in 2009 to 23% by 2014. Ap-
proximately 50,000 cars will be imported from Com-
munist China by 2014.
Evidently the U.S. taxpayers are loaning GM $20-
$50 billion to stay alive so it can close U.S. plants, lay
off U.S. workers, transfer some production to for-
eign countries like Communist China and import in-
ferior cars to the U.S. so more U.S. workers can be
laid off. And our insurance rates and health care
costs will increase from accidents as the wheels falls
off the Chinese made vehicles.
We don't need imported cars. We need fuel effi-
cient, reasonably priced cars manufactured in the
U.S..
Donald A. Moskowitz
Londonderry, NH


Wandering With
The Publsher
Marv Ellen Greene


Red, White


And True


Mysteries

Our story begins in 1812 in Paris, when an ac-
cident in his father's leather shop caused three-
year-old Louis to go blind. Louis' injury, was
originally thought to not be very serious, but then
the injured eye became infected and the infection.
spread to his other eye. Before long, Louis was
blind.
At age ten, Louis went to a school for the blind
in Paris. He was not satisfied with the books that
the school had for the blind students, though, as
they consisted of raised lettering like that used in
the Braille alphabet, but they literally spelled out
every letter.
If a sighted person had to read one letter at a
time with his eyes, it would take a long time to read
anything, so you can imagine how long it would
take a blind person to'"read" one letter at a time
with his fingers. Louis knew there must be a way to
improve upon this alphabet.
This one's no great mystery - the hero of the
story is Louis Braille, the inventor of the Braille al-
phabet. What you might now know, however, is the
story of how he developed the Braille alphabet.
There were at least twenty types, of embossed
alphabets available at the time in the early 1800's.
The problem was that they were all developed by
people with normal vision but used by the blind. As
a result, they were ineffective.
Louis' first., inspiration was probably his
school's library 'books - or actually the lack of li-
brary books - for the blind. After reading all four-
teen of them, he knew there must be a way to
increase the number of books written for the blind.
In 1819, a French army officer named Charles
Barbier created the forerunner of the Braille alpha-
bet. He used his twelve-dot system of raised letter-
ing, called "night writing," to send messages to his
soldiers at night.
Barbier's night writing system of raised dots
and dashes was similar to Morse code, although
Morse code wouldn't be invented for another 25
years. They used this alphabet so they could under-
stand the messages without having to light a match,
since a lit match would reveal their location to the
enemy. ,,
LouisBraille- set out to improve upon Barbier's
system: By 1824, the 15-year-old had created the six-
dot system of raised lettering that's used today. It
was an immediate hit with the othernstudents at his
school, even though it was initially rejected by the
school's teachers. Louis Braille later became. a
teacher at this school - the same school for the blind
that he attended as a student.
When he died in 1852, it looked like the Braille
alphabet would die with him, but a group of four
blind men who founded the Royal National Institute
of the Blind kept his alphabet alive. The Institute is
now the largest publisher of Braille in Europe.
Where did Louis Braille come up with the idea
of "printing" the dots in his new alphabet - the one
that bears his name?
The injury that caused Louis to go blind at age
three occurred when he slipped in his father's
leather shop and was poked in the eye by an awl. An
awl is a tool with a very sharp point at the end of it,
and it is used to punch holes in leather. When he de-
veloped his Braille alphabet, he used an awl to poke
the paper from underneath in order to create
Braille dots above the paper.
Louis Braille used the object that caused him to
go blind to create a whole new alphabet, enabling
other blind people to read.


. Online Poll



If Amtrak begins running through

Madison again, will you ride the rails?




Yes






0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35


This week's question: How much money are you willing to spend
on a summer vacation?

To view and participate in our weekly online poll, visit www.greenepublishing.com.








Wednesday, June 3, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier - 3A


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


I'I'









*" r


Summer Camp

Underway In Lee
The Town of Lee's Building Blocks summer
camp began June 1 and runs for 10 weeks, ending
Aug. 7. The cost of the camp is only $50 a week per
child for children attending the full 10 weeks. The
price includes a hot meal and two healthy snacks,
daily. Donations are desperately needed for scholar-
ships for the camp. The cost for children attending
two weeks or more is $55. The cost for attending only
one week is $60. The local 4-H is co-sponsoring the
camp, which will be held at the old Lee School Gym
and on the grounds. The camp is open to children,
ages 6-12. i
Midway Church of God will host a promotion
recognition night on Wednesday, June 3. Students
who have either been graduated or been promoted
or who won some special recognition, such as for
sports, will be recognized.
Midway Church of God's Youth Retreat will be
held June 12 and i3.at the church. The title of the re-
treat is "Dig In." The worship band from Live Oak
Church of God will be special guests. Children, ages
8 and up, will enjoy a night of g6od, clean, Christian
fun and get to camp out at the church. For more in-
formation, please call 971-5200.
Happy birthday wishes are extended to Bradley
Martin, June 6, and Drew Fitch, June 8.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great
week and a beautiful forever. May God bless each
and every one of you!

Got news
straight from -
the horse's mouth?


We Do.


The Madison County Carrier ,
& Madison Enterprise Recorder


In the late spring of
1973, I was assigned to an
American air base in
Southeastern England.
RAF. Bentwaters was lo-
cated in a region known
as East Anglia, If you
look at the palm of your
right hand and envision it
as a map of the UK, East
Anglia would be your
thumb. Bentwaters was
in Suffolk, one of the four
counties (the others being
Norfolk, Essex, and Cam-
bridgeshire) comprising
the East Anglican region.
East Anglia is a rural
area that Madisonians can
easily identify with, but
during World War II, the
sleepy farmsteads were
transformed into. airfields
to house the mightiest air
armada ever assembled.
This area would be the
home of the 8th Air Force,
more 'than 1500 bombers
and 800 fighters on nearly
a hundred airfields. In
Norfolk and Suffolk, an
airfield was constructed
every eight miles. Imag-
ine 60 triple-runway air-
fields located in Madison
and Taylor counties, each'
basing between 40 and 50
aircraft, and you can be-
gin to visualize the scope
of this incredible opera-
tion. As some have de-
scribed, England would
become the "aircraft car-
rier" to attack Germany.
The first English
home my family lived in
was in a village about the
size of Lee known as Strat-
ford St. Andrew. A couple
of miles north on a farm
lare road near the village
of Parham lay the re-
mains of an airfield.
Framlingham was the
World War II base of the
390th Bomb Group which
flew B-17 bombers against
Hitler's Fortress Europa.
On a pretty summer day.
we would walk from our
home to the airfield. Most
of the concrete was long
gone, broken into aggre-
gate to build roads, and
the farmers had reclaimed
their fields, but looking
down from above, there
was little doubt that an
airfield once stood there.
All the weight of the con-
crete and heavy bombers
had permanently scoured
the land into the shape of
the airfield.
It all began in early
1942 when the headquar-
ters element of the Mighty
Eighth relocated from Sa-
vannah, Georgia to South-
ern England. They
brought with them con-
struction crews that
would begin building
these airfields, faster and
in greater numbers than
previously imagined. By
the summer, the first B-17
Flying Fortresses began to
arrive. 'They would fly


tu re


^eJ)


Madison's girls
basketball team won
the Christmas Tour-
nament in Mayo over
the Christmas holi-
days and are shown
happy with excite-
ment after winning
Saturday, Dec. 22,
1980. Other girls
teams in competition
were Branford and
Aucilla. The girls had
just accepted their
trophy here and are
screaming with ex-
citement.


Madison County Carrier Photo, January 2, 1980


East Anglia And

The Mighty Eighth


National
Security
Joe Boyles
Guest Columnist


their first mission into oc-
cupied France on August
17, 1942.
As the Mighty Eighth
slowly added strength,
they began to put together
.larger and more impres-
sive raids into enemy ter-
ritory While the British
bomber doctrine sided to-
ward night, area satura-
tion bombing, ; the
American,', doctrine
worked out in the inter-
war years in the Air Corps
Tactical School at Mont-
gomery's Maxwell Field
emphasized daylight pre-
cision bombing. This doc-
trine also held that the;
bomber could provide its
own self-protection and
would not require fighter
escort, an assumption that
would prove not only erro-
neous but costly to the ear-
ly bomber crews.
Flying B-17 Flying
Fortresses and B-24 Liber-
ators, the Mighty Eighth
flew into the teeth of ever-
increasing enemy opposi-
tion from fighters and
flak. They took enormous
losses - in 1943, the Eighth
Air Force had the highest
casualty rate in all of the
American armed forces.
It wasn't just the .enemy
opposition that caused the
terrible losses. Poor flying
weather led to many acci-
dents. The extreme tem-
peratures and thin air at
22,000 feet created many
cold and oxygen related
injuries and. severely
worsened the survival of
wounded crewmen. Un-
like other combat units
where the wounded to
dead ratio was 3 to 1, the
Eighth suffered more
deaths than wounded .
Each bomber carried
a crew of ten, four officers
and six -enlisted men.
When a bomber went
down over enemy territo-
ry, ten beds at their home
base in England would be
empty that night. Many
died - some 26,000 in 33
months of combat ... more
than the Marine Corps
would lose in the entire
war. And they filled the
German POW camps -
more than a third of the
prisoners liberated in 1945
were airmen.
Early in the war, the
German fighters, primari-
ly ME-109s and FW-190s,
tore up the bomber forma-
tions and caused grievous
injuries to the crews. With
the introduction of the
long-range North Ameri-


can P-51 Mtustang in early
1944, the fighters could
now escort the bombers
all the way to their targets
and return. At this point,
AAA or flak became the
primary German defense.
By war's end, the damage
caused by these two de-
.fenses roughly equaled.
An average bomber group
lost between 150-200
bombers in about two
years of operations. Mul-
tiply that by 40 (the num-
ber of groups at war's end
and 10 (the size of each
,crew) and you get an idea
of the human carnage.
By VE day in the
spring of 1945, the Eighth
Air Force employed 40
bomb groups and 15 fight-
er groups, about 2500 com-
bat aircraft. They could
easily mount thousand
bomber raids escorted by
500 fighters. Faster than
the Germans could knock
our aircraft from the
skies, American industry
turned out replacements
while the Army Air Force
training system filled the
ranks. This was a war of
production that Germany
could not win.
So what did the
Eighth Air Force accom-
plish at such a huge price?
I would rate their success
in four categories. First,
they tied up a huge
amount of the German re-
sources in defending
against the bombers and
wori air superiority The
second front that Soviet
Premier Stalin agitated.
for was the air front flown
by the Americans. and
British. Second, airpower
isolated the battlefield in
Northern France. When
the Normandy Invasion
took place in June 1944,
our soldiers faced negligi-
ble enemy air attacks, and
German reinforcements
could only move under the
cover of darkness. In the
last year of the war, the
bombers succeeded in the
third and fourth accom-
plishments when they at-
tacked the transportation
system and synthetic oil
industry These hammer
blows wrecked Germany's
war production and has-
tened the end of the war.
There is a marvelous
museum near Savannah
that documents this in-
credible unit and the
young men who valiantly
fought the air war against
Nazi Germany in World
War II.


Sridra PressAssoc 2



Award Winning Newspaper







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WATKINS


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Carolyn Williams
iAssociate ID# 384192
(850) 929-2345:
crshaw7@yahoo.com
www.watkinsonline.com/carolynwilliams


o...................................................








4A * Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 3, 2009


REGIONAL CRIME & FROM PAGE ONE


Fourteen Convicted On Charges Of Internet Trafficking in

Controlled Substances As Well As Money Laundering


A jury in U.S. District Court yesterday found Jude La-
Cour (age 36, of Daytona Beach) guilty of fifty-two counts
of money laundering and various drug-trafficking of-
fenses involving the sale of controlled substances over
the Internet. For each count of money laundering, La-
Cour faces a term of 10 to 20 years in federal prison.
The jury also found co-defendants Dr. Christopher
Tobin (age 42, of Wilmington, North Carolina), Dr. Akhil
Baranwal (age 35, of Pennsylvania), Dr James Pickens
(age 73, of Midvale, Utah), and Geunnet Chebssi (Phar-
macist, age 57, of Spencerville, Maryland) guilty of drug-
trafficking offenses involving the sale of controlled
substances over the Internet. LaCour, Tobin, Baranwal,
Pickens, and Chebssi each face (for each count) a term of
three to five years in federal prison.
Previously Jeffery LaCour (age 61, of South Daytona,
and father of Jude LaCour), Hudsen Smith (age 37, of De-
land), Dr. Alexis Roman Torres (age 55, of Puerto Rico),
Dr Andrew DeSonia (age 48, of Indiana), Dr Margaret
Fulmore (a/k/a Margaret McIntosh, age 53, of Charlotte,
North Carolina), and Dr. Abel Lau (age 37, of Tulsa, Ok-
lahoma) had pleaded guilty to drug-trafficking offenses
related to this case. Each faces a term of three to five
years in federal prison.
The LaCours and Smith recruited doctors located


Suspects

cont from page 1A
through the cornfield and eventually flushed the
suspect from the cornfield back onto the roadway.
Madison County Sheriff's Office Sgt. Jansch and
Sheriff Ben Stewart were part of the perimeter and
observed the suspect on the roadway and conducted
the arrest.
The subjects were transported to the Hamilton
county Jail with a multitude of charges from two
separate incidences in Hamilton County that in-
cluded but not limited to robbery, kidnapping, ag-
gravated battery, fleeing, and grand theft.


Retired Circuit Judge
Over 45 Years Experience


TraclTce areas include but not limited to:
Criminal Law * DUI * Family Law
Child Support * Pr.bate * Wills * Trust
Legislative: Consultikg
*811 Thomasville Rbad, 2nd Floor * 850.425.1935
cdmcclurelawfirm aoLcom

Charles D. Mcelure, ATTORNEY AT LAW
The nrinr ol a lawyer is rv, important decis,oin ihl sroulci noC Dt based
solely on Badertisemenf Before you decide, as3 us io send jou Iro
written Information abjou l ur Quliricsior.6 and 6ypelance


across the United States, including Tobin, Baranwal, Ro-
man Torres, DeSonia, Fulmore, Lau, Pickens, Millette,
and Hanny to review health questionnaire answers and
approve customer orders for the controlled substances
solely on the basis of the answers. The doctors had no
face-to-face contact with the customers, did not verify
their identities or ages, did not conduct any physical ex-
aminations or testing, did not review any medical records
before approving drug orders, and often were not licensed
in the states in which the customers resided. Indeed, as,
proven at trial, Jive Network doctors approved and issued
drug orders not to diagnose and treat medical conditions
but to facilitate the distribution of drugs that Jive Net-
work customers pre-selected and to profit from that dis-
tribution. Jive Network paid the.doctors a,fee for each
questionnaire they reviewed. Jive Network doctors un-
lawfully approved and issued "prescription" drug or-
ders outside the usual course of their professional
practice and for no legitimate medical purpose. The
"prescriptions" they issued for Jive Network customers
were invalid.
During the three-year conspiracy the organization
distributed approximately 4.8 million dosage units of
Schedule ImI controlled substances and approximately
39.2 million dosage units of Schedule IV controlled sub-


Shooting

cont from page 1A
with the victim, Cain Sundance Holcomb. This al-
tercation resulted in Sapp shooting Holcomb with a
high-powered rifle.
Sapp was arrested at the scene and charged with
aggravated battery with a firearm and transported
to the Madison County Jail.
Holcomb was treated at the scene by Madison
County Emergency Medical Services and transport-
ed to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital via helicopter.
Holcomb was stabilized there and transferred to
Shands surgical intensive care unit in Gainesville
and remains in serious condition.
This case is pending and remains under investi-
gation and has been assigned to Chief Investigator,
Captain Mark Joost.
Additional information will be released as cir-
cumstances allow.


stances to Internet customers who had no valid pre-
scriptions. Jive Network received well over 500,000 cus-
tomer orders for controlled substances and illegally
generated revenue in excess of $77 million.
The United States also proved at trial that Jude La-
Cour and Jeffrey LaCour agreed to launder the proceeds
of the illegal drug conspiracy with the intent to promote
and carry on the conspiracy They transferred millions
of dollars via wire transfer and check to their personal
brokerage or bank accounts.
This case was jointly investigatedby the Federal
Bureau of Investigation, the Internal Revenue Service,
the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Food and
Drug Administration, and the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice-Criminal Investigation. It was prosecuted by Assis-
tant United States Attorneys Karen L. Gable and Daniel
C. Irick.
Madison County Parks & Recreation
Adult Softball Leagues


The Madison
County Parks &
Recreation Dept.
will start the adult
softball league on
* June 15th, 2009. Teams
may sign up at the
Recreation Complex
Monday - Friday
8:00a.m. -3:00p.m.
Or at the Clerk of Courts office
Monday - Friday
8:00a.m. -5:00p.m.
Fees for this season will be
$250.00 per team. These fees must be
paid before the schedule will be made.
CO-ED Leagues will play on Monday;
Church League will play on Tuesday.
Awards will be given to first place
teams only. (Team Trophy Only)


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Wednesday, June 3, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier * 5A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Joseph Mary

Darrell Louise

Adams Browning


Joseph Darrell
Adams, age 55, died. on
Friday, May 22 in Valdos-
ta, Ga. ,
Funeral services
were held. at 11 a.m., on
Tuesday, May 26, in the
chapel of Beggs Funeral
Home, with burial fol-
lowing at Pine Grove
Cemetery
The family received
friends from 6-8 p,m.,, on
Monday, May 25, at Beg-
gs Funeral Home.
Joseph was born on
June,21, 1953 in Augusta,
Ga., and is the son of
Vernon E. ,and Virginia
Mumford Adams. He
lived most of his life in
Madison and was a mem-
ber of the Pine Grove
Baptist Church.' He
worked for Corporate
Graphics in Madison.
He is survived by his
mother, Virginia Adams
of Madison; two broth-
ers, Jimmy and (Kathy)
Adams of Tallahassee,
Paul and (Wanda)
Adams of - Madison;
three sisters, Grace
Elaine (Steve) Maygold
of Elk Grove, Calif., Gin-
ger (John) Bullard of
Madison, Sandy and (Ed-
win) Bochnia of Madi-
son; many nieces;
nephews; great nieces;
and a host,of friends.
He was preceded in
death by his father, Ver-
non Adams; and a broth-
er. Chris Adams.








Yu l a p
Has ots10 Ofer


Mary I4ouise Brown-
ing, age 101, departed
this life June 1, 2009 at
her longtime home in
Madison.
Mrs. Browning was
a retired school teacher
having taught mathe-
matics for 37 years in the
Madison County school
system. She was a mem-
ber of the Eastern Star,
Delta Kappa Gamma,
Madison County Histori-
cal Society, and before
her. death, she was the
oldest living member of
the First Baptist Church
of Madison,. where she
was a longtime Sunday
School teacher, WMU
member, history com-
mittee member and 1898
Sanctuary Committee
member.
Mrs. Browning was
predeceased by her hus-
band,- Edwin B. Brown-
ing, Sr. and her daughter,
.VMarilyn Browning
Chutz. She is% survived
by a daughter, Dorothy
B. Brown, of Madison
and two sons, James. W.
Browning of Bradenton,
and Edwin B. Browning,
Jr., of Madison. She is
also survived by eight
grandchildren and six
great-grandchildren.
Burial services will
be held graveside at Oak
Ridge Cemetery in-Madi-
son on Wednesday, June
3, 2009, tat 11 a.m. In lieu
of flowers,. the family re-
quests that donations be
made to the First Baptist
Church of Madison, 134
S. Meeting Avenue,
Madison, FL 32340, for
preservation of the 1898
Sanctuary


June 3-6
Midway Baptist Church will host a revival June
3-6, featuring the Rev. Ronnie Combass. Services will
begin at 7 p.m. each evening. Everyone is welcome to.
attend.
June 5
The Spirit of Greenville will host a 2009 Indepen-
dence Day fundraiser on Friday, June 5. There will be
a fish fry and a drawing. The event takes place from
4-7 p.m. at Haffye Hays Park in Greenville.
June 5-6
Come join us at the 16th Annual Wellborn Blue-
berry Festival, Friday and Saturday, June 5-6, held in
Andrews Square on the grounds of the Wellborn
Community Center in historic downtown Wellborn.
Admission is free. Events for the weekend include
arts and crafts, food vendors, Herold White and the
Country Masters, children's games, contests, amuse-.
ments, a bake-off contest, a tasting party, the chil-
dren's talent contest, karaoke, blueberry pancake
breakfast, talent contest, children's story-time crafts,
'and grand prize raffle drawing. For information, call
(386) 963-1157 or (386) 963-4898, e-mail wendellsnow-
den@prodigy.net or visit www.wellborncommunity
association.com.
June 5-7
The Jefferson County High School'class of 1984
will celebrate its 25th class reunion, June 5-7, in Mon-
ticello. For more information, contact Carolyn
Hamilton at (850) 284-4306 or deonjala72@yahoo.com,
or Wendy Parker-Evans at 284-8002 or evansw66@
embarqmail.com.
June 7
On Sunday, June 7, Lee First Baptist Church will
honor Simon Kinsey for 60 years of faithful service
as a deacon. The 11 a.m. service will be Deacon Emer-
itus Simon Kinsey, Jr., Day. He was ordained at LFBC
in May 1949 and also served as active deacon for
many years at East Hill in Tallahassee. He has been,
an active deacon at LFBC since retiring and coming
home in 1984. Everyone has a special invitation to
share this honor with us. The church family, will
serve lunch in the IT Carter Center following the'
morning service.
June 7-11
Vacation Bible School starts at Concord Baptist
Church on Sunday, June 7, and goes thru Thursday,
June 11. It will begin each evening at 6 p.m., with din-
ner, and ends at 9 p.m. There is a class for all ages.
This year's theme is "Crocodile Dock." Bring your
friends!
June 8 ... ... . .
The Florida DEP's Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park will host a digital photography
workshop on Mondays, May 4 and June 8, from 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. Taught by professional photographer
Don Williams, the workshops will teach participants
how to create a photographic composition, the
shooting effects of color and black and white im-
ages, flash usage, depth of field, linear perspective
in two dimensional photography and exposure pri-
orities and settings. Computer programming, com-
bined with hands-on outdoor photography sessions,
will enhance student. photography skills. Workshop
fees are $25 per workshop, including park admis-
sion. Participants should bring a film or digital cam-
era. No computers are needed for this workshop. For
additional information or to register for the work-
shops, please call (386) 397-1920 or visit www.
stephenfosterCSO.org.
June 9
On Tuesday, June 9, Jhe Suwannee River Water
Management District's governing board will meet at
9 a.m. at District Headquarters, Hwy 49 and US 90 E,
Live Oak. The meeting is to consider district busi-
ness and conduct public hearings on regulatory and
land acquisition matters. A workshop will follow the
meeting. All meetings, workshops and hearings are.
open to the public.
June 9
The RATT pact is looking for new talent for up-'
coming community performances. Whether you de-


camp. A ministry for
children and young peo-
ple of any (or no) denom-
ination. For more
information, call 888-763-
2602, Ext. 16.


Serving Madison,

Jefferson, Taylor &

Lafayette Counties


Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King - Agent Glen King Agent

233 W. Base St. * Madison * (850) 973-4071

Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St. * Monticello * (850) 997-2213


Freddy Pitts * Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. * Perry * (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County * Mayo, FL * (386) 294-1399


I


sire center stage, backstage or anywhere in between,
we have a place for you! Open auditions will be held
on Tuesday, June 9, at 7 p.m, at the Wild Plum Restau-
rant in Madison. There is no need to prepare in ad-
vance. Just bring a smile and a desire to have fun. For
more information, call (850) 971-5273 or e-mail
rattpact@gmail.com.
June 10
The June 10 meeting of the 55 Plus Club might be
the most important meeting of the year. In this time
of cutting back and being aware of the natural re-
sources that we use, the program will be about saving
energy and lowering our electric bills. Salads, sand-
wiches, desserts and tea will be served. The 55 Plus
Club meets at the United Methodist Community Cen-
ter, about five miles north of Madison on Hwy 145.
The free luncheon is at noon and is open to anyone in
the community 55 years and older. There are no fees
of any kind and reservations are not necessary. Se-
niors of all faiths are welcome. This is the last meet-
ing of the season before 55 Plus Club takes a
two-month vacation.
June 12
The Senior Citizens Council of Madison' County
will be hosting a Health Expo in the fellowship hall of
the First United Methodist Church in Madison. The
expo will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and will fea-
ture over a dozen of vendors available to inform citi-
zens of their health. Door prizes will be given away
throughout the day.
June 13
The Wilson Family Band, a bluegrass gospel
band from Folkston, Ga., will be in concert Saturday
evening, June 13, at 6 p.m., at Sirmans Baptist
Church. For directions, call Johnny Carroll at (850)
948-4228.
June 15-19
Kids, ages 3-12, come explore Bible stories, do
fun activities, songs,; crafts, games, snacks and out-
door cookouts with our Forest Friends during the
Friendship Trek Vacation Bible School at the Hanson
United Methodist Church, .June 15-19.
June 17-20
Camp Weed Summer Camp for Rising 3rd and 4th
graders will take place June 17-20. Visit www.camp-
weed.net for a brochure, registration and scholarship
forms. Join in the Fun in the Sonshine at our 85th
consecutive summer camp. A Ministry of the Episco-
pal Diocese of Florida for children and young people
of any (or no) denomination. For more information,
call 888-763-2602, Ext. 16.
July 20-23
Camp Weed Summer Camp for Children with
Parents) in Prison will take place July 20-23.-Visit
www.campweed.net for a brochure, registration and
scholarship forms. Join in the Fun in the Sonshine at
our 85th consecutive summer camp. A ministry of
the Episcopal Diocese of Florida for children and
young people of any (or no) denomination. Scholar-
ships available for qualified applicants. For informa-
tion, please call 888-763-2602, Ext..16.
July 26-August 1
Camp Weed Summer Camp for Rising 5th and 6th
graders will take' place July 26-Aug. 1. Visit
www.camp-weed.net for a brochure, registration and
scholarship forms. Join in the Fun in the Sonshine at
our 85th consecutive summer camp. A Ministry of the
Episcopal Diocese of Florida for children and young
people of any (or no) denomination. For more infor-
mation, please call 888-763-2602, Ext. 16.
August 2-8
Camp Weed Summer Camp for Rising 7th, 8th and
9th graders will take place Aug. 2-8. Visit www.camp-
weed.net for a brochure, registration and scholarship
forms. Join in the Fun in the Sonshine at our 85th
consecutive summer


FAR

BUREA


[91.7 FM
www.wapb.net








6A * Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 3, 2009


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Pinetta VFP Holds Recognition Pinner


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
About six weeks and a thousand meals ago, the
Pinetta Volunteer Fire Department started feeding
flood victims and their families as part of an ongo-
ing contribution that is deserving of praise to last a
lifetime. Keeping with that rich tradition, the de-
partment held a "farewell" meal on May 15, inviting
the entire community to close a chapter in the de-
partment's history that will never be forgotten, es-
pecially by the numerous souls who were helped.


ill



I/9'~


5,,,.-
Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, May 15, 2009
The lovely Pinetta VFD meal service volunteers,
pictured left to right: Diane Thompson, Cybil Powell
and Inda Tinney, were recognized for their commit-
ment to feeding flood victims and their families.
With the grill fired up and the help of several
lovely volunteers who selflessly delivered hot meals
several times a day for weeks, the lights in the
kitchen were finally turned off, guests and victims
expressed their appreciation. Of course, the VFD
remains, active in the aftermath of the flood, con-

T-Counmty

Electric General

Manager To

Speak At 55

Plus Meeting
The June 10 meeting of the 55 Plus Club might
be the most important meeting of the year. In this
time of cutting back and being aware of the natural
resources that one uses, the program will be about
saving energy and lowering electric bills. Julius
Hackett, General Manager, of Tri-County Electric
will be the guest speaker.
Greenville United Methodist Church will be the
host church. They plan on serving salads, sandwich-
es, desserts and tea.'
The 55 Plus Club meets at the United Methodist
Community Center and it is located about five miles
north of Madison on Highway 145. The free lun-
cheon is at 12 noon and is open to anyone in the com-
munity 55 years and older. There are no fees of any
kind and reservations are not necessary.
55 Plus Club was founded to inform seniors of
events in the community and to bring programs of
interest to them in an atmosphere of Christian fel-
lowship. Seniors of all faiths are welcome.
This is the last meeting of the season before 55
Plus Club takes a two-month vacation. The groups
hopes to see everyone there, and wish all a great
summer, of relaxation, possible travel and lots of
great vegetables from the Madison gardens!!

We Love the Kids!

Come Join Us!

RAINBOW AW8Y'S

SUMMER CAMP


ureene ruDisning, Inc. riiuou y Micnaei urfls, imay i1, Luu9
The Pinetta VFD was recognized by Madison County Emergency Management for their dedication to
helping victims of the 500-year flood in 2009 that swept away homes and took one life., Pictured left to right:
Tyler Shadrick, Allen Shadrick, Vicki Spires, Tammy Thompson, Richie Kelley, Austin Keller and Wesley
Thompson. Not pictured: Doug Finney, Joey Knight, Keith Gramlin, Landy Johnson, Darriel Spires, Ty
Leggett, Jeremy Deming, Chris Fletcher, Michael Farley, Wayne Vickers, Ryan Shadrick, Julie and Wayne
Shewchuck, Terry Studebaker, Frank Wyno, Ryan Bass, Philip Hackle and Brittany Keller.


tinuing to support disaster recovery efforts. It's
simply that the daily meal program has concluded.
For their generosity, the department was recog-
nized with a "Distinguished Service Award" from
Madison County Emergency Management. Signed
by Director Jim Stanley, the certificate of apprecia-
tion for meritorious service praised them for "dedi-
cation to duty, tireless effort, and selfless service
during the Floods of. 2009."
Pinetta VFD Chief Allan Shadrick was ex-
tremely proud of his staff and community volun-
teers, expressing his appreciation for a job very
well done. In the end, their service to the citizens of
Madison County was illustrative of. a notion popu-
larized by an international civic orgalixiatibni,'Ser-
vice Above Self" and "He Profits Most Who Serves
Best."
Congratulations and thanks to the fine men and


women of the VFD and all the community volun-
teers who rose faster than the waters of the 2009
Flood.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.

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John Adams 386-362-1525 F


son, Beatrice Hutchinson and Sherri Howell.
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison Post Office Letter Carriers gathered
2,815 pounds of food on Saturday, May 13. The food was
given to Consolidated Christian Ministries (CCM).
Madison residents left the food outside mailboxes.
0 16th Annual WIellborn Blueberry Festival o
June 5-6, 2009 * No Admission Fee
Andrews Square in Downtown Wellborn, Florida
Friday 9am - 9pmo Saturday 7am - 5pm "
Come join us For two fun-filled days
of Blueberry Treats & Entertainment
* Arts & Crafts * Food Vendors * Country Store selling all things
blueberry * Blueberry Bake-off Tasting Party, * Blueberry Pan-
cake Breakfast * Parade * Live Entertainment * Talent Contest *
* Children's Games * Crafts & Contests *
0 Hosted by the Wellborn Community Association, Inc.,
* a non-profit 501(C)(3)corporation
For information, schedule and directions,
visit www.wellborncommunityassociation.com,
Scall 386-963-1157, 0
or e-mail: wendellsnowden@prodigy.net


Letter carriers Milton Driggers and Sherri Howell
helped gather the food and presented it to representa-
tives from CCM.
"We collected more pounds of food than we did
last year," Howell said. "We didn't do as good as we did
the year before, however."
Howell said that the local letter carriers would do
things a little differently next year and, hopefully, col-
lect more food.

TROY'S AUTOMOTIVE
MACHINE SHOP





C n Owner
324 NE Conner St. Day (386) 362-5655
Live Oak, FL 32060 Night (386) 362-5593


Madison Letter Carriers

Collect Food For The Needy
.- ... . . ' -- .-.1 .


o oeniuo suubanitu
Letter carriers collected food across the nation on May 13. The Madison route carriers collected a total
of 2,815 pounds in groceries. Pictured left to right are Judy'Bentley, Milton Driggers, Harold "Hobo"' Hutchin-








Wednesday, June 3, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier * 7A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Farmers And Friends Festival


Fills Four Freedoms


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, May30, 2009 'Geoff Hill and son Joshua are warmly greeted by Cindy Vees and daughter
City of Madison Police Officers were on hand to assist at the Farmers and Christin, who is visiting from college in Pensacola, while stopping by the Cham-
Friends Festival. Pictured left to right: Ruth Parks, Ben Mabry and Joey Agner. ber booth during the Fifth Saturday Festival.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The second Fifth Saturday Farmers And Friends
Festival of 2009 filled the streets surrounding Four
Freedoms Park on May 30, as vendors and patrons ex-
changed merchandise, refreshments and a lot of
neighborly conversation. Launched by the local Ro-
tary Club, in collaboration with the Chamber, the
Fifth Saturday project continues to chip away at two
community priorities: something to do and creating
revenue.
Since taking office at the Chamber - now called
the Madison County Chamber of Commerce and


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis. May 30, 2009
Town of Lee Mayor Ernestine Kinsey (right) en-
joys speaking to Ansley Paulk at the Studstill Lumber
Co. booth during the Farmers and Friends Festival
held on May 30 at Four Freedoms Park. .


Tourism - Executive Director Ted Ensminger has
pushed ,these goals as priority one, along with at-
tracting and building more tourism. So when the Ro-
tary Club, also champions of local fundraising,
initiated the Fifth Saturday idea, it was a natural,
and apparently fruitful, marriage between the two.
Other key sponsors and advertisers have since joined
suit.
The gazebo was a hub of activity again as it fea-
tured several gospel bands, including up-and-comers
LifeSong, who were in the press recently after sign-
ing a recording contract. Visitors and fans were seen
clapping and singing, along, grabbing a shaded seat
for a few minutes to enjoy the music between shop-
ping and dining.
The dining diversity and tastiness was a big hit.
Several churches, as well as private vendors, offered
up cool beverages and spicy meats to beat the heat,
not to mention desserts to satisfy any 'sweet tooth.
The Lee UMQ youth had a particularly interest ig,
booth that stood out, offering watermelon and base-
ball "prayer" caps, certainly a popular local combo.
In addition to concessions, craft and business
booths were a big hit as well, showcasing picks rang-
ing from folksy personal merchandise to home im-
provement, and tobacco awareness to banking. And,
of course, no Madison gathering would be complete
without a few raffles. Featured this year among draw-
ings and giveaways, was a popular picnic table/deluxe
grill combination sponsored by the Kiwanis, which
was won by Lisa Wentz; and a shotgun sponsored by
tfie Chamber, which was won by Roy Ellis.
Lastly, this reporter would be remiss not to men-
tion another extremely beautiful feature of the day:
the lovely ladies of Madison County in their colorful
spring and summer at- . .
tire. The last fifth Satur-


day fell in January, which was still quite cool, espe-
cially that morning. By contrast, this bright,, sunny
day was a Madison postcard.
The next Farmers and Friends Festival is August
29 and should prove to be a great way to say "so long"
to summer as school resumes. For additional infor-
mation about future Fifth Saturday programs, and to.
make vendor reservations, phone Rotary Secretary
Jim Catron a (850) 673-8201, or the Chamber at (850)
973-2788.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
minihael@greenepublishing.com.
M -


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, May 30, 2009
Willie Robinson (left) got some help at the grill
from his brother Herman during the May 30 Farmer
and Friends Festival at Four Freedoms.


The Lee UMC youth offer a popular combo, watermelons and prayer caps,
during the May 30 Farmers and Friends Festival.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, May 30, 2009
During the Farmers and Friends Festival on May 30, the lovely ladies of Lee
United Methodist Church featured a variety of tasty desserts for patrons of all
ages. Pictured left to right: Wanda Hodnett, Mary Ruff, Florence Webb, Mary Ethel
Ragans, Ramona Guess, Marge Heater and Frances Mercer.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, May 30, 2009
Hanson UMC volunteers are pictured, left to right: Brian Leonardson, Louise Strickland, Laura Pulliam,
Pauline Strickland, Glendyle Littleton, Tom Morse, Missy Pulliam and Millie Leonardson, operated a conces-
sion stand at the Fifth Saturday Festival.


Available Year Round

(386) 294-1211









8A * Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 3, 2009


BRIDAL GUIDE: Ak CArle


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Q Do you have to give favors to every guest, or
can you give them per couple? I picked a fa-
e vor that's a bit expensive.
A It's totally fine to give favors per couple.
The only problem may be with guests who
* are singles - obviously, you should give
them their own, so that no one feels left out. Where
to place them on the table is a littledtricky The solu-
tion: Use place cards. Often people use just table
cards, which directs guests to specific tables, where
they can sit in any seat they choose. With place
cards, you put their name in an exact spot at a spe-
cific table. Place each favor halfway between the two
place cards of a couple, so they'll be able to see it's
for both of them, and directly above or on top of the
service plate for singles. That way, you can be sure
everyone gets a little something!

R If invited guests do not respond to a formal
wedding invitation, even though a re-
* sponse card was supplied, should we call
them o find out if they will come? Or can we as-
sume that they're not coming?

A As far as final head count goes, you should
never assume. Call to see if they're com-
* ing. You never know - maybe they think
they sent the response card but'it may be hiding un-
der a pile of mail. If calling is a problem, assume
that they are coming, and make sure there's food
and seats for them. It's better to have extra grub and
room than to have neglected guests wondering
where to sit!

t='. At what age are girls too old to be flower
Girls?

Flower girls are generally between four
and eight years old. (Sometimes, "mature"
* two- and three-year-olds pull it off quite
charmingly, possibly with parents escorting them
down the aisle.) If the girl is a bit older, you might
consider making her a junior bridesmaid - junior
bridesmaids wear dresses similar (or the same) in
color and style as the bridesmaids', they walk down
the aisle in the procession, and they stand at the al-
tar or stage with the other attendants.

My parents want to invite the whole world
to our wedding. They're willing to pay for
* the extra guests, but we'd rather keep
things small and intimate. How can I rein them in?
A parents and their children often have very
different ideas regarding the fundamen-
* tals of weddings, and disagreements are
part of the planning process: Sit down with your fi-
anc6 and your parents, and, as politely as you can,
explain your desire to-have a smaller affair. Give a
specific example as to how an increased guest list
will alter the wedding's vibe (say, your dream recep-
tion site only seats 100). If your parents are paying
for everything, then technically .they are the hosts,
which means they have more bargaining power.
However, if you and your fiance are contributing to
the bill, politely tell them you appreciate the offer to
cover a portion of the headcount; but that you get fi-
nal say on the guest list. Regardless of who is pay-
ing, try to compromise by agreeing to put a cap on
the number of extra invitees, and leave it at that.

How do I discuss my bridesmaid choices
I I with a good friend of mine who's not going
* to be in my wedding? We just aren't as close
as we once were, but feel guilty for not including
her, especially since I was her maid of honor!

A This is tough! Prepare fdr hurt feelings, be-
cause unless she feels the same way you do
* (that you've grown apart and it would be'
awkward for both of you if she was in your wed-
ding), phe's going to be upset and maybe angry. The
best way to do it is to be completely honest. Maybe
go out for coffee together and just tell her. Explaifi
that it was a tough decision but you really felt like
you should have the people you feel closest to at this
point in your life standing up for you, and there are
so. many of those people (including her),. that you
had to leave out some very special ones. She may or
may not understand, but at least you'll have put
everything on the table. A rule of thumb: Don't ig-
nore it. In this case, honesty really is the best policy


Q I've found a florist whose work I absolutely
love and I definitely want to book her for my
* wedding. However, I'm worried she won't be
able to make it to the church on time for my noon
ceremony - she's in the city, arid my wedding is go-
ing to be at the beach right in the thick of tourist sea-
son. Is it okay if I hire her only for my reception'
decor and find a local florist to do the bouquets?
A It's totally fine to hire a florist to do one
part of the wedding or the other - we've
* heard of plenty of brides who chose DIY
decorations for their receptions and had their florist
simply create the bouquets and boutonnieres - and
there are certainly brides out there who've created
their own bouquets and hired. a pro to do the rest.
You should talk with your florist to see what she
thinks of your timeline. While you're right to be
'concerned about traffic and. timing (especially since
florists usually work with fresh flowers that very
morning), maybe there's a way that she can work
around it, whether it's bringing in additional assis-
tants to help complete the work on time or simply
choosing a simpler design.
If she can't execute your vision in time, or if
you're just too worried it'll be a crunch, there's no
reason you can't have someone else arrange the per-
sonal flowers. Just make sure both florists are on the
same page with respect to your palette and prefer-`
ences so that all the flowers still gel together. You'll
probably do best to have either your centerpieces or
your bouquets be kind of on the simple side - per-
haps you can choose one bloom that you absolutely
love for the bouquets, then just make certain that a
bit of it is included in the centerpieces. Either way,
you should wind up with flowers you love. .

My friend is having a traditional Greek
wedding and I'd like to give her something
� that is traditionally Greek (in addition to
thega I purchased from her registry, of course.)
.What can I do?
A Food is a great focal 'point in Greek wed-
dings - in some Greek villages, women
* bake sourdough breads and decorate them
with beads and blossoms. It's also popular to Qffer
the newlyweds a cake made of honey, sesame seed,
and quince. If you aren't afraid to experiment, find
a Greek cookbook and spend a few hours in, the
kitchen. That way, you'll surprise your friend with
knowledge of her ancestry and learn,,something
yourself in the process. . ..

I am 29 and my fiance is 42. I have a fairly
steady job and my fiance is doing extreme-
" ly well. Several years ago, my dad said that
someday he would pay for my wedding. Well, I re-
cently asked if he would like to contribute, and he
said he would need to talk it over with my stepmom.
It was a hard question to a�k, because he hasn't paid
for anything for me since I moved out almost 10
years ago. It was very uncomfortable for both of us.
Two weeks later he offered me $10,000. My aunt has
since expressed surprise that I asked - she felt that
since I am almost 30, and have been working for so
many years, it wasn't the right thing to do. But my
fiance really encouraged me to ask, as I am my fa-
ther's only daughter. Now I feel guilty about the
whole thing: Should I just let it go, accept that he has,
offered to pay, and try to find the best possible deal
to keep costs at a minimum? Should I maybe try to
pay for some of it myself? -

Budgeting for your wedding is one of the
hardest things you'll ever do. Money is nev-
* er fun, especially when paired with guilt. It
sounds like you should have a heart-to-heart with
your dad, telling him how much you appreciate his of-
fer to contribute but that you are also having conflict-
ing feelings about it. Maybe he felt guilty when you
asked, too, and came through on his promise from
several years ago because he felt obligated. Or maybe
he's glad to do it but was initially hesitant because he
knew he had to discuss it with his wife. I'd say the
most important factor is how you feel about taking his
money If it's going to make you miserable throughout
your wedding planning, then it's probably not worth
it. Your aunt's comment seems totally off the mark -
just because you are of a certain age arid have a
.steady job doesn't mean you must foot the bill your-
self. And this is really none of her business anyway -
ultimately it's between you and your father.
If you and your fiance can comfortably contribute
to your wedding costs, you should do.so. However, it
strikes me as a little odd that your fiance was so enthu-
siastic about your dad contributing when, as you said,
he's "doing extremely well." (You also said, "Maybe I.
should pay for it myself" - shouldn't both of you be
contributing?) My take on it is that every couple should,
contribute to their own wedding as best they can; they
shouldn't expect money from their parents, nor should
they automatically be expected to pay for it themselves.
The most important thing right now is to clear the air
with your dad, so you can have fun with the wedding
planning instead of feeling depressed.


4


Perr, IT3234
I'l:�85 ) 2


Qb I'd like for my dog Alex to be present at my
wedding. I know it sounds nutty but I grew
e up with him and consider him to be one of
mybest friends. However, I'm getting married in a
church and Alex is a huge golden retriever and
tends to get overly excited when he's around crowds.
I'm worried he might get rambunctious and disrupt
the ceremony What can I do?

A Before you do anything, make sure the cer-
emony location allows animals. Once
* you've overcome that hurdle, enlist the
services of ,an empathetic friend or family member
who loves Alex almost as much as you do. Ask that
person to walk Alex in and out of the service on a
leash and sit near an exit in case he acts up or -
worst-case scenario - has to relieve himself. This
way you can concentrate on your vows and feel con-
fident that your furry friend is there and in good
hands.

My son recently got engaged to. a lovely
7| girl, but we don't know her parents. Should
.* we call them up and invite them to dinner,
or is i up to them to make the first move? They live
about two hours away from us.
A The "rule" is that the groom's parents call
on the bride's parents after their son tells
* them about the engagement. So it would be
absolutely appropriate, not to mention extremely
cool of you, to call up and invite them to dinner. It's
a nice touch to also include your son and his brand-
new fiance.

fe I was. hoping to ha ve a candlelight ceremo-
I ny, but I am unclear about how it actually
S *works. I bought a ton of white Christmas
lights, which I am hanging from the floor-to-ceiling,
windows in the ceremony/reception ballroom, but I
don't think this will give off enough light so that
guests will be able to see. Can you give me a few
more suggestions?

A Your twinkly lights sound great, but
you're probably right about wanting more
* light. First, make sure you know what the
local fire ordinances are, including the guidelines as
to how many candles you can light - or if you can
light them at all. Ask the manager of the location to
help you find that out. Then, based on the regula-
tions, you need to decide where you wapt to place.
the candles. Sounds like you're concerned about
there being enough light around the two of you at
the altar, so you might want to put large candles on
stands (maybe decorated with flowers) around
where you will exchange vows so people can see the
area. You could also place one at the end of each
pew. But don't overdo it - the whole purpose of a
candlelight ceremony is that the room is dim, after
all.

What is the appropriate Wording to an-
l nounce our marriage?. We have both been
r married before and the wedding is for fam-
ily an closest friends only There are many people
we wish to inform of our union, yet we do not want
gifts.. Do you have examples? -

A Wedding announcements are more than
appropriate, and a very thoughtful .gesture
* on your part to keep those dear to you in-
formed. Granted, you don't wish for gifts; however, if
they are sent or given, consider yourselves blessed!
The following is an example of how you can word
you announcement, assuming that you and your
husband are doing the announcing:

Mrs. (or Ms.) Bride
and
Mr. Groom
have the pleasure of announcing their mar-'
riage...

Q= I can't seem to find white shoes that I like
anywhere, and I need to settle on a pair
o soon so I can have my final fittings done
while wearing the right heels.. Is it way too tacky to
wear shoes that aren't white?

.A Though brides traditionally wear shoes to
Match their gowns (which are almost al-
* ways some shade of white), you don't ab-
solutely have to. In fact, many brides - having gone
conventional with the white dress -- choose to have
a little more fun with their footwear. You could have
your shoes be your "something blue," or pick a
metallic pair that matches with your jewelry or the
embellishment on your gown. Or you can go really
crazy with footwear that matches your interests -
we've seen brides walk down the aisle in everything
from biker boots to custom-made cowboy boots
(with the bride and groom's initials on them, natu-
rally). Get out there and find a shoe - any shoe -
that you love. No matter what its color, you're sure
to put your best foot forward.








Wednesday, June 3, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com




FUN PAGE


Madison County Carrier * 9A


AOL O PHO P
GRAHS ET U
I BI AN AOE
R W E H I J B N
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UAUDA SEA
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ACROSS
1. "Shoo!"
5. "What's gotten
you?"
9. "Beg pardon ..."
13. Advocate
14. Merlin, e.g.
15. Basic unit of
money in Western
Samoa
16. Locomotive
driven by the
electric current
generated by a
diesel engine
19. Speak to rudely
20. "Awesome!"
21. Dispatch
22. His "4" was
retired
23. Setting for TV's
"Newhart"
24. Parisian
gangsters
26. Nonsense
29. Bring up the rear
30. Boat propellers
31. "Acid"
34. "_ it the truth!"
35. You are
37. Bridges of Los
Angeles County
38. "Crikey!"


39. Stalk
40. Brass instrument
without valves
41. Terminal'that
serves bus
.passengers
44. B-complex
vitamin that is a
constituent of
lecithin
47. When doubled, a
dance
48. "My boy"
49. Devastation
50. _ cross
51. Arm bone
52. Large edible crab
of northern
Pacific waters
56. Blemish
57. Fluff
58. _ bread
59. "Check this out!"
60. Irascible
61. Maple genus
DOWN
1. Areas of a concert
hall where the
audience sits
2. Band or bracelet
worn around the
wrist


Long, long time
"Amen!"
Cuba, e.g.
Call for
_ el Amarna,
Egypt
Bauxite, e.g.
Charge
: Draconian
. A-list
. Ceremonial staffs
carried as a
symbol of office
. Coastal raptor
. Pandemonium
. Name holder
. Calamity
. Biology lab
supply
. Dermatologist's
concern
. It may be boring
. Early maturity
. Make laws
. Tavern
. Woman
chaperon
. 10 jiao 9
. "__ bitten, i
twice shy" 6
. Except
. Jerk
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Abiu
Aiea
Aji
'aku
Alophia
Ash
Au
Bay
Bean


Bog birch
Coca
Dock
Elm
Fir
Galax
Gilo
Grape
Haha


Haya
Hemp
'Hippomane
Ho'awa
Holei
Hyssop
'ie'ie
Indian shot
Inga


Isachne
Jojo
Keahi
Koi
Kopa
Lily
Lophophora
Maga
Mago


Masa
Nigua
Oat
'ohe
Paha
Pea
Peony
Pituri
Plum


Kind ot case
Lean
Criminal
Mashed potato
with spring
onions
Meteorological
effects
Tracks
Bell sound
Obtained from
urine
A pint, maybe
Josh
Bean counter, for
short


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Rice grass
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Sun spurge
Talh
Tarwi
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Tobacco
Udo
Uhiuhi
Wasabi
Weigela
Yerba


DB "t et ory








SAdvertiseyour

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. Call 973-4141



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Tire & MuffIle
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1064 E. US 90 * Madimon, FL
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Sizes: 5x10'-* 10x10'* 10x20'
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10A - Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com




MONEY & FINANCE


Wednesday, June 3, 2009


Speculative Investing Versus Blind Gambling

A $13,500 investment in. Pilgrim's Pride seven months ago
would be worth $500,000 today


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
When. Pilgrim's
Pride stock hit its low of
13.5 cents per share on
Dec. 2, 2008, many pre-
dicted doomsday for the'
company, after all, they
had just declared bank-
ruptcy. The stock had
plummeted so low that
one could have pur-
chased 100,000 shares on
that day for $13,500.
Granted, $13,500 is a
lot of money for most,
but it's less than the cost
of a new truck. Bottom
line: The investment
would have grown to,
$500,000 as of the writ-
ing of this article. For
those with less money, a
modest investment of
$135 would be worth
$5,000 - the ratio re-
mains the same
Of course, hindsight
is 20/20 and plenty of'
folk would have said that
it would be "throwing
money away," or "throw-
ing good money after
bad" This begs the ques-
tion: Would such a trans-
action be considered a


blind gamble or an edu-
cated, albeit speculative,
investment? Moreover,
is speculation different
from gambling?
Although few in-
vestors typically take ad-
vantage of these
opportunities, tens of
millions of shares trad-
ed daily, but could one
have seen the opportuni-
ty? Could someone liv-
ing in New Orleans, for
instance, get a look be-
hind the scenes to see
that Pilgrim's Pride was
still a' viable business,
one that certainly sup-
ports the Madison Coun-
ty community?
' In other words; those
who took the time to con-
duct a little local re-
search would have the
potential to decide it
likely the company
would rebound.. Conse-
quently, the stock had lit-
tle chance of falling all
the way to zero. And
since the most they
could lose is 13.5 cents
per share, the upside po-
tential looked very at-
tractive compared to the


Investment Ideas
for Newlyweds
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones


June is a popular month for weddings. If you're getting
married this month, you have a lot to think about, but
after the wedding - well, you'll have even :more to
think about. And one of those topics should be your
investment strategy. In these days of economic uncer-
tainty, it's important that you and your spouse rnake
investment decisions today that-will help you reach
your long-term goals.

Of course, the investment process can seem confus-
ing to just one person, so you might think it 'will be
twice as difficult for the two of you. But that's not nec-
essarily so. You ,an launch an investment strategy that
can serve you well throughout your lives together by
following these few basic steps:

* Identify your goals. When you start out, you may
have short-term goals, such as saving enough for a
down payment' on a house. As you move through the
years, your goals will become longer-term in nature.
For example, if you have children, you might set a goal
of helping them pay for college. And you will need to
establish a goal of saving for retirement. Your first step
toward achieving all these goals is identifying them. /
* Commit to regular investing. When you begin
your careers, you and your spouse may not have a lot
of disposable income, but you still need to commit
yourselves to putting aside some money each month
- even if it's only a small amount - for investment
purposes. If you each have an employer-sponsored
retirement plan, such as a 401(k) plan, contribute as
much as you can afford.
* Reconcile your investment styles. You and your
spouse may have different orientations toward invest-
ing. By nature, you might be an aggressive investor,
while your spouse could be' more conservative, or vice
versa. This divergence does not have to be a problem,
but 'you should communicate your ipreferences-clearly
to each other when choosing investments together. If
you and your spouse each compromise a bit, you can
come up with a joint portfolio that works for both of
you. At the same time, when you each have an
account, such as a 401(k), you may not want them to
look alike by containing duplicate, investments.
Instead, consider building portfolios that complement
each other and that can help fill in any gaps that exist
in your joint investment strategy.
* Be co-managers. You probably know many mar-
ried couples in which one spouse handles all the
finances and investments. 'This isn't necessarily 'a
good model to follow. You and your spouse will benefit
if you both are familiar with your investment situation
and capable of making decisions. Nobody knows 'what
the future will hold, and if one spouse suddenly finds
himself or herself in charge of the family finances, with
no preparation, it can lead to troubles.

By following these suggestions, you can make long-
term investing a rewarding part of your marriage. And
the sooner you get started, the greater those rewards
can be.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


EdwardJones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631 * Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 * Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204
Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


May 29, 2009: PGPDQ.PK 4.65
. ,T.. -' -' .. . . ...
-- - - ', --I -!-

--"-"'-, -""--- '-,-'---'- __ _


Pilgrim's Pride experienced huge declines last year due to the economy, ultimately resulting in bank-
ruptcy and a stock price of 13.5 cents per share, but has since rebounded to $5 per share on good industry
news. Those in the know or with the foresight to predict a comeback could have bought when the stock price
was so low and quickly enjoyed a hefty return on their investment. (Stock chart data from Yahoo! Finance at
finance.yahoo.com.)


downside risk. Also, this
is not insider trading.
Just because people
work for a company
doesn't mean they're
breaking "insider trad-
ing" rules, rather they
are going after answers
to better know where
they are putting their
money and their future.
It's no different than a
real estate investor get-
ting intimately acquaint-
ed with a property.
There are a variety
of schools of thought re-
garding the percentage.
of an investment portfo-
lio that should be. put
into the speculative cate-
gory. Some say little to
none, others say as
much as 10 percent
based on the level of
wealth and risk toler-
ance, but the bottom line


is that a speculative in-
vestment doesn't need to
be thought of as blind
gambling.
This reporter saw a
similar opportunity in
banking shares recently,
with Citigroup (purchas-
ing a small position),,
and Bank of America, as
well other banking
shares. The bottom line:
After making calls to
several regional bankers
and then speaking to a
few investment special-
ists who are paid huge
sums to make sure the
losses incurred last year
don't become a calami-
tous loss this year, be-
lieved the banking
industry - to many the
backbone of Amnerica -'
would not collapse and'
that the government was
only a temporary and


friendly business part-
ner.
In that scenario, if a
family with $200,000 in
retirement savings had
taken only $5000 (2.5 per-
cent) and invested it in
Citigroup at $1 per share
or Bank of America at $3
(near their lows in early
March), it would have re-
turned $20,000 by May,
netting a $15,000 profit.
Comparing that to the
$200,000 total portfolio
represents an annual
return of 7.5 percent on
the total portfolio. The
small speculative invest-
ment would have carried
the entire portfolio.
Now, back to reality.
None of what has been
described was known for
sure, .which, again,
makes it speculative.
However, the examples


given were available to
everyone to research.
Furthermore, the timing
was evident.
The stock market is
similar to the real estate
market in that it will
present opportunities in
cycles, sometimes for
one stock, sometimes for
the whole market. Those
investing with a buy-
and-hold approach, in-
vesting a 'little with
every paycheck for in-
stance, will typically
miss these opportunities
and often see their in-
vestments go nowhere
for years. Looking for
the educated speculative
investment along the
way can make a measur-
able difference.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
i ;Walking through a hard-
ware store with a friend, a per-
son sees something needed for
the house; a broom for example.
Because paychecks aren't due un-
til the 'next day, they ask their
shopping buddy to borrow a few
dollars to purchase the broom now,
in return for which they offer to not
only to pay them back tomorrow,
but buy them dinner as well. The
friend, finding these terms accept-
able, loans the' money and the
broom is purchased.
This is, in essence, what

when a company issues bonds.
Generally, as a business grows,
it doesn't generate enough cash'
internally to pay for the supplies
and equipment necessary to keep
it growing. Because of this, most'
businesses have one of two op-
tions. They can either 1.) sell a por-
tion of the company to the general public by issuing
additional shares of stock, or' they can 2.) issue
bonds. When a company issues bonds, it is borrow-
ing money from investors in exchange for which it'
agrees to pay them interest at set intervals for a pre-


determined amount of time.
same thing as a mort-
gage only you, the in-
vestor, are the bank.
Most everyone
knows that over the long
run - measured, in
decades - nothing beats
the -stock market. This
being the case, 'why
would anyone invest in
bonds? Although they re-
turn less than stocks in
the long run, bonds have
several traits that stocks
simply can't match.
The first is capital
preservation. Unless a
company goes bankrupt,
a bondholder can be.al-
most completely certain
they will receive the
amount they originally
invested. Stocks, which
are subordinate (have a
lower claim) to bonds,
face the possibility of
tremendous declines
from the value of the ini-
tial investment.
Secondly, bonds pay
interest at set intervals
of time, which can pro-


In essence, it is the


vide valuable income for retired couples, individu-
als, or those who need the cash flow. For instance, if
someone owned $100,000 worth of bonds that paid
six percent interest annually ($6,000 yearly), an
equal fraction of that interest would be sent to the
bondholder either monthly or quarterly, giving
them money to live on or invest elsewhere.
Bonds can also have large tax advantage for
some people. When a government or municipality
issues various types of bonds to raise money to
build bridges, roads, etc., the interest that is earned
is tax exempt. This can be especially advantageous
for those whom are retired or want to minimize
their total tax liability.
By comparison, CDs work somewhat the same,
but the yields tend to be lower, typically in line with
the lesser risk, although the differences in risk are
usually acceptable for bonds with gobd ratings. Sev-
eral rating services can 'be readily investigated,
keeping in mind that ratings range from AAA to
junk.
Historically, investors move from more to less
risk over their lifetime as the time frame of the in-
vestment changes. For instance, if one is 40 and has
$100,000 to invest from a real estate sale, the stock
market may be more appealing as the investor has
several decades before retirement to get through the
peaks and valleys to typically higher ground. How-
ever, if one is 70 and looking at preserving wealth,
bonds may offer a more appropriate fit.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


SIn production To Bonds


PERSONAL INJURY &

;,WRONGFUL DEATH


Jon D Caminez
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney


CAMINEZ & HARDEE, P.A.


(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


I III= ;�, Andw - - - , . - ..


I


I . h w I . I- , . . . I , . . I








Wednesday, June 3, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier * 11A


HEALTH & NUTRITION


Misconceptions About Lifetime

Sun Exposure Still Abound

80 percent of Ultraviolet Radiation

Exposure NOT Received by age 18


Many people take a laissez-fair
attitude about protecting themselves
from the sun because they think the
damage is already done. Experts
have known for quite some time that
this is not the case.
"For years, dermatologists be-
lieved that the majority of sun expo-
sure was received before the age of
18," said Dr. Perry Robins, President
of The Skin Cancer Foundation. "We
now know that the damage is typical-
ly spread out over the course of a life-
time and that all of the damage
matters, yet many people still don't
know that. That's why it's so impor-
tant to be diligent about sun protec-
tion at every age, especially as we
head into summer."
As reported in the Sun & Skin
News, a publication of The Skin Can-
cer Foundation, a multi-center study
led by Dianne Godar, PhD, showed
that we get less than 25 percent of our
total sun exposure by age 18. Dr. Go-
dar's team carefully analyzed nation-
al UVR exposure data over a two-year
period as well as the outdoor activity
profiles of almost 10,000 Americans
and here's how it broke out:


ounce of sunscreen per application.
Not using enough will effectively re-
duce the product's SPF and tlhe pro-
tection you get.
* Be sure to cover often-missed
spots: lips, ears, around eyes, neck,
scalp if hair is thinning, hands, and
feet.
* Reapply at least every two
hours, more often if some of the prod-
uct may have worn off while swim-
ming, sweating, or towel-drying.
* Choose a product that suits
your skin and your activity Sun-
screens are available in lotion, gel,
spray, cream, and stick forms. Some
are labeled as water resistant, sweat-
proof, or especially for sports; as fra-
grance-free, hypoallergenic, or
especially for sensitive skin or chil-
dren.
Cover-up with clothing:
* Wear long-sleeved shirts and
long pants. Or, opt for specially made
sun-protective clothing that offers a
specific UPF (ultraviolet protection
factor) number and may be more
lightweight and comfortable to wear.
The Skin Cancer Foundation consid-


ers a UPF of 30 or
higher to be very good
protection.
* A broad-
brimmed hat goes a
long way toward pre-
venting skin cancer in
often-exposed areas
like the neck, ears,
scalp, and face. Opt for
a 3-4 inch brim that ex-
tends all around the


hat. Baseball caps and visors shade
the face but leave neck, lower face,
and ears exposed.
* UV-blocking sunglasses with
wraparound or large frames protect
your eyelids and the sensitive skin
around your eyes, common sites for
skin cancer and sun-induced aging.
Sunglasses also help reduce the risk
of cataracts later in life.
The first organization in the U.S
committed to educating the public
and medical professionals about sun
safety, The Skin Cancer Foundation
is still the only global organization
solely devoted to the prevention, de-
tection and treatment of skin can-
cer. -The mission of the Foundation
is to decrease the incidence of skin
cancer through public and profes-
sional education and research., For
more information, visit www.skin
cancerorg.


Sun Safety Tips
For Active Lifestyles
The Skin Cancer Foundation en-
courages people to be active and en-
joy the outdoors while still protecting
themselves from the sun. A little ex-
tra effort goes a long way when it
comes to sun protection.
Watch the time: "
S The sun is strongest between 10
a.m. and 4 p.m., so try and do your ac-
tivities in the early morning or late
afternoon. It's cooler during those
times anyway which makes overheat-
ing less likely
Use a sunscreen of SPF 15 or high-
er whenever you are outdoors.
* Choose a sunscreen with ingre-
dients that block both UVB and UVA
rays.
* Apply liberally and evenly to
all exposed skin before you go out-
side. The average adult in a bathing
suit should use approximately one


Diabetic Women Need To

Conceive A Plan Before

Conceiving A Baby


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
There are a combi-.
nation of factors, diet
and lifestyle among
them, which have led to
an extremely high rate
of diabetes in Madison
County, many of who are
women of childbearing
age. Diabetic women
who want to become
mothers face special
risks: more than 20 per-
cent of them are likely
to have a child with
birth defects if they be-
gin a pregnancy while
their blood sugar is
poorly controlled. How-
ever, that percentage can
drop dramatically if
women with diabetes
take certain steps before
conceiving a baby.
According to cur-
rent research, the likeli-
hood of birth defects
could be reduced up to 90
percent if all diabetic
women worked with a
physician or nurse prac-
titioner to manage risks
before pregnancy In
fact, not so long ago,
women with diabetes
were discouraged from
getting pregnant, be-
cause doctors feared
bearing a child could
lead to serious complica-
tions for both infant and
mother. Of course, many
women with diabetes
still want children, and
not all babies are
planned.
Typically, a diabetic
woman whose blood sug-
ar is out of whack may
have to wait up to six
months to improve her
chances for a safe preg-
nancy But thanks to ad-
vances in medical
technology anrd greater
education, there are few-
er instances where
women with diabetes are

CDC Says

October

Soonest

For Swine

Flu Shot

Availability

A U.S. health official
said a swine flu vaccine
could be available as ear-
ly as October, but only if
vaccine production and
testing run smoothly
this summer. Dr. Anne
Schuchat of the U.S. Cen-
ters for Disease Control
and Prevention said the
agency began shipping
virus samples to manu-
facturers in the past sev-
eral days. The govern-
ment will have to review
the safety and effective-
ness of what's produced,
and decide if a vaccina-
tion campaign is war-
ranted. October is about
the time seasonal flu vac-
cine campaigns general-
ly get rolling. CDC
officials reported more
than 8,500 probable and
confirmed cases in the
U.S., including 12 deaths
and more than 500 hospi-
talizations.


being advised not to
have children. Unfortu-
nately, 20 to 30 years ago,
diabetes might have al-
ready damaged the kid-
neys, eyes and heart
because it was not under
control. Fortunately,
times are better and
medicine has advanced,
but precautions should
be followed.
Diabetics hoping to
have a child will usually
be referred to an assort-
ment of health care pro-
fessionals, including a
maternal-fetal medicine
specialist, dietician, and
a pre-natal diabetes edu-
cator to advise them on
how to go through their
pregnancy with minimal
complications. After
pregnancy is confirmed,
diabetic mothers-to-be.
should also remember
the following:
R Food intake need
not be increased sub-
stantially to nourish the
fetus. The appropriate
increase in calories is
equivalent to about a
half-peanut butter and
jelly sandwich and a
glass of milk.
* Pregnant diabet-
ics should take folic acid
to minimize chances for
birth defects. Folic acid
occurs naturally in
spinach and oranges, is
added to some processed
foods and is available
over the counter as a
supplement.
* Expectant moth-
ers with diabetes should
check blood sugar levels
four to six times a day,
especially if they have
Type 1 diabetes, which
requires constant in-
sulin treatment. Type 2_
diabetics (even those
who may not need in-
sulin therapy when not
pregnant) will probably


need to take more to
keep blood sugar in
check during pregnan-
cy.
All pregnant women
should also continue
with their normal exer-
cise routine to help di-
minish excessive weight
gain. She should start
with a low level of exer-
cise and increase it over
a period of time. It is
also vital for pregnant
diabetics to give birth in
a medical facility that
has the right resources
on hand in case of emer-
gencies, including a neo-
natal intensive care
unit, because it is not
unusual for the baby to
have low blood sugar or
respiratory problems
when born.
Practitioners be-
lieve that diabetic
women who deliver
healthy babies through'
healthy lifestyle prac-
tices can use that experi-
ence to stay motivated to
manage their diabetes
long-term. Pregnancy
and children are power7-
ful motivators, where!
the mother is willing to'
put in the extra effort,
and want to make sure
they don't slide down to
another level once their
child is born.
.Michael Curtis can
be reached at michael@:
greenepublishing.com.


Question: Why is it that really bad toothaches
happen on the weekend?

Answer: Doesn't that seem like the truth? Why
does toast land jelly side down? Sorry, but I don't have
a serious answer for this question. I hear this tooth
emergency question asked every week in one form or
another. I sometimes commiserate that it seems like
toothaches only happen on the weekends, National
holidays, your trip to New York City, or. if you say'
anything derogatory about my Florida Gators (that's for
all you Seminole fans out there). I can't explain why it
happens this way and I have not found anyone who
could explain the phenomenon. To add to the mystery,
many patients said they felt so much better by the time
they got to the office. I explain to them that it must be
the doorknob on the front of the office.. So many people
say they touch the knob and they feel better. I tell them
next time they have trouble and nothing else gives them
relief, just come touch the knob until they can get an
appointment.
Truthfully, most dentists schedule
appointments on weekdays. Appointments on
weekdays can go a long way to head off emergencies
on weekends and vacations. If you have not seen a
dentist in the 21st Century I would say you are due to.
see one soon. You can do it the easy way during the
week or the hard way on your trip or vacation. I suggest
the easy way...make a weekday appointment. Might be
a good idea to have a checkup soon. There is only one
thing worse than a bad toothache during your vacation
out of town...that is your bad toothache while your
dentist is out of town on their vacation. You might be
SOL (Simply out of Luck).

Roderick K Shaw III, DMD, MAGD
Master of the Academy of General Dentistry
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmail.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of Dentistry.


Ages Cumulative average percentage of
lifetime sun exposure*
1-18 22.73 percent
19-40 46.53 percent / "j
41-59 73.7 percent --
60-78 100 percent
*based on a 78-year lifespan









12A * Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 3, 2009


DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts

850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340
ANYTHING LEFT OVER 7 DAYS
WILL BE SOLD
rtn, n/

SS Painting
Contractor &
Pressure Cleaning
Services
(850) 673-7754
Sandy Sanderson (Owner)
Free Estimates
Over 35 Years Experience
4/28 - 7/3, pd
Do You Need Help'!

Domestic Worker
Housekeeping, errands,
yard work, pet and live-,
stock care. Efficient,
honest and reliable, 30
years experience

Call Sandra
850-971-5734 or
727-514-4852



Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165
an, n/c

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rn, n/c



Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
. up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 - 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-an, n/c

SMale Donkey. 3 yrs old.
$225. 850-464-1600
rtn, n/c
Like New
King size sealy poster-
pediac bed w/ frame &
Brass Headboard
$300/neg. Complete
Twin Maple Canopy Bed
$200/Firm
5/27, 6/3 pd cc

Lifestyler Treadmill 8.0, 1.5
HP Plus manual $150.00,
Food slicer - slices roast,,
cheese, vegetables $30.00,
Whit le sewing mach-
ing - never, been used $25.00,
Golf Balls .50 - .75 cents
each, Antique Spool Bed
$125.00, Upright like new
Hoover vacuum cleaner
$40.00, Fire Place Screen &
Glass Door $60.00, Cabinet
Doors-variety sizes-make
offer, Ladder Type Ahttena
20' plus-make.offer
850-973-8548
5/27 rtn nc
Discounted Steel Buildings
Big and small, Get the Deal
of Deals!
www.scg-grp.com
Source # OES
850-391-0204 '
5/27,6/3, pd, cc



Queen Pillowtop
mattress & box set.
New - manufacturer
wrapped, full warranty
Delivery available
222-7783
6/3, C
Living Room
matching set: 100%
Microfiber. Still in
crate, never used. can
.deliver $549
545-7112
6/s3,c
New
7 piece sleigh bedroom
set. Delivery available.
$699
222-7783
6/3, c

S All Leather
Sofa & Loveseat, List
$1999, must sell, $799.
New in crates, lifetime
warranty. Delivery
available 425-8374
6/3,.c
Full Size
mattress w/ matching
base, brand new with
warranty $135
222-7783
6/3,c


Specialty Memberships
Madison, Jefferson, and Tay-
lor Counties From $250
annual fee
nflhunts@gmail.com
6/3,6/10, pd, cc


1997 Ford F-150 4x4
3 inch lift, dual exhaust
all power $4500 FIRM
850-210-2949 or 850-
997-5293
5/20, rn, nc

1987 Ford Bronco for sale.
Super hot engine! 58k
original miles. Auto trans.
Differential doesn't leak.
Only rolled over once but
never "mud bogged." Upper
body has no glass but engine
and running gear awesome!
Now painted camo $500.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c



House for Rent
in Greenville, FL
(near elementary school).
All Electric, Newly remod-
eled 3 bedrooms, 1 bath
$575/mo. 1st & security de-
posit. Housing Choice
Vouchers Accepted
Call 617-922-9984 or
617-437-1905

For Rent;
Doublewide Mobile
Home
3 BR, 2 Bath,
great room with fireplace,
large grilliAg deck,
. off Hwy 6 near Blue
Springs, Lee Schpol Dis-.
trict no pets, 1 year lease,
references required.
$600 month /
$600 security deposit..
Call 423-538-1206
or 423-845-0590
5/13 - n,
Apartment for rent
2/1 Central Madison
$425 1st month & securi-
. ty deposit'
464-0073 or 464-9659
6/3, pd

Apartments
2 & 3 Bedroom starting at
$495.00; Close to North
Fjorida Community Col-
lege. Call Mike at Accredit-
ed Real Estate Services -
(386) 288-3596'
4/28 - rtn, c
Clean as new. TWo story, 3
BR, 2.3 baths, formal LR &
* DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. New'
Kitchen, Range, Ref, D/W,
G/D. Oak Floor downstairs,
Heart Pine upstairs. 2 Central
H&A. Yard maint. included.
ADULT FAMILY. No pets.
$900 rent and deposit. Good
credit req. 205 NE Shelby Ave.
Madison. Call George 973-
8583 or 557-0994.
5/8 - nrtn, c
3 BR ZBA M.H. On A Lake
1 year lease, no pets.
$550 a month + security.
929-4333.
rtn, c

outhernem illasS of

Madison apartments


Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711.315 SW
. Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
tIn,

Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786-
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
an. (


CLEAN 3 BR, CH & CA,
new R & Refg, Oak floors.
ADULT FAMILY ONLY.
Rent $685 plus deposit.
No pets. Good credit req.
432 NE Horry Ave., Madison.
Call George 973-8583
or 557-0994.
nn, c
Madison Heights
Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed
for low income families
150 SW Burngardner Dr.
Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833
ext. 485
Equal Housing
Opportunity

Downtown IBR/1BA apartment.
Newly renovated. $450 per mth.
Call 567-1523
rln, cc




"1st time home buyers"
We have several programs-to
help 1st time home buyers
plus GOUT assistance up to
$8,000 $$$
Call Eric for details
(386) 719-5560
6/3,6/10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/1, c

"Brand New""
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 to many
upgrades to list, all this
for only $42,843.00 Call
Eric to set up appoint-
ment (386) 719-5560
6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/1, c

"WOW"'
$150.00 and your property
puts you in a home today
call Eric at
(386) 719-5560
6/3, 6,10, 6/17, 6/24.7/1, c
Trade in's & Repos Available
Call Eric for a list of our
homes available at discount-
ed prices, many to choose
from!
(386) 719-5560
6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/1, c
New Manufactured Homes
Starting at $23.70 4q. ft.
Guaranted lowest prices in
North Florida. Call Rick
(386) 752-8196
6/3, 6/10,6/17, 6/24, 7/1, c
The Wait Is Over!
Introducing "Mossy Oak"
the most innovative, quality
and affordable manufactured
houses in the industry. Call,
Mr. Mott (386) 752-1452
6/3, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24, 7/1, c
Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452
6/3, 6/10. 6/17, 6/24,7/1,c

Best Cash Deals on Mobile
Homes. NO ONE BEATS
MY PRICES
386-719-0044
- n.c
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/
2 BATH Excellent Shape;
SNeed Chas, Priced to sell, '
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
rtn,c
Brand Spanking New
2009 5 BR/3BA; 2004 Sq Ft;
$594.31 Per month. Seller .
pays $3,500 toward closing
cost. Call Mike at
386-623-4218
' n,c

Modular Home for sale in
town. Save $20,000.00. Turn
Key Deal; Owner says make
an offer. It Must Go!
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
nn,c

PRICE REDUCED!
Spacious Mfg home with 4
BR, 3 BATH, Bonus Room'
with lots of windows. Discon-
tinued floor plan. Fore More
info call Sarah. 386-288-0964
an,. '

Become a Homeowner for
the same monthly payments
you are throwing away on
rent. Call Sarah for more info.
386-288-0964


MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00
Call 386-288-4560
/n.c
Need More Space
for a growing family?
2001, 5 BEDROOM, 4
BATH TRADE-IN.
Excellent condition.
For more info call Sarah.
386-288-0964
rtn,c
Pirst lime home Buyer
$7,500.00 CASH
IN YOUR POCKET
Call David for details
386-719-0044
rtn,c
WE PAY CASH..... FOR
YOUR USED MOBILE
HOMES 1980 OR NEWER.
LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129
rtn,c
Home Owners....
Guaranteed Financing
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rnl, n/c




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1.87 Acres $22,000
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5/6-rtn, cc

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5/27. 6/3 c 6/3, 6/10, 6,17, c


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The Healthy Start Coalition
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Taylor Counties is currently
accepting Requests for Pro-
posals for a direct service
position effective July 1st.
The contract will consist of
outreach efforts and working
with collaborative partner-
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in a three-county area and
provide technical assistance
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June 19, 2009 for
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6/3, 6/10, c

PART-TIME LIBRARY
AIDE II MADISON PUB-
LIC LIBRARY

Suwannee River Regional
Library is seeking applicants
for the position of a regular
part-time Library Aide II at
the Madison Public Library,
Madison FL. The applicant
will work approximately 28
hours per week and also be
used as a substitute. Mini-
mum qualifications include
graduation from a standard
high school, ability to type
and experience with Internet
and computer software. Li-
brary and/or experience
working with children and
youth are desired.. Salary is
$7.21 to $10.24 per hour de-
pending upon qualifications
and experience. Interested
applicants may obtain an ap-
plication at the Madison,
Greenville or Lee Public Li-
braries, or at the Suwannee
County Administrative Ser-
vices Department, 224 Pine
Ave., Live Oak, FL 32064,
telephone (386) 362-6869.
Applicants are encouraged to
submit resumes, letters of
reference and other bio-
graphical information with
their applications. All appli-
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the Administrative Services
Department in Live Oak.
Position will remain open
until filled. The Suwannee
County Board of County
Commissioners is an equal
employment opportunity em-
ployer that does not discrimi-
nate against any qualified
employee or applicant be-
cause of race, color, national
origin, sex, including preg-
nancy, age, disability, or
marital status. Spanish
speaking individuals are en-
couraged to apply. All ap-
plicants subject to a
pre-employment physical.
"Successful completion of a
drug-test is a condition of
employment."
6/3, 6/10, C




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Wednesday, June 3, 2009


'IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 2009-CP-035


IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY BURNETT FLEMING
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of MARY BURNETT FLEMING,
deceased. File Number 2009-CP-035, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is Madison County Courthouse, Madison,. Florida 32340.
The name and address of the personal representative is set forth
below.

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is served who have
objections that challenge the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal representative, venue or
jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections
with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is served within three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHSAFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the decedent's estate must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
N , OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is the 27th day
of May, 2009.


LOIS FLEMING HAND
Personal Representative


THOMAS E/ STONE
Attorney for Personal
P.O. Box 292
Madison, Florida 32341
Telephone: 850-973-6560
Attorney at Law-Fla. Bar No. 212490


5/27,6/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-CA-198
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY/
Plaintiff,
vs.
SANDRO GONZALEZ; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SANDRO
GONZALEZ; MARIA S.OCHOA A/K/A MARIA OCHOA; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF MARIA S.OCHOA A/K/A MARIA OCHOA; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTS), IF
REMARRIED, AND IF, DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS,
AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTS); AU-
CILLA
PLANTATIONS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF
SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANTSS)!
Defendanmus. ; ,.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARIA S.OCHOA A/K/A MARIA OCHOA; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTS);
Whose residence are/is unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any,
in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Courtl and to serve a copy
thereof upon the plaintiff's attorney. Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra,
9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, PL 33619-1328/ telephone (813) 915-8660,
facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this
Notice,'the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage
against the following described property, to wit:
TRACT 36, AUCILLA PLANTATION UNRECORDED/ MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT AN IRON ROD MARKING THE NORTHWEST COR-
NER OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 EAST, MADI-
SON
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREE 28 MINUTES 47
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1130.27 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 740.95 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF 80 FOOT WIDE
ROADWAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT (SW 395TH
STREET), RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 17
DEGREES 22 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 133.90
FEET TO A POINT ; THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10
SECONDS WEST, 274.81 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 20 DE-
GREES 07 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 190.21 FEET
FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BE-
GINNING, CONTINUE ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS:
NORTH 20 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 6332 FEET TO A POINT/- THENCE NORTH 08 DEGREES 43 MIN-
UTES 10 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 311.07 FEET TO A POINT;
THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE/'RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 43
MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1010.11. FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 46 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 207.91 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 01
DEGREES 19 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 293.82
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 32
SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1132.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
A/K/A
LOT 36 AUCILLA PLANTATION
GREENVILLE, FL 32331

If you fail to file your answer or written defenses in the above proceeding, on
plaintiff's attorney, a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or Petition.'
DATED at MADISON County this 28 day of May 2009.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
Ing a special aqcommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-8771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.


6/3,6/10


www.greenepublishing.com


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FileNo. 2008-116-CP


INRE: ESTATE OF
EDWARD WOOOROW
SMITH, HI,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of EDWARD WOODROW SMITH, In,
deceased, whose date of death was August 24,2008; File Number 2008-116-
CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, FL
32340. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate must file their daims with this court WITH-
IN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is: May 27, 2009.


BETTY MARLENE SMITH
Personal Representative
4898 N.W. CR 141
Jennings, PL 32053

JAMES W. PREVATT, JR.
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 0352012
The Prevatt Law Firm. P.A.
P.O. Box 310
506 S.Ohio Avenue
Live Oak, PL 32064
Telephone: (386) 362-7979

5/27,6/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,. IN AND FOR
,MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2009-33-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM JOHNSTON ROWE, a/k/a
WILLIAM J. ROWE,
FILE NO. 2009,33-CP
Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of William Johnston Rowe, a/k/a William J.
Rowe, deceased, whose death was April 18, 2008, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
Post Office Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341. The names and addresses of the
Personal Representative and the Personal Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against Decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served,must file. their claims with this Court WITHIN THE .LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mands against Decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITH-
IN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.7,02 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is June 3, 2009.


Attorney for Personal Representative;
/s/ Scot B. Copeland
Scot B. Copeland (FBN 0156681)
Law Offices of Scot B. Copeland, P.L.
Post Office Drawer 916
Madison, FL 32341
Ph: (850) 973-4100
6/3, 6/10


Personal Representative:
s/ Elizabeth Cobb Rowe
Elizabeth Cobb Rowe
2212 Hill Park Court
Decatur, Georgia 3003


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Madison County Carrier * 13A


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 009-CP-034

IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARJORIE FRANCES ZIPPERER
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of MARJORIE FRANCES
ZIPPERER, deceased. File Number 2009-CP-034, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida
32340. The name and address of the personal representative is
set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is served who have
objections that challenge the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal representative, venue or
jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections
with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
:n All other creditors of the decedent and persons having
,.claims or demands against the decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is served within three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.

* All other creditors of the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the decedent's estate must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.

The date of the first publication of this Notice is the 27th day
of May, 2009.


ELLEN LANORA ZIPPER
Personal Representative






5/27,6/3


THOMAS E/ STONE
Attorney for Personal
P.O. Box 292
Madison, Florida 32341
Telephone: 850-973-6560
Attorney at Law-Fla. Bar No. 212490


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD
, JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2008-438-CA

U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION ,AS INDENTURE
TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE NOTEHOLDERS OF
AEGIS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES TRUST 2005-3,
MORTGAGE-BACKED NOTES
Plaintiff,
vs.
SUSAN ROACH DIORIO A/K/A SUSAN DIORIO;
WILLIAM T. DIORIO N/K/A ELLSWORTH JACOB
BURWELL; UNKNOWN PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PP.OPEPiTY; MARGARET B. SANDS;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARGARET Bi SANDS; JUDY K.
PAUL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDY K. PAUL;
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA;

Defendants.

NOTICE OFTORECLOSURE SALE-

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated May 18, 2009, and entered in Case No. 2008-438-CA, of the Circuit.
Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for MADISON
County, Florida. U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDEN-
TURE TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE NOTEHOLDERS OF AEGIS AS-
SET BACKED SECURITIES TRUST 2005-3, MORTGAGE-BACKED
NOTES is Plaintiff and SUSAN ROACH DIORIO A/K/A SUSAN DIORIO;
WILLIAM T. DIORIO N/K/A ELLSWORTH JACOB BURWELL; UN-
KNOWN PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
MARGARET B. SANDS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARGARET B.
SANDS; JUDY K.PAUL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDY K. PAUL;
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA; are defendants. I will slpH to the highest
and best bidder for cash at AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURT-
HOUSE, AT 125 SW RANGE AYE, MADI SON IN
MADISON COUNTY, FL, at 11:00 a.m., on the 18 day of June, 2009, the
following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
BEGIN AT THE SW CORNER LOT OF A.C. SASSER ON HORRY
STREET IN THE TOWN OF MADISON, FLORIDA, FROM THENCE
RUN SOUTH 52 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST 97 FEET TO LOT OWNED
BY LOLA ROWE, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 FEET TO LOT OWNED
BY A.C. SASSER, THENCE RUN WEST 97 FEET TO THE PLACE OF
BEGINNING, IN THE TOWN OF MAISON, AND LYING AND BEIGN
IN SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST. MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with
60 days after the sale.

Dated this 20 day of May 2009.
TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of said Court


BY: /s/ Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person
with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain
assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 145 N. Hemando, Rm.
408, Lake City, FL 32055, Phone No. (386)758-2163 within 2 working days
of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call
1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V)
(Via Florida Relay Services).
Submitted by:
Kahane & Associates, P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380


527, 6/3





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14A * Madison County Carrier


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a aa S **' * 6. . * 6 6

2009 Chrysler PT Cruiser ,,e


Ta^toft T/


Interested in trying
some delicious
local flavor? These
restaurants are only
minutes away and ready to
delight your palate with
offerings from some of the
best kitchens around.
Experience "home" cooking
as the name implies, as these
great eateries literally
are part of your home;
the North Florida and
South Georgia area.


1874 Clubhouse Dr.
Valdosta, GA
229-242-7700


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Ole Times County Buffet
Suk. Sdad & 1$4 m4
hand Cut Top Siroin Steakis On liuffel Nhigh
Banquet KacilitieO \vailabe
(229) 253-1600
11 '.3 N . S~. AUI'LL, Lirxc ku id. \" 'dt l,. iJ-\
Ljkc tl'n M.ai[l. H ,',vi.in Lkc Ci',.. FL
M astetiia, d,' ,j. :\, i A ria r t:a \F;-;\S .'DLI. i o' r


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100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work * Frame Straightening


Quit Putting Off Your Repairs
STONE HOUSE
CONSTRUCTION, LLC
Licensed & Insured
(229) 233-5134 (office)
(229) 227-8303 (cell)
Cairo, GA "


Specializing in Quilting and Basic Sewing
Debi . Cecilia
Mccuiiers Now Offering Monogramming McCuliers
Also offering Sewing Machine Service & Repair

Selling PFAFFt
& Singer Sewing 229-498-1028
Machines ' 1A i l I01a N. Main St,
Sewinq Classes Fali'i�m M Gwft Boston, GA


31626


Available New Store Hours Starting Jan..2th: Tues.-i. 10-6
1. 0t.e Sat. 9-4, Cloifed Snday & Monday.


SFanmil Dining
For A Tasty Experience!

SExpress to go dri\e through
is now open for QUICK FOOD pickup
Featuring
Wraps, Sandwiches. Salads
- Pasta & Drinks.
Starting from $3
SDrive in hungry,
Drive out happy
S379 W. Base St. Nladiion. Fl 32340
850 973 6405
SL -i.l' " . ...l..c. . I, .... n.. ..rii
, --- ..-.., -----.,l -.R.... I, *


Touring, Automatic, Air Conditioning
Retail $20,700
Sale Price $SI,81 . #S
2009 Dodge Avenger -
Automatic, Air Conditioning
Retail $21,255
Sale Price s17,9 S 6 4.,
2009 Dodge Journey SXT
Automatic, Air Conditioning
Retail $25,295
Sale Price S19, 38 #80013
2008 Dodge Durango
Automatic, Air Conditioning
Retail $30,755
Sale price $19,9798 #80M
2008 Chysler Sebring Limite_[-"I
Sunroof Leather Interior ,.
Retail $29,255M;
Sale Price $19,869- __#80019
2009 Dodge Charger
Automatic, Air Conditioning
Retail $25,810
Sale Price 21,884 #6oo054
All price altW factory rebate. Plud tax, tag & Ife.


[ Wi J USt ""- - 1 101 Commerce Drive
229Q 228-9 1 00 "N]x 0t ost on.a" I
wwwi.roycaopbI.ClOm (Jut Post 19 on Hwy 319N)


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