Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00151
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla
Publication Date: February 25, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00151
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text







SMadison Coun\


INSIDE TOE

Celebrating

At Madison

Nursing

Center


See Page 7A


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U!iviersif o F!O)id LilDra iy
pDe0p O Specjai Coii, Fla HistOry
,-jA l,-! tr Library
t: awinviieFt ?"l


B ^ii diH


Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper
ap Not lrd


Pinetta VFD

Holding Early

Spring Auction
Saturday, Feb. 28, at
6:30 p.m. at the Pinetta
Fire House.
Come join the fun!
light refreshments will be
served.
For more information,
call 850-929-4633 or 850-929-
7574.

Lee Community

Yard Sale Set

For March 7
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
There was a bumper
sticker that read:
"We should live in a
world where there is
enough money for educa-
tion and we hold bake sales
to buy bombers."
Of course, no one is
suggesting. that America
weaken its military, sim-
ply that our communities
have enormous needs that
are deserving of full sup-
port as well. Another of
these areas of much-de-
served support is the fine
men and women who vol-
unteer to keep our com-
munity safe from fire and
emergency
Many find it surpris-
ing to learn that the volun-
teer fire departments of
Madison County still rely
heavily on events like yard
sales to raise vital operat-
ing funds. So, support of
these events is essential.
On March 7, from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m., the Lee Vol-
unteer Fire Department
will be holding a commu-
nity yard sale at the fire-
house, which is located ad-
jacent to Lee City Hall on
County Road 255 just
north of US 90.
Residents are urged to
drop buy and grab a bar-
gain. Those interested in
renting space or donating
items are gratefully re-
quested to contact Carolyn
at 971-5573 or Cindy at 971-
5222. Organizers thank all
in advance for their con-
tinued support of this
worthwhile service.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at
michael(@greenepublishln
g.com.

Local People
Asked To Share
Their Health
Concerns

The Madison area has
been selected as one of
five locations for "Town
Hall" meetings to get im-
portant input from people
in rural areas about
health concerns. The ses-
sion is scheduled on Mon-
day March 2, at the Madi-
son County Extension of-
fice. The State Office of
Rural Health wants to
know what people who
live in rural areas consid-
er to be the top health is-
sues. The session will
begin at 10 a.m. and end at
Please See Health, Page
2A


Carl m Elected

ToaFlorida High

School Hall Fame

The Florida High School Athletic Association has an-
nounced that one-legged athlete Carl Joseph from Madi-
son is among the eight former Florida prep stars chosen
for induction into the FHSAA sports Hall of Fame.
Joseph, now 48 and living in Tallahassee, is be-'
lieved to be the first disabled athlete to
achieve this honor at the state or national
level.


"I've wondered whet-
her a guy could jump over
a canyon on a motorcy-
cle, says CBS Sports An-
alyst Dan Dierdorf "but I
never even thought about
someone playing football
on one leg. It was so pre-
posterous it never entered
my mind. All I'can say is
that'Carl is an exception-
ally rare human being."


Born without a left leg, he trans-
formed himself from the object of pity
and ridicule as a child to one of respect
and awe at Madison High School. Win-
ning over dubious coaches along the
way, he was a 3-sport standout, earn-
ing eight varsity letters and Big Bend
Conference awards.
In high school, he was able to hold
his own against two-legged athletes,
usually getting the better of them despite
playing or rather hopping on one leg.
It was when he dropped his crutches (or
propped his wooden leg against a tree) and
hopped onto the playing field that he became an
extraordinary athlete, seemingly defying tie laws
of physics and reason.
Captain of the varsity football team and starting
nosegpard, he couldn't be blocked by only one offen-
sive lineman, so he was double- and triple-teamed. He
registered 11 solo tackles in one game. Career high-
lights include chasing down and sacking a quarter-
back, blocking a punt, recovering 15 fumbles, batting
down numerous passes, and intercepting a pass. He
could also punt if needed.
Joseph won three varsity letters in track. He could
sail the discus 130 feet and the shotput 40. He excelled
in the high jump, winning the district championship
at 5 feet 10 inches. In practice, he cleared 6'5".
The pace of basketball limited Carl's playing
time. He was the eighth man on the varsity his senior
year, averaging four points and three rebounds a
game. A tenacious defender and rebounder, he could
dunk and swat shots into the stands.
During the tense early years of forced integration in
Madison, Joseph's inspirational football exploits were
credited with uniting the black and white communities.
He created immense interest and renewed civic pride in
a football team that had been drawing sparse crowds at
home. By his senior year, bleachers were overflowing in
Madison and on the road.
Former college football coach Jackie Sherrill, a men-
tor to Joseph, reacted to the announcement by saying,
"Congratulations to the selection committee for recog-
nizing.a young man who is not in the record books for
points, total yardage, sacks or tackles but rather for his
ability.to inspire the sports world and motivate'us to be-
'lieve we can do anything if we really never, ever give up."
Frank Yanossy, Joseph's high school football coach,
said, "There is no one individual more worthy of this
award."
Joseph, now a special needs teacher and prep football
coach, was elated by his selection. "I feel really blessed
that after all these years an honor like this could happen to
me," he said. "When I was a little kid, I used to actually
dream about playing varsity sports in high school. But now, to
be among these great athletes, that's something I never could've imagined."
Joseph, who is a bishop in his church and a gospel singer, said his inclusion in the
hall of fame gives hope to everyone, especially disabled people, "that anything is pos-
sible if you put your mind to it and never quit."
Officials at the National Federation of State High School Associations in Indi-
anapolis were not aware of any disabled athletes among the 350 inductees in their
hall of fame. Personnel at several state high school sports shrines said they had no
knowledge of any disabled inductees.
Florida-bred sports stars already in the FHSAA Hall of Fame include Chris
Evert, Emmitt Smith and Cris Collingsworth.
The hall of fame induction ceremony and awards banquet will be held in Gainesville
on April 26.
According to an Internet story on Joseph:
"In 1980, Carl was known worldwide. He appeared on That's Incredible, To Tell
Please see Carl Joseph, Page 2A


Man, Wqman Arrested

For Credt Card Fraud


By Jacob Bembry -. The Department of Agriculture
Greene Publishing, Inc. stopped Sanchez and Royra'x vehicle
A man'and woman were, -,ste.d on the interstate and returned them to
for credit card ofraudn owSi# b- Madison County
ruary 21. ..: r'4 Sanchez had active warrants from
According it Dade County for credit card fraud and
Sheriff's ... a. mnia drug trafficking.
Sano"e 14 ti, tried Law officers found 262 cartons of
t ~jwh several cigarettes in the vehicle that Sanchez
P I- TVhey were un- and Royra were traveling in.
W f chasess were de- Additional charges are pending
~fc. : against the couple.


North Florida

Livestock Show

And Sale

-Grand Champions
Please see Friday's Madison Enterprise-Recorder
for full coverage of the North Florida Livestock Show
and Sale.
F~.7 ,a*.e.


Colin Kauffman, right (holding ribbon) had the
Grand Champion Swine at the North Florida Livestock
Show and Sale held Feb. 16-19 in Madison. His hog was
bought by Birdsong Peanuts in Lee. Ronnie Thompson,
left, accepts the ribbon on behalf of Birdsong.
..I .I r --


Connor Ginn, center, raised the Grand Champion
steer for the North Florida Livestock Show and Sale. The
steer was bought by Clemons, Rutherford and Associ-
ates and H2 Engineering. Will Rutherford, left, repre-
sented Clemons; Rutherford and Associates and Mike
Hartman, right, represented H2 Engineering.


Man Arrested For Grand Theft
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A man was arrested on Thursday, Feb. 19, for grand
theft after stealing shelves from Beall's Outlet in Madi-
son.
According to a Madison Police Department report,
at approximately 9 a.m. that morning, the manager of
Beall's called in reference to someone taking shelves out
of the building behind the store.
Upon Patrolman Eric Gilbert's arrival, he spoke
with the manager and she told him that she had seen
the driver of a truck from a local business loading the
shelves and wire baskets into the truck and driving off.
Gilbert spoke to another employee at the store who
told him the same story that the manager had.
Patrolman Joey Agner went to the business who
owned the truck. He spoke with the employees who said
that they didn't know anything about the thefts.
When Gilbert returned to the police department, he
got a call from a man who said that he had seen the sus-
pect dropping off the wire baskets at an entrance to\a
field near the business. He also advised what the sus-
pect was wearing and that he was in the Winn-Dixie
parking lot.
Agner went back and talked to the employees again
and found the wire racks where the caller said that they
were. He took photos of them.
Jorge Torralblas-Legon was placed under arrest and
driven to the jail.
The shelves and baskets were turned over to Beall's
by the MPD.


Bridal Guide
Classifieds/Lcgals
Path of Faith


lges LA.l & Regi,.n.I Cnm 4-
6-8A History 13A
9A Obituaries 5A
14- 15A Money & Finance 12A
B Section Regional 16A


lS d 7/ Thu 7/OI
Wed 7147 Thu 78/,0 S
2126 2/26
Partly cloudy skies. High 71F, Mix of sun and clouds, Highs In the
Winds ESE at 5 to 10 mph. upper 70s and lows In the low 60.0


Frl I "
Fri 77155 1 Sat 76153
2/27 2/28
Times of sun and clouds, High in Scattered thunderstorms, Highs in
the upper 70s and lows in the mid th mid 70s and lows in the low
SOs, 1 n








2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 25, 2009



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Carl Joseph


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.

Wake Up And Hear The Real Story About Sex Offenders


Living is already almost impossible for "sex offenders",
and the more and more laws that are passed daily eventually
they are going to explode, and it won't be a pretty sight. You
must be realistic when making laws, these draconian laws
make it impossible for anyone to live ANY type of life. Every-
one is for treatment and punishing those violent offenders
who are making other sex offenders lives hell, but like I said,
we must be realistic. To post their faces on the news, in news-
papers ect, ect! Only leaves their kids at risk. The public has a
right to know yes but does the public have the right to vigilante
justice? Does the public have the right to harass me and my
family?
Think!! Come up with solutions, not "feel good" laws,
which make it harder and harder for sex offenders to get on
with their lives.
"Buffer Zones" are a false sense of security!
"Buffer Zones" are banishing people from their town,
state, and possibly the country!
"Buffer Zones" create homelessness, which costs society
lost productivity individual dignity and creates additional
problems for enforcing any accurate registry!
"Buffer Zones" do nothing, except banish! It could be 50
miles and if someone wanted to re-offend, they'd just get in a
car and drive!
When will people ever realize no matter how tough on
crime, all the zero tolerance, all the registries in the world will
not prevent a murderer from murdering, a thief from stealing,
a dealer from dealing, a user from using, a rapist from rap-
ing....accusations on any sex crime, child abuse, or domestic
violence will literally nail your butt to the wall! No'DNA has to
be present, No violence has to be present..... HEARSAY
ALONE IS LITERALLY NAILING THOUSANDS AND
THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE TO THE WALL BECAUSE
THESE LAWS ARE BIASED. This is what happened to Mr.
Cooperad why wasn't the (victim) in this case charged she had
a fake id saying she was 20. Isn't that against the law? Why is
it that the men and/or women in these cases lose their lives

What About

Alcohol Abuse?
I would like to voice my opinion on the recent letter
about the cigarette tax and the evils of smoking. Yes
you've done your homework and you had all the facts
and figures but there seems to be one thing that you and
others choose to ignore.
Alcohol abuse and it's related problems cost society
billions of dollars every year. Most of the costs pertain
to the adverse effects of alcohol abuse on your health.
Many people have alcohol related health issues and pub-
lic programs are paying for their treatments, hospital
care, and let us not forget the many people who are on
disability because they chose to drink.
I can also say that smoking a cigarette has never
caused me to wreck my car and injure or kill myself and
innocent others. I am sure if you ask someone who has
lost a loved one to drunk driving they would say that
they really wish that person had chosen a cigarette in-
stead of a drink.
I hear a lot of talk about smoking but I have to won-
der why these same people don't seem to have a problem
with alcohol. Maybe they aren't as pure of body as they
would like us to believe.
Glenda Floyd


and these so called victims go free. Don't get me wrong any
man or women who intentionally hurts a child should be
buried under the judicial system but what about the one's who
didn't know ? Are they really to blame?.
Registries are punishing sex offenders as well as their
families and children, and opening them up to vigilantism.
DON'T THE FAMILIES AND CHILDREN OF SEX OFFEND-
ERS COUNT? They are suppose to be "for the children", right?
Registries are putting families and children of sex of-
fenders in a public position to be socially outcast and discrim-
inated against with regard to employment, housing, school-
ing, etc!
About 90% of the people on theregistry are NOT violent
offenders that these laws were meant for in the first place!
These laws cost millions, if not billions to enforce, and
they cause prison over-population, which is already a prob-
lem, especially in florida, and taxpayers pay for all this.
There are over one million women and children whose
lives are inter-twined with a sex offender in the United States.
They should matter too!
The whole sex offender registry is botched. Only 4% of
guys /gals on the registry are true molesters/rapists. The reg-
istry is filled with consensual/ statutory cases and juvenile
cases(19 year olds with 16 year olds).The politicians just try to
pump up their ratings by pumping up public hysteria, yet the
registry is outdatedprofiles to many cases that are harmless
and is just a whipping post for politicians. Was Elvis Pres-
leyJerry lee Lewis, Jimmy Page,Humphrey Bogart, Charlie
Chaplin and Jake Lomatta all "sex offenders" for dat-
ing/marrying teenage girls as men? Come on reallyhow about
all our grandfathers from the old country marrying our
grandmothers as teens,are they all"sex Offenders"?.Time to
grow up,put the age of consent at 15 like europe and Canada
and lets get onto the real criminals.Theone's that are molest-
ing our children,the one's that are killing our babies.
Renada Bryant


Whatever Y u Need,

Greene Publishing, Inc.

Classifieds

Have -,

It!


GREENE
Publishing, Inc.


1695 S. SR 53 Madison


973-4141


cont from Page 1A
the Truth, Today and several NFL shows. Stories ex-
tolling his high school exploits were written in national
magazines and newspapers. He received thousands of
fan letters. A book was written about him, One of a
Kind: the Legend of Carl Joseph.
"In 1981, the Philadelphia Sportswriters Assn. gave
him its prestigious Most Courageous Athlete of the Year
award, putting him in the company of Rocky Bleier and
Tommy John. Carl went on to play varsity football at
Bethune- Cookman College and received his degree in
physical education in 1987. He now teaches special needs
children and serves as an assistant football coach for the
Jefferson County High Tigers under former NFL player
Rodell'Thomas. But at 48, his future is clouded by his de-
clining physical condition. He had knee surgery in 1992
and was hospitalized in 2005 with sarcoidosis the mys-
terious respiratory ailment cited as a factor in Reggie
White's death. Getting around today is harder than ever
for Carl, but, not unexpectedly, he soldiers on.
"Ironically, Carl has a following today in the Deep
South, but not for his past athletic ability, which is for-
gotten largely because his book was never distributed
and a movie never made. His fame these days derives
from his performances on the Soithern gospel circuit as
lead singer of Carl Joseph & the Spiritual Tru-
Tones. In the churches and auditoriums where the
quartet plays on weekends, audiences are uplifted by
this courageous one-legged man on crutches. If they
only could have seen him dunk."

Health

cont from Page 1A
noon. The information will be shared about this process
and what is expected to result from all the people partici-
pating.
All people in Madison, Jefferson, Taylor, Suwannee
and other surrounding rural counties are invited to join us
for this special meeting. The facilitator will be Dr. Gail Bel-
lamy,.Florida State University Professor. She will lead the
discussion, and comments and opinions from the partici-
pants will be documented and provided to the State Office
of Rural Health. These sessions allow local people an op-
po'tunity to share what matters to them, and what they
think should be emphasized when it comes to optimum
healthcare for rural areas.
Rural health has some unique characteristics related
to the delivery of health careservices because there at of-
ten limited providers; transportation is often a key issue,
and many of the people living in rural areas work for small
employers who are not able to provide health care.
Living in rural areas in Florida has many benefits. You
r participation in this meeting will help to ensure that
maximum healthcare is one these the key benefits. This is
a chance for your opinions to be heard. Please join us for
this important meeting!



|bappll"' |




SHELBY LICHT


tove Mommy,

Jacob, Grandma,

|r Papa!
r. 1-a0-N-I rJ'Or-O- r-Pt-OrJ J-JU- jg- iJ-


Miss Leona Gay is a resident at Lake Park
of Madison Nursing Center. There for going on
three years in August, Gay has been a Madison
resident most of her life. Born and raised in the
county, Gay moved to South Florida for a bit
and then moved on to Georgia. When Gay's first
husband died in 1967, she returned to Madison
and has been here since. Remarried in 1977,
Gay chuckled when she laid it all out.
"First I was a Blair, then a Coleman, now
I'm a Gay."
When asked what is a personal motto, Gay
responded, "Do unto others as you would have
them do unto you..."


QUESTION OF THE WEEK
"Have you stopped eating peanut butter
because of the salmonella scare?





Yes





No ^ l ^-: 4. .:



Log on to GreenePublishing.com to vote on next week's question:
"How often do you recycle?"
Voting for this question ends 3-2-09


mummma









Wednesday, February 25, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee e

Limelight
lacob Bembry
Columnist


Who Done Stole

The Bride?
Lee United Methodist Church will host a dinner the-
ater on Saturday, Feb. 28, beginning at 6 p.m. The title is
Who Done Stole the Bride? Everyone is invited to attend
this production. Cost is by donation only.
The Lee Day Pageant is scheduled for Saturday,
March 14, at 6 .p.m., at the Lee Elementary School in
Madison. Go out and show your support for the contes-
tants in the pageant.
Contestants in the pageant include:
Baby Belle Little Miss
Jasmine Reddy Emily Bishop
Kendall Odom Haley Phillips
Nevaeh Krueger Emmolyn Terry

Tiny Princess Pre-Teen
Sienna Guillen Amanda Miller
Lilly Premorel Casey Hooker
Dallas Walker
Jr. Little Miss Kelsey Odom
Abigail Reddy Celina Quintana
Caibre Johnson
Haley Reddy Teen
Angelina Quintana Jodi Phillips
Kandace Odom
Elaine Terry
Belated birthday wishes are extended to Bertha Jean
Phillips, who celebrated her birthday on Sunday, Feb. 22.
Hope you had a happy one!
A special study on the Book of Revelation will begin
on Sunday, March 1, at Midway Church of God.
The series is entitled "E-Quake" and is based on a
book by Rev. Jack Hayford. Services begin at 6 p.m.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week
and a beautiful forever! May God bless each and every
one of you!





US Bank National Association vs. Jon Hicks -mort-
gage foreclosure
Woodland III vs. Anson Jean-Pierre, et al mortgage
foreclosure I
Robert E. Truesdale vs. Arthur G. Smith other civ-
il
Stacey Stephens vs. Allen Hall repeat domestic in-
junction
Green Tree Services vs. John and Kelly Michalows-
ki other civil
Crystal Hightower and Department of Revenue vs.
Jacquez Jackson support
Jessie Messick and Department of Revenue vs. John
Finch support
Teresa Stephens and Department of Revenue vs.
Darrell James support
Linda King and Department of Revenue vs. Isaat
Nelson support
John 0. Williams vs. Ed Thompson mortgage fore-
closure
Shayon Straughter vs. Shalonda Rowe repeat do-
mestic injunction
Lettie M. Sexton vs. Lacey McLeod Jones repeat
domestic injunction
Surretta Bell vs. Morris Bell domestic injunction
Connie Alexander Harris vs. Sim Alexander other
civil


+


Good Morning!
Subscribe today to enjoy your local news
At the start of every Wednesday and Fridayl
,Just $30 In county and $38 out of county.
Call us at 850-973-4141
To start your subscription today!


Dear Readers:
Since I'm
one-handed now National
thanks to
surgery on my Security
left hand to re-
pair a broken Joe Boyles
metacarpal Guest Columnist
bone, I'm recy-
cling the "best of
stray vectors"
from my previ-
ous columns. Hopefully, I'll have two
hands to work with next week.
I am an advocate for term limits, es-
pecially for the people who make laws.
The longer a legislator is in office, the
more distant he or she becomes from
the people who elected him and the
more he becomes part of the establish-
ment. Remember Jimmy Stewart's
character in the movie Mr Smith Goes
to Washington? We need more of that.
Do you want to know how to suc-
ceed in business? Here is a very simple
rule that works every time focus on
your customer. You'd think that we
would never lose sight of that princi-
ple, but you'd be surprised how many
*things interfere with customer focus.
And then there is the government;
here's a test go up to your average
public servant and ask him to identify
his customer. I bet you get more than a
few blank stares.
Remember the adage, if you want to
discourage something, then tax it (Con-
versely, if you want to encourage be-
havior, then subsidize it.). Okay, now
will someone please give me an eco-
nomic justification for taxing saving
and investment?
Who was it that said, "You spend
the first three years in school learning
how to read so you can spend the rest of
your life reading to learn?" That is pro-
found.
The building block of all society is
the family When that building block is
undermined, or never existed in the'
first place, society will suffer. Along
the same lines, education begins in the
home, long before public education
starts. Two parents have a much better
opportunity to positively influence the
education of their children than one.
"Suppose I am an idiot and a mem-
ber of Congress. But wait, I repeat my-
self." Thanks Mark Twain for that
pearl of wisdom.
Isn't it ironic that education began
in the churches (the first printed book
was the Gutenberg Bible) and today, we
are doing everything possible to rid
public schools of any hint of religion?
Do politicians create more drag on
the economy than boost? What do
politicians know about economics any-
way?
Have you ever noticed that it is far
easier to'spend someone else's money


Than your own?
1 E And that my
friends, is what
politics are all
[ about. .Don't
you wish that
every politician
had to sit
through at least
one sermon on
stewardship?
Do you think
they might be able to apply the concept
to their role as a trustee for public
funds? Nah!
Have you ever noticed that politi-
cians talk about public money like it is
theirs? Who earned the money? What
does a politician.know about "earning"
anything other than the most votes in
the last election?
"The problem with Washington is
everyone is too far from home." I did-
n't make that one up ... but Dwight D.
Eisenhower did. That statement is an
undeniable truth!
OBE is an acronym that stands for
"overcome by events." Think about
how many government programs,
agencies and laws enacted over the
years have been overcome by events ...
and still exist.
As I grow older, I find that I am us-
ing less hair shampoo. I wonder why?
The old saw goes like this: "there
are only two things in life that you can
count on death and taxes." Leave it to
conniving politicians to combine both
ideas into one ... death tax. That leads
to a moral question: should death be a
taxable event?
The great 19th Century statesman
Henry Clay said, "Of all human powers
operating on the affairs of mankind,
none is greater than that of competi-
tion." If we really want to improve the
performance of something like public
education, isn't it imperative that we
introduce competition? Isn't that what
school choice is all about?
In the second paragraph of the Dec-
laration of Independence, Thomas Jef-
ferson writes, "we are endowed by our
Creator with certain inalienable rights
that among these are life, liberty and
the pursuit of happiness." To recount,
our rights are conveyed by God and the
first of these is the right to life. Think
about it.
The other night, I listened to a col-
lege administrator explain that the
cost of student tuition was going to
rise because the legislature did not ap-
propriate enough money this year to
run our state universities. At no time
did the interviewer ask the administra-
tor why the cost of operating our col-
leges has risen at three times the rate of
inflation over the past two decades. Is-
n't that the real question we should be
asking?


m Press Associ


2008
Award Winning Newspaper








P.O. Drawer 772
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Heather Bowen
STAFF WRITERS
Michael Curris and Tyrra Meserve
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
James Sutter and Stephen Bochnia
TYPESErTER/SUBSCRIPTIONS
Bryant Thigpen
ADVERTISING
SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy McKinney,
Jeanette Dunn
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
StLcy Martin
Dedhine kfor cii fied.s i Monday
ji 3 prn.
Deadline for Legal Ad erusement h
NMondas) ji. pm.
There will be a '" charge lor Affidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In County L30 Oul-oI'-Couni) $38
(State lacJ li\ws includedi

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
'postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, IL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the
right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the man-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene
Publishing, Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


Stray Vectors


Did you Know...


The pleasant feeling of eating chocolate is

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4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 25, 2009



LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER

i m m mmm --


Madison County

E ilME BEAT

ALL SUSPECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED INNOCENT
-UNT!DLROVEN GUILTY IN A COURT OF LAW

Man Arrested For

Marijuana Possession
A Madison man was arrested for possession of mar-
ijuana less than 20 grams and possession of alcohol by a
person under 21 years of age on Saturday evening, Feb.
21.
According to a Madison County Sheriff's Office re-
port, Cpl. Mike Maurice stopped a car on a routine traf-
fic stop. As Maurice approached the vehicle, he detected
a strong odor of marijuana coming from the car.
A search of the car turned up less than 20 grams of
marijuana.
Angus Davenport, 19, was arrested and charged on
the marijuana possession and underage drinking
counts.

Palm Beach County

Resident Charged

With Grand Theft
On Feb. 6, William Rolland Baugh, 50, turned himself
in to the Palm Beach County Jail pursuant to a warrant
for his arrest for grand theft, a first-degree felony
The Florida Department of Law Enforcement
(FDLE) began investigating Baugh in November 2006 af-
ter receiving information from EnviroCap, LLC, a Tam-
pa-based company, about fraudulent claims in excess of
$800,000 they received from Custom Solutions Interna-
tional, Inc. (CIS), a consulting firm, owned.by Baugh.
EnviroCap is responsible for providing financing to
environmental remediation companies for clean-up on
petroleum contaminated sites. Baugh, who was once the
president and personal guarantor of Custom Solutions
International, Inc., allegedly presented EnviroCap with
invoices for work that was incomplete or had never been
performed. The criminal' activity allegedly occurred
from 1999 through April 2004. EnviroCap initiated legal
actions against CIS in September 2004.
Baugh is~'being held at the Palm Beach County Jail
on a $15,000 bond.


common Joe Bandit" Arrested


And Charged With Bank Robbery


R. Alexander Acosta, United States Attorney for the
Southern District of Florida, and Jonathan I. Solomon,
Special Agent in Charge, Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion, Miami Field Office, announced that defendant
Douglas Granston has been arrested and charged in a
federal criminal complaint filed today in Fort Laud-
erdale with armed bank robbery, in violation of Title 18,
United states Code, Section 2113 (a) and (d). He made his
appearance in federal court this morning in Fort Laud-
erdale. A pre-trial detention hearing has been scheduled
for February 24, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. before Magistrate
Judge Barry Seltzer.
According to the affidavit filed in support of the
complaint, Granston was identified as the bank robber
after bank surveillance photographs were released by
the media. Information generated from the news media
coverage led to the identification and subsequent arrest


of Granston as the person who had robbed the Bank of
America, located on West Broward Boulevard in Planta-
tion, FL, on January 16, 2009, as well as other banks.
The complaint further alleges that Granston con-
fessed to committing fifteen (15) bank robberies in the
Southern District of Florida. During the interview,
Granston identified himself in various bank surveil-
lance photographs at the victim banks. In addition,
Granston stated that he carried a loaded .45 caliber pis-
tol during the commission of 14 of the 15 bank rob-
beries. Ammunitioli used by a .45 caliber pistol was
seized from Granston's residence after he consented to a
search.
Mr. Acosta commended the extraordinary investiga-
tive effort of the Federal Bureau.of Investigation and its
Violent Crimes Task Force. The case is assigned to As-
sistant United States Attorney Donald Chase


State Pharmacy Inspector Arrested


For Accepting Unlawful Compensation


Florida Department of Law En-'
forcement special agents have ar-
rested an inspector with the Flori-
da Department of Health for al-
legedly charging pharmacies,
providers and consultants a fee for
expediting and successfully pass-
ing their inspections.
Johanna Estrada, 37, of Miami
was arrested Feb. 19 and charged
with three counts of unlawful com-
pensation or reward for official be-
havior, a second-degree felony. If
convicted, Estrada could face up to


Mail To:
Greene Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Drawer 772
Mad ison, FL 32341


15 years on each count.
The investigation began in Oc-
tober 2008 when agents received in-
formation that Estrada was charg-
ing a fee for expediting and suc-
cessfully passing inspections of
new and existing pharmacies.
These inspections are conduct-
ed free of charge by the Florida De-
partment of Health as a means of
making sure that the pharmacies
comply with state health stan-
dards. The fees charged ranged
from $500 to $1,000 per inspection.


I


On three occasions between Oc-
tober and January, FDLE agents set
up surveillance outside of the
pharmacies Estrada was due to in-
spect. Each time, an undercover
witness met with Estrada at the
pharmacy to conduct the inspec-
tion. According to agents, each in-
spection passed with no issues and
Estrada was given $500 per inspec-
tion.
Estrada was booked into the
Turner Guilford Knight Correc-
tional Center on a $20,000 bond.


Your Local Paper las Lots Ti Offer:
* Community Events
* Sports
* Local News
* Classifieds

Call 9734141 to start your subscriptionitoday


- E-I


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Wednesday, February 25, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


lbs J


Clarice

Hollingsworth

Graves

Mrs. Clarice Hollings-
worth Graves, age 76, died
on Friday, February 20,
2009, in Madison.
Funeral services were
held Monday, February 23,
at 11 a.m., at the Pinetta
First Baptist Church in
Pinetta. Burial in Mt.
Horeb Cemetery in Pinet-
ta.
The family received
friends at Beggs Funeral
Home on Sunday, February
22 from 5-7 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, the
.family request that contri-
butions be made to the
Pinetta Baptist Church
Building Fund, P.O. Box
117, Pinetta, FL 32350.
Mrs. Graves was born
in Madison County on
April 17,1932. She is the
daughter of the late John
Timothy Hollingsworth
and Mae Ardell Blair
Hollingsworth. She was a
member of the Pinetta
Baptist Church. She was a
homemaker.
She is survived by a
son, Timothy Graves of
Tallahassee; two daugh-
ters, Ramona Sprenkle and
husband Hal, and Sabrina
Hammock and husband
Alvin, all of Pinetta; one
brother, Jack Holling-
sworth and wife Charlotte
of Pinetta; four sisters,
Linda' Sapp and husband
Wayne of Pinetta, Johnnie
Hollingsworth and Ruthie
Freeman of Tallahassee,
Faye Hardee of Panama
City; five grandchildren,
Cortni and Will Brown,
Dusty and Melissa Ham-
mock, Eli Sprenkle, Dylan
Hammock and Zack Spren-
kle; three great-grandchil-
dren, Hayden and Adyson
Hammock and Gracie
Brown; one brother-in-law,
Ernest C. Graves; a host of
nieces; nephews; and
friends.
She was predeceased
by her husband, Henry
Paul Graves.


Christine

Cruce

Christine Cruce, a
homemaker, age 89, passed
away on Thursday, Febru-
ary 19, 2009, at Big Bend
Hospice House in Tallahas-
see. She was born in
Ashburn, Ga., Coming
from Cordele, Ga., she had
lived in Shady Grove since
1936. Mrs. Cruce was a
member of the Shady
Grove Missionary Baptist
Church. She enjoyed
spending time with her
family, especially her
grandchildren, gardening,
fishing, cooking for her
family and attending
gospel sings.
She was preceded in
death by her husband, J.D.
Cruce, in 1958.
She is Survived by four
sons, L.M. Cruce and wife
Bessie of Shady Grove, J.
W. Cruce and wife Berry of
Madison, Jerry Cruce and
wife Mary of West Mem-
phis, Arkansas, Richard
Cruce and wife Carol of
Perry; one daughter, Reba
C. Todd' and husband Tom-
my of Perry; 15 grandchilL
dren; 34 great-grandchil-
dren; and 15 great-great-
grandchildren; a host of
nieces; nephews; other rel-
atives and friends.
Funeral services will
be held at Joe P. Burns Fu-
neral Home on Saturday,
February 21, at 2 p.m., with
Pastor Jessie .Benefield
and Pastor Howard Folsom
officiating. Interment will
follow at Hendry Cemetery
Family will receive
friends on Friday evening
from 7-9 p.m., at Burns
Chapel.
You may sign the
guestbook at: www.joepb-
urnsfuneralhomes.com.


Got news
straight from
the horse's mouth?

We Do.

The Madison County Carrier
& Madison Enterprise Recorder


Mildred

Warick

Merritt
Mildred Warlick Mer-
ritt, age 104, died on Satur-
day, February 21, 2009, in
Madison.
Funeral services will be
Thursday February 26, at 2
p.m., at McCommons Funer-
al Home in Greensboro, Ga.
Burial will follow in Greens-
boro City Cemetery Greens-
boro, Ga.
Contributions in Mrs.
Merritt's honor may be
made to Druid Hills United
Methodist Church, 1200
Ponce de Leon Ave. NE, At-
lanta, GA 30307.
She was born on Novem-
ber 18, 1904, in Americus,
Ga., and is the daughter of
the late Samuel Eugene War-
lick and Hattie McAfee War-
lick. She attended Girls
High in 1922 and Oglethorpe
University She was a Secre-
tary for a retail credit com-
pany for five years.
She was a member of
the Druid Hills United
Methodist Church in At-
lanta, Ga., and the Agape
Circle United Methodist
Woman, Charitee's Club, At-
lanta, Druid Hills Garden
Club and Atlanta Athletic
Club. She moved to Madison
10 years ago to be near her
family.
She is survived by a son,
Edward E Merritt, Jr. and
wife Sara of Jasper, Ga.; a
daughter, Mary Jane Beggs
and husband Tommy of
Madison; six grandchildren;
and 15 great-grandchildren.
She was predeceased by
her husband, Edward E
Merritt, Sr.


Olivia


S.

Wood
Olivia S. Wood, beloved
mother and grandmother,
age 88, died Thursday Feb-
ruary 19, 2009, at Lake Park
Nursing Home in Madison.
Funeral services will be
Sunday February 22, at 2
p.m., at Beggs Funeral Home
Madison Chapel with burial
at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
The family will receive'
friends Saturday February
21, from 5-7 p.m., at Beggs
Chapel.
She was born May 27,
1920 into a family of pio-
neers in Madison, and also
lived in Madison all her life.
She was a retired secretary
for Live Oak Gas Co., and
had also been employed with
Thompson Industries for
many years. She
loved to crochet and made
many afghans and other
items. Her favorite past time
was working with her flow-
ers and in her yard and
loved to sit on her front
porch in her rocker
She is survived by her
one son, Allen Wood ,of
Madison; two .daughters,
Betty Ann Wood of Madison
and Laverne Willette of
Jacksonville; several grand-
children; great-grandchil-
dren; one sister, Agnes
Schickiolk of Madison; and
a host of nieces; nephews;
and friends.
She is dearly loved by all
other family and friends and
will be greatly missed.
She was preceded in
death by her husband, DeWi-
ley Wood and one grand-
child, Jamie.


iMALiN0Af?



WtCAL5CL P


SFebruary 22-27
March 8-13,22-27
The Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
will host an Elderhostel pro-
gram for adults age 55 and
older entitled "Suwannee Riv-
er Adventure: Canoeing, Hik-
ing and Folklore in Florida."
Three dates are being offered
for this active educational
program during the months
of February and March. This
unique program offers partic-
ipants the opportunity for ca-
noeing and hiking along with
educational classes about the
folklore of the Suwannee Riv-
er Valley All meals, lodging
and classroom supplies are
included. For information on
program fees and registra-
tion, please call Kelly Green at
(386) 397-4478. Participants
can register for this program
at www.elderhostel.org or call
1-800454-5768.
Tuesday, Wednesdays &
Saturday Thru March 31
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park, in White
Springs, will host a black-
smithing workshop on Tues-
days, Wednesdays and Satur-
days through the end of
March, from 9 a.m. until 12
noon. Students will learn how
to draw out, bend, upset and
twist iron. Everyone will
leave with a simple finished
product. Workshop fees are
$15 per class, which includes
park admission and all sup-
plies. For additional informa-
tion or to register for the
workshops, please call the
Park Gift Shop at (386) 397-
1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.org
February 26
The Florida Peanut Pro-


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ducers Assoc. would like to
announce their 34th annual
membership meeting to be
held Thursday Feb. 26, at the
Jackson County Agriculture
Conference Center, 2741 Penn
Ave., Marianna. All peanut
growers and their spouses are
invited to attend. Registration
will begin at 6:30 p.m. CST, fol-
lowed by the traditional
smoked steak dinner
February 26
North Florida Communi-
ty College presents Renais-
sance Days & Medieval
(K)nights Madrigal Dinner
Thursday Feb. 26, at the Madi-
son Woman's Club, at 6 p.m.
"Enjoy delicious food, live mu-
sic and entertainment indica-
tive of the medieval era" Re-
serve your seats by Feb. 20.
Tickets are $25 each. Call (850)
973-1642 for tickets and infor-
mation.
Thursday Thru
March 5
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park, in White
Springs, will host the first ses-
sion in a series of poetry
workshops entitled, "Writing
from the Heart," on Thursday
Feb. 5. Classes will continue
on Thursday nights until
March 5. Author Sudye Cau-
then will teach participants
how to work toward creating a
poetry chapbook, as well as
simple poetic techniques. Par-
ticipants should bring pencils
and paper. The classes are lim-
ited to five participants. Work-
shop fees, including park ad-
mission, are $25 per class or
$100 in advance; For addition-
al information or to register
for the workshops, please call
(386) 397-1920 or Sudye Cau-
then at (386) 397-1284.


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A sales representative will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at
sales meetings, call1-877-567-2347, TTY: 711. 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. local time, 7 days a week. You can switch to another Medicare
Advantage plan until March 31, but during this time you can't join or drop your Part D coverage.
AARP does not make health plan recommendations for individuals. You are strongly encouraged to evaluate your needs before
choosing a health plan. The AARP" MedicareComplete* plans are SecureHorizons' Medicare Advantage plans insured or covered
by an affiliate of UnitedHealthcare, an MA organization with a Medicare contract. AARP is not an insurer. UnitedHealthcare pays
a fee to AARP and its affiliate for use of the AARP trademark and other services. Amounts paid are used for the general purposes
of AARP and its members. The AARP" MedicareComplete* plans are available to all eligible Medicare beneficiaries, including both
members and non-members of AARP.
AARP and its affiliate are not insurance agencies or carriers and do not employ or endorse insurance agents, brokers,
representatives or advisors.
Limitations, copayments and coinsurance niay apply. Benefits may vary by county and plan.
M0011_081205_185138 OVFL3137532_000


WE--g Nov%#








6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 25, 2009



AROUND MADISON COUNTY



Coalition Grows Membership Madison Farn Service


And Adds Conference Center


Agency To Hold Bill


Update Meeting


A'


HPPI Executive Di-
rector Gregory Harris,
serving as Associate
Director of the Madison
Alcohol and Other Drug
Prevention Coalition,
welcomes guest speak-
er and friend Senta
Goudy to the planning
workshop held on Feb.
7 at the new conference
center located at 316
SW Pinckney Street in
downtown Madison.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Saturday, February 7th, between 9 a.m. and noon, an extremely timely-and
unique gathering took place at 316 SW Pinckney Street. Members and leadership of
a concerned community launched phase one of the 2009 agenda of the Madison
County Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Coalition to great praise and even
greater expectation.
Featured guest speaker Senta Goudy, who coordinates vital resource and infor-
mation exchange between'the coalition and the Department of Children and Fami-
lies, discussed key stats and summaries specific to Madison County As the invited
guest of Dr. Gregory Harris, whose oversight of the coalition is coordinated with lo-
cal leadership, including Chair Margie Evans and Community Coordinator Jerome
Wyche, the speaker pledged her time and professional network to the causes of the
coalition.
First on the agenda: youth prevention.
"It takes a village to raise a child," has now been repeated so often by so many
that appreciation for the message has been.lost. The timeliness and accuracy of the
message, especially when it comes to youth prevention of alcohol and drug use is
still right on the mark, however. Put another way; without the cooperation and par-
ticipation of the community, progress will be difficult and limited.
"Our goal to improve the condition of alcohol and other drug use in the com-
munity, and to establish meaningful youth prevention programs throughout Madi-
son County, depends on all of us working together. Reaching out to schools, govern-
ment and churches is essential. We have to let parents know that we understand the
challenges they're facing and that we're working hard making plans to support
them," Harris explained.
"Of course, we need to hear from the teens and their parents before we finalize
any plans, so our next step will be to launch an organized exchange to get to know
the circumstances unique to them and this area, and then combine that with what
we know already. We will also continue to invite all concerned individuals to join us
as members of the coalition. We truly need and gratefully welcome them," he added.
In order to better facilitate the process of growing the coalition and meeting
its notable mission, a new office and conference center was opened where mem-
bers and guests can hold meetings and community events to raise strategic
awareness, and participation. The refurbished facility is located a short block
west of the Courthouse, allowing convenient meetings for everything from criti-
cal data gathering to celebrations and success stories. Organizers have also
agreed to make it available to the community as an option to affordable meeting
spaces.
A very famous football coach once stated to this reporter; "Plan you work and
work your plan." Again, a simple idea that is timeless in its ability to deliver
when applied. Implemented by Harris and the other coalition membership, it is
the exact approach they know will make the difference in Madison County, but
they also know how much more is possible when others add their insights and en-
couragement.
The plans are underway The MCAODPC cordially invites the community to
join them at their regular meeting scheduled for Monday, March 9 at 6:30 p.m. at
the conference center. For more information or to schedule a special engagement
with the coalition, including guest speakers to or from the group, please phone
(850) 385-1205 or phone toll-free at (866) 659-4062.
Michael Curtis can be reached at Michael@greenepublishing.com.


The Madison County
Farm Service Agency
(FSA) will be holding a
2008 Farm Bill Update
meeting on March 5, 2009
at 6:30 pm at the Madison
County Extension Office.
All agricultural land own-
ers and farmers, are invit-
ed to attend.
Some of the topics that
are to be discussed are:
Farm Loan Programs
Farm Service Agency
Programs
Natural Resource Con-
servation Service Pro-
grams
Charlotte Blackburn
(FSA-Farm Loan Pro-
grams), Bern Smith (Nat-
ural Resource Conserva-
tion Service) & Mark De-
mott (FSA-Farm Pro-
grams) will be available to


answer questions.
We hope that this
meeting may provide an-
swers to some of your
questions concerning the
new farm bill. Refresh-


MWre
Than
Just
Pmnilt4


'~' r
.r.

*~. I r
i ... . i f


Saint Leo University admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. IFounded in I889
e- al:( 5 )9 3-3 6 o m i: s


ments will be provided.
If you have any ques-
tions concerning the meet-
ing, please call the Madi-
son FSA Office at (850)973-
2205.


Our Madison office has been moved to Live Oak and we
are pleased to continue to service your area.
For your convenience, the Madison phone number,
850-973-8877; is still available to take your calls.
610 Industrial Ave, SW Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-5360
i 24 Hour Emergency
(386) 590-0888


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--if








Wednesday, February 25, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY



ItBas mrwime o CeEbrteRAtrAinuursinCentern


Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo by Tyrra B Meserve, February 17, 2009 0


6 Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo by Tyrra B Meserve, February 17, 2009
Newly crowned Valentine King Matthew Maxwell and Queen Minnie Johnson smile
at attending friends.
By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Celebration was in the air and even Cupid paid a visit to
Madison Nursing Center this February as Miss Mary Lu-
cille Wynn had birthday cake and a new King and Queen of
the Valentine took their thrones. Last year's royalty stepped
down with grace and hearts floated down from the ceiling,
little "I love yous" from friends.
Heart shaped cookies lay sprinkled with sparkles on ta-
bles bedecked pink, white and red as residents of Madison
Nursing Center flittered in for February's festivities. First
up on the order of anything but business, Valentine royalty
changed hands in front of the crowd and a new King and
Queen took the throne. Slated to ride in the Down'Home
Days parade, just as last year's predecessors, King Warren
Little and Queen Elaine Duffy did, recently crowned King
Matthew Maxwell and Queen Minnie Johnson looked regal
as they accepted their robes.
Mary Lucille Wynn, previously a Greenville resident,
now a resident of the Center since 1990, was among the on-
lookers during the changing of the crowns. Her spot in the
spotlight came a few days later when she celebrated her
birthday in the same room shared with the Queen. Born in
1929, Wynn enjoys Bingo and parties, dancing and touring,
games and life. A member of Saint John's Baptist Church,
Wynn is filled with faith.
Saying "I love you" is what means the most on Valen-
tine's Day is what the residents and staff of Madison Nurs-
ing Center explained, and saying "I love you" seems to j'
come naturally to those who were there.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be reached at
tyra@greenepublishing.com.


The Madison County Farm Service Agency (FSA) will be holding a 2008 Farm Bill Update
meeting on March 5, at 6:30 p.m. at the Madison County Extension Office. All agricultural land
owners and farmers are invited to attend. Some of the topics that are to be discussed are:
.f Farm Loan Programs _. Farm Service Agency Programs
S.. Natural Resource Conservation Service Programs
Q Charlotte Blackburn (FSA-Farm Loan Programs). Bern Smith (Natural Resource Conservation
SService) & Mark Demott (FSA-Farm Programs) will be available to answer questions.
We hope that this meeting may provide answers to some of your questions concerning the new
farm bill. Refreshments will be provided. If you have any questions concerning the meeting, please
call the Madison FSA Office at (850) 973-2205.








8A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 25, 2009


AROUND MADISON COUNTY




The Model T Ford Is sack On The Road


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Touring North Florida roads in style
is a classic car that has never gone out of
style for some. Starting out as just a little
get-together for friends, Model T'ers from
all over the country now tour at least
once a year over Madison streets on what
has grown to be a "very big deal" for this
never-grow-old car.
"What is it they say?" Woody Wood-
worth asked his fellow Model T'er Ken
Meek, chuckling as he looked out the
door at the collection of classic cars
parked outside. "Oh yeah, there's no real
difference between our toys and little boy
toys, except ours are more expensive!"
According to members who were
staying at the Holiday -Inn Express, this
Model T Club started out as an impromp-
tu get-together for friends who missed
the ageless auto. At first, just a few indi-
viduals who happened to have a hanker-

. ,.



'I ii-,8i


ing for classic cars, now their numbers
have multiplied and they drive in from all
over. Here for one week, drivers from
Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Ken-
tucky and Missouri are in town, just to
name a few. Ts are tagged and parked in
the parking lot of Madison's Holiday Inn
on State Road 53 from all over the U.S.,
symbols of American ingenuity
"The Model T stands for fun," said
Ken Meek, a Model T fan from Saint
Claire, Missouri. "It's a fun car, a fun hob-
by and a fun way to see the sights along
the way You can see things along the road
in a Model T that you could never see in a
modern car. It's like riding a horse, slow
and easy"
Well, maybe a horse with runners,
but any collector can cachl +he drift.
When it comes to classic cars and classic
style, the Model T just can't be beat.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be
reached at Tyrra@greenepublishing.com.


"G'" 4 L ureene rublsning, Inc., moto By
Tyrra B Meserve, February 23, 2009
Every year, Carol Mar-
- com of Jacksonville closes
Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo By Tyrra B Meserve, February 23, 2009 her eyes and steps back in
Pretty ModelTs parked all in a row at Madison's Holiday Inn Express on State Road time with fantastic Ford
53 South. fashion.


I *1
FAR


U


Serving Madison, Jefferson,
Taylor & Lafayette Counties


INURm Auto, Life, Health, Home


Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King Agent Glen King Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071

Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213

Freddy Pitts
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399

24/7 Claim Service: 1-866-275-7322
"Helping You Is What We Do Best."


Question: Why should we place a filling in a baby
tooth? It is going to fall out anyway isn't it?

Answer: Cavities in teeth are infections from a bac-
teria in the mouth called streptococcus mutans. Whenever
cavities form, the disease from one tooth can/will infect
other teeth in the mouth. There is the very real risk that a
.cavity in a baby tooth will infect the permanent tooth next to
it. Incidentally, toothaches in baby teeth are no picnic ei-
ther. They can hurt just a badly as'adult teeth. As a gen-
eral rule of thumb, it takes'about two years from when a
cavity starts to get deep enough to cause an abscess.

A heartbreaking case happened to 12 year old Deomonte
Driver who died from an abscessed molar in 2007. I do not
know.the specifics of the tragedy. The case sounded like it
followed the familiar pattern where cavities in baby teeth
were untreated. Then the child got cavities in adjacent per-
manent teeth which abscessed and caused a fatal brain in-
fection.

It is absolutely needless to let cavities progress. My advice,
get them fixed when they are small and easy to fix and be-
fore they spread throughout the mouth. It is fast, easy and
certainly cheaper to fix one small cavity early on. A mouth
full of untreated cavities is not something I recommend. Get
those cavities baby teeth treated!

Roderick K Shaw III, DMD
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmail.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of
Dentistry


PERSONAL INJURY &

WRONGFUL DEATH


Jon D. Caminez
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney

Ian Brown
Cary A. "B6" Hardee, III



CAMINEZ, BROWN & HARDEE, P.A.

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET.
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


Greene Publishing, Inc.. Pholo By Tyrra B Meserve, February 23, 2009
Touring car hobbyists Ken Meek, Ray Dragoo and Woody Woodworth grab a gab
before hitting the road in their Model Ts.


NMM








Wednesday, February 25, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com



BRIDAL GUIDE


Madison County Carrier 9A


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229-263-4149
101 Webster St. Quitman, GA


A wedding theme is pretty impor-
tant, and, as you plan your wedding,
you will discover that it is the theme
that makes the wedding ceremony
what it is.
A wedding theme needs to be cho-
sen by the couple that is getting mar-
ried. As you wed, you will choose a
theme that brightens your heart: one
that you love most. Themes can be
very dynamic and it all depends on
what you wish to go with.
Before you decide on the theme, it
is vital for you to take time and really
consider what you would want to have
in your ceremony. The theme ensures
that your ceremony has a signature
and a distinction from all others.
It is time for you to go to work. If
you think that you want some help de-
ciding, why not include some of your
closest friends and family? Many
times, they will help you decide on
something that is extra ordinary.
If you are a cowboy fan, 'you can
have that cowboy wedding you have al-


ways dreamt about. The theme will be
achieved by the decorations and the
design of the clothes at the wedding.
Many bridegrooms would give
anything to wed the cowboy way You
need to look at all you have and make
the most out of it. The best thing is to
be creative, even as you seek to make
the theme prominent.
For many ladies who would like to
feel like classic queens, you can have a
Victorian theme for your wedding.
Again. the dresses you choose and the
decorations will announce that Victo-
rian excellence.
If you are in the Army and would
like your wedding to bring out the pa-
triot in you, you can have a military
wedding theme. The wedding theme
will see you decorate your wedding in
patriotic designs and styles. There is
nothing more pleasurable than honor-
ing your country this way as you cele-
brate the love in your life.
There are countless theme ideas
that you can choose from and even


co p with your very own ideas.
Personalize the event and make it very
intimate, and the guests will definitely
appreciate not just your theme, but
your ceremony as well.
A wedding theme on location is
easy to accomplish. For example, if
you are having a beach wedding, the
nature and surroundings of the beach
will be your theme. There are other
people who will choose to have a reli-
gious theme or a cultural theme in
honor of their beliefs and customs.
To get more inspiration about
themes, it is probably good to look at
wedding magazines and see what is
new and interesting. Also, do not miss
shows that are dedicated to weddings
and you will not just get ideas, but will
also be highly entertained.
To make your work even easier,
you can go online and discover some of
the greatest theme ideas that you can
have for your wedding. You will be in-
spired to make your wedding the best
experience of your life.


_;P"aa~fe4,,,~~~ -llqLP Ad ldPy~rla\pl~es'~~~~CY;~~~


II 'nLmmo








10A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 25, 2009


SPORTS


By Fran Hunt
Specialfrom the Monticello News
Aucilla Christian Academy has
reported its rosters for the junior var-
sity softball, junior varsity baseball
and varsity baseball teams for the,
2009 season.
The junior varsity Lady Warriors
are Kelly Dollar, Vicki Perry, Sunnie
Sorensen, Shelby Witmer, Brooke
Kinsley, Michaela Metcalfe, Whitney
McKnight, Hadley Revell, Pamela
Watt, Victoria Brock, Kayla Fulford,
Caitlyn Holland, Autumn Lamb and
Marisa Thomas. Coaching the young
Lady Warriors this year is Mary Beth


Bishop.
The young Warriors are Levi
Cobb, Tres Copeland, Cole Davis, Rus-
sell Fraleigh, Bradley Holm, Brandon
Holm, Hunter Horne, Tyler Jackson,
Jared Jackson, Capas Kinsey, Ben
Sadler, Hans Sorensen, Matt Tuten
and Philip Watts. Coaching the young
Warriors this year is Daryl Adams.
Warriors on the team this season
are Casey Anderson, Matt Bishop,
Stephen Dollar, Lane Fraleigh, Ryan
Pricher, Jake Walker, Clark Christy,
Brandon Darnell, Kent Jones, Mar-
cus Roberts, Casey Wheeler and
Trent Roberts.


Lady Warriors' 2009

Softball Schedule
By Fran Hunt
Specialfrom the Monticello News
Aucilla Christian Academy reports the schedule for the varsity softball
team. Action began around the diamond with the preseason classic Satur-
day, Feb. 7, at Florida High.


Feb. 10
Feb. 12
Feb. 13
Feb. 19
Feb. 20
Feb. 23
Feb. 25


N. Florida
Godby
Rickards
Madison
Lafayette
Melody
Melody


3 pm
5 pm
4 pm
4 pm
3:30 pm
3:30 pm
4 p.m


away
away
home
home
home
away
home


Mar. 19
Mar. 20
Mar. 23
Mar. 26
Mar. 30
Mar. 30
Apr. 7


Hamilton
Godby
Lafayette
John Paul
Liberty
Franklin
Taylor


4 pm
4 pm
6pm
4 pm
11 am
4 pm
4 pm


home
home
away
home
away
away
home


Mar. 6 Munroe 6 pm away Apr. 9 Munroe 4 pm home
Mar. 10 Madison 6 pm away Apr. 10 Graceville 4:30 pm home
Mar. 12 John Paul 4 pm home Apr. 13 Maclay 4 pm home
Mar. 13 Rickards 6 pm away Apr. 14 Taylor 4 pm away
Mar. 17 Maclay 3 pm away Apr. 17 Florida 4:30 pm home
Wrapping up the season is the District Tournament, 6 p.m., April 21 and
April 23, hosted at Munroe.
Coaching the Lady Warriors this year is Edwin Kinsey


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Kayla Fulford and the Lady Warriors de
Middle Feb. 19 in a four-inning game.
By Fran Hunt
Special from the Monticello News
The Aucilla Christian Academy JV
softball team conquered the season open-
er Thursday, Feb. 19, against Perry Mid-
dle, 21-5, in the four-inning game.
Sunnie Sorensen went 3 for 5, with 3
runs scored, 2 RBI, 1 double anda home
run; Whitney McKnight went 4 for 5, with
1 run scored and 3 RBI. Pamela Watt went
3 for 4, with 4 runs scored and 2 RBI.
Michaela Metcalfe went 3 for 5, with 5
runs scored, 4 RBI and 1 triple. Hadley
Revell.went 2 for 4, with 3 runs scored, 4
RBI and 1 walk. Brooke Kinsley went 2-for
5, with 1 run and 2 strikeouts. Keli Dollar
went 2 for 3, with 2 runs, 2 RBI and 1 walk.
Autumn Lamb went 1 for 1, with 1 run.
Marisa Thomas went 1 for 3, with 1 RBI
and 2 strikeouts. Kayla Fulford went 0 for


Defeated Perry


2, with 1 walk and 2 strike-
outs.
On the mound, Watt
also struck out 5 and
walked 7.
Friday, Feb. 20, the JV
Lady Warriors lost a 13-12
squeaker to Lafayette
County
Sorensen went 3 for 4,
with 4 runs, 1 double. and 1
walk. Watt went 3 for 5,
with 2 runs scored, 1 RBI
and 1 double. Metcalfe
went 1 for 4, with 3 runs
scored, 2 RBI, 1 double and
1 walk. Revell went 2 for 5,


with 1 run scored and 2
RBI. Dollar went 1 for 3,
with 2 runs, 1 triple and 2 walks. McK-
night went 1 for 3, with 1 RBI and 2 walks.
Kinsley went 1 for 6, with 1 run scored.
Thomas went 1 for 2, with 1 strikeout.
On the mcund, Watt pitched a com-
plete game, with 2 strikeouts and 4 walks.
"I believe our team can compete with
everyone on our schedule," said Coach
Mary Beth Bishop. "We've put up 33 runs
in our first two games and will work on
being more aggressive on defense as well.
The girls know if they give us their best at
all times, we'll never be disappointed, and
they continue to push themselves and get
better each day.
"We have great leadership from our
captains, Sunnie Sorensen and Keli Dol-
lar, and they, in turn, delegate responsi-
bilities to the younger girls," she conclud-


JV Warriors Drop Season Opener


By Fran Hunt
Special from the Monticello News
The Aucilla Christian Academy junior
varsity baseball team dropped the season
opener against Perry Middle (Taylor
County), 10-0, Feb. 19, in a five-inning game
called due to the 10-run rule.
"Taylor is a really good team, and I
guess we started off as a bunch of nerves,
just coming out of basketball season," said
Coach Daryl Adams. He added that the
young Warriors allowed six runs in the
first innings, five of which were unearned,
and they committed three errors, but be-


gan cutting back on the errors to commit a
total of five throughout the entire game.
"Taylor is a high-quality team. They
are good," said Adams. "We're good too,
but you can't take anything away from
them."
Aucilla collected four hits during the
game. Phillip Watt went two for two; Rus-
sell Fraleigh, one for three; and Ben
Sadler, one for two.
On the mound, Hans Sorensen served
as the Warriors pitcher, giving up three
earned runs, five unearned runs and five
hits. He struck out one and walked four.


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Wednesday, February 25, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11A



SCHOOL & EDUCATION


NFCC Early

Childhood

Education

Program

Begins

March 17

If one has dreamed of
becoming a certified
preschool teacher, NFCC's
early childhood education
program can make it possi-
ble for them to be in the
classroom in less than one
year. New classes begin
March 17 and will be held
Tuesday and Thursdays
from 6-10 p.m. at the NFCC
Career and Technical Edu-
cation Center (Bldg. 13) in
Madison. Those interested
in joining the program
should apply now and be-
gin the admissions
process.
The program combines
classroom instruction and
field work experience to
prepare students for satis-
fying careers in childcare.
Graduates may become
childcare workers, teacher
aides, preschool teachers
or childcare development
specialists in public, pre-K
or private day care pro-
grams.
The early childhood ed-
ucation program has four
learning sections, which,
when completed, lead to a
vocational/technical edu-
cation certificate. The cer-
tificate satisfies require-
ments for the Florida De-
partment of Education's
Early Childhood Profes-
sional Certificate with a
preschool specialization.
Program graduates are
certified to be a lead
teacher in a public or pri-
vate preschool class in.
Florida. Certificate credits
may also be applied toward
an associate in applied sci-
ence degree at NFCC.
To enter the program,
individuals must be at
least 18, have a high school
diploma or GED, complete
NFCC admissions, pass the
Test of Adult Basic Educa-
tion, and have a back-
ground check before enter-
ing the program. Financial
aid may be available to
qualified students.
For more information,
contact D.J. Waller in the
NFCC Career and Techni-
cal Education Center at
(850) 973-1629 or email
WallerD@nfcc.edu. Infor-
mation is also available at
www.nfcc.edu [search: ear-
ly childhood education].















Certificate Classes
Begin March 17


S"I love working with children so
its going to be very rewarding to
work with children in my career."
S Jennifer Bohannan
NFt'C Early Childhood Education Graduate
North Florida Community College
WWW.NFCC.EDU

lWMANWI


Area Educators Attend NFCC Science Summit


Area educators attended North Florida
Community College's Science Summit Jan.
23. Hosted by the NFCC Science Department,
the summit allowed area middle school and
high school teachers the chance to network
with NFCC instructors and discuss impor-
tant topics in education and science.
"The summit was very successful and I
was very pleased with the results," said Bon-
nie Littlefield, science and math instructor at
NFCC. "The event opened doors for NFCC to
build contacts, share ideas and offer educa-
tional assistance to area schools. We are al-
ready thinking of ideas for next year."
NFCC President John Grosskopf and Sci-
ence Department Chair Terry Zimmerman
welcomed participants to the event. The vis-
iting teachers then enjoyed a tour of NFCC's
science building, a planetarium show and
hands-on labs in biology, physical science and
chemistry Lunch was provided and the day
ended with group discussions on grant possi-
bilities and other topics of interest.
Many of the visiting teachers commented
on the valuable information received during
the summit, the educational activities that
can be taken and used at their own schools,
the outstanding technology available in
NFCC's science building, the chance to meet
and network with other professionals and the
enthusiasm and welcoming nature of NFCC
instructors coordinating the event.
For NFCC the summit also was a way to
promote the sciences at NFCC, to share infor-
mation about college programs and to re-
mind area teachers of the educational oppor-
tunities and resources NFCC can offer to


Photo Supplied
The NFCC Science Summit allowed NFCC instructors to network with area middle and high
school teachers. Working together in a biology lab are, left to right, NFCC instructor Barry
Barnhart, Penny Kuntz and Rick lott of Madison County Central School, NFCC instructor Bon-
nie Littlefield and Willene Herring of Madison County Central School.


schools and students in its six-county dis-
trict.
NFCC sponsors a variety of educational
summits each year to help share ideas and
foster communication between educators in


J
.Mm


S, ,
.-. .
1. .
I'
I .. '


NFCC's six-county service area. For more in-
formation about the NFCC Science Depart-
ment, contact Terry Zimmerman at (850) 973-
1646, email ZimmermanT@nfcc.edu or visit
www.nfcc.edu.


A*...


AN AWARD THIS BIG HAS EVERYONE CELEBRATING. Shands HealthCare
is proud to receive the 2008 Governor's Sterling Award. As the state's top honor for performance
excellence, the award symbolizes our commitment to continuous quality improvement and outcomes.


We're the largest organization ever to win the Sterling
Award, and we're doing the job we set out to do make
healthcare better for everyone. the S C EN c E o H OPE


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12A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 25, 2009



MONEY




Rwnnors Flying That 3Banks Wi1 Be Nationalized


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
In Madison County, there are several banking offices
for personal and business banking, among them: Bank of
America, Capital City, Citizens State, Farmer and Mer-
chants, Madison County Community, and Wachovia (Citi-
group). Each employs and extends loans to residents of
Madison County and, therefore, each has a stake in its fu-
ture. Unfortunately the banking system doesn't stop at the
county line.
For those who still have a stomach for financial news
after watching their stock retirement portfolios collapse,
there has been an abundance of banking news that has
both Wall Street and Main Street dropping their jaws. It is
regarding the rumors of nationalizing the U.S. banking
system.
"President Barack Obama's administration has moved
to quash rumors that troubled U.S. banks will be national-
ized as the shares of financial institutions took another
beating in the market," an Associated Press report states.
"This administration continues to strongly believe that a
privately held banking system is the correct way to go,"
White House spokesman Robert Gibbs told reporters amid
the speculations that Bank of America and Citigroup are
among banks facing imminent nationalization.
The U.S. Treasury Department also rejected the market
speculation. "There are a lot of rumors in the market, as al-
ways, but you should not regard these as any indication of
the policy of this administration," said a Treasury
spokesman. He recalled that Treasury Secretary Timothy
Geithner had made clear that the administration Would
work to keep the embattled financial system in private
hands.
Rather than the undesirable extreme of nationaliza-
tion, it was stressed that the banking system, shaken by a
home mortgage meltdown, would be "regulated sufficient-
ly" not to repeat the economic tragedy The administra-



Help Climb Over Interest Rate
Worries with Bond Ladder
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones
As an investor, you need to look back no farther than last year
to understand why it's not a good idea to own only stocks. In
fact, many people buy bonds to lessen the impact of volatility
on their investment portfolios. Yet, just as stock prices move
up and down, bond prices also fluctuate, primarily in
response to rising and falling .interest rates. These interest-
rate movements can wreak havoc on your bond portfolio
unless you can help yourself climb over them with a "bond
ladder."

Before we examine what goes into a bond ladder, let's review
some bond basics relating to price and interest rates.
Suppose, for example, that you a buy a $1,000 bond that pays
five percent interest and is scheduled to mature in five years.
Each year that you hold your bond, you will receive $50 in
interest; at the end of five years, you'll get your $1,000 back,
provided the issuer doesn't default. However, if you decide to
sell your bond before the five-year period is up, you could get
more or less than $1,060 for it. If market interest rates the
rates paid on newly issued bonds were to drop to four per--
cent, then your higher-paying bond is considered more valu-
able to investors, so you might be able to sell it for, say,
$1,050. Conversely, should market interest rates rise to six
percent, nobody will pay you full value for your lower-paying
bond, so you would have to sell it at a discount, perhaps for
$950.

Because market interest rates constantly rise and fall, the
value of your bonds will do likewise. This could be a big prob-
lem if you wish to sell bonds before they mature and use the
money to buy new bonds. Keep in mind that if bonds are sold
prior to maturity, you can lose principal value.

To help reduce the impact of rate swings, you might want to
build a bond ladder. To do so, you buy several bonds, with
varying maturities short-term, intermediate-term and long-
term. Once you've constructed your ladder, you'll have some
advantage in all interest-rate environments. When market
rates are low, you'll still have your longer-term bonds earning
higher interest rates. (Typically, longer-term bonds pay the
highest rates.) Plus, only a small portion of your bond portfo-
lio (the maturing short-term bonds) will need to be reinvested
at the low rate. And when market interest rates are high, you
can reinvest the maturing short-term bonds at the higher
rates.

You can further diversify your ladder by choosing different
types of bonds or even certificates of deposit (CDs), for the
different "rungs." This diversification can't guarantee a profit or
protect against a loss, but it may help you reduce the nega-
tive effects of a downturn that primarily hits one type of bond.

Here's one more point to keep in mind: Try to avoid building
your ladder with bonds that provide little or no call protection.
When market interest rates fall, bond issuers will often "call"
bonds that is, they will redeem the bonds before they
mature so they can issue new ones at the lower rates. You
can help reduce the call risk in your bond ladder by purchas-
ing bonds with call protection, which cannot be called before
a certain date.

Ladders, by definition, can help you surmount obstacles. And
the same is true with bond ladders. If you want to invest in
bonds, and help reduce the impact of interest-rate move-.
ments, consider building your ladder soon.

Brad Bashaw EdwardJones
Investment Representative
114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341


tion's reassurance appeared to appeal to the market on Fri-
day, rebounding banking stocks that had plunged to new
lows, which had pulled down the key Dow stock index to its
worst level in six years.
Senator Christopher Dodd, who heads the Senate bank-
ing committee, also said the Democratic administration
was seeking to avoid nationalizing banks, but did not rule
out a short-term state takeover.
"I don't welcome that at all; but I could see how it's pos-
sible it may happen," the Democrat said in an interview on
Bloomberg Television. "I'm concerned that we may end up
having to do that-at least, for a short time."
The market capitalization of Bank of America and Cit-
igroup eroded so rapidly last week that it was eclipsed by
state funds injected into them, meaning the government
was in control by default.
The U.S. government has injected $45 billion each into
Citigroup and Bank of America to prevent their collapse in


exchange for preferred stocks, without voting rights. The
government then said it would conduct "stress tests" on
ailing financial institutions ahead of any further capital
injections and removal of "toxic" assets from their
strained balance sheets.
Given the battering their shares took early Friday, the
capitalization of Citigroup is hardly more than $10 billion,
while that of Bank of America is $17 billion, well below the
federal government's holdings. But the banks dismissed al-
legations of financial troubles.
A Citigroup spokes-man highlighted the bank's high
Tier 1 capital ratio-a measure of financial strength-and
said it continues to cut assets on its balance sheet, reduce
expenses and streamline its businesses for future "prof-
itable growth." A spokesman for Bank of America echoed
the view.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greenepub
lishing.com.


Stock MarketE Hits tSix1Year Low


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, 'Inc.
There is an investing method known as "dollar-cost
averaging" that suggests putting in a consistent percent-
age of money at consistent intervals over time. When the
prices of stocks are up, those purchases are combined
with purchases when stocks are down. Over an extended
period of time-decades, for instance-the average of the
purchases will perform well because, over the long haul,
stocks have outperformed other similarly available liquid
investments.
Here's the big asterisk, though: What if the market
dips suddenly at the end of years of accumulation, just as
one is retiring? Unless there is an equally fast rebound-
which is far less likely, based on history-the anxiety can
rise as high as the stocks dropped.
The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid to its lowest
level in six years, Friday. The Dow's fall illustrates the
rapid destruction of wealth in the stock market during


the financial crisis. The Dow now stands at about half of
its all-time high of 14,164, reached in October 2007. The to-
tal value of all shares of companies on the Dow has dwin-
dled to $2.45 trillion, down from $4.51 trillion.
Bank stocks have tumbled in particular, as investors
grow increasingly nervous about the fragile economy and
the pile of toxic mortgage assets clogging the financial
system. The uncertainty about the banks has kept the
black cloud over the markets that will linger until a Trea-
sury plan comes to the aid of these money center banks.
Some analysts say the Dow's new low could further
fuel anxiety and cause more selling. The losses came after
the Labor Department said the number of people receiv-
ing unemployment benefits neared 5 million, although
first-time jobless claims stayed flat at 627,000. The Federal
Reserve on Wednesday said the unemployment rate would
remain elevated through at least 2011.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greenepub
lishing.com.


Online BDainmkng Offers Convenience And Caution


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Since its debut about a decade ago, online banking has
become one of the fastest-growing Internet activities.
Roughly 43 percent of people who use the Internet (orf
about 63 million Americans) do some banking there, ac-
cording to a 2006 survey by the Pew Internet & American
Life Project-even more than make travel reservations on-
line.
But that growing popularity has also brought increas-
ing anxiety over whether something as private and person-
al as a bank account can be fully protected in the relatively
unregulated and un-policed Internet.
Since the birth of electronic commerce, financial insti-
tutions have stepped up online security measures to make
the process less vulnerable to attacks. But that hasn't
stopped hackers, who continue to look for ways to exploit
security gaps.
Among the most popular attacks are "phishing"
schemes that duplicate bank Web sites and ask customers
to log on to their accounts. Others send e-mails, purported-
ly from bank employees, asking for sensitive financial in-
formation. Often the two work in tandem, with an e-mail
containing a link that directs recipients to a bogus bank
site. Both scams are designed to steal user IDs and pass-
words as a customer types them in, giving these cyber-
thieves access to the person's financial accounts.
Other approaches embed viruses, spyware or "Trojan
horses"-programs that can give thieves unauthorized ac-
cess to a computer by recording and sending out a user's
keystrokes. These programs allow thieves to look as you
type in sensitive financial information. Within seconds,
your savings and checking accounts, even your invest-
ments, could disappear.
How big a problem are we talking about? The numbers
are tough to pin down. Experts say there are no reliable
studies showing how much money is lost through online
banking alone, primarily because banks themselves can't
always pinpoint the source of how a crime occurred,
whether on the Web or through an ATM. Various reports of-
fer hints at the magnitude. For instance, about $3.2 billion
was lost to phishing attacks in 2007, according to a survey
by Gartner, a technology research firm, with about 3.6 mil-
lion people losing money to these attacks over 12 months.
Take the so-called Sinowal Trojan, a virus that injects
what seem like legitimate pages on someone's browser, and
then steals the user's login credentials. In probably one of
the largest online banking breaches known to date, the
virus has compromised 300,000 online bank accounts and
about 250,000 credit and debit card accounts over the past
three years, according to a study published in October by
California's RSA Fraud Action Research Lab-with more
than 100,000 online bank accounts hit in the past six
months alone.
That's not to say banks are not trying. For a small fee,
Bank of America-the largest online banker in the United
States-recently introduced the SafePass card, a wallet-
sized card embedded with a button that, when pressed,
sends the customer a six-digit security code via text mes-
sage. The customer can then enter the code along with
his/her user name and password to access an online ac-
count. For business accounts or wealthier clients, some
banks also offer SecurID, a token-like device that generates
a new six-digit code every minute that users need to log in
to their accounts.
Bank of America, along with other financial institu-
tions, also has started an alert system advising customers
by e-mail or text every time a transaction occurs. "Protect-
ing the safety and security of our customers' information


is our top priority," Bank of America spokeswoman Brit-
ney Sheehan said.
SSo, should you be avoiding online banking altogether?
Not so' fast. There are risks associated with traditional
'baifig 's' well. More than three-quarters of banking
fraud stems from offline factors, such as check fraud, mail
theft or a lost wallet, according to the 2007 Online Banking
Security Report, released by Javelin Strategy & Research.
"When you're online, even though you have a lot of
risks, you're more in control, because you can do something
about the risk. You can monitor your accounts, and you can
say no to the malicious junk," Javelin President James Van
Dyke said. "In the old-fashioned world, such as the paper-
and-mail world, you can't do much to keep prying eyes from
looking at those paper checks and paper statements."
Experts suggest that anyone using online banking
should take these steps:
1. When logging on to a bank Web site, a user should
look closely at the site's URL to make sure it matches the
bank's name. That's the name that appears in the little rec-
tangular browser window. A more secure URL will begin
with "https://" and be followed by the bank name. Make
sure the bank's padlock is displayed in a corner of the site
before you log on.
2. Log on to banks only from a secure computer. Never
log on from a public computer in a hotel or caf6, and be
careful when logging on to unknown networks with a lap-
top.
3. If you get a warning e-mail, call your bank. Don't
click on any provided links.
4. If your computer is acting strangely-for instance,
reacting slowly or getting pop-ups-avoid using it for on-
line banking until you can get it checked out.
5. Keep anti-virus and anti-spyware software up to
date.
6. Never respond to any e-mail that requests personal
information.
7. Be leery of fly-by-night, Internet-only banks with
high interest rates on savings or checking accounts. Make
sure the bank is FDIC-certified and is insured.
8. And, most importantly, use a different user name and
password for each financial account. The password should
be complex, with numbers and symbols, and changed reg-
ularly
One final precaution: Know the rules. Federal regula-
tions require that banks return money lost to electronic
transactions, but there are time restrictions where detect-
ing is concerned. Different banks have their own rules-
look them up before you shift your banking to the Web.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greenepub-
lishing.com.





I e You could putup to $5,000 into a tax-deductible IRA for
2008 if you qualify ($6,000 if you're 50 or older). If you I
didn't reach that limit by December 31, 2008, tell your
Bank or IRA trustee that your 2009 contributions are for
2008 until either (a) you reach the dollar limit or (b) the
April 15 contribution deadline arrives. You can then deduct
S these amounts on your 2008 return for a quicker tax benefit I

S*SCHOELLES
S& ASSOCIATES, INC.
439 SW RANGE AVE MADISON, FL 32340 850-9734353 /
-- -------------- II I I I


Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596 I
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
wwwedwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871









Wednesday, February 25, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 13A



HISTORY


kitC s.
f / ^ y v o0
L~y 1Io~1Ws:


m neml/ole deader


By Alfa Hunt
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Despite the common understanding
of Florida's Native Americans, the Semi-.
nole tribe is not among the indigenous
Florida tribes. The indigenous tribes to
the Florida area included the Apalachee,
Timucua, Calusa, Tequesta and Mate-
cumbe. These were the people who en-
countered explorers such as De Soto,
Ponce de Leon and Fontaneda, and these
men wrote of the indigenous tribes into
the early 1500s. The name Seminole is not
to be found in the early records.
The Seminole tribe is actually a
group of several other tribes that migrat-
ed to Florida. By the 1700s, Europeans
had migrated into present-day Georgia,
the Carolinas, Tennessee and Alabama.
The indigenous Indians of these areas
were dramatically reduced in number,
due to disease and early Spanish slavery.
In the early part of the 1700s, a signif-
icant group of northern Indiaris from dif-
ferent'tribes moved into Florida territory
because of the influx of Europeans into
their native territories. The Indians
north of Florida began to colonize the
state to claim land of their own.
The English Colony of Georgia was
established in 1732 as a buffer between
the English in the North and the Spanish
in the South. This would force a larger
number of migrating natives, who re-
fused to fight with either side, to flee
westward. Some chose to separate from .
the general westward migrating party
and to go south. Florida was close and
easy to get to, and there was little resis-
tance.
By this time, various members the in-
digenous Florida Indians had either been
killed, enslaved, had perished from ill-
ness, or had accepted a new culture as
their own. This left previously inhabited
territories available to the displaced
"Georgia Indians."
There are actually two debated rearp
sons as to iwhythis group ofpeopleweie,,
given the name Seminole.
The. Creek phrase "ishi semoli" liter-
ally means "the people whom the Sun
God does not love." Actual use is more
like a person who has separated them-
selves from others, also known as a run-
away The word could have also come
from the Spanish word, "Cimarron,"
which is used when referring to a domes-
ticated animal that has returned to the
wild. Those people who separated and
came to Florida became known as Semi-
noles.
The Seminoles were a heterogeneous
tribe mostly composed of Lower Creeks
from Georgia, Mikasuki-speaking
Muscogees, as well as a few escaped black
slaves.
Perhaps one of the more well-known


figures who was a descendant of the
Seminole tribe and a resident of Madison
County was Chief Tuko-see-Mathla, who
was more commonly known as John
Hicks. Hicks was assumed to have been
born around the same time as the Decla-
ration of Independence was being signed
in 1776.
In 1823, Hicks had a town listed at
Alachua Prairie by Neamathla-a
prominent Mikasuki chief, who had been
chosen to be the Seminole's chief repre-
seitative-at the Treaty of Moultrie
Creek. It is believed that Hickstown was
at Hixtown Swamp in Madison County.
In 1825, Hicks' town was moved to what
is now Indian Prairie, northeast of
Ocala, as shown in a letter by surveyor
Leroy May
May was hired to survey the Indian
reservation boundary. He came down the
Ocklawaha River and found Hicks' vil-
lage. May informed Hicks that his village
was north of the reservation line, to
which Hicks replied that he knew of no
line and would not allow May to pass on
to the Indian Agency because he could
not guarantee May a safe trip.
Hicks would also press the issue that
the white people had taken his livestock,
and that his people had been poorly treat-
ed. Hicks' band had not received any food
that was promised in the Moultrie Creek
Treaty Hicks then took May on a tour
through the village and showed him the
starving people..
In 1826, it became clear that Florida
Governor William P. Duval was not hap-
py with Neamathla, who had been very
flexible to the Americans at the Treaty of
Moultrie Creek. Because of the poor
treatment Neamathla's Indians received
from local settlers, Neamathla suddenly
had a change of heart. Duval demanded
that Neamathla remove his people from
their reservation in north Florida and
move south to the Central Florida reser-
vatiop, When Neamathla made it clear he
would. rnpt, Duval rode into,Neamathla's
camp, confronting 300 angry and armed
warriors. Duval "fired" Neamathla as
head chief of the Seminoles and
arranged for an election at Fort King.
Neamathla would no longer tolerate the
white settlers here in Florida, so he
moved to Alabama.
In August 1826, John Hicks was elect-
ed as "The Chief of the Three Nations,"
or "Chief of the Seminoles, Mikasukis
and Tallahassees." There was a large cer-
emony after the election at Fort King.
Over 2000 Indians attended the festivi-
ties. One of the reasons that Hicks may
have had the most support and respect of
the Seminoles was because of Sam Jones,
a powerful medicine and war chief of the
Miccosukee tribe, whom Hicks often rep-
resented in council.


Soon after his election as head chief,
Hicks complained about the United
States' treatment of the Seminoles in
Florida. The condition had worsened to
the point that a delegation of chiefs went
to Washington, D.C., to present their
complaints. Hicks was the spokesman
for the group. He asked for more land to
be added onto the reservation to which
the American government wished the
Seminoles to relocate. He pressed the
matter that his people did not want to
travel to the west. He also demanded that
the white settlers return the African peo-
ple who had been accepted into their
tribes.
In 1829, when Andrew Jackson be-
came president, the Indian Removal Act
was actively pushed through Congress.
The U.S. government now wanted to re-
move all the eastern tribes to the
Arkansas 'Territory, west of the Missis-
sippi River.
Hicks, along with several other chiefs
visited the land in the Arkansas territory
in late 1832 and early 1833. The Seminoles
said that they only agreed to see the land,
but were not obligated to move. The gov-
ernment said that they had signed the
Treaty of Fort Gibsoii, agreeing to relo-
cate. Charges were that Indian Agent
John Phagan coerced and forced the Indi-
ans to sign the treaty after encouraging
the Indians to drink to the point of exces-
sive intoxication. Phagan, in turn, was
soon removed from office under charges
of mismanagement.


Hicks died in November 1833 due to
unknown causes. A few years after his
death, Hicks' son stated that, if their fa-
ther would have lived, it would have pre-
vented the Second Seminole War. It is in-
teresting how many theories of how
Hicks died rose out of nowhere.
Col. McKinney incorrectly stated
that Seminole Chief Osceola had killed
Hicks. Indian Agent Wiley Thompson
simply states that Hicks had died, with-
out going into detail. The truth is, if
Osceola had killed Hicks, Thompson
would have said so. More than likely,
McKinney had confused the native name
of Tuko-see-Mathla with Charlie Emath-
la, who Was killed by Osceola in Novem-
ber 1835 for treason.
In a further note, if Osceola had
killed Hicks, it would have started the
Second Seminole War two years earlier,
and it would have been a blood feud
among the Seminole and Miccosukee
tribes, instead of against the American
government.
Another author writes that Chief
Jumper's people poisoned Hicks. This is
also an unlikely conclusion, due tothe
fact that Jumper had talked in favor of
emigration and peace, just as Hicks did.
Killings and clan feuds were serious
things among the tribes, and unjustly
killings would not have happened with-
out any act of revenge or retribution be-
ing the result. Therefore, the notion that
Hicks was murdered by fellow Seminoles
is highly unlikely


AV,-. ,L A. ,u ., N A v r ,,o ,-,

CA LENDAR
s.FORMAR-H4,







Will be providing free blood pressure and blood glucose
screenings, along with' important health education at
North Florida Pharmacy of Madison.


Time: 9


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NEW
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iName
IAddress


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RENEW


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City /State/Zip
I Mail To: Greene Publishing, Inc., P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341

I or bring by the Enterprise-Recorder office.
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14A* Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, February 24, 2009


Geenvile Pointe

: Apartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC
accessible apts: Rental assis-
tance may be available. HUD
vouchers accepted. Call 850-
948-3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn


oluthem villas of

Aakdison a ftpaitments

Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1,2, & 3 BR HC &
non-HC accessible apts. Call
850-973-8582, TDD/TTY 711.
315 SW Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Se-
mor's and Disabled. 2 Bed-
'room open with Subsidy
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd, Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider
and Emplover



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Madison Heights
Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed
for low income families
150 SW Burngardner Dr.
Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833 ext. 485
Equal Housing Opportunity.

House for Rent
in Greenville, FL
(near elementary school).
All Electric, Newly remodeled
3 bedrooms, 1 bath $600/mo.
1st & security deposit.
Housing Choice
Vouchers Accepted
Call 850-973-7349 or
617-4 37-1905'

DOWNTOWN APARTMENT
FOR RENT, NEWLY
RENOVATED 1BR, 1 BATH
$450.00 MO.
567-1523

FOR RENT IN LEE, FL
3/2 M/H
2/1 M/H
PLEASE CALL
850-973-4606
OR 850-673-9564

2 BR 1 bath Singlewide Mobile
Home in Cherry Lake Area.
$350.00 month, plus deposit
973-2353
House for Rent
2Bed/1 Bth. Great neighbor-
hood. Within city limits.
$500mth. 1st and last mths rent
due. Security deposit required.
673-9425
Restored 3 BR Home, CH&Air,
Oak Floors, new R&Rfg.
1335 sq ft.
Adult Family only, no pets.
$700 rent and deposit.
Credit check.
432 NE Horry Ave. Madison.
Call George. 973-8583, 557-0994.

HOME FOR RENT
Restored 3 BR Home, CH &
Air. Oak floors, large storage,
1335 Sq Ft
Yard Maint. included.
Adult family only, no pets,
$800 rent and deposit.
Credit check.
432 NE Horry Ave. Madison.
Call George
973-8583, 557-0994

LAKE FRONT HOME


1 yr lease. 2 Bed, 2 Bth.
Includes kitchen appliances, wa-
ter, and lawn maintenance.
$800 per mth, $800 deposit.
850-973-3025
rtn

2 BR/1 BTH House For Rent
Central H&A, Appliances,
Furnished, $500 per mth, $500
Security. Vouchers Accepted.
Call 973-3917


For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suwannee
was $135,000, Now $99,000. 2
BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Building with
Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
Trees. 386-719-0421

FOR SALE / OWNER
FINANCING
ALL LAND BELOW IS
HIGH AND DRY

5 acres Lee, North of Hwy 6,
Cayenne Rd., rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995
$5,000 down, $325/mo

10 acres Beulah Meadows Rd,
DWMH and houses allowed,
$49,500,, $5,000 down
$459/mo

10 acres Old Blue Springs Rd.
access, DWMH and houses al-
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down,
$459/mo

25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)

Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
12/24-rtn

For Sale:
2BR/ 2 BTH Townhouse
at 346 SW Macon St.
Call After 5:30 at 253-1201.


Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Views
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
Open and Covered Decks, Large
Screened Porch, Gas FP, CH/A,
Oak Floors & Cabinets,
and Appliances.
Offered Furnished at $179,900.
Call BJ Peters at 850-508-1900

Land Owners- with good or bad
credit!!! You can own a new
home with. $0 down.
Call Will at 850-253-8001.

For Sale 3 Bed/ 2 Bth w. A.C. on
1/2 Acre in Lee. Only $599mth.
Call Will for more info at
850-253-8001
FSBO- 3 Bed, 1.5 Bth, 1 Acre,
1500 sqft, built in 1994, recent
upgrades, Cherry Lake area.
$98,500.
850-464-1368


For Sale in Hamilton Co.
.on 5 Acres.
You Choose Floorplan.
Call Today
850-253r8001
rtn
For Sale 4 Bed/2 Bth w. A.C.
in Madison County
for only $649 per mth.
Call to be pre-approved.
850-253-8001
rtn

One acre on Diving Bird Loop
for sale. $5500. Call Derrick or
Christy in Cherry Lake. Call:
229-469-0619, or 229-242-8294.







Downtown' Office/ Retail space
for rent. 700 to 1,400 Sql ft.
567-1523
FOR RENT,
Office Building across street
from Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder
Office);
111 SE Shelby St. Madison
Newly renovated back to the
1920's era Call 973-4141






Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage
Corner lots.
Fronts both Harvey Greene Dr.
and Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line,
8 inch water main,
access to city utilities,
fire hydrant, and service from
two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141


HOME ONLY LOANS
No mortgage on your land. Put
Home on your land,
family land, state land or rental
lot. Singlewides start at $350.00
month and
Doublewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn
HOME BUYERS.. GUARAN-
TEED FINANCING THRU
B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044

NEW 4 BEDROOM 2 BATH
READY TO MOVE IN. CALL
386-288-4560
LOW CREDIT SCORES???
I MAY BE ABLE TO HELP YOU
BUY A HOME.
386-288-4560
MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00 CALL 386-288-4560

ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00 P&I
per mo, Doublewide your land
$422.00 P&I per mo. Singlewide
& $30,000.00 for land $520.00
P&I per mo. or Doublewide with
$30,000.00 for land $602.00 P&I
per mo. Our land your land or buy
land. I specialize in credit chal-
lenged customers. Applications
over the phone, credit decision next
business day. Let me help make
your new home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
Call Steve 386-365-5370

BEST CASH DEALS ON
MOBILE HOMES. NO ONE
BEATS MY PRICES
386-719-0044
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/ 2
BATH EXCELLENT SHAPE
NEED CHAS, PRICED TO SELL
CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
MODULAR HOME FOR SALE
IN TOWN SAVE $20,000.00
TURN KEY DEAL OWNER
SAYS MAKE AN OFFER IT
MUST GO CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218

BRAND SPANKING NEW 2009
5 BEDROOM 3 BATH 2004 Sq Ft
$594.31 PER MO. SELLER PAYS,
$3,500 TOWARD
CLOSING COST.CALL MIKE
386-623-4218


PRICE REDUCED! SPACIOUS
MFG HOME WITH 4 BED-
ROOMS, 3 BATH, BONUS
ROOM WITH LOTS OF WIN-
DOWS. DISCONTINUED
FLOORPLAN. FOR MORE INFO
CALL SARAH
386-288-0964

BECOME A HOMEOWNER FOR
THE SAME MONTHLY PAY-
.MENTS YOU ARE THROWING
AWAY ON RENT. CALL SARAH
FOR MORE INFO
386-288-0964

NEED MORE SPACE FOR A
GROWING FAMILY? 2001, 5
BEDROOM, 4 BATH TRADE-IN.
EXCELLENT CONDITION. FOR
MORE INFO CALL SARAH 386-
288-0964

FIRST TIME HOME BUYER
$7,500.00 CASH IN YOUR
POCKET CALL DAVID FOR
DETAILS 386-719-0044
WE PAY CASH..... FOR YOUR
USED MOBILE HOMES 1980
OR NEWER. LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129
FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY AND
LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE ZONED
COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129


Your Loal Pape
Has Los 14)Offer
omuit .vet
Spor
Lcalew


Children's Dresses.....

Size 3 white long dress, worn as
flower girl dress, satin bodice, lacy
overlay on bottom, built in crinoline -
$50

Size 3 white long dress, worn as
flower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all
on
bodice, sequin/beadwork/appliques on
bottom, built in crinoline. $50

Size 4 off white dress, worn as
flower girl dress, lace work around
bodice, pretty lace work at bottom,
cap sleeves $25

Size 5 purple pageant dress, with
matching socks and hair bow, white
sequin and bead work on bodice, built
in crinoline beautiful dress $50

Size 7 red pageant dress, white ap-
plique, sequin afid bead work on
bodice and bottom, built in crinoline -
beautiful dress $65

Size 7 white and peach pageant
dress, white ruffles with peach outline
across chest, sleeves, and bottom, nev-
er worn $35

Size 7-8 off white dress, worn as a
flower girl dress, overlay of lace over
entire dress, probably knee to calf
length $25

Size 8 white, long dress, lace around
neck with decorative bodice $25

Size 14 white long dress, pink and
white sequin/bead/applique work at
neckline, bodice and waist area, roses
at bottom, two layers of ruffles across
bottom, cap sleeves, rose and lace
work coming down back of gown,
with matching hair bow $40

Size 14 white long dress, cap
sleeves, white applique/bead/sequin
work coming down bodice $50

Size 16 white long pageant gown,
cap sleeves, white sequin work across
entire bodice and sleeves, buttons
around neck with circular cut-out on
back, beautiful gown $100

Teen dresses....

Size 7-8 Kelli green gown, lace
overlay $40

Size 8 red gown, sequin/bead work
around bodice $50

Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for
a teen division approximately 13-15) -
GORGEOUS lime green dress, strap-
less but with spaghetti straps that cress
cross across the back, sequins spotted
across the entire gown, built in crino-
line absolutely gorgeous. $300
(paid over $500 for it)


Call 850-973- 3497
and leave message.






1987 Ford Bronco for Sale. Super
hot engine! 58k original miles.
Auto trans. Differential don't
leak. Only rolled over once but
never "mud bogged". Upper
body has go glass but engine and
running gear awesome! Now
painted camo $500.
850-464-1165





New Kitchen Store
at 7th Heaven Flea Market
19 S. in Monticello. Many kitchen
themes. See Ms. Joan 242-9343.
Also have custom fitted belts.

1984 Sand HS 66' Mobile Home
$4000. Must give 30 days notice
to current occupants.
Call 386-623-0057
Under Counter Microwave Vent-
$85

Electric Built-In Dishwasher-
$185

Man's 14kt Gold Jaguar Quartz
Watch- Make Offer

Man's Tag Huer Professional Se-
ries Watch (Swiss Made and test-
ed at 200 meters)- Make offer

Call Patricia at 850-973-6868


Yorkie Pups
Call 850-584-9882


Advent Christian Village
Cal: 658-JOBS (5627)
or visit www.acvillage.net
Do more than work, join a family!

Social Services Director- LTC
FT position to lead/direct a service
team with high standards of
practice at 161-bed long-term care fa-
cility, including
services/programs for memory
impaired and a strong
community-oriented
environment. BSW and long-term care
experience required. MSW strongly
preferred. Two or more years relevant
experience with good
understanding of LTC regs strongly
preferred.

FT Wound Care/Restorative LPN-
Day Shift
,Nonrestricted FL LPN license'& 2
years clinical experience required,
preferably in long-term care; must
have knowledge of Florida LTC regs;
IV certification, basic knowledge of
wound care, excellent documentation
skills, PC literacy in MS Office appli-
cations, & experience with successful
budget mgmt. Day shift. Mon thru Fri:
weekend on-call rotation required.

Accounting A/R Clerk.
FT position; HSD or equivalent re-
quired; prior experience in insurance
billing and coding, PC operation with
MS applications, including word
processor, spreadsheet, and database
required. Must be detailed
oriented.

Groundskeeper
PT staff for various grounds-related
positions in residential
community; prior experience in resi-
dential or commercial lawn care a
plus; valid Florida DL required.

Water/ Wastewater Treatment
Operations
FT water/waste water treatment opera-
tor; valid FL C water or waste
water treatment
certification required; dual certifica-
tion strongly preferred.
Experience in all aspects of
water/wastewater & distribu-
tion/collection systems required.

Competitive wages & excellent
benefits (health, dental, life, disabili-
ty, supplemental insurance, 403b,
paid time off,) plus access to onsite
daycare and fitness facilities.

EOE, Drug Free Workplace, Crimi-
nal background checks required.

Apply in person at ACV Personnel
Department Mon thru Fri, 9:00 am.
until 4:00 p.m., Carter Village Hall,
10680 Dowling Park Drive, Dowling
Park, FL; fax resume/ credentials to
(386) 658-5160; or visit
www.acvillaqe net.
Maintenance Technician Need-
ed- Arbours at Madison.
Knowledge on General Mainte-
nance and Repair Techniques re-
quired. HVAC, Full Certification,
and Pool Certification a plus.
Great Benefits!
No phone calls please.
Fax resumes 850-253-0127.
Sales Consultant
America's Home Place is seek-
ing an experienced sales person
for our Valdosta
location. The applicant must
have a proven successful sales
track record. Fax resume to
229-245-8790 or email to
bpolk@americahotmeplace.com.


Security Officer Needed at
NFCC.
Must have Class D Security Li-
cense. Call Capt. James at 850-
363-2807 Saturday and Sundays
3:30-1 1:30 pm

FREE FLORIDA LOTTERY
TICKETS!!!
Make $ Playing the Lottery.
You could become a million-
aire next month. Guaranteed
income producing system. Free
membership booklet. 1-877-
526-6957. ID # J3992.



Cooks & Waitresses
Spaghetti House
Apply in Person After 1 lam
at 291 A SW Dade Street
Madison, FL
No Phone Calls Please
Ask for Bob


Help Wanted for
Part-time Position
in Landscape Business.
973-2848


Substance Abuse Counselor
Human Services Agency is seeking
a Full-time Substance Abuse
Counselor to serve adolescents in
Madison County. POsition will
perform outpatient intervention
services and administer prevention
programs in a school based setting.
Preferred candidate will have a
Master's degree in social or behav-
ioral science. Also prefer experi-
ence working with juvenials in-
volved with substance abuse.

Qualified applicants must com-
plete a DISC Village employment
application and submit to: Madi-
son Counselor, 3333 W. Pensacola
St., Suite 150, Tallahassee, FL
32304. Applications may be down-
loaded at www.discvillage.com.
Please call (850) 575-4388 for as-
sistance. EOE/ Drug Free Work-
place.




Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.'
850-464-1165

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004.
IF NO ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER AND
SINFORMATION'ABOUT THE MILL
Cash for Savage 99 Rifle,
and Colt Pistol.
Call: 971-5359





REWARD:
for the Return of
lost Chocolate Lab.
If you have seen or know
where Diamond might be
Please call 850-673-9722
or 850-973-7980
or 869- 0240.




A beagle/basset mixed female
dog. Approximately 4 years
old. She is a full-figured dog.
Brown, black and tan mark-
ings. Picky eater, wants to be
inside. She has been spayed.
Found east of Madison on
Roller Coaster Road, the
week of February 16th.
(850) 973-2416.
Leave a message.




Learn To Play Piano!
Learn to play piano by ear! Af-
fordable piano lessons at begin-
ner and intermediate level. Basic
music theory and bass guitar-
lessons also available. For more
information or to schedule,
please call (850) 464-0114.






MARTIN'S
CARPET REPAIR

Re-Stretching, Patching,
Seam Repair, Berber Pulls,
Bums, Water Damage, etc.

Don't waste money to buy new
carpet if you don't have to....
Call 850-879-0120
or
850-973-2003

DUINN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts

850-973-4728
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340

ANYTHING LEFT OVER 30 DAYS
WILL BE SOLD


Residential / Business
Cleaning & Maid Ser-
vice


*Move-Ins and Move-Outs
*One Time, Weekly, Bi-
Weekly, or Monthly Services
Call 850-879-0179


- -
~ Vc~ EU F ~ ~


4S= auIscgrib -e Tod a4ayI
Caxftl 973"414:1.-


s Deadline For Classifieds



C A SIFFI DS (850) 973-4141
3:00 p.m. Every Monday












Wednesday, February 25, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP.,

Plaintiff,


vs.
JOHN HENRY AUST, JR. A/K/A JOHN H. AUST, JR.;
KIMBERLY ANN AUST A/K/A KIMBERLY AUST; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIMBERLY ANN AUST
A/K/A KIMBERLY AUST; IF LIVING; INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED; THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;


CASE NO. 2008-482-CA


Defendants)


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of'
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Madison County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Madison County, Florida,
described as: LOTS 54 AND 55, LAKESIDE TERRACE SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
L, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY/FLORIDA. A/K/A
232 SE Park Loop
Madison, FL 32340
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, At-the west front doorsteps of the -
Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW Range Ave., Madison, Florida 32340 at 11:00 a.m.,
on May 12, 2009.
DATED THIS 12 DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 12 day of February,
2009.

CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the American with Disabilities 'Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior
to the proceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771
(TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NO:


THOMAS J. BEGGS, IV,
2009-006-CA


Plaintiff,

vs.

ALTHEA RUSSELL; FLO MCCALLA; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO-THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED,

Defendants.

NOTICE-OF ACTION -

To: All Above Named Unknown Defendants, including Unknown Tenant No.1 and Un-
known Tenant No. 2,
Addresses Unknown

YOU, ALL ABOVE NAMED UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS, INCLUDING UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1 AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, ARE NOTIFIED that an action seek-
ing foreclosure and other relief on the following property in Madison County, Florida:
Description: OH 4 Parcel IN: 15-2N-10-5965-
000
A portion of Section 15, Township 2 North, Range 10 East, being more particularly de-
scribed as follows:
Commence at a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of said Section 15;
thence South 00'09'21" West along the.east line of said Section 15 a distance of 1,321.10
feet to a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of the South Half (S _) of the
Northeast Quarter (NE _) of said Section 15; thence North 89*50'02" West along the north
line of said S of NE a distance of 992.43 feet to the northeast corner and POINT OF BE-
GINNING of the following described parcel; thence South 00*09'58" West a distance of
659.71 feet; thence North 89*50'02 West a distance of 330.80 feet; thence North 0009'58"
East a distance of 659.71 feet to said north line of S of NE 1/4 ; thence South 8950'02"
East along said north line of S of NE _; thence South 89'50'02" East along said north line
a distance of 330.80 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 5.01 acres, more or less. Density Exception: 03-18-B
SUBJECT TO the ESTRI&TIONS AND PROTECTIVE COVENANTS for OAK HILLS
(an unrecorded subdivision in Madison County Florida) as more particularly described in
OR Book 703 page 255 through 262 and OR Book 705 Page 94 of the public records of
Madison County Florida.
ALSO SUBJECT TO that easement for utilities granted,to TriCounty Electric Corporation
and recorded in OR Book 708 Page 199 to 203 of the public records of Madison County
Florida.
ALSO SUBJECT TO existing county graded road rights-of-way.Said lands situated, lying
and being in Madison County, Florida.Said property is not the homestead of the Grantor(s)
under the laws and constitution of the State of Florida in that neither Grantor(s) or any
members of the household of grantor(s) reside thereon.has been filed against you, and each
of you, are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Scot B.
Copeland, the plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 174 East Base Street, Madison, Flori-
da 32340 on or before March 18, 2009; and file the original with the clerk of this court ei-
ther before service on the plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petitioDated
this 16th 'day of February, 2009.
TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

Lee Community Volunteer Fire Department is accepting bids for:

19 Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus with face piece and 4500 psi/45 minute bottles and 19 spare
4500/45-min. bottles
and
A Cascade/Compressor Fill Station
4500 psi with D.O.T. approved cylinders
All breathing apparatus must conform to current NFPA and MSHA quality standards. Com-
pressor will meet CGA standards, with all system components rated for 6009 psi working pressure.
All electrical components shall comply with UL, NEMA, or IEC standards.
Lee Community Volunteer Fire Department reserves the right to reject any or all bid sub-
missions. The submissions are due on or before Friday, March 6, 2009 at 4:00 pm.

Send all information to:
Lee Community Volunteer Fire Department
C/O Madison County Emergency Management
1083 SW Harvey Greene Drive
Madison, FL 32340
For additional information contact Vicki Brown, Emergency Management Program Coordi-
nator at (850) 973-3698.

,NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT TO THE
MADISON COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE

BY THE PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, SERVING
ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 1633215, Florida Statutes, as
amended, and the Madison County Land Development Code, as amended, hereinafter referred to
as the Land Development Code, objections, recommendations and comments concerning the
amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Planning and Zoning Board of Madison Coun-
ty, Florida, serving also as the Local Planning Agency of Madison County, Florida, at a public hear-
ing on March 12, 2009 at 5:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the Court-
house Annex, Board Room, located at 229 Southwest Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida.
LDC 09-1, an application by the Planning and Zoning Board, to amend the Land De-
velopment Code by revising the wording in Section 4.6-10 Prison/Correctional Facilities (2) (C)
to further clarify Intent.
The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any interested party shall
be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be an-
nounced during the public hearings and that no further notice concerning the matter will be pub-
lished, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced
public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested parties may appear and be heard with
respect to the amendment.
Copies of the amendment are available for public inspection at the Courthouse Annex, Of-
fice of the County Coordinator, located at 229 Southwest Pinckney Street, Suite 219, Madison, Flori-
da, during regular business hours.
All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above refer-
enced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.


www.greenepublishing.com


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,

Plaintiff,

vs.'

CASE N0.2008-593-CA
HARRIS REISBAUM; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
HARRIS REISBAUM; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES;
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS;

Defendants)


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure enteredjn the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Madison County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Madison County, Florida,
described as:

DESCRIPTION (TRACT #11)

COMMENCE AT AN IRON ROD MARKING THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 EAST,
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREE
05'02" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 921.56 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 04'22" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1491.51 FEET TO
A POINTING THE CENTERLINE OF AN 80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY
UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329), FOR A POINT
OF BEGINNING, THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
AND LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE, RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES
52'41" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1150.83 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE
SOUTH 03 DEGREES 41'27" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 403.72 FEET TO
A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 06'09" WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 1130.13 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF THE
AFOREMENTIONED 80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND
DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329), THENCE NORTH 06
DEGREES 40'39" WEST, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE
OF 400.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN
80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT
(ROAD 329) OVER AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 40 FEET
THEREOF ALSO SUBJECT TO A 10 FOOT UTILITY EASEMENT
ALONG THE SIDE AND REAR LOT LINES. TOGETHER WITH
AND SUBJECT TO THAT CERTAIN DECLARATIONS OF
EASEMENTS, RESERVATIONS AND PROTECTIVE COVENANTS
FOR AUCILLA PLANTATIONS RECORDED DECEMBER 15,2005 IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 791, PAGE 298 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND ANY
AMENDMENTS THERETO.
A/K/A

Tract 11 SW Open Sands Loop
Pinetta, FL 32350

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, At the west
front doorsteps of the Madison County Courthouse, West Range Ave., Madison, Florida
32340 at 11:00 a.m., on March 3, 2009.

DATED THIS 4 DAY OF February, 2009.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4 day of February,
2009.


CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: "
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.

TO BE PUBLISHED IN: Madison County Carrier



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CITIZENS STATE BANK CIVIL ACTION NO. 08-555-CA
424 West Base Street
Madison, Florida 32340

Plaintiff,

vs. FORECLOSURE AND
OTHER RELIEF
LINDA MEHR
2807 South West Beaumont Ave,
Palm City, Florida 34990, unknown tenants; and other unknown parties in
possession, including the unknown spouse of any person in possession of the
property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that De-
fendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal
status is unknown, claiming under any of the named or described Defendant,
Defendants.
/

NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN;

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the final judgment of
foreclosure entered on February 12,2009, in the above styled action I,
Tim Sanders, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following described
real property:

A portion of those lands described in O.R. Book 619, page 288 of the
public records of Madison County, Florida, being a portion of Section 4, Township 1
North, Range 9 East, being more particularly described as follows:

Commence at a concrete monument marking the southwest corner of said
Section 4; thence North 8923'55" East aloig the south line of said Section 4 a
distance of 2009.90 feet to the southwest corner and POINT OF BEGINNING ot'f the fol-
lowing described parcel; thence North 0035'48" West a distance of 402.08 feet to a
point on the boundary of said O.R. Book 619, page 288; thence North 8929'56"East along
said O.R.,Book 619, page 288 a distance of 1267.62 feet to a concrete monument; thence
continue North 89029'56" East along said O.R. Book 619, page 288 a distance of 581.07
feet to the westerly right-of-way line of State Road 53 as described in said O.R.
Book 619, page 288; thence South 0623'17" West along said right-of-way line a distance
of 334.92 feet, thence North 8234'04" West a distance of 49.89 feet to the point of curva-
ture of a non-tangent circular curve to the left having a radius of 500.00 feet and a central
angle of 8826'25"; thence along said curve an arc distance of 771.79 feet (Chord; North
7323'55" West,.697.42 feet) to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South
6222'52" West a distance of 615.61 feet to the south line of said Section 4; thence South
59023'55" West along said south line a distance of 543.93 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. Containing 10.68 acres, more or less.
TOGETHER WITH an easement for ingress, egress and utilities over and
across
Easement "A" as described in 0-R. Book 694, Page 19, of the Public
Records of Madison County, Florida. '

Parcel Identification Number: part of 04-1N-093448-001-000

The sale will be held on March 5, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. (or as soon
thereafter as possible, provided that said sale must be commenced prior in 2:00 p.m.)
to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the West door of the courthouse in Madison
County, in Madison, Florida, jn accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any,


other than the owner of the above described property as of the date of the
lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact Sondra Williams, court administrator, Post Office Box
15(9, Lake City, Florida 32056, telephone:(386) 758-2163, within 2 working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hearing or'voice impaired, call 711.
Dated: February 12, 2009.

Tim Sanders
As Clerk of the Court

BY: /s/ Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk


Madison County Carrier 15A


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA/IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC,

Plaintiff/
vs.

CASE NO. 08-565-CA
PHILLIP RICHARD DEAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF PHILLIP RICHARD DEAN; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2,

Defendants)


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Madison County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Madison County, Florida,
described as:

Start at Northwest corner of Northeast quarter (NE 3/4) of Section 33,
Township 1 North, Range 9 East, Madison County, Florida, and-run
South 6.7 feet West along forty line 330 feet to concrete monument on
edge of Anderson Pond, thence North 60 degrees 46.2' East 156.5 feet to
edge of a cul de sac (with radius of 50 foci; and centerpoint North 60
degrees 46.2 East 50 feet); thence along radius of cul de sac
Southeasterly through central angle of 57 degrees 35' 48.4" and an arc
distance of 50.26 feet to and of cul de sac at South side of a 60 foot
wide street; thence South 33 degrees 41.8' East along side of street 423
feet to PC of a curve (with Delta angle of 19 degrees 08' 30" and centerline
radius of 297.04 feet); thence Southeasterly along are of curve to left
109.08 feet and through a central angle of 19 degrees 06' 36" to PT of
curve; thence South 52 degrees 48.4 East along South side of a 60 foot
street 173.2 feet to PC of a curve (with Delta angle of 13 degrees 25'.
48" and centerliie radius of 424.67 feet); thence along street Southeasterly
along arc of a curve to right 92.50 feet and through a central angle of
13 degrees 25' 48" to PT of curve; thence along street South 39 degrees
22.6' East 242 feet to PC of curve (with Delta angle of 19 degrees 24' 39" and
centerline radius of 292.36 feet); thence along street Southeasterly
along arc of curve to right 88.68 feet and through a central angle of 19
degrees 24' 30". to PT of curve and point of beginning of Lot 6; thence South 19
degrees 58' East along street 16.45 feet; thence South 70 degrees 02' West
250 feet; thence North 19 degrees 58' West 50 feet thence North 70
degrees 13' 43" West 20.33 feet; thence North 50 degrees 37.4' East
35.12 feet; thence North 70 degrees 02' East 224.54 feet to South side of
street; thence along street Southeasterly along arc of curve (with Delta angle
of 19 degrees 24' 30" and centerline radius of 292.36 feet) 59.05 feet and
through a central angle of 12 degrees 53' 44.5" to PT of curve and point
of beginning of Lot 6, containing 0.4 acres, more or less, and being
part of said Northeast quarter (NE 1/4).

Also the following street easement for ingress and egress:

Start at the Northwest corner of Northeast quarter (NE 1/4) of Section
33, Township 1 North, Range 9 East; Madison County, Florida, and run
South 6.7' West along forty line 330 feet to concrete monument on edge'
of Anderson Pond; thence North 60 degrees 46.2' East 206.5 feet to
center point of cul de sac with 50 foot radius at beginning of herein
described street easement; thence South 33 degrees 41.8' East 40 feet to
end of cul de sac and beginning of centerline of herein described 60
foot street; thence continue South 33 degrees 41.8' East along
centerline 423 feet to PC of curve to left with Delta angle of 19 degrees 06.6'
radius of 297.04 feet; tangent of 50 feet; thence along the centerline curve
99.07 feet and through a central angle 19 degrees 06.6' to FT of curve; thence
South' 52 degrees 48.4' East 173.2 feet along centerline to PC of curve
to right with Delta angle of 13 degrees 25' 48", radius of 424.67 feet,
tangent of 50 feet; thence along centerline curve 99.54 feet and through
a central angle of 13 degrees 25' 48" to PT of curve; thence.South 39
degrees 22,6' East along centerline 242.0 feet to PC of curve to right
angle with Delta angle of 19 degrees 24' 30", radius of 29236 feet,
tangent of 50 feet, thence along centerline curve 99.04 feet and through
a central angle of 19 degrees 24' 30" to PT of curve; thence South 19
degrees 58' East along centerline 166.45 feet to PC of curve to left
with Delta angle of 25 degrees 23.5' radius of 221.94 feet, tangent of 50
feet; thence along centerline curve 98.358 feet and through central angle of
25 degrees 23.5 to FT of curve; thence South 45 degrees 21.5' East along
centerline 100 feet to end of street easement at West right-of-way line
of State Road 14, 50 feet from centerline, thereof, containing 2.2 acres,
more or less, and being part of said Northeast quarter (NE 1/4).
A/K/A

185 SW Anderson Pond Way
Madison, FL 32340

at public sale, to-the highest and best bidder, for cash, At the west
front doorsteps of the Madison County Courthouse, 101 South Range Street, Madison,
Florida 32340 at 11:00 a.m., on March 3, 2009.

DATED THIS 4 DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2009.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4 day of February, 2009.

CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT


By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk


THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 2009CA000430001XX
OLD BLUE SPRINGS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability
Company,
Plaintiff,
vs

KENNETH D'SOUZA and VANESSA D'SOUZA, as
husband and wife; et al,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: KENNETH D'SOUZA and VANESSA D'SOUZA, Defendants, unknown tenants;
and other unknown parties in possession, including the unknown spouse of any
person in possession of the property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the
surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by,
through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, nat-
ural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of
the named or described Defendants.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following de-
scribed property in Madison County, Florida, to-wit:

Lot 23, of Block B, of RIVER TRACE subdivision as recorded in Plat Book 2,
Pages 28-30 of Madison County, Florida.
Subject to any outstanding mineral rights of record.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Plaintiff s attorney and counsel of record, ROSE M. DECKER, JR, Esquire of
The Decker Law Firm, P.A., 320 White Avenue, Post Office Drawer 1288, Five Oak, Flori-


da 32064, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file
the original with the Clerk of the Court, Honorable Tim Sanders, whose address is Madi-
son County Courthouse, Post Office Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341, either before service
on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If you fail to answer, defend or other-
wise plead to this action to foreclose a mortgage, a
Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint This Notice
of Action is executed and published pursuant to the provisions of 49.08, et seq., Florida
Statutes.
DATE: February 20, 2009.
(COURT SEAL) Honorable Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Court
Madison County, Florida

By Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk


egals









16A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 25, 2009



AROUND MADISON



Fifth Saturday Farmers And Friends Festival Recap


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
When asked how the
club measured the success
of the inaugural Fifth Sat-
urday Farmers And
Friends Festival, Rotary
President-Elect Brian O'-
Connell stated, 'As a Ro-
tary sponsored project,
our initial measure would
be the vendor response,
both the number of ven-
dors and their willingness
to return."
'"At 50 vendors, the
club exceeded its goal for
the new event," Madison
Rotary Club President Al-
ston Kelley added. "We
spoke to the vendors all
morning and they seemed
really happy There were
at least four or five hun-
dred visitors by midday,
and I wouldn't be sur-
prised if it got as high as a
thousand by afternoon."
Vendors, including
arts and crafts booths,
civic and healthcare infor-
mation booths, and a nice
variety of food and bever-
age vendors were placed
along Range and Marion
at Four .Freedoms Park.
Roads were then barricad-
ed, allowing everyone a
very cozy experience in
spite of a chilly breeze.
The hunting and fish-
ing theme that accompa-
nied this inaugural festi-
val was a big hit. A Fly-
fishing master, David
Lambert, impressed on-
lookers with demonstra-
tions and tips. The festival
also included a turkey call-
ing competition sponsored
by the Madison County
National Wild Turkey Fed-
eration Chapter that drew


over 44 contestants in six
different categories. First,
second and third place
was awarded in the follow-
ing six divisions:
FRICTION
1st Robbyn Day
2nd Mike Mayfield
3rd Tanner Norris
JAKES
1st Robin Shiver
2nd Lane Peavy
3rd Gary McGuire
GOBBLING
1st Earl Masey
2nd Scott Ellis
3rd Clint Strange
OWL HOOTING
1st Tanner Norris
2nd Chris Graham
3rd Mike Mayfield
AMATUER
1st Chad Hodge
2nd Tanner Norris
3rd Josh Williams
OPEN
1st Scott Ellis
2nd Clint Strange
3rd Mike Mayfield
The next fifth Saturday
occurs on May 30. At that
time, the Gospel and Blue-
grass Festival will be fea-
tured. The 2009 Fifth Sat-
urday Farmers & Friends
Festivals are a Madison
,Rotary Club sponsored
event with the participa-
tion of local civic, busi-
ness, and community lead-
ers who are working to-
gether to ensure the suc-
cess of the program, in-
cluding a special contribu-
tion from the Madison
,County Chamber of Com-
merce and Tourism.
"Three more times in
2009, Four Freedoms Park
will be lined with booths
and displays heralding
our rich heritage and
quality local products. We


personally invite all inter-
ested to become a sponsor
or vendor of these festive
events," O'Connell noted.
Fifth Saturday festi-
vals will showcase his-'
toric Madison as it draws
crowds to shop, dine and
tour. Promotions will ex-
tend into Jacksonville,
Tallahassee and Southern
Georgia to ensure regional
exposure.
Entertainment and
commerce represent the
winning combination nec-
essary to give these events
lasting appeal, which is
exactly the goal in its de-
sign. To their immense
credit, Madison Rotary
Club has demonstrated
their ability to deliver as
promised and is looking to
add future Fifth Saturday
Farmers & Friends Festi-
vals to an already impres-
sive resume. Proceeds
from the event will be
added to the club's local
commitments.
Rotary is synonymous
with worldwide charity,
striving to reflect its motto
of "Service Above Self" in
all undertakings. The
Madison Rotary Club
meets weekly on Wednes-
days at noon at the St. Vin-
cent's fellowship hall.
Sponsorship and vendor
applications for Fifth Sat-
urday, as well as member-
ship and program infor-
mation for Rotary, may be
obtained by calling Brian
O'Connell at (850) 973-3356
or by mail at: Madison Ro-
tary Club, EO. Box 745,
Madison 32341.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, January 30, 2009
The clowns of Lee United Methodist Church entertained visitors at the Fifth Satur-
day Farmers and Friends Festival. The Gospel in Greasepaint family, front row left to
right, are: Emily Weaver, Faith Archambault and Nicole Davis. Back row, left to right,
are: Jason Archambault, Devyn Monismith, Chelsea Hanners, Karla Hanners, Keith
Hanners and Jamal Thornton.


Ht21cLx You


MM Thank you a T for giving
wi the opportunity to serve
you for the past 29 years.
As my clients, you have been
endearing treasures & Cifetimefriends.
Iwilwafways appreciate your friendship,
confidence, loyalty & business.
GodBCess y'ACC -
See you around town,

SJnnette Sircy


.2Km


200: FORD

SPORT:b p j


$21 900
i_-M1ta1h1r i 1f The Yea w


FOD #1 SenglTack 32Years



0% IS AVAILABLE

S$150000 Worth of
Accessories Given

S$25, 997 With The Purchase of
2009 F150


Fl 50


SAP


Ford Rebate .. ................. -2000o 0
Ford Conquest Cash ................ -100000


Stk#ESP9001


* ""Mon or i EE CAR & TRUCK CENTER

Price or Payments do not include tax or title fees. 2 2 9 -3 3 3s 2 3 0 0
Prices includes all incentives Downtown Valdosta www.langdaleford.com


for 72
MONTHS

DOWN

fStk#MT8029 ----
Must add tax & title fees
Must finance with Ford Motor Credit Ford Bonus Cash,
Ford Conquest must own a non Ford product


ID


ID


509737


a


Iff-


Now


^rOQAOO22




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