Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00150
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla
Publication Date: February 18, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00150
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text








inMadison CouLihL


Myra Valentine
Elected Chair Of
North Central
Florida Regional
Planning Council


Myra Valentine
Madison Mayor Myra
Valentine has been elected
Chair of the North Central
Florida Regional Planning
Council. Valentine has
served on the Council since
,2001, representing the City of
Madison as a local elected of-
ficial.
The Council, whose
members are local elected of-
ficials and gubernatorial ap-
pointees, administers a vari-
ety of state and federal pro-
grams for north central Flori-
da including Alachua, Brad-
ford, Columbia, Dixie,
,Gilchrist, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Madison, Suwan-
nee, Taylor and Union Coun-
,ties. Programs include devel-
opment of the Strategic Re-
gional Policy Plan, technical
assistance to local govern-
ments in development of
Please see Myra Valentine,
Page 4A
Greene
Publishing
Announces
Two
Community
Projects
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
"What doesn't kill you,
makes you stronger," is
one of those old sayings
that give people a positive
way of looking at a bad sit-
uation.
Think about it though;
what about those occa-
sions that it does kill you?
In a new three part se-
ries titled, "It Can Kill You
Madison," this reporter
will be providing a closer
look at several preventable
killers, and perhaps just as
importantly, constructive
and achievable ways to
break away from those
killers without over-
whelming emotional sacri-
fice.
The companion pro-
ject, titled, "Consider Your
Options," will introduce a
variety of ideas on how to
find and launch new op-
portunities, increase
wealth, and apply proven
techniques to find new
revenue sources for exist-
ing businesses and start-
ups.
Most employees and
entrepreneurs often be-
lieve there are few options
to improve themselves or
improve productivity.
These articles are sure to
challenge, and hopefully
eliminate, many of those
obstacles to success.
This is not a fluff pro-
Please see Community
Projects, Page 4A


INSIDE TOI


F2G Offers

Kids Room

To Grow


See Page 6A


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SMadison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


Cowboys Honored At Football Banquet


Kendal Kornegay,
left, receives the Defen-
sive Academic Player of
the Year Award from De-
fensive Coordinator Rod
Williams at the Cowboy
football banquet held
Monday, Feb. 16. The
award was given to Ko-
rnegay for demonstrat-
ing scholastic excel-
lence in the classroom.


Chris Thompson, left
in the photo at the right,
receives the Offensive
Academic Player of the
Year Award from Offen-
sive Coordinator Mike
Coe, right. Thompson,
who has signed with
Florida State University,
was recognized for not
only his abilities on the
field but for scholastic
excellence in the class-
room.


Please See the Friday, Feb. 20, edition of-The Madison Enterprise-Recorder
for full coverage of the Cowboys Football Banquet



High School Seniors Give Back

Submitted by the
Madison County High
School 7 -
Future Career and '
Community Leaders .
of America L',. ..


During the month of
February Madison Coun-
ty High School second
period community ser-
vice class "Seniors Giv-
ing Back" will be having
a drive at Harveys for the
Suwannee Valley Human
Society They will be col-
lecting bleach, kitty lit-
ter, dry dog and cat food.
They will be placing a
box in Harvey's so as you
buy your groceries you
can simply place the food
or bleach in the box as
you leave. If you would
rather do more you could
adopt a new friend. They
have cats, dogs, kittens,
and puppies that need a
good home. Their ani-
mals have all their shots,
a micro-chip, and are
ether spayed or
neutered.
If adoption is not an
option for you, you may
take donations of house-
hold furnishings, cloth-
ing, books, or toys to the
Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society on 1156 SE
Bisbee Loop,, Madison,
Florida and receive a tax
exemption credit for
your donations.
The center is open
Tuesday to Saturday
from 10 A.M. to 2 p.m.
Please come adopt.


Photo submitted
Brittany Browning, a member of Seniors Giving Back, is
lending a helping hand at the Suwannee Valley Humane
Society Thrift Store.

Donate With A Purpose
Submitted by Madison County High School Future Career and
Community Leaders of America
Attention residents of Madison County: you have previously
been infornied of the volunteer work that Madison County High
School senior students have been contributing to the United
Methodist Thrift Store. As part of our services for the Thrift
Shop, we are encouraging all of you to start this 2009 year of
on a good note. Please go through your homes and work places
to locate items of no longer use to you. (Clean out your garages,
attics, and other areas that might collect dust). Afterwards, de-
liver these articles to the United Methodist Thrift Shop located
by the Madison County Jail. We are asking that these items be
donated only if in good condition, and can be of further use to
someone else. Times available for donation include:
Please See Donate, Page 4A


Above: Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart takes
notes as he and Jimmy Lyons look over food laid out on
a jacket. Lyons' wife, Sharon, an employee of the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Commission in the Twin Rivers State
Park area near Ellaville when she discovered the myste-
rious items. Apparently, the items are part of a religious
ritual known as "root." The items shown above and be-
low (in a closer look) could indicate a prayer for food or
a monument to someone.


Happy 101st Birthday,

Miss Madison 1925


Mildred White, born Lois Mildred Bishop, who won
the title of Miss Madison in 1925, celebrated 101 won-
derful years on February 13, 2009.
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On June 5, 1925, the Madison Enterprise-Recorder ran
a story announcing the Miss Madison contest. Accord-
ing to the article, seven businesses, including the ER,
that comprised the Madison Trade Territory, sponsored
the contest.
In order to nominate and vote for contestants, resi-
dents were required to visit these merchants, who in
turn used an elaborate scoring system to convert pa-
tronage into votes. This elaborate scoring system yield-
ed big numbers for the winner, Mildred Bishop, who re-
ceived 14,151,015 votes. As winner, she was treated to a
two-week, all-expenses-paid, tour of the North and East,
which was a very significant prize at the time.
Now residing in Jacksonville Beach, Lois Mildred
Bishop was born on February 13, 1908 to Roberta and
Please See Miss Madison 1925, Page 4A


2 Sections, 28 Pages
Around Madison County
Bridal Guide
Classifieds/Legals 14
Path of Faith B Sc


Local & Regional Crime
6-7A History
9A Obituaries
- 15A Money & Finance
section Regional


4A
I3A Wed 73/57 Thu 70134 Fri 58133 Sat /21 .
5A 2118 2/19 2/20 2/21
I OA Windy with isolated thunderstorms Windy with clouds giving way to Sunny. Highs in the upper 50s and A few clouds. Highs in the mid 60s
16A developing. A few storms may be sun. lows in the low 30s. and lows in the low 40s.
16A I severe.,









2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 18, 2009



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS




/~ ~ etesT Th Ed I i torI -I


God Explains MCMH Honors One Of Its Own
I iA.ImWn


VVomlIIII
A little boy asked his
mother, "Why are you cry-
ing?"
'"Because Im a woman,"
she told him.
"I don't understand," he,
said. His Mom just hugged
him and said, "And you never
will."
Later the little boy asked
his father, "Why does mother
seem to cry for no
reason?"
"All women cry for no
reason," was all his dad could
say.
The little boy grew up
and became a man, still won-
dering why women cry
Finally he put in a call to
God. When God got on the
phone, he asked, "God,
why do women cry so easily?"
God said: "When I made
the woman she had to be spe-
cial.
I made her shoulders
strong enough to carry the
weight of the world, yet gentle
enough to give comfort.
I gave her an inner
strength to endure childbirth
and the rejection that
many times comes from her
children.
I gave her a hardness that
allows her to keep going when
everyone else gives up, and
take care of her family
through sickness and fatigue
with out
complaining.
I gave her the sensitivity
to love her children under
any and all circumstances,
even when her child has hurt
her very badly.
I gave her strength to car-
ry her husband through his
faults and fashioned her from
his rib to protect his heart.
I gave"her wisdom to
know that. a good husband
never hurts his wife, but
sometimes tests her strengths
and her resolve to stand be-
side him unfalteringly
And finally, I gave her a
tear to shed. This is hers ex-
clusively to use whenever it is
needed."
"You see my son," said
God, "the beauty of a woman
is not in the clothes she wears,
the figure that she carries, or
the way she combs her hair.
The beauty of a woman
must be seen in her eyes, be-
cause that is the doorway to
herheart the place where
love resides."


Greetings Everyone,
We at MCMH want to
thank each one of you for
all that you did to help to
make the retirement par-
ty for Mrs. Margaret Gra-
ham so very special. We
had an awesome crowd,
and I know that she will
never forget it, and nei-
ther will we. She was tru-
ly, blessed as family and
friends gathered to cele-
brate her and her excep-
tional career .
Special thai'k you to
all MCMH employees -you
are the best. Our delight-
ful Pink Ladies added so
much to our celebration;
we had many of our
board members and attor-
ney for the MCMH board,
Cary Hardee, attend to
our celebration- we also
had some of our doctors
and medical staff joining
us!
Mr. Abercrombie did
a great job describing the
culture in 1962-the year
that Margaret Graham
began her long and distin-
guished career at MCMH.,
He thanked her for her
enormous dedication to
this hospital. Chairman
of the board, Howard
Phillips graciously pre-
sented Mrs. Graham with
a plaque in appreciation
of her long and dedicated
career spanning 47 years
at Madison County
Memorial Hospital.
Mrs. Mary Alice
Lewis .had many kind as
well as funny things to re-
late to the huge crowd,
about the many years
they worked at the hospi-
tal together and the
meaningful relationship
that they share as a re-
sult.
Aubrey Jones not
only prepared an elegant
and delicious array. of
food for the occasion, he
also shared some of the
experiences that had hap-
pened in MCMH kitchen
and Dietary Services
with Mrs. Margaret Gra-
ham leading the amazing
cooking team. MCMH is


ty...


ty...


&merc


((98.


gem


Publisher


rBy Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.

MEET Yo R


P NEIGHBOR

Vicki Howerton




sit


Vicki Howerton is the Community Relations
Coordinator for Madison County Community
Hospital. Working at the hospital for over a year,
Howerton admittedly loves her job.
"I feel like the Lord placed me here for a rea-
son," Howerton says with earnest.
Living in Madison herself since 1971, How-
erton's husband has deep family roots that can
be traced back to war hero Colin P. Kelly
When asked what motto Howerton lives by,
her response was quickly delivered.
"Proverbs," Howerton answered, "Trust in
the Lord with all your heart, lean not unto your
own understanding. In all your ways acknowl-
edge Him and He will direct your ways."


Question Of The Week

What is your favorite Valentine gift to give or receive?



Card "13%


Flowers 20%


A practical gift 33% /


Candy 33% |


Log on to our website to vote on next week's question:
"Have you stopped eating peanut butter because of the salmonella scare?"
Voting for this question ends February 23.
www.GREENEPUBLISHING.com


known for, among other
things, its very good food,
and now we all know why.
However, she is leaving
the team amazingly well
prepared to carry on.
We send a huge
"thank you" to all our
community who joined
together representing
every area of our special
Madison- representing
County Government, City
Government, other car-
ing, and interested people
who received the invita-
tion when it was gra-
ciously extended to our
community in the
Greater Madison County
Chamber of Commerce
and Tourism letter- or
heard at church, work, or
other places, and wanted
to be part of expressing
appreciation to a lady
who richly deserved it...
We especially want to
thank Mary Alice Lewis
for helping plan, and a
huge thanks to Cheree
Platt who worked tireless-
ly helping to totally trans-
form the Dining Room as
well as donating to our
hospital many of the
beautiful and extraordi-
nary decorations for this
event! A big "thank you"
to Jenny Andrews who
also provided beautiful
decorations for this cele-
bration- and thanks to
Jackie Johnson who gra-
ciously offered decora-
tions as well. We are
thankful for awesome
friends all over our coun-


The festive "Money
Tree" was an amazing
part of the planned re-
tirement celebration.
Generous gifts of God's
love lavished Margaret
Graham on her special
day. Most of them were
hanging on the lighted
"Money tree," which dis-
played colorful gift bags,
red ribbons, and con-
tained gifts from the
heart. We are grateful to
all for the outstanding
participation....
We live in the greatest
community on earth!
Thanks everyone for
helping to make it so
unique and so special. A
huge thanks to Tyrra
Meserve and The Madi-
son County Carrier, as
well as to Madison Florida
Voice online for great pic-
tures and coverage from
each of you for this most
important event. Our hos-
pital is such a wonderful
and important part of our
Madison County Great
things continue to unfold
daily! We are all grateful...
and so very blessed!!

Thanks Everyone!
Vicki Howerton
...And the entire
MCMH Family

Life is short. Forgive
quickly. Love truly. Laugh
uncontrollably, and never
regret anything that made
you smile.... thanks
again! .


In life, sometimes, we all tend to get caught up with
our own emotions and problems and we seem to let
those emotions run our lives.
About a year ago I took up the habit of writing say-
ings on "post-it-notes" and sticking them up on my mir-
ror, at home, so that I would continually read them when
I was getting ready in the morning. I then carried this
habit over into my office, at work.
I've learned that sometimes it just helps, to sit back
and re-read a lot of these ponderous quotes........

Life is too short to wake up with regrets.
Love the people who treat you right.
Fdrget about the ones who don't.
Believe everything happens for a reason.
If you get a second chance, grab it with both hands.
If it changes your life; let it.
Nobody said life would be easy,
They just promised it would be worth it.

When God leads you to the edge of the cliff, trust Him ful-
ly and let go. Only 1 of 2 things will happen, either He'll
catch you when you fall, or He'll teach you how to fly!

When we stand before God,. on Judgment Day, He will
not ask us how other people treated us; He will ask us
how we treated other people!

Do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry
about itself Each day has enough trouble of its own.

Remember there's blue sky behind the blackest cloud

My attitude is NOT a feeling my attitude is a choice!

It's good to have money and the things that money can
buy, but it's good, too, to check up once in awhile and
make sure that you haven't lost the things that money
can't buy.

Have A Great Day!
Until then.....see you around the town.









Wednesday, February 18, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Contestants Set For


Lee Day Pageant
Lee United Methodist Church will host a dinner the-
ater on Saturday, Feb. 28, beginning at 6 p.m. The title is
Who Done Stole the Bride? Everyone is invited to attend
this production. Cost is by donation only.
The Lee Day Pageant is scheduled for Saturday,
March 14, at 6 p.m., at the Lee Elementary School.
Go out and show your support for the contestants in
the pageant.
Contestants in the Lee pageant include:'


Baby Belle
Jasmine Reddy
Kendall Odom
Nevaeh Krueger

Tiny Princess
Sienna Guillen
Lilly Premorel


Jr. Little Miss
Abigail Reddy
Caibre Johnson


Little Miss
Emily Bishop
Haley Phillips
Emmolyn Terry

Pre-Teen
Amanda Miller
Casey Hooker
Dallas Walker
Kelsey Odom
Celina Quintaha


Haley Reddy Teen
Angelina Quintana Jodi Phillips
Kandace Odom
Elaine Terry
I want to wish Annie Curtis a happy birthday on
Wednesday, Feb. 18. She is the daughter of Michael and
Angelina Curtis.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week
and a beautiful forever! May God bless each and every
one of you!





Shayon S. Straughter vs. Shalonda Rowe repeat do-
mestic injunction
Brandy Ware Moore vs. ,Leonard Moore dissolu-
tion of marriage
Snowey Hagan vs. Diane Brown repeat domestic
injunction
.Kristen M. Hendry vs. Walter David Hendry disso-
lution of marriage
Raymond C. Mullenix II vs. Jennifer A. Mullenix -
other domestic
Arthur Glen Smith vs. Timothy Allen Dennis -
mortgage foreclosure
*Green Tree Services vs. Jimmie Nell Cruce other
civil
Freddie L. Williams vs. Ashley L. Williams other
domestic


Regarding the football coach at the high school,
driving to work in a new truck: I looked around the
high school and saw that most of the teachers are dri-
ving new or nearly new cars. The coach is not the
only one driving a new vehicle.
Where is Hillary Clinton now that she is Secre-
tary of State? Has she vanished from the face of the
earth?


-Look Who s New ,

Look Who's New .


4


Anna Grace BelT

'" ACan Belf and Jennifer Cox
are happy to announce the ar-
rivaC of their beautifuC baby gir .,,
Anna Grace BeCC, born on Janu- .-
ary 27, 2009. She weighed 7 Cbs.,
andio oz.


rida PressAssoc


2008
Award Winning Newspaper



Tmmmy &aynGee


ChosanofFtlbrida's Tlh Olrading iN ppers
P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Website:
www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
news@greenepublishing.com
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
Classifieds / Legals
debra@greenepublishing.com

PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene
EDITOR
Jacob Bembry
PRODUCrION MANAGER
Heather Bowen
SIAFF WRITERS
Michael Curti- and Tyrra Meserve
GRAuPHC DESIGNERS
James Surfer and Stephen Bochnia
TYPESETTER/SUBSCRIPTIONS
Bryant Thigpen
ADVERTISING
SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy McKinney,
Jeanette Dunn
CLASSIFIED \ND LEGAL ADS
Slacy Martin
Dead Lne lor .iiliedi i. Monday
'iL 'p rri
Deadline for l BI Ad.eni'rnmntcnis
Monday at 5 pm.
There will be a '3' charge for Affidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In County $30 Out-of-County $38
(State & local taxes included)

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 .800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the
right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the man-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene
Publishing, Inc(.. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


Editorial note: "Stray vectors" is the a


There are two
categories of TV
commercials that
I detest. The first
is the commer-
cial that demeans
men. You know
what I'm talking
about: men are
stupid; deserve to
get bopped in the
forehead; things


National

Security
Joe Boyles
Guest Columnist


like that. The second category is the
commercial from trial lawyers, many of
them medical related, that invites class
action lawsuits. "Know your legal
rights." The mute button on my remote
control comes in handy.
Barack Obama came into the White
House last month promising a new era of
politics and bi-partisan approach. So. he
lets Nancy Pelosi's liberal allies in Con-
gress write the stimulus bill and turns
his back on the Republicans when they
tried to interject their ideas into the
process. So much for bi-partisanship.
Barack blew it right out of the gate.
When it comes to an energy policy,
I'm not interested in quick fixes. When
naysayers tell me that oil won't come
from the North Slope of Alaska for ten
years or the Outer Continental Shelf for
seven, not only do I not believe them,
their argument is irrelevant. Let's get
started NOW!
Apparently the Democrats want to
tackle health care by providing insur-
ance to those who are without while pre-
serving employer-based health insur-
ance plans. Here's my question: how
many employers are going to continue to
provide health insurance for their work-
ers when the government says they'll
step in to cover the uninsured?
While politicians in Washington are
talking about an economic stimulus
package, the people are getting a stimu-
lus every time they fill up at the gas sta-
tion. I figure that I'm saving about.$50 a
week from what I was paying for gas six
months ago.
The popular myth is that Bush Ad-
ministration deregulation caused the
mortgage meltdown which led to the fi-
nancial mess we are in. It is a myth.
Clinton Administration rewrites of the
Community Reinvestment Act resulted
in runaway subprime lending. The Bush
Administration repeatedly tried to re-
form the mortgage lending business but
Congressional Democrats stonewalled


author's by-line for random thoughts.
every effort.
Bush and the Re-
publicans were
.. "v | simply too weak
to overcome par-
tisan opposition.
What is
the Bush legacy?
Let's start with
this: eight
months inte his
presidency,
America suffered the worst attack in our
nation's history- Three thousand people
died at the hands of al-Qaeda terrorists.
Over the subsequent 88 months, America
was not attacked again.
I have made the case repeatedly that
Democrats are weak on national security.
Obama's holdover selection of Robert
Gates as Secretary of 'Defenise at least
partially confirms this theory. .Recall
that Republican William Cohen was Bill
Clintoh's second SECDAF?
Why aren't American cars competi-
tive with foreign autos made in this coun-
try? Answer the cost of labor for a big
three built car is $73/hour while the
same cost for a foreign car built in a non-
union shop in the South is $44. The big
three automakers and the unions repre-
senting their labor force do not want to
update, their business models to reflect
21st Century economic realities.
If we continue to financially "bail
out" industries, companies, and individ-
uals that made risky, poor decisions,
when are they ever going to learn the
lessons from those decisions?
Age and experience do not necessari-
ly equate to maturity. Joe Biden is twen-
ty years older and has more than thirty
years senatorial experience over Barack
Obama, yet Obama is more mature. Go
figure!
The reason why the beginning of life
is so important to the abortion debate is
because the, Constitution prohibits our
government from depriving a human be-
ing of life without due process. That
right is also expressly mentioned in the
Declaration of Independence.
For the most part, I don't think that
politicians lie to us, but they rarely tell
us the whole truth about anything.
When I studied, honor land ethics, we
called that quibbling.
Candidate Obama promised his back-
ers "hope and change." There is still
plenty of hope, but the change has van-
ished.


)id you Know...

In ancient times, it was believed that cer-
tain colors could combat the evil spirits that
lingered over nurseries. Because blue was
associated with the heavenly spirits, boys
were clothed in that color, boys then
being considered the most valuable
resource to parents. Although baby
'girls did not have a color associated
S ,-with them, they were mostly
clothed in black. It was only in the
Y Middle Ages when pink became associ-
b: ated with baby girls.


Stray Vectors


00


E









4A Madison Qounty Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 18, 2009



LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER

*Uin' K 'a -K--


.lMaaison county



ALL SUSPECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED INNOCENT
UNTIL .PROVEN GUILTY IN A COURT OF LAW

Man Arrested For

Trespass After Warning
A Madison man was arrested for trespass after
warning and resisting without violence on Saturday,
Feb. 14.
According to a Madison Police Department report,
Sage Brown had been given a trespass warning for a
relative's home earlier that evening.
Patrolman Eric Gilbert was dispatched back to the
relative's location that year. He found Brown hiding
inside a vehicle in the back yard.
Gilbert placed Brown under arrest and he became
unruly. He began cursing his relative, Patrolman Joey
Smith and Gilbert.
Brown tried snatching away several times while
walking back to Gilbert's patrol car.


Myra Valentine

cont from Page 1A

their comprehensive plans, land development regula-
tions and grant management, administration of de-
velopments of regional impact, local mitigation
strategies, hazardous materials, homeland security,
housing assistance programs and economic develop-
ment. In addition, the Council staffs the Metropolitan
Transportation Planning Organization for the
Gainesville Urbanized Area, the North Central Flori-
da Local Emergency Planning Committee, the North
Central Florida Regional Hazardous Materials Re-
sponse Team and The Original Florida Tourism Task
Force.
Valentine has been very active in the organization
over the past several years. She has served as Vice-
Chair, Secretary-Treasurer; Chair of the Finance
Committee and Program Committee and a member of
the Board of Directors for five terms. She also cur-
rently serves as a Council representative to the Flori-
da Regional Councils Association.


MISS Madison 1925 Madison County...


cont from Page 1A
Ben Bishop of Madison. She later married Samuel Jack-
son White of Live Oak on June 14, 1950.
The owners and staff of the ER wish one of
Madison's finest centenarians a warm and blessed
birthday.
Staff writer Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greeneviublishing.com.


Community Projects


cont from Page 1A


ject simply to entertain. Instead, those interested will be
invited to convenient after-hours gatherings to develop,
and more importantly, implement these new plans. It's
apparent that some old approaches aren't working. Con-
sequently, it's time to "Consider Your Options."
This reporter and Editor Jacob Bembry are col-
laborating on these projects to ensure all interested are
well supported from day one. Those interested in more
details may respond to information provided in the arti-
cles or may contact Jacob Bembry or Michael Curtis at
(850) 973-4141.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishinz.com.


Donate

cont from Page 1A

Tuesday, donation to thrift store, and Wednesday and
Saturday the thrift store opens at 9 a.m. to 12 noon.
The items you donate are tax deductible, so donating
can benefit you, as well as the people who receive your
items. Household items are a great necessity to the
thrift shop due to the increase need by customers,
they sell very quickly Madison County High School
Seniors are collecting items from school as well. so
any clothing, shoes, toys, books, etc. that your chil-
dren may out grow, could be donated to their first pe-
riod class. You can also send items to the thrift store.
We hope you give consideration to this announce-
ment, and "clean it and send it" to the First United
Methodist Thrift Shop where it %would greatly be ap-
preciated.


2/4/09
Flora Estella Roeha -
driving while license
suspended
Todd Coleman
Richardson DUI
William Spencer
Vought Criminal regis-
tration
Jeremiah Under-
wood Criminal registra-
tion
.Quahasha Latevia
Wright Possession of
less than 20 grams of
marijuana
Craig Mitchell Dis-
orderly conduct
2/5/09.
Roosevelt Lamb, Jr. -
VOP (circuit)
Alexander Lloyd -
Driving while license
suspended, failure to
stop for inspection
2/6/09
Victoria Nicole
Solomon Grand theft
third degree specified
property
James Donald Mur-
phy DUI
Ladarrious Jer-
maine Crumity Crimi-


nal registration
John Michael Hul-
saver Petit theft
2/7/09
Kenneth Sermons -
Driving while license
suspended, possession of
more than 20 grams with
intent to sell, resisting
without violence
Elizabeth Sarmiento
Sanchez DUI, no valid
drivers license, out of
county warrant
2/8/09
Wilton Cooks III -
DUI
Sage Tamell Brown -
Failure to appear
2/9/09
Phillip Douglas Bai-
ley "Driving while li-
cense suspended or re-
voked, possession of
marijuana less than 20
grams, possession of
drug paraphernalia, no
motor vehicle registra-
tion
2/10/09
Steven Kristopher
Adderly Out of county
warrant, VOP, posses-
sion of cocaine


Your Local Paper Has Lots To Offer:
* Community Events
- Sports









Wednesday, February 18, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 5A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The family of Dorothy Louise Rogers
would like to express their thanks to
everyone for the kindness they shared
with us during the passing of our mother.
Your prayers, visits, food and flowers were
all appreciated.
May God bless each of you.

Wayne Rogers and Family
Diane and Paul Webb and Family
Nancy and Larry Thigpen and Family
Gloria and David Cashwell and Family
Carol and Eddie Brooks and Family
Myrtle Webb and Family




*TITHANK YOU

The children of the late Sister Rachel
Smith Garrett would like to thank you for your
acts of kindness during our loss. Your kind-
iess was greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Jonnie, Sophia, Greta,
Waddie, James, and Maylois


M0NNVNITY MW0


February 4-23
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild invites all
to visit the Columbia
County Library to enjoy
an exhibit of their hand-
made quilts. The quilts
will hang from Jan. 28
until Feb. 23 during regu-
lar scheduled library
hours. The Columbia
County Library is located
on 490 N Columbia, in
Lake City. For details
about the show, call Mar-
cia Kazmierski at' (386)
752-2461, Nancy Palmer at
(386) 961-9067 or Barbara
Wand at (386) 758-7727.
Tuesday, Wednesdays
& Saturday Thru
March 31
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park, in
White Springs, will host
a blacksmithing work-
shop on Tuesdays,
Wednesday and Satur-
days through the end of
March, from 9 a.m. until
12 noon. Students will
learn how to draw out,
bend, upset and twist
iron. Everyone will leave
with a simple finished
product. Workshop fees
are $15 per class, which
includes park admission
and all supplies. For ad-
ditional information or
to register for the work-
shops, please call the
Park Gift Shop at (386)
397-1920 or visit
tvww.stephenfosterCSO.or
g.
Feb. 19, March 19,
April 16
"Learn the folklore of
the animal and experi-
ence guided imagery and
journaling in this fun-
filled, thought-provoking
workshop." The third
Thursday evening of each


month, join motivational
speaker Khrys Kantarze
and artist Sue Ruda to
learn and explore the
folklore of various ani-
mals (Horse Workshop,
Feb. 19; Wolf Workshop,
March 19; and Owl Work-
shop, April 16) native to
the land at the Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Cen-
ter State Park on U.S.
Hwy. 41 N in White
Springs. Cost is $25. Pre-
registration is requested.
To register, call (386) 397-
1920. For more informa-
tion, contact Khrys at
(386) 234-0846.
February 19
The Kingsmen Quar-
tet will be in concert at
Bible Deliverance Church
in Madison, on Feb. 19.
For more information,
call (850) 464-0114.
Thursday Thru
March 5
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park, in
White Springs, will host
the first session in a se-
ries of poetry workshops
entitled, "Writing from
the Heart," on Thursday,
Feb. 5. Classes will contin-
ue on Thursday nights
until March 5. Author
Sudye Cauthen will teach
participants how to work
toward creating a poetry
chapbook, as well as sim-
ple poetic techniques.
Participants should
bring pencils and paper.
The classes are limited to
five participants. Work-
shop fees, including park
admission, are $25 per
class or $100 in advance.
For additional informa-
tion or to register for the
workshops, please call
(386) 397-1920 or Sudye
Cauthen at (386) 397-1284.


Larry

Lawton

McCulley
Larry Lawton McCul-,
ley, age 58, of Jennings,
passed away early Friday,
February 13, 2009 at
South Georgia Medical
Center in Valdosta, Ga.
Larry was born in
Hamiltofi-Couinty and
spent most' of his life
working on the family
farm. He was a former
National Guardsman and
was a member of the Jen-
nings United Methodist
Church.
Larry was preceded
in death by his father, Mr.
Lawton McCulley.
Survivors include two
sons, Colby McCulley and
his wife Heather of
Gainesville, and Chase
McCulley of Valdosta,
Ga.; his mother, Marta
McCulley, Jennings; one
brother, Terry McCulley,
Jennings; one sister and
brother-in-law, Barbara
and Mike Jones of
Jasper; several' nieces
and nephews and a host
of friends.
Funeral services were
held Sunday, February 15,
in the chapel of Harry T.
Reid Funeral Home with
Pastor Lee Ferdon offici-
ating. Mr. Mike Jones
gave the eulogy. Inter-
ment followed in Ever-
green Cemetery.


Robert

Lee

Earnest III
Robert Lee Earnest III,
age 74; died Saturday Febru-
ary 14, 2009, at home in
Cherry Lake.
Funeral services will be
Saturday, February 21, 2009
at 11 a.m., at First Baptist
Church in Madison, with
burial at Cherry Lake Bap-
tist Church Cemetery Visi-
tation will be Friday, Febru-
ary 20, from 5-7 p.m., at Beg-
gs Funeral Home, Madison
Chapel.
In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions
may be made to First Baptist
Church of Madison, 134 SW
Meeting Street, Madison,
Florida 32340 or Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, Florida
32308-5428
Mr. Earnest was born
September 14, 1934 in West
Palm Beach. He moved to
Madison in 1993 coming
from Jupiter. He worked as
an Accountant for Prat
WhitneyAir Craft. He was
on the Board of Florida Air
Craft Federal Credit Union,
and member of the Rotary
Club. He was an active mem-
ber of First Baptist Church.
He is survived by his
wife of 43 years, Annie
Earnest; three sons, Robert
L. Earnest IV of Madison,
Edward Taylor Earnest of
Ocala, and James Bowen
Earnest of- Stuart; and sev-
en grandchildren.


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6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 18, 2009


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


There s KOOm klnough

To Grow At F20


Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo By Tyrra B Meserve, February 9, 2000
The F2G Academy, with owners Sedrick and Angela Davis, had a grand opening
that brought in seekers of higher learning for little minds.
By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
New kids on the block, the F2G Academy, has started class. Opening their doors on
a really grand scale, Monday, February 9 saw students enrolled and parents parade in
and out of the halls of the learning facility recently built. Owners, Sedrick and Angela
Davis, are giving back to their community on a graded A-curve, teaching Madison chil-
dren by giving them room to grow.
The sunny house on Brooklyn Drive knows it can teach Madison's children what
they need to know for that extra boost into the academic future with early hands on stud-
ies. Starting with infants, all the way up to after school care, the F2G Academy offers its
little learners something extra with music, art and dance classes, Tennis lessons, com-
puter stations and learning centers and they specialize in early literacy and math.
A Headstart program is offered at no charge, regardless of income for all VPKers 4
and 5 years of age, and after school care is available for older siblings in higher grades.
Able to hold up to 72 students, there is still enough room to grow on the roll sheets of the
academy as well.
Uniforms keep students tidy and easily recognizable as surveillance cameras in and
outside the facility keep students safe. Of course, an open door policy is in place, allow-
ing parents keyless front door entry and they are welcome to stop by and say "hi" to their
precious bundles anytime.
'Looking for something to keep 'em occupied on Saturdays? The F2G has parents cov-
ered there, too. Popcorn and a flick will be provided on Saturdays for less than a matinee
that's sure to please those tiny critics. If they get itchy in their seats, a tennis court out-
side is sure to keep them busy until mom arrives.
Thanks go out to all who came down to the F2G Academy and Madison welcomes the
new school in town. Just the curve students need to learn on, let them do it the F2G
Academy way
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be reached at tyrra@greenepublishing.com.

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Celebration


Pauline Hle Drden

Submitted by the Dryden.family: ern style feats usually three
The family invites you to times a day when family comes
help us celebrate on Saturday. to visit.
February 21, 2009, at Midway Mrs. Dryden watches
Baptist Church. Mom will ar- preaching on TV. chats on the
rive at 1 p.m., so please arrive phone with her sisters and
between 12:30 and 12:45 friends every day, does her
p.m. we want to sur- laundry. cooks and does
prise her! No gifts dishes. She misses
please. Cards will/her little Boston
be great. The chil- Terrier. Pee-Wee ;
dren will furnish III. but feeds some
meat. bread, tea. outdoor cats and
coffee and birth- walks around her "
day cake. A veg- i pines looking for
gie, side dish or o xes deer and
dessert will be turkeys. She and.,
appreciated. 11r. Dryden al-
s Mrs. Dryden ways had a beauti-
has devoted her ul yard and veg-
time to her family. table garden, but :
She and her late hus- she is unable to tend it :
band, Quinton Dryden. now.
spent 64 years together raising Her children are Becky and
six children, farming, garden- John Gallagher of Madison,
ing and building houses. There Ga.; Patsy Welch of Lee (the
are 25 grandchildren: 50 (plus mother of the five Payne chil-
two on the way) great-grand- dren): Bill and Nancy Dryden
children; and four great-great- of Jacksonville; Edith and.-
grandchildren. "Mema" is sel- Richard Terry of Madison; ,
'dom alone as she has lots of Ken and Mary Dryden of Okee-
beds and still cooks her famous chobee and Don and Bridgitt
buttermilk biscuits and south- Dryden of Port-de-Paix, Haiti.

:In,


-
+







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Portable Building Sale

Madison County School Board

The Madison County School Board will accept sealed bids for the
portable buildings, walkway covers and walkway at the old
Madison County Excel School Site located at 177 NW Parramore
Avenue in Madison, Florida. The property may be inspected on
February 20,2009, and February 23,2009, between 8:00 a.m. and 3:00
p.m. Bids Must be received in the Madison County School Board
Office, located at 210 NE Duval Avenue, Madison, Florida, by 3:00
p.m. on February 23, 2009.

Bid forms and instructions are available at Madison County School
Board Maintenance Office, 210 NE Duval Avenue in Madison on
days of viewing items.

The School Board reserves the right to reject all bids in the sole
discretion, and for the sole benefit of the School Board.








Wednesday, February 18, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY




Lee To Celebrate 100th Anniversary


By Tanya Terry
Special to Greene Publishing, Inc.
The weather is beautiful outside
this Saturday morning, and folks from
all around have started to head to the
city hall in Lee, Florida. Today is Lee
Day, though not just any Lee Day, the
100th anniversary celebration.
Every year, the citizens of the town
celebrate homecoming with several ac-
tivities throughout the day. A special
committee has been selected to head up
this exciting event. The committee has
spent several months organizing every
little thing down to who will help with
which event and who will judge each
event.
To start the day off, the Lee City Hall
is serving sausage and pancakes for
breakfast. This delicious meal is for all,
however the committee is asking for a
small donation. Lee Day is non-profit
and any money made from this event is
put into an account for.next year's event.
After breakfast, festivities start with
several things that will be judged and
given ribbons for. The Cake contest is
the most popular. Several cakes are sub-
mitted into the contest and a judge


tastes them to see how delicious each
one is. The judge also rates
the appearance and
gives a first, second -
and third place ,
ribbon. The
pet contest is
so much
fun to
watch.
Some
will just
sit in
t h eA r r
owners
arms o0 I
by their
side d
peaceful-
ly and oth- '
ers do not
cooperate
very well. They a
can be small or
large; shaggy or bald, .
and also hyper or laid
back. There is always a large as-
sortment of different species of friendly
animals. The animals are judged tiniest,


largest, cutest and more. The next event
is the craft event this is so inter-
esting. There are quilts,
crocheted blankets,
cross stitch pictures,
needle point, paint-
ed pictures; a
person may
even see an un-
usual cre-
A ation of
something
put together
with little
things you
may find
around the
house. Last
year there was
a bird house
Made out of an
old guitar. There
also were little hous-
es built out of tongue
depressors. Town folks
Slove all the different ways to
show their talents.
The parade is starting and everyone
can here the sirens from the emergency
vehicles. Children always love to see the
fire engines, though they may not be as
thrilled to hear all the noise. Girl and
Boy Scout troops can be seen carrying
the flag of the United States. The new
Miss Lee and her court are each riding
on a car dressed so beautifully in their
gowns. Let us not forget the grand mar-
shal, the founding father and the citizen
of the year. They are citizens of Lee cho-
sen by the committee. Here comes the
band playing a lively upbeat song and
Dawns daycare with all the toddlers rid-
ing so happily This year's teacher of
the year, Mrs. Gurley is riding on a float
with several school children.
A few teens are showing off their
four wheelers and Chance Webb riding
in his little truck is always nice to see
each year. The children love to see the
shrine's on their motorcycles and in


their funny little cars. Seeing how they
move the miniature vehicles around in
circles and drive all over the road is the
neatest thing. Last but not least the
horses are always at the end, leaving a
trail behind signaling there was a pa-
rade today. Parades are such a joyous oc-
casion to bring the children and animals
out for the day.
Lunch time is when everyone sits
around with their food listening and
watching the entertainment. A person
can smell the aroma of so many wonder-
ful smelling'foods for miles around.
Deciding what to eat is extremely
hard to do with so many scrumptious
choices. Turkey legs, bar-b-q, hamburg-
ers, and even sausage dogs how is a per-
son to choose just one. They are all great
choices one is never any more appetiz-
ing than the next. While the people of
Lee are walking around there are bands
playing and singers singing. Later on in
the day we will see dancers dancing and
dignitaries talking.
If for any reason anyone gets tired of
sitting around watching each perfor-
mance there are several art and craft
booths lined up all around. The little
ones can even ride rides.
There is the man on his lawn mower
pulling delighted children around in
barrels, with the side cut out for a child
to sit in, attached to each- other and
hooked to the mower. Over in the back
corner is the petting zoo and the pony
rides. The balloon shaping the
Methodist church does is fascinating to
watch, and is always a hit with the little
ones.
By the time everyone see's all there
is to look at, eat lots of junk food, lets the
kids play on the rides or in the play-
ground, and watches a little of the pro-
gram everyone is joyously ready to head
home. Come out for Lee Day next year
but this will be the only one hundredth
year celebration.
What a superb job the committee did
this year they should all be so proud.


Saturday, March 28
* 2:30 p.m. Reenactment of 1909 signing of incorporation papers, followed
by a flag raising ceremony.
* Speeches by local, County and state dignitaries.
* Social hours with food by LVFD, and entertainment by Mark Branham and Jeffrey Todd (until dusk)
* Dusk fireworks-over Lake Brittany.

Saturday, April 4
* 7 a.m. Town of Lee's Homecoming Commiutee's centennial Festival opens at Town Hall
Complex to welcome its many wonderful guests!
* 7 to 9 a.m. Those guests may choose to enjoy a delicious pancake and sausage
breakfast served at the Methodist Church by its great cooks.
* Be sure to bring all the children for the clowns, Rusty & Strawberry, to greet them
with balloons, magic shows dnd face painting.
Provided for your entertainment and pleasure .will be plenty of mouth-watering food and
drink, vendors of unusual and interesting articles to feast your eyes upon,
A blue ribbon event better than ever A cake walk (you want to win this one!)
The senior quilt booth-don't miss Mary's lovely quilts
Many educational booths showcasing Madison County, etc.
Other things of interest for the kiddies:
Tractor pull Train rides Pony Rides Pet Show Slides

Best of all this year is the ART & ESSAY CONTEST for all school children, with great
prizes for the winners.

Also showcased will be a special exhibit done just for this event of an unusual work of
art by Tommy Greene. Be sure not to miss "Memories of Lee" edited by Mayor Kinsey
and Jacob Bembry's Lee Day booklet.

We also have a wonderful slate of entertainers who will keep your ears happy and your
toes tapping. (The Mercy Mountain Boys, Randy & the Honky Tonks, William Scott &
Eldorado, the Gibbs Family Singers and Elvis.) As well as special songs by Mark Branharn.
Best of all, barring complications, Sen. Bill Nelson will be our Grand Marshall and the
Marine Band will perform and also be in the parade.


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8A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 18, 2009



SCHOOL & EDUCATION




HQCCS A St A,4 Wctso44 At lUF


Photoshop, InDesign,
yearbook trends A-Z,
yearbook judging and
Evaluation process ...
these were some of the
many workshops offered
at the District 2 Florida
Scholastic Press Associa-
tion's fall workshop for
middle and high school
journalism students at the
University of Florida on
Saturday, Oct. 18.
Nineteen of Mrs. Su-
sanne Griffin's yearbook
class students at Madison
County Central School
woke up bright and early
on a Saturday morning,
left Madison before the
sun came up, and arrived
in Gainesville before most
of their peers and class-
mates had dragged them-
selves out of bed.
These dedicated MCCS
seventh and eighth
graders enjoyed a day of
journalism workshops in
the hopes of making this
year's Bronco yearbook
one of the best ever.
This year marks the
63rd anniversary of the
Florida Scholastic Press
Association, which is


known for its track record
of providing scholastic
journalists and advisors
the training they need.
This year's workshop,
hosted by the University of
Florida's College of Jour-
nalism, was a time of
preparation, honing jour-
nalism skills, and most of
all, gaining knowledge
and having fun while -7
ing so.
District 2 covers 24
Florida counties and is the
largest district in the
state. Classes, we. ,taught
by UF jp ag rprofes-
sors, profesip al journal-
ists and photographers,
yearbook representatives,
and other business profes-
sionals. UF journalism
students gave tours of the
college, and there were
hands-on computer work-
shops for InDesign, pod-
casting and Photoshop in
the college's computer
labs.
Connor Ginn, a second
year journalism staff
member, said, "I went to
the InDesign class and
learned different ways to
create spreads and multi-


The MCCS journalism staff, under the supervision of Susanne Griffin, journeyed to
UF last month to expand their yearbook prowess.


ple pages by the click of a
button." Second year
staffer Kassidy Stallings
added, "The Photoshop
class was very interesting.
I learned how to tweak pic-
tures and make them more
creative." Eighth grader
Keeley Smith stated, "My


LE Fa(4 4 Dac F F All A4


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, February 13, 2009
The LES Valentine's Dance was fun for kids of all
- . -- . - t .


Olivia Dickey, Rachel Curtis

evening that was fun for all
ages.
Susan Phillips' fifth
grade class sponsored the
program to raise money for
a field trip to Sea World.
It's a very special ending
for kids who are graduat-
ing from elementary
school, and a fitting reward
for their job well done. '
Extra kudos wenlttiut
to Christi Annett, presi-
dent of the School Adviso-


ages. Pictured left to right:
and Laila Dickey.

By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Lee Elementary School
continued its tradition of
finding great ways to raise
money for school projects
with a Valentine's Dance
held Feb. 13 in the school
cafeteria. Praising the help
of parent volunteers,
school staff and faculty,
Principal Jack McClellan
expressed his appreciation
for a job well done for an


ry Committee, for her con-
tribution to the festive dec-
orations. Katie Knight,
president of the PTO; par-
ent volunteers; and espe-
cially the packed room of
elementary students en-
joyed the decorations, mu-
sic, dancing, snacks and
lots more. In the end, shy
sweethearts and big bud-
dies played until the lights
went up at 9 p.m. announc-
ing the end of the three-
hour gathering.
Favorite activities of
the evening included
rounds of two old classics:
musical chairs and limbo.
Dozens and dozens of
kids entered each competi-
tion, which brought out the
game in younger and older
classmates. Third grader
Drew French won the lim-
bo and fifth grader Justin
Willis conquered the
chairs, although judging
from the big smiles, every-
one was a winner.
Residents and parents
of the Lee community are
urged to participate in up-
coming programs, as all
dollars raised go right back
into the children. For more
information, or to make an
affordable donation to
school projects, simply call
(850) 973-5030.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


favorite class was the year-
book trends class. We
watched a really hilarious
video on collegehumorcom
about fonts. You should
check it out!"
First year yearbookers
also enjoyed the FSPA ex-
perience at UE Seventh
grader Nicole Blair said,
"I enjoyed going to the A-Z
yearbook trends work-
shop. It had a ton of ideas
and tips. This was one of
the best trips I have ever
gone on." Eighth grader
Lyric Davis added, "The
Photoshop class was my
favorite. We learned how
to do all kinds of detailing
on pictures, by going
through computer filters. I
never thought any of that
was possible."
At the annual FSPA
conference in Tampa last
spring, Mrs. Susanne Grif-
fin, MCCS journalism ad-
visor, was awarded FSPA's


platinum key in honor of
her 20 years of FSPA mem-
bership and for advising
journalism publications
in secondary schools. In
2004, Griffin was honored
as the District 2 FSPA
Journalism Teacher of the
Year. Griffin stated, "FSPA
has helped me so much in
my -journey of teaching
journalism to middle
school students. During
my first year of advising
many years ago, 'I joined
FSPA and attended one of
their fall workshops. It was
the best decision I ever
made in terms of becom-
ing a better journalism
teacher. They 'taught me
the ropes' then (when I
knew absolutely nothing
about secondary school
journalism), and they con-
tinue to help, advise, di-
rect, encourage and en-
lighten me today."
In addition, FSPA


sponsors annual evalua-
tion services, and Griffin
always sends in her stu-
dents' publications for
judging. Last year, the 2008
Bronco yearbook won a sil-
ver award. "I am very
proud of last year's book;
but in journalism, we are
always striving to do bet-
ter things. This year's staff
has already begun to think
of and implement new
ideas that will hopefully
bring their evaluation
score up to All Florida,'
the equivalent of a first
place ranking."
One new "idea" the
staff is implementing this
year is producing their en-
tire book online, using:
their yearbook publisher's:
(Herff-Jones) online site,
hjedesign.com.
"[Publishing the book
online] is definitely a chal-
lenge, to say the least," ex-
plained Griffin. "The stu-
dents are teaching me be-
cause most of them are so
technologically savvy
When one student
doesn't know how to do
something, I ask another
student to help out. ,It is
certainly a team effort. I
just hope their "coach" caqn
survive this year of uncer-,
tainty! They are 'thinking
outside of the box,' but
sometimes I feel as though
I don't even know where
'the box' is!" By using the
online program, however,
the staff will have newer,
more updated options for
their 2009 yearbook.
2008-09 yearbooks are
$35. Parents may pay by
check, cash or money or-
der, and they may pay ei-
ther the full amount or a
down payment. For more
information, call MCCS at
(850) 973-5192, Ext. 262.


NFCC HI41s Ditr44 3 FFA Colses


Photo Submitted
Madison County FFA members attending the District 3 FFA contest held at NFCC
Jan. 22 are, left to right, Jantz Jenkins, J.J. Combass, Courtney Cote, Brittany Watts,
Karagan Hunter, Baylee Bass, Randi Floyd, Blake Webb and Cooper Welch.


LIVE OAK GAS


50 Gallons of Gas- $ 99.95


U








p~i


95


North Florida Com-
munity College welcomed
participants of the Dis-
trict 3 Future Farmers of
America contest to its
campus Jan. 22. Nearly 200
students, ranging from
middle school age to high
school seniors, took part
in the district event which
offered FFA members
from Jefferson, Madison,
Hamilton, Suwannee,
Lafayette, Dixie, Colum-
bia, Putnam, Levy and
Gilchrist counties a
chance to meet and also
compete in areas such as
knowledge, public speak-
ing and tractor opera-
tions.
After'the opening cere-
mony at NFCC's Van H.
Priest Auditorium, the
various FFA chapters sep-
arated into groups to test
their public speaking
skills and knowledge of
FFA, agriculture mechan-


ics, agriculture manage-
ment and farm equipment
against fellow FFA mem-
bers. Competitions were
held on the NFCC campus
and at the Madison Coun-
ty Extension Office, adja-
cent to the college cam-
pus. NFCC provided the
students with information
on college programs and
assisted in the prepara-
tion of lunch for the


group.
"Hosting the young
men and women of FFA
District 3 is a treat," said
Doug Brown, NFCC dean
of program development
and community outreach.
"These are among the best
and brightest students in
our area schools. The col-
lege is honored to partner
with such a quality pro-
gram," he added.


Fish Day
Now Is The Time For Stocking
*4-6" Channel Catfish $33 per 100
*6-8" Channel Catfish $53 per 100
*Bluegill (Coppernose & Hybrid) *Redcar
*Largemouth Bass *Black Crappie (If Avail.)
*8-11" Grass Carp *Fathead Minnows
We will service you at:
Farmers Supply Co. in Valdosta, GA
-. Wed Feb., 25 From: 8-9 am
To Pre-order, Call:
Arkansas Pondstockers 1-800-843-4748
Walk Upg Welcome








Wednesday, February 18, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com



BRIDAL GUIDE


Madison County Carrier 9A


144&

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10. Don't Rock the Cash Bar. When it comes to alcohol
at your reception, what you serve is entirely up to you.
Whether you choose to serve a full bar, limited cocktails.
Beer and Wine, or no alcohol at all will be based on various
factors including Pudget. The one option that is not recom-
mended is a Cash Bar. Your guests should be gracious
enough to accept what is being offered to them. If, however,
a guest feels the need for a drink selection that is not of-
fered, chances are that he or she will be resourceful enough
to find it.
Also, request that bartenders not put out tip jars. If you
are hosting the bar, if6lr ~tfrlbring contact that you are
happy to pay gratuity to thlbeb ender(s) but that you do not
want your guests to feel obligated to tip.
9. Go flat! A huge number of brides give feedback that
they wish they had worn flats, having kicked off their heels
during the reception. As a bride you can expect to be stand-
ing for 8-12 hours on your wedding day Be sure to break in
your shoes well in advance. Even when wearing flats, unex-
pected blisters can form after a few hours on your feet.
8. Have a little faith. D.J.'s are perhaps the wedding
vendor most micromanaged by couples. Too many song re-
quests may actually impede the flow of your party You hire
your D.J. to judge when to play what music. You wouldn't in-
struct your Caterer step by step on how to prepare food, or
your Photographer on what angles and lenses to use. Limit
your D.J. request list to a few favorites and a do-not-play list
of only the songs you cannot stand. Do not get carried away
and have some trust.
7.. Prioritize, prioritize, prioritize. What really mat-
ters most to you, the photographer, the music and dancing,
the food and wine, the decorations, or being able to accom-
modate a large guest list? Put your money towards what you
care about. You will have regrets if you skimp on what real-
ly counts. When you, the Bride and Groom are not footing the
bill yourselves however, you may have to forfeit some finan-
cial decision-making, If this is the case you will need to com-
promise on certain priorities or if you really want that
pricey photographer offer to pay for one yourself.
6. Bibbity Bobbity Boo. Wedding Dress shops are noto-
rious for having your dress shipped in at the last minute.
Think about it, if you owned a Wedding Dress Boutique you
wouldn't want every brides dress held at your shop for nine+
months before their weddings. Schedule your first fitting
well before your wedding. Your final dress fitting should be
noless than 1 week prior to your wedding so that alterations
can still be made.
Tuxedo rentals for all attendants must be tried on, that
includes Dad. Whether the Tailor seemed to take precise
measurements or not, too many men still show up at wed-
dings with high waters or baggy tuxes.
5. Don't hit the road, Jack. Your wedding day is one of
the biggest, most important days of yourlife. You will be ex-
hausted and a bit disorderly the following day Going away is
the last thing you will want to worry about. Wait at least a
couple of days before venturing on your honeymoon. Your
wits will thank you.
4. Last night of single life. DO NOT hold your Bache-
lor or Bachelorette party the night before your wedding! This
may seem like a no-brainer but many brides and grooms still
practice the archaic ritual of drinking all night on that fatal
evening. It is simply not worth it, as the Bride/Groom and
your attendants will no doubt feel tired, look tired, have a
hangover, or worse be sick walking down the aisle. If neces-
sary, request that any out of town attendants arrive a day
earlier to help you to prepare and celebrate a different night.
3. No Guidance. With no Director there are too many de-
tails left to too many people at your ceremony Having a Wed-
ding Coordinator allows for one person to coordinate your
wedding party processional, music, minister, seating guests
and to resolve any unexpected last minute complications. A
Coordinator will ease the stress level of everyone, including
you, tremendously on your wedding day. So if your location
does not include a Wedding Day Coordinator who also directs
your rehearsal. h e your own. A Wedding Coordinator may
be much more affordable than you think.
2. Stretching yourself too thin. As the bride you will
make everyone around you crazy by waiting until the last
minute in planning and finalizing details. If you have a hard
time planning and prior t4ng on your own then get help.
You don't want to be rem lbered as "one of those brides"
that put everything off aiei enh expected her friends and
family to pick up the pieces, do you?
Do not commit yourself to social events the day before
your wedding. This day is meant for you to wrap up loose
ends, beautify yourself, attend your rehearsal and rehearsal
dinner in many cases, and most importantly get some
amount of rest for the day ahead. You are going to need it!
1. High demands. Try to keep in mind that although
your Bridesmaids and Groomsmen may offer you extra help,
these friends can become taken advantage of. The only "offi-
cial obligations" of wedding party members are emotional
support, the financial expense of wedding attire and travel,
participation in the rehearsal and the obvious role on your
wedding day In the case of the MOH or BM, reception toasts
are traditional as well. Other help that these individuals may
offer should not be viewed as duties, but rather as acts of
kindness including: setting up/tearing down, transporting
ceremony goods, throwing a bridal shower or other party,
distributing gratuities, and any other help that is offered.
Remember to be thoughtful towards your attendants.
Bridesmaids may not be comfortable in 4 inch heels, pur-
chasing new jewelry or paying to have their hair or makeup
professionally styled. Do not forget to personally thank any
bridal party members for taking part in your wedding, as
well as family members who gave you assistance. A small
thank you gift is always appreciated.


(0


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10A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 18, 2009




MONEY & FINANCE




Q&A's About Oil And Gas Prices


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Consumers are doing a
double-take at the pumps re-
cently as gas prices have
gone back above $2 a gallon
in places, while crude oil is
hitting five-year lows, below
$35 a barrel.
Oil prices account for
about 60 percent of the cost
of gasoline. So, as oil futures'
tumbled below $34 a barrel
on Feb. 12-after trading as
high as $50 a barrel just 10
days ago-why are gas
prices rising? When oil
made its extraordinary fall
in recent months from a
record high above $147 a bar-
rel in July 2008, gasoline fol-
lowed suit. Why not now?
Here are some questions
and answers about the con-
nections between oil and
gasoline prices.
Q: Why aren't gas
prices falling at my local ser-
vice station right now?
A: While oil and gaso-
line prices very often move
in the same direction,
there's usually a lag between
crude's decline (or rise) and
that of gasoline. Some ana-
lysts say the slow rise' in
gasoline prices is likely tied
to oil's sharp rise at the end


of last year, when fighting
between Israel and Palestin-
ian militants raised con-
cerns about supply disrup-
tions in the oil-rich Middle
* East.
Q: If that's the case,
now that oil has retreated to
below $35, shouldn't gaso-
line get cheaper?
A: It should-and it
might-but other factors are
at play For one, the refiner-
ies that process crude into
products such as gasoline
are sharply cutting produc-
tion, in part because de-
mand has fallen off so
much. Less, production
means less supply, which.,
tends to push prices up.
The gasoline producers
are trying to make some
money in the wake of a dis-
mal 2008. When crude prices
were so high in the first half
of last year, refining mar-
gins-the difference be-
tween what refiners pay for
crude and what they get for
products they make from
oil-were dismal. In the lat-
ter half of the year, margins
improved as oil prices reced-
ed, but refiners continued to
struggle because people
were simply driving less and
buying less gasoline.


Companies that refine
oil are publicly traded. If
they don't turn a profit, they
won't be around long. "Re-
finers are not going to con-
tinue to sell gasoline at a dis-
count to crude oil," said Ben
Brockwell, director of data,
pricing and information ser-
vices for the Oil Price Infor-
mation Service: "It simply
hasn't paid to produce gaso-
line."
Q: But doesn't that
mean they're simply inflat-
ing the price of gasoline?
A: That's the opinion of
the nonprofit group Con-
sumer Watchdog, which
tracks the industry closely
and has consistently called
for greater regulation of re-
fineries.
Consumer Watchdog
says production cuts at re-
fineries in California, for ex-
ample, have far exceeded the
state's drop in consumption.
"The refinery cutbacks
are for purely financial rea-
sons," said Judy Dugan, the
organization's research di-
rector. "Now is the time for


government to insert sharp-
er oversight and regulatory
controls of the refining in-
dustry"
Q: How does my local
station set gas prices? Does
it follow orders from corpo-
rate headquarters to keep
prices as high as possible?
A: One thing many
people don't realize is that
major oil companies own
fewer than five percent of
gas stations. Exxon Mobil
Corp., for example, said last
June it was getting out of
the retail gasoline business,
following other major oil
companies who've been sell-
ing the low-margin busi-
nesses to gasoline distribu-
tors.
Many stations are
owned by local retailers-
and many say' they took a
beating last year when
crude prices spiked because
they were unable to raise
pump prices fast enough to
keep pace. That's exactly
why some stations raised
prices quickly after oil fu-
tures jumped late last year-


not because the more expen-
sive oil had made its way
through the production
process, but because they
saw an opportunity to make
some money after struggling
with paltry profits for
months. So, the usual lag be-
tween oil and gas prices may
not have occurred this time
around at some stations-
they wanted to raise prices,
and they didn't feel like
waiting.
Gas station owners face
a balancing act: They must
try to maintain a price that
allows them to afford the
next shipment of gasoline,
but they're also trying not to
give the competition an
edge.
Independent gasoline re-
tailers report the profit mar-
gin on a gallon of gasoline
has improved significantly
since the summer, when
they sometimes made pen-
nies per gallon. Now, be-
cause of crude's descent,
they can make 25 cents to 30
cents a gallon--and most
make no apologies for trying


to keep the price as high as
possible while remaining
competitive.
Q: Are gas prices going
to go up even more this sum-
mer?
A: Probably, but how
much depends on whose
forecast is accepted. Remem-
ber that summer is driving
season, and gasoline prices
always climb when thou-
sands of people begin to take
vacations and trips to the
beach.
Tom Kloza, chief oil an-
alyst at the Oil Price Infor-
mation Service, predicts
prices will move sideways
over the next little while be-
fore they begin to climb, in
the spring, reaching $2 ,to
$2.50 a gallon. He said he
doubts prices can get much
higher than that given the
weak economy In another
forecast, the U.S. Energy De-
partment predicted gasoline
prices will average $2.37; a
gallon through 2009.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
As details of the Stimu-
lus Package are released,
some industries, especially
the automakers, are waiting
anxiously for good news.
General Motors, for in-
stance, emerged as both a
winner and loser in the $789
billion economic stimulus
package that lawmakers fi-
nally ironed out between the
House and the Senate ver-
sions. GM won a provision
that will erase a tax.liability
of up to $10 billion that
would have resulted from re-
structuring efforts, said
Senator Debbie Stabenow, a
Michigan Democrat.
Yet, GM, Ford and other
automakers failed to get the
full tax write-offs for car
buyers proposed in the Sen-
ate bill, which might have
slowed the plunge in sales
that has pushed GM to the
brink of bankruptcy
President Barack Oba-
ma, who has been pointing
to parts of the plan that fo-
cus on areas hardest hit by
the economy, is counting on
the package to help revive
the economy The United
States has lost 3.6 million
jobs since December 2007,
and ,the nation's unemploy-
ment rate has risen to 7.6
percent-its highest level
since 1992.
"This is the biggest
stimulus bill ever passed in
the history of the country,"
said Pete Davis, president of
Davis Capital Investment
Ideas in Washington, which
provides analysis of Con-
gress to investors.
The effects will be wide-
spread, with individuals get-
ting a boost from tax breaks,
state governments seeing
additional funding, and
companies benefiting from
road building and other in-
frastructure projects in the
package. "The peak of the
effects will probably occur
in six to 12 months," he said.
The package, which will
be sent to the White House
for Obama's signature after
final congressional ap-
proval in both chambers,
amounts to the biggest burst
of public works spending
since the interstate highway
system was started in the
1950s.
Prospective homebuy-
ers were considered in a
proposed $15,000 tax credit,
only to have it reduced to
$8,000. Democratic Senator
Max Baucus noted the de-
crease would hurt U.S.


homebuilders such as Cen-
tex and D.R. Horton Inc. An-
other big loss for home-
builders and manufactur-
ers, negotiators all but elim-
inated the biggest tax cut for
businesses, a provision that
would let companies convert
losses into tax refunds.
Baucus added that the
measure, which would have
let companies claim an esti-
mated $67.5 billion in tax re-
funds this year and next,
was sacrificed to help keep
the final package under $800
billion. The provision had
been a top priority of busi-
ness groups, including the
National Association of
Manufacturers, whose mem-
bers include Dow Chemi-
cals, Con Agra Foods and
the U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce. The change would
also have been a boon to
homebuilders who enjoyed
large profits until 2006 when
the housing market began to
implode.
Democratic Senator Bar-
bara Mikulski of Maryland
said her plan to aid the auto
industry by letting car buy-
ers take a tax write-off on
their interest payments was
reduced to $2 billion from
the original $11 billion.
Dealers lobbied hard as car
companies had been seeking
the larger amount after U.S.
auto sales fell 37 percent in
January, the worst sales
month since 1981.
The National Automo-
bile Dealers Association, a
trade group for 20,000 car
dealers, including Fort Laud-


erdale-based AutoNation,
the country's largest pub-
licly traded auto retailer,
asked its members to urge
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi
to support the Senate-passed
tax deduction.
"While we're pleased to
see the stimulus includes an
element designed to moti-
vate auto consumers, we be-
lieve the unprecedented
sales climate that all au-
tomakers are struggling
with calls for as much of an
incentive as possible," said
Wade Newton, a spokesman
for the Washington-based Al-
liance of Automobile Manu-
facturers.
In other concessions,
lawmakers scaled back Oba-
ma's proposed payroll tax
credit to $400 for individuals
and $800 for families, rather
than the original proposal of
$500 and $1,000, Baucus said.-
The plan includes an alter-
native minimum tax cut in-


stead, he said.
"This represents the
ginning of turning our eco
omy around," Sena
Joseph Lieberman, an in
pendent from Connectic4,
said when the agreemq
was announced.
Obama said he wante t
bill on his desk by the Feb.A
Presidents' Day holiday .
thanked lawmakers, saying
in a statement the mov
would provide tax relief fe
families "and businesses,
while investing in health
care, energy and infrastruc-
ture. :
Relevant to Madison
County, House and Senate
negotiators also agreed 4f
provide $6.3 billion in grants
to expand high-speed Inte-
net access in rural areas, a-
cording to the Senate Conm-
merce Committee.
Michael Curtis can bS
reached at michae]^
greenepublishiig.com. ;


A 2008 law reinstated the expired deduction for quali- |
fied higher education expenses paid in 2008 and 2009.
Single filers may deduct up to $4,000 if adjusted gross
income (AGI) is $65,000 or less (AGI of $130,000 or
less for joint filers). The deduction limit drops to $2,000 I
for AGI up to $80,000 for single filers and $160,000 for joint
filers. No deduction is allowed over these income thresholds.,


| *SCHOELLES A
& ASSOCIATES, INC.C
S 439 SW RANGE AVE MADISON, FL 32340 850-973-4353
V NO -

hI~mKI


Stimulus Package Approved

Reveals Winners And Losers; Details Still Coming


Time May Be Right to Convert
to Roth IRA
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones


Do you regularly contribute to a Traditional IRA? If so, you're
taking an important step toward building financial resources
for retirement: But it's possible that you could take an even
bigger step- by converting your IRA to a Roth IRA. And you
may have two especially good opportunities to make this con-
version in 2009 and 2010.

Before we examine why this may be so, let's take a quick look
at the differences between a Traditional IRA and a Roth IRA.
Depending on your income level, your contributions to a
Traditional IRA may be tax deductible; regardless of your
income, your earnings grow tax deferred. With a Roth IRA,
your contributions are never deductible, but your earnings
grow tax free, provided you've had your account for at least
five years and you don't start taking withdrawals until you're
59-1/2. However, if your modified adjusted gross income
exceeds certain levels ($120,000 per year if you're single and
$176,000 per year if you're married and filing a joint return),
you can't contribute to a Roth IRA.

Here's another distinction between the two types of IRAs:
With a Traditional IRA, you must start taking required mini-
mum distributions (RMDs) when you reach 70-1/2. But if you
own a Roth IRA, you are never required to take distributions,
so you can let your money grow as long as you can afford not
to touch it.

Which IRA is "better"? There's no'one right answer for every-
one. Generally speaking, though, the combination of potential
tax-free earnings and no RMDs might make the Roth IRA an
attractive choice for most people. Additionally .you have
access to the money you put into the Roth tax-free and penal-
ty-free at any time, as long as you are not withdrawing earn-
ings. So, if you have a Traditional IRA, you might wish to con-
vert it to a Roth if you can. If your adjusted gross income
is more than $100,000, you can't make the conversion in
2009. Also, keep in mind that any conversion will require you
to pay income taxes on your pre-tax contributions to your
Traditional IRA and any growth in your account's value.

If you meet the income limits for a conversion in 2009, you
might want to consider doing so, because your tax obligation
for a Roth conversion might be lower in 2009 than it would
have been in previous years. Following last year's steep mar-
ket decline, the value of your IRA may be down significantly
- and, generally speaking, the lower the value, the lower the
tax bill upon conversion. Furthermore, if your income is some-
what dependent on the state of the economy, you could end
up with lower earnings in 2009 another factor that could
lessen the tax impact of a Roth IRA conversion.

Even if you don't make the conversion in 2009, though, you
may still want to consider this move next year. In 2010 and
in 2010 only you can convert your Traditional IRA to a Roth
IRA regardless of your income level. Furthermore, the income
taxes due on conversion can be spread, over two years -
2011 and 2012.

So contact your financial and tax advisors to determine if a
Roth IRA conversion is appropriate for you. Over the next two
years, you've got a good window of opportunity to make this
move so you'll want to act before that window closes.


Brad Bashaw EdwardJones
Investment Representative
114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


FORECLOSURE FILING

..' *' . s .- .


W. Thomas Copeland P.A.

190 S. Range Ave

(Remax Professional Bldg)

(850) 973-9909


Free Debt Consultation








Wednesday, February 18, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11A


HEALTH & NUTRITION


Home Respiratory Wants Everyone


To Breathe A Little Easier


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
When Home Respira-
tory Solutions opened in
Madison, they did so with
,their motto in mind-to
-help all who need respira-
tory products and ser-
'vices to "breathe a little
easier." Corey Lockler,
the location manager, is
extremely excited to
bring the company to
'Madison.
' "Home Respiratory
86lutions was founded on
'communities like Madi-
'son. Our staff under-
4tands that service and
1'upport is as important as
'price and convenience.
We're also very
pleased to have a full-time
respiratory therapist on
staff. Her name is Carol
Lanier and she is very
'good at her work, and she
' ihderstands that client
needs always come first.
Assisting both Lockler
and Lanier is Nicole Lee."
Fully equipped with


various oxygen and CPAP
solutions, respiratory
aides, products and ser-
vices are affordably
priced, and most insur-
ance is 'accepted, includ-
ing Buena Vista HMO.
They also have a wide
range of durable medical
equipment.
"We can travel to
homes and businesses,
and we welcome all in-
quiries. We are also very
pleased to offer 24-hour
service. But mostly, we
want to thank all the kind
people who have helped
us since we opened, espe-
cially all the incredible
physicians in the area. We
truly can't thank them
enough" Lockler added.
Home Respiratory So-
lutions is conveniently lo-
cated in downtown Madi-
son at 289 SW Range St.
Their phone is (850) 973-
2830.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, January 30, 2009
Corey Lockler and Nicole Lee work hard to make sure
all the clients and customers of Home Respiratory Solu-
tions "breathe a little easier."




Home' Respi(ratory Solwtaonw
289 SW KRageg Avevte-
McocU Lo, F oridav 32340
(850) 973-2830
Toll Free, 800-973-2830

Home Oxygen CPAP/BiPAP care & service
Nebulizers and nebulizer medications shipped
right to your door from our own pharmacy
Hospital beds, wheel chairs and many other home medical aides available
24/7 service Patient education Local billing
Registered Respiratory Therapist on staff;
Same day set up Diabetic supplies


%UNINSURED??

We have a sliding-fee program for
those who qualify at
Tri-County Family Health Care
Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician
You may save $ on your prescriptions
from us, when filled at Jackson's Drugs
Please call 850-948-2840
for more information
TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
( Mon., Wed., Fri. Bam-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.



Are You in Need Of
Chiropractic Services?

Dr. Michael A, Miller

180 S. Cherry St., Suite D 3116 Capital Circle NE, Ste.2
Monticello, FL 32344 Tallahassee, FL 32308
850-997-1400 igSZ 850-668-4200
Now exceptin Blue Cross Blue Shield and most other insurances


Some examples of foods for heart health include:
v Beans, peas and barley
v Soybeans, other soy-based foods (not soybean oil)
v Fruits and vegetables
v Salmon, tuna, sardines and mackerel
v Red grapes and purple grape juice
v Nuts such as almonds, walnuts, pecans and hazelnuts
v Green or black tea
v Onions, scallions, shallots, garlic and leeks


Question:
dental floss?


What is the best type
Waxed or Unwaxed?


Answer: Great question! We fre-
quently get asked that question. A recent
study published by the University of
Texas compared the effectiveness of 3
types of floss (unwaxed, woven, and
shred-resistant) at removing the hard to
reach, plaque between teeth and under
gums that is responsible for gum disease
and tooth decay. The results showed no
significant difference in the effectiveness
with different types of floss. My experi-
ence has taught me that patients with
tightly touching teeth prefer waxed or
shred resistant. For others, traditional
unwaxed floss works best. ;The answer is
they are all effective, so try each one and
see which you prefer. Remember, the
best floss is the one that you actually
use!

Roderick K Shaw III, DMD
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmail.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of
Dentistry


FINDING




Physician


HOMECARE

Home Oxygen Nebulizer Medication
Diabetic Shoes & Supplies Home Medical Equipment
24 Hour Service
353 NE Marion St. Phone: 850-973-4125
Madison, FL Fax: 850-973-8922


1.






12A Madison County


Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wed


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Wednesday, February 18, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 13A



HISTORY.




Greenville In Depth


By Alfa Hunt
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The small community of Greenville,
throigh the course of its history, has
bee4 known to the public by several
nafits: Sandy Ford, Station No. Five,
andpGreenville,
,"The town's beginning dates back to
1850-, when a post office was established
in the Sandy Ford area along the Aucilla
River. It is assumed that the post office
site was where U.S. 90 crosses the river.
Around 1854, the populace began mi- .
grating further to the east and was soon ,
followed by the post office, which kept
thq name ,Sandy Ford. The first post- -
master of the new location was Samuel
Wiliams.
SWhen the Georgia and Pensacola i' -
Railroad made its way through. the : -
county, it established its Station No.
Five near the settlement, and thus, the ,,. ,
arda took on the second name of Station / .
No Five.
When the War Between the States
brqke out, the citizens of the communi- A street scene
ty ?ame to the conclusion that a more
"a ropriate" name was
reTqired. This was mainly R' -
dueto the fact that they
wi ed a better name be 1
sta ped on supplies,
whilh were being sent to
their men in arms.
A local woman by the
naA of Mrs. Roberts had,
su ested the name of
"G-enville," in honor of
her hometown of
Greenville, S.C.
oThe citizens consid-
erod the fact that many of
th4 local families had for-
mely lived in South Car- ,'
oliiLa and the new name J
wap adopted. The name of
the' town was changed in ..
the early years of the Civil ,
Wa, but the official name -
of bthe post office was not ,
adtp iirn, the-190s.' ?
,A resident of the coun- '
ty, Elijah J. Hays, helped
with the expansion of the
towfii. By 1876, Hays had
purchased most of the
property in the town.
Some of this land was pur-'
chased from the Goodman
family It is noted that the .-- .-
depot there, at least in one
eai1y railroad timetable,
waV referred to as "Good- Picture of the Gree
m ai Station."
?On his large acreage,
Hays operated several
farins, a general merchan-
dise' store, a drug store, a 'o
brickyard, a cotton gin, a
gristmill, a cotton ware- f'
house and a turpentine
stit. Along with these
businesses, Hays laid out
th& plans for the town and
would often start his land
descriptions with phrases
involving the railroad
wells. Several wells' were
in he vicinity and a prob- l i
le arose of knowing
where to begin marking iY
the landlines. This prob- '-- .
lem has existed ever since. .
:in 1867, one of the very ., i L
firkt black churches orga- i I II '
nizl within Madisoni rt
Cotywas New Zion Bap- '
tisochurch, of G reenville." I 'A1 :
There are unelaborated ac- | m. ;
co its of its organization,
bui'he church was first es- ..
taliished in the "Sixteen" .
n@e hborhood of "
Gr nville, which is in the
northern section of the Celebration of the 115h
town.
.In October 1877, Elijah
Hags sold six acres along the railroad to Louis Pandy, Eleven Bradley,
Jolfn Ellison, Anthony Hall and Edward Murray These men were the
trt tees of the new Zion Church. While under the leadership of the
Re Taylor, the original church building was erected on the six-acre
site. The original church building served as a school until the
Gr enville Training School was built.
rIn 1960, a new building, which would house the New Zion Church,
wa built. Since then, this building has been remodeled and expanded.
An organ and an air-conditioning system was installed as well.
SFinally, in 1907, the community of Greenville was incorporated for-
msiy with defined boundaries. The first mayor of the town was WD.
Gr'fin and the first town council was comprised of L.J. Porter, A.
Renms, J.C. West, J.W Rogers and T.J. Redding.
,Other important offices of Greenville were the marshal, the clerk


and the assessor. It is noted the position of town marshal was a hectic
an' rough job for any man. It wasn't an uncommon occurrence for one
marshal to either be relieved of his position or give it up willingly One


of Greenville. Photo taken in th


nville Public School children. P


anniversary of the founding of


Elijah James Hays


incident reports that, in 1908, one town
marshal was discharged for drunken-
ness while on duty.
One notable or memorable incident
^, in Greenville's history was in 1912 when
an ordinance was passed to ban hogs
from the streets. At the time, there had
been a large problem with people steal-
ing hogs. The ordinance was believed
not only to improve the streets but also
to prevent the theft of hogs.
It wasn't until 1923 that voters
agreed to bond the town in order to set
up a water and light system.
Also during the 1920's, several news-
II.s-were published for short periods
e. Among the newspapers of the
ay were the Greenville Times, the
Greenville Journal and the Greenville
Progress. The Greenville Times was a
short lived newspaper, which was pub-
lished from July 1911 to August 1912.
Sept. 4, 190, the Bank of Greenville
opened for business on a corner lot in
Photo Courtesy Of the Florida Archives Greenville. It remained in business in
ie early 1900's. the same location for the next 60 years,
before it finally relocated to a new loca-
tion in 1965. The original
i a- ...' *officers were E.J. Hays,
.. ..president; J.W. Bishop,
- % .' vice president; and. M.A.
S'.., ': '. McDowell, cashier. The
original board of directors
'' was comprised of E.J.
Hays, J.W Bishop, R. Cha-
son, T. J. Redding,. J.D. Sir-
mans, J.O. Bishop, WB.
Bishop, 'M.A. McDowell
and A. Reams. The origi-
nal capital of the bank was
a total of $16,000.

Greenville, which became
known as the Bank of
Madison County, is the
"only bank in the county
:t that continued to operate
Ai, through the Great Depres-
sion.
In' 1909, a '6raLnd new
t Trick building was erected
in Greenville, which cost
ea$6,500. The new school
would include a 450-seat
auditorium. It wasn't until
1925 that Greenville had a
senior high school.
.i T The board of directors
made sure to place within
each school a "good dictio-
nary and a good encyclope-
Photo Courtesy Of the Florida Archives dia," and they encouraged
hoto taken in 1902. each school to establish a
library. The board also
raised teachers' salaries;
men now made $52 per
month, while women made
$39 per month. Due to the
fact that there was no com-
.pulsory attendance law,
the average attendance
was slightly over 50 per-
cent. By'1916, the number
of students requiring
transportation had .lin-
creased to 125, with 7 wag-
ons being used. The cost of
the wagons to the county
was a total of $1,475. It is
reported that the school
superintendent said that,
Sif the cost for this trans-
portation continued to in-
crease, the service would
be discontinued.
The Greenville
Woman's Club was orga-
nized Dec. 9, 1920, in the
home of Mrs. Jacob Vick-
ers. The first officers elect-
ed in 1920 were Mrs. A.E.
Huggins, president; Mrs.
L" C.L. Carter, vice president;
Photo Courtesy Ot the Ftorida Archives Mrs. J. Vickers, secretary-
Mt. Zion Baptist Church. treasurer; and Mrs. W.S.
Cooper, press reporter.
The Greenville Wom-
ans Club immediately began working by improving the cemetery by
planting grass and trees and fencing in the area. The group's next tar-
get was the town council. They pressured them into cleaning the town
and improving the public facilities. By 1928, the Greenville Woman's
Club owned five lots and had begun building their first clubhouse in
which they held their first meeting March 6, 1929. During the Depres-
sion years, the Woman's Club building was rented as a residence in or-
der to raise the money for mortgage payments.
By 1943 the mortgage was finally paid off. The Woman's Club also
began the first public library in Greenville, which was eventually tak-
en over by the Suwannee River regional library
When it came to politics, Greenville led the way for black and fe-
male citizens to take the reins. One of the more notable females of


Madison County politics was Georgia Porter Mugge. She is said to have
led the way for women in Madison County politics when she was elect-
ed mayor in 1937, defeating two male opponents, a true accomplish-
ment for women during the 30s.










14A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, February 18, 2009


S renville Pointe

(:: Apartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC
accessible apts. Rental assis-
tance may be available. HUD
vouchers accepted. Call 850-
948-3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn


nCSouthern m 0llas of

M 0adison apartments

Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR HC &
non-HC accessible apts. Call
850-973-8582, TDD/TTY 711.
315 SW Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn

Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Se-
nior's and Disabled. 2 Bed-
room open with Subsidy
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd, Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider
E Empl~r



OPPORTUNITY

Madison Heights
Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed
for low income families
150 SW Burngardner Dr.
Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833 ext. 485
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn

House for Rent
in Greenville, FL
(near elementary school).
All Electric, Newly remodeled
3 bedrooms, 1 bath $600/mo.
1st & security deposit.
Housing Choice
Vouchers Accepted
Call 850-973-7349 or
617-4 37-1905
cc/rtn

DOWNTOWN APARTMENT
FOR RENT, NEWLY
RENOVATED 1BR; 1 BATH
$450.00 MO.
567-1523
12/19-rtn

For Rent:
4 Bedroom 2 Bath house with a
built in office, beautifully re-
modeled tile & wood floors
with carpet in 4 bedrooms.
Fireplace, large shaded yard,
large front porch, all electric.
Lee School district. Off HWY
6 near Blue Springs, 1 year
lease, References required.
$700 a month,
$700 Security Deposit
423-538-1206 or 423-845-0590
rtn


2 BR 1 bath Singlewide Mob
Home in Cherry Lake Area
$350.00 month, plus deposi
973-2353


ile

it


rtn


House for Rent
2Bed/1 Bth. Great neighbor-
hood. Within city limits.
$500mth. 1st and last mths rent
due. Security deposit required.
673-9425

Private, quite, furnished,
one BR Mobile home
for one person.
Direct TV, near town, $350.00
plus Electricity
850-973-4030


rtn/cc

HOME FOR RENT
Restored 3 BR Home, CH &
Air. Oak floors, large storage,
1335 Sq Ft
Yard Maint. included.
Adult family only, no pets,
$800 rent and deposit.
Credit check.
432 NE Horry Ave. Madison.
Call George
973-8583, 557-0994
10/17- rtn


LAKE FRONT HOME
1 yr lease. 2 Bed, 2 Bth.
Includes kitchen appliances, wa-
ter, and lawn maintenance.
$800 per mth, $800 deposit.
850-973-3025
rtn

FOR RENT IN LEE, FL
3/2 M/H
2/1 M/H
PLEASE CALL
850-973-4606
OR 850-673-9564'
Home For Rent
3 Bed/ 2 Bth 3200 sq. ft.
$950 per month, $950 deposit.
850-869-0916


Largely BedrboiM Unfurnished
Aparli'iihl '1-'45'.00. Quiet,
Close *to Town, Includes Direct
TV, 2 Screened Porches, and
Washer and Dryer. 850-973-4030


For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suwannee
was $135,000, Now $99,000. 2
BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Buildin with
Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
Trees. 386-719-0421

FOR SALE / OWNER
FINANCING
ALL LAND BELOW IS HIGH
AND DRY

5 acres Lee, North of Hwy 6,
Cayenne Rd., rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995
$5,000 down, $325/mo

10 acres Beulah Meadows Rd,
DWMH and houses allowed,
$49,500,, $5,000 down
$459/mo

10 acres Old Blue Springs Rd.
access, DWMH and houses al-.
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down,
$459/mo

25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)

Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
12/24-rtn

Land Owners- with good or bad
credit!!! You can own a new
home with $0 down.
Call Will at 850-253-8001.


Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Views
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
Open and Covered Decks, Large
Screened Porch, Gas FP, CH/A,
Oak Floors & Cabinets,
and Appliances.
Offered Furnished at $179,900.
Call BJ Peters at 850-508-1900

For Sale 3 Bed/ 2 Bth w. A.C. on
1/2 Acre in Lee. Only $599mth.
Call Will for more info at
850-253-8001 "` ;
rtn

FSBO- 3 Bed, 1.5 Bth, 1 Acre,
1500 sqft, built in 1994, recent,
upgrades, Cherry Lake area.
$98,500.
850-464-1368
rtn


For Sale in Hamilton Co.
n on 5 Acres.
You Choose Floorplan.
Call Today
850-253-8001
Mn


For Sale 4 Bed/2 Bth w. A
in Madison County
for only $649 per mth.
Call to be pre-approved
850-253-8001


I


Learn To Play Piano!
Learn to play piano by ear! Af-
fordable piano lessons at begin-
ner and intermediate level. Basic
music theory and bass guitar-
lessons also available. For more
information or to schedule,
please call (850) 464-0114.





Yorkie Pups
Call 850-584-9882


HOME ONLY LOANS
No mortgage on your land. Put
Home on your land,
family land, state land or rental
lot. Singlewides start at $350.00
month and
Doublewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING'INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn
HOME BUYERS.. GUARAN-
TEED FINANCING THRU
B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044

NEW 4 BEDROOM 2 BATH
READY TO MOVE IN. CALL
386-288-4560
LOW CREDIT SCORES???
I MAY BE ABLE TO HELP YOU
BUY A HOME.
386-288-4560
MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00 CALL 386-288-4560

ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00 P&I
per mo, Doublewide your land
$422.00 P&I per mo. Singlewide
& $30,000.00 for land $520.00
P&I per mo. or Doublewide with
$30,000.00 for land $602.00 P&I
per mo. Our land your land or buy
land. I specialize in credit chal-
lenged customers. Applications
over the phone, credit decision next
business day. Let me help make
your new home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
Call Steve 386-365-5370


BEST CASH DEALS ON
MOBILE HOMES. NO ONE
BEATS MY PRICES
386-719-0044
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/ 2
BATH EXCELLENT SHAPE
NEED CHAS, PRICED TO SELL
CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
MODULAR HOME FOR SALE
IN TOWN SAVE $20,000.00
TURN KEY DEAL OWNER
SAYS MAKE AN OFFER IT
MUST GO CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218


BRAND SPANKING NEW 2009
5 BEDROOM 3 BATH 2004 Sq Ft
$594.31 PER MO. SELLER PAYS
$3,500 TOWARD
CLOSING COST CALL MIKE
386-623-4218

PRICE REDUCED! SPACIOUS
MFG HOME WITH 4 BED-
ROOMS, 3 BATH, BONUS
ROOM WITH LOTS OF WIN-
DOWS. DISCONTINUED
FLOORPLAN. FOR MORE INFO
CALL SARAH
386-288-0964

BECOME A HOMEOWNER FOR
THE SAME MONTHLY PAY-
MENTS YOU ARE THROWING
AWAY ON RENT. CALL SARAH
FOR MORE INFO
386-288-0964

NEED MORE SPACE FOR A
GROWING FAMILY? 2001, 5
BEDROOM, 4 BATH TRADE-IN.
EXCELLENT CONDITION. FOR
MORE INFO CALL SARAH 386-
288-0964

FIRST TIME HOME BUYER
$7,500.00 CASH IN YOUR
POCKET CALL DAVID FOR
DETAILS 386-719-0044


WE PAY CASH..... FOR YOUR
USED MOBILE HOMES 1980
OR NEWER. LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129


L.C. FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY AND
LIVE OAK
d. CAN POSSIBLY BE ZONED
COMMERCIAL
rtn MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
m LYNN SWEAT


Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165


BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004.F NO AN-
SWER, PLEASE LEAVE NAME,
TELEPHONE NUMBER AND IN-
FORMATION ABOUT THE MILL


Cash for Savage 99 Rifle,
and Colt Pistol.
Call: 971-5359


Downtown Office/ Retail space
for rent. 700 to 1,400 Sql ft.
567-1523
10/22-rtn

FOR RENT
Office Building across street
from Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder
Office);
111 SE Shelby St. Madison
Newly renovated back to the
1920's era Call 973-4141
rtn







Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage
Corner lots.
Fronts both Harvey Greene Dr.
and Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line,
8 inch water main,
access to city utilities,
fire hydrant, and service from
two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141
rtn


1987 Ford Bronco for Sale. Super
hot engine! 58k original miles.
Auto trans. Differentials don't
leak. Only rolled over once but
never "mud bogged". Upper
body has no glass but engine and
running gear awesome! Now
painted camo $500.
850-464-1165


OLE=I


Pit Bull on Colin Kelly Hwy.
on the Ga./Fla. Bridge (Florida
Side). Call Melissa Kent at
850-673-1974 for more infor-
mation. Must have proof of
ownership.







658-JOBS (5627)

Do more than work, join a family!


Social Services Director- LTC
FT position to lead/direct a service
team with high standards of
practice at 161-bed long-term care fa-
cility, including
services/programs for memory im-
paired and a strong community-orient-
ed
environment. BSW and long-term care
experience required. MSW strongly
preferred. Two or more years relevant
experience with good
understanding of LTC regs strongly
preferred.

Accounting A/R Clerk.
FT position; HSD or equivalent re-
quired; prior experience in insurance
billing and coding, PC operation with
MS applications, including word
processor, spreadsheet, and database
required. Must be detailed
oriented.

Groundskeeper
PT staff for various grounds-related
positions in residential
community; prior experience in resi-
dential or commercial lawn care a
plus; valid Florida DL required.

Water/ Wastewater Treatment Op-
erations
FT water/waste water treatment opera-
tor; valid FL C water or waste
water treatment
certification required; dual certifica-
tion strongly preferred.
Experience in all aspects of
water/wastewater & distribu-
tion/collection systems required.

Benefits include health, dental, life,
disability, savings, APLAC
supplemental policies, access to onsite
daycare and fitness facilities.
EOE, Drug Free Workplace, Criminal
background checks required.
Apply in person at ACV Personnel
Department Mon thru Fri, 9:00 am.
until 4:00 p.m., Carter Village Hall,
10680 Dowling Park Drive, Dowling
Park, FL; fax resume to (386) 658-
5160; or visit www.ACvillaqe net.
WANTED:

House-keeper wanted for one day
per week in Greenville for busy
household.

Flexible hours available. Please call
Kathy @ 948-1709.


LMadison is a Drug Free Work-
place. The applicant must pass a
complete physical, drug test and
background test before being em-
ployed.


PLACE YOUR AD HERE!
Call 850-973-4141


MiaNntenance mchncaned
ed- Arbours at Madison.
Knowlege on General Mainte-
nance and Repair Techniques re-
quired. HVAC, Full Certification,
and Pool Certification a pluss.
Great Benefits!
No phone calls please.
Fax resumes 850-253-0127.
Sales Consultant
America's Home Place is seek-
ing an experienced sales person
for our Valdosta
location. The applicant must
have a proven successful sales
track record. Fax resume to
229-245-8790 or email to
bpolk@americahomeplace.com.


Security Officer Needed at
NFCC.
Must have Class D Security Li-
cense. Call Capt. James dt 850-
363-2807 Saturday and Sundays
3:30-11:30 pm

Make $ Playing the Lottery. You
could become a millionaire next
month. Guaranteed income pro-
ducing system. Free membership
booklet. 1-877-526-6957. ID #
J3992.


Cooks & Waitresses
Spaghetti House
Apply in Person After
11am
at 291 A SW Dade Street
Madison, FL
No Phone Calls Please
Ask for Bob

We are seeking a Full
Time/Part Time Responsible
Nanny/Househelp. We haVe a
small 2 Bedroom House and a
3 year old girl. The position is
Monday-Friday 7am-6pm. The
little girl is in school each day
until 2:30. From 2:30-7pm it's
all about care for the child and
in the mornings housekeeping.
You must drive, have a clean
driver's record, and pass a
background check. We are
looking for someone who
wants a very long-term posi-
tion. Email us your resume at
dinehoepfl@yahoo.com or call
us on 352-245-3265.
.The City ot Madison will be ac-
cepting applications for a Water
Maintenance Technician Trainee.
Applicants must be 18 years of
age, possess a valid Florida CDL
"B" Driver's License, or acquire
one within the first 6 months of
your'employment period or forfeit
your position with the city of
Madison. High School Diploma or
GED: pass a physical examination,
a drug test, and a background
check. The city prefers someone
with at least one year of field ex-
perience in water facilities mainte-
nance and repair activities. Job ap-
plications may be picked up at
City Hall between the hours of
8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday
through Friday, February 9, 2009
until February 20, 2009. No appli-
cations will be accepted after this
date.

The City of Madison is an Equal
Opportunity Employer and recog-
nizes veteran's preference.


The City of Madison has an open-
ing in the City's Wastewater De-
partment for the position of Waste-
water Tech 1. Applicants must have
a high school diploma or GED, be
18 years of age, and have a Class
"D" Commercial Florida Driver's
License. We prefer someone with
three years experience in mainte-
nance and repair of pumps, motors
and equipment. A comparable
amount of training or experience
can be substituted for the mini-
mum qualifications. Job applica-
tions may be picked up at the City
Hall between the hours of 8:00 am
and 5:00 pm, Monday through Fri-
day. Applications will be accepted
for this position from February 9,
2009 until February 20, 2009. No
applications will be accepted for
this position after 5:00 pm on Feb-
ruary 23, 2009.

Fhe City of Madison is an Equal
Opportunity Employer and recog-
nizes
Veteran's Preference. The City of


WELDING
New & Used Parts

850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison. FL 32340

ANYTHING LEFT OVER 30
DAYS WILL BE SOLD


PAGEANT DRESSES FOR
SALE

Children's Dresses.....

Size 3 white long dress, worn as
flower girl dress, satin bodice, lacy
overlay on bottom, built in crino-
line $50

Size 3 white long dress, worn as
flower girl dress, sequin/beadwork
all on
bodice, sequin/beadwork/appliqu6s
on bottom, built in crinoline. $50

Size 4 off white dress, worn as
flower girl dress, lace work around
bodice, pretty lace work at bottom,
cap sleeves $25

Size 5 purple pageant dress, with
matching socks and hair bow,
white sequin and bead work on
bodice, built in crinoline beauti-
ful dress $50

Size 7 red pageant dress, white
applique, sequin and bead work on
bodice and bottom, built in crino-
line beautiful dress $65

Size 7 white and peach pageant
dress, white ruffles with peach out-
line across chest, sleeves, and bot-
tom, never worn $35

Size 7 off white dress, worn as a
flower girl dress, decorative with
flowers across chest and sleeves,
calf to ankle length in front, longer
in back $25

Size 7-8 off white dress, worn as
a flower girl.dress, overlay of lace
over entire dress, probably knee to
calf length $25

Size 8 white, long dress, lace
around neck with decorative bodice
- $25

Size 14 white long dress, pink
and white sequin/bead/appliqu6
work at neckline, bodice and-waist
area, roses at bottom, two layers of
ruffles across bottom, cap sleeves,
rose and lace work coming down
back of gown, with matching hair
bow $40

Size 14 white long dress, cap.
sleeves, white applique/bead/sequin
work coming down bodice $50

Size 16 white long pageant
gown, cap sleeves, white sequin
work across entire bodice and
sleeves, buttons around neck with
circular cut-out on back, beautiful
gown $100

Teen dresses....

Size 7-8 kelli green gown, lace
overlay $40

Size 8 red gown, sequin/bead
work around bodice $50

Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is
for a teen division approximately
13-15) GORGEOUS lime green
dress, strapless but with spaghetti
straps that cress cross across the
back, sequins spotted across the
entire gown, built in crinoline ab-
solutely gorgeous. $300 (paid
over $500 for it)
Call (850) 973-3497
and leave message








MARTIN'S
CARPET REPAIR

Re-Stretching, Patching,
Seam Repair. Berber Pulls,
Burns, Water Damage, etc.

Don't waste money to buy new
carpet if you don't have to....
Call 850-879-0120
or
850-973-2003
for a FREE estimate!


DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair


^^^fBB^^B^^^^^^^f^^^^^^^^iB^Mi^^^SDeadlsiineFr Cassfeds


FAS IFF D9sfi 1(8501 973-4141BHI
^^^^g^^A^^^UJ^^Jj^^^ff^3:00 pKffm.BEveryMonayfBB









Wednesday, February 18, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 15A


wewga'ls

I - -


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
.FIORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
C,eVIL DIVISION

, YLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP.,

.Plaintiff,



-CASE NO. 2008-482-CA
JOHN HENRY AUST, JR. A/K/A JOHN H. AUST, JR.;
KIMBERLY ANN AUST A/K/A KIMBERLY AUST; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIMBERLY ANN AUST
A/K/A KIMBERLY AUST; IF LIVING; INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED; THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
,ASIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES,
,AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;

Defendants)


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final'Summary Judgment of
-Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Madison County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Madison County, Florida,
described as: LOTS 54 AND 55, LAKESIDE TERRACE SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
:L,,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY/FLORIDA. A/K/A
232 SE Park Loop
Madison, FL 32340

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, At the west front doorsteps of the
Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW Range Ave., Madison, Florida 32340 at 11:00 a.m.,
'on May 12, 2009.

DATED THIS 12 DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2009.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 12 day of February,
*2009.

CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

fHIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
' Lnw Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
'Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior
to the proceedings: If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771
(TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NO:


THOMAS J. BEGGS, IV,
2009-006-CA


Plaintiff,

vs.

ALTHEA RUSSELL; FLO MCCALLA; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

To: All Above Named Unknown Defendants, including Unknown Tenant No.1 and Un-
known Tenant No. 2,
Addresses Unknown

YOU, ALL ABOVE NAMED UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS, INCLUDING UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1 AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, ARE NOTIFIED that an action seek-
ing foreclosure and other relief on the following property in Madison County, Florida:
Description: OH 4 Parcel IN: 15-2N-10-5965-
000
A portion of Section 15, Township 2 North, Range 10 East, being more particularly de-
scribed as follows:
Commence at a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of said Section 15;
thence South 0009'21" West along the east line of said Section 15 a distance of 1,321.10
feet to a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of the South Half (S _) of the
Northeast Quarter (NE J of said Section 15; thence North 8950'02" West along the north
line of said S of NE a distance of 992.43 feet to the northeast corner and POINT OF BE-
GINNING of the following described parcel; thence South 00*09'58" West a distance of
659.71 feet; thence North 89'50'02 West a distance of 330.80 feet; thence North 0009'58"
East a distance of 659.71 feet to said north line of S of NE 1/4 ; thence South 89*50'02"
East along said north line of S of NE _; thence South 89'50'02" East along said north line
a distance of 330.80 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 5.01 acres, more or less. Density Exception: 03-18-B
SUBJECT TO the RESTRICTIONS AND PROTECTIVE COVENANTS for OAK HILLS
(an unrecorded subdivision in Madison County Florida) as more particularly described in
OR Book 703 page 255 through 262 and OR Book 705 Page 94 of the public records of
Madison County Florida.
ALSO SUBJECT TO that easement for utilities granted to TriCounty Electric Corporation
,and recorded in OR Book 708 Page 199 to 203 of the public records of Madison County
Florida.
ALSO SUBJECT TO existing county graded road rights-of-way.Said lands situated, lying
and being in Madison County, Florida.Said property is not the homestead of the Grantor(s)
under the laws and constitution of the State of Florida in that neither Grantor(s) or any
members of the household of grantor(s) reside thereon.has been filed against you, and each
'of you, are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Scot B.
-Copeland, the plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 174 East Base Street, Madison, Flori-
da 32340 on or before March 18, 2009, and file the original with the clerk of this court ei-
ther before service on the plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petitioDated
this 16th day of February, 2009.
TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of the Circuit Cburt

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

INVITATION TO BID
.DRUG TESTING SERVICES

jOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of
Madison County, Florida will receive sealed bid proposals for Drug
Testing Services for all employees of the Board and Constitutional Officers of the County
(with the exception of the Madison County Sheriff's Department). Bids must be submitted
to the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Madison County, Florida, at the Madison
.County Courthouse, 125 SW Range Ave, Room 101, Madison, Florida, or by mail to Madi-
son County Clerk of Court, P.O. Box 237, Madison, FL 32341, before 4:00 p.m., on
Wednesday, March 11, 2009. All bids must be submitted sealed and shall remain sealed
until they are publicly opened and read at 4:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as practical at
the above office of the clerk.

SCOPE OF WORK.
It is the intent of this Bid to select one (I) firm to provide all services listed herein rather
than awarding by category. The Board desires the health care provider to conduct pre em-
ployment and random drug screening. All testing will be performed by a certified labora-
tory that is licensed and approved by the Slate of Florida Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services (HRS). Testing shall be done using criteria established by the
National Institute on Drug Abuse and in accordance with section 440.102, Florida
Statutes, drug-free workplace program requirement standards and CRF
Part 40 of the Department of Transportation. All collections will be performed at the
County's work locations, except pre-employment testing which will be collected at the
contractor's site. Collections and testing are to be mobile and available twenty four
hours a day seven days a week.

Seven (7) copies of bid should be submitted in a sealed envelope marked:
"SEALED BID FOR: DRUG SCREENING" and the name of the firm submitting
bid. The bid must include a Certificate of Insurance showing that the bidder
has liability insurance of at least $1,000,000.

All questions and requests for bid packets should be directed to Tim Sanders, Clerk, Madi-
son County Board of County Commissioners, at (850) 973-1500.

The Board reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept or reject
any or all bids in whole or in part, with or without cause, and to accept the bid that in
their judgment will be in the best interest of the county.

Any changes made to the specifications shall be in writing only. No verbal comments shall
change the minimum requirements listed in the specifications.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,

Plaintiff,

vs.

CASE NO.2008-593-CA
HARRIS REISBAUM; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
HARRIS REISBAUM; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES;
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS;

Defendant(s)


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Madison County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Madison County, Florida,
described as:

DESCRIPTION (TRACT #11)

COMMENCE AT AN IRON ROD MARKING THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 EAST,
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREE
05'02" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 927.56 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 04'22" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1491.51 FEET TO
A POINTING THE CENTERLINE OF AN 80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY
UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329), FOR A POINT
OF BEGINNING, THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
AND LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE, RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES
52'41" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1150.83 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE
SOUTH 03 DEGREES 41'27" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 403.72 FEET TO
A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 06'09" WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 1130.13 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF THE
AFOREMENTIONED 80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND
DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 329), THENCE NORTH 06
DEGREES 40'39" WEST, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE
OF 400.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN
80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT
(ROAD 329) OVER AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 40 FEET
THEREOF. ALSO SUBJECT TO A 10 FOOT UTILITY EASEMENT
ALONG THE SIDE AND REAR LOT LINES. TOGETHER WITH
AND SUBJECT TO THAT CERTAIN DECLARATIONS OF
EASEMENTS, RESERVATIONS AND PROTECTIVE COVENANTS
FOR AUCILLA PLANTATIONS RECORDED DECEMBER 15,2005 IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 791, PAGE 298 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND ANY
AMENDMENTS THERETO.
A/K/A

Tract 11 SW Open Sands Loop
Pinetta, FL 32350

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, At the west
front doorsteps of the Madison County Courthouse, West Range Ave., Madison, Florida
32340 at 11:00 a.m., on March 3, 2009.

DATED THIS 4 DAY OF February, 2009.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of the date of the Us pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4 day of February,
2009.


CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.

TO BE PUBLISHED IN: Madison County Carrier


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CITIZENS STATE BANK CIVIL ACTION NO. 08-555-CA
424 West Base Street
Madison, Florida 32340

Plaintiff,

vs. FORECLOSURE AND
OTHER RELIEF
LINDA MEHR
2807 South West Beaumont Ave,
Palm City, Florida 34990, unknown tenants; and other unknown parties in
possession, including the unknown spouse of any person in possession of the
property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that De-
fendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal
status is unknown, claiming under any of the named or described Defendant,
Defendants.
/

NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN;

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the final judgment of
foreclosure entered on February 12, 2009, in the above styled action I,
Tim Sanders, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following described
real property:

A portion of those lands described in O.R. Book 619, page 288 of the
public records of Madison County, Florida, being a portion of Section 4, Township 1
North, Range 9 East, being more particularly described as follows:

Commence at a concrete monument marking the southwest corner of said
Section 4; thence North 8923'55" East along the south line of said Section 4 a
distance of 2009.90 feet to the southwest corner and POINT OF BEGINNING of the fol-
lowing described parcel; thence North 0035'48" West a distance of 402.08 feet to a
point on the boundary of said O.R. Book 619, page 288; thence North 8929'56" East along
said O.R. Book 619, page 288 a distance of 1267.62 feet to a concrete monument; thence
continue North 8929'56" East along said O.R. Book 619, page 288 a distance of 581.07
feet to the westerly right-of-way line of State Road 53 as described in said O.R.
Book 619, page288; thence South 0623'17" West along said right-of-way line a distance
of 334.92 feet, thence North 8234'04" West a distance of 49.89 feet to the point of curva-
ture of a non-tangent circular curve to the left having a radius of 500.00 feet and a central
angle of 8826'25"; thence along said curve an arc distance of 771.79 feet (Chord; North
7323'55" West, 697.42 feet) to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South
62022'52" West a distance of 615.61 feet to the south line of said Section 4; thence South
59023'55" West along said south line a distance of 543.93 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. Containing 10.68 acres, more or less.
TOGETHER WITH an easement for ingress, egress and utilities over and
across
Easement "A" as described in 0-R. Book 694, Page 19, of the Public
Records of Madison County, Florida.

Parcel Identification Number: part of 04-1N-093448-001-000

The sale will be held on March 5, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. (or as soon
thereafter as possible, provided that said sale must be commenced prior in 2:00 p.m.)
to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the West door of the courthouse in Madison
County, in Madison, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes.


Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the owner of the above described property as of the date of the
lis pendens must file a claim within-60 days after the sale.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact Sondra Williams, court administrator, Post Office Box
15(9, Lake City, Florida 32056, telephone:(386) 758-2163, within 2 working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated: February 12, 2009.

Tim Sanders
As Clerk of the Court

BY: Is/ Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA/IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

CIT1FINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC,

Plaintiff/
vs.

CASE NO. 08-565-CA
PHILLIP RICHARD DEAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF PHILLIP RICHARD DEAN; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2,

Defendants)
/

NOTICE OF SALE

NoticKs hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Madison County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Madison County, Florida,
described as:

Start at Northwest corner of Northeast quarter (NE 3/4) of Section 33,
Township 1 North, Range 9 East, Madison County, Florida, and run
South 6.7 fee f l' Iiqoqg forti line 334 feet to concrete monument on
edge of Anderson Pond, thence North 60 degrees 46.2' East 156.5 feet to
edge of a cul de sac '(with 'radius of 50 foci; and centerpoint North 60
degrees 46.2 East 50 feet); thence along radius of cul de sac
Southeasterly through central angle of 57 degrees 35' 48.4" and an arc
distance of 50.26 feet to and of cul de sac at South side of a 60 foot
wide street; thence South 33 degrees 41.8' East along side of street 423
feet to PC of a curve (with Delta angle of 19 degrees 08' 30" and centerline
radius of 297.04 feet); thence Southeasterly along arc of curve to left
109.08 feet and through a central angle of 19 degrees 06' 36" to PT of
curve; thence South 52 degrees 48.4 East along South side of a 60 foot
street 173.2 feet to PC of a curve (with Delta angle of 13 degrees 25'
48" and centerline radius of 424.67 feep); thence along street Southeasterly
along arc of a curve to right 92.50 feet and through a central angle of
13 degrees 25' 48" to PT of curve; thence along street South 39 degrees
22.6' East 242 feet to PC of curve (with Delta angle of 19 degrees 24' 39" and
centerline radius of 292.36 feet); thence along street Southeasterly
along arc of curve to right 88.68 feet and through a central angle of 19
degrees 24' 30" to PT of curve and point of beginning of Lot 6; thence South 19
degrees 58' East along street 16.45 feet; thence South 70 degrees 02' West
250 feet; thence North 19 degrees 58' West 50 feet thence North 70
degrees 13' 43" West 20.33 feet; thence North 50 degrees 37.4' East
35.12 feet; thence North 70 degrees 02' East 224.54 feet to South side of
street; thence along street Southeasterly along arc of curve (with Delta angle
of 19 degrees 24' 30" and centerline radius of 292.36 feet) 59.05 feet and
through a central angle of 12 degrees 53' 44.5" to PT of curve and point
of beginning of Lot 6, containing 0.4 acres, more or less, and being
part of said Northeast quarter (NE 1/4).

Also the following street easement for ingress and egress:

Start at the Northwest corner of Northeast quarter (NE 1/4) of Section
33, Township 1 North, Range 9 East; Madison County, Florida, and run
South 6.7' West along forty line 330 feet to concrete monument on edge'
of Anderson Pond; thence North 60 degrees 46.2' East 206.5 feet to
center point of cul de sac with 50 foot radius at beginning of herein
described street easement; thence South 33 degrees 41.8' East 40 feet to
end of cul de sac and beginning of centerline of herein described 60
foot street; thence continue South 33 degrees 41.8' East along
centerline 423 feet to PC of curve to left with Delta angle of 19 degrees 06.6'
radius of 297.04 feet; tangent of 50 feet; thence along the centerline curve
99.07'feet and through a central angle 19 degrees 06.6' to FT of curve; thence
South 52 degrees 48.4' East 173.2 feet along centerline to PC of curve
to right with Delta angle of 13 degrees 25' 48", radius of 424.67 feet,
tangent of 50 feet; thence along centerline, curve 99.54 feet and through
a central angle of 13 degrees 25' 48" to PT of curve; thence South 39
degrees 22,6' East along centerline 242.0 feet to PC of curve to right
angle with Delta angle of 19 degrees 24' 30", radius of 292.36 feet,
tangent of 50 feet, thence along centerline curve 99.04 feet and through
a central angle of 19 degrees 24' 30" to PT of curve; thence South 19
degrees 58' East along centerline 166.45 feet to PC of curve to left
with Delta angle of 25 degrtes,23.5' radius of 221.94 feet, tangent "of 50r
feet; thence along centerline curve 98.358 feet and through central angle of
25 degrees 23.5 to FT of curve; thence South 45 degrees 21.5' East along
centerline 100 feet to end of street easement at West right-of-way line
of State Road 14, 50 feet from centerline, thereof, containing 2.2 acres,
more or less, and being part of said Northeast quarter (NE 1/4).
A/K/A

185 SW Anderson Pond Way
Madison, FL 32340

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, At the west
front doorsteps of the Madison County Courthouse, 101 South Range Street, Madison,
Florida 32340 at 11:00 a.m., on March 3, 2009.

DATED THIS 4 DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2009.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of the date of the Us pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4 day of February, 2009.

CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT


By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk


THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceedings. If
hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice),
via Florida Relay Service.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.


IN RE: ESTATE pF
CARLTON C. BIIRNTTE,
Deceased.


CASE NO.: 2009-07-CP
PROBATE DIVISION


NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION


TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ENTI-
TLED ESTATE AND ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the administration of the estate of CARLTON C.
BURNETTE, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court in and for Madison County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, the address of which is the Madison County Courthouse, Post Office
Box 237, Madison, Florida 32340. The name and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or demands against the estate are required, WITHIN THREE
CALENDAR MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE to file
with the clerk of the above styled court a written statement of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or his agent or attorney, and the amount claimed. If the
claim is not yet due, the date when it will become due shall be stated. If the claim is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is se-
cured, the security shall be described. The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to enable the clerk to mail one (1) copy to each the repre-
sentative.
All persons interested in the estate to whom a copy of this Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required, WITHIN THREE CALENDAR MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE to file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the decedent's will, the qualifications of the personal repre-
sentative, or the venue or jurisdiction of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this Notice of
Administration: February 11, 2009.
Cary A. Hardee, II CARLTON M, BURNETTE, Personal Representative
Post Office Drawer 450 504 SW Range Avenue
Madison, Florida 32341 Madison, Florida 32340
Telephone (850) 973-4007
Facsimile (850) 973-8495
Florida Bar Number 133856
Attorney for the Personal Representative
2/11,2/18









16A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 18, 2009



REGIONAL NEWS


The Florida Department Of Health

Today Identified A Single Case of

Salmonella Typhimuirium In A

Resident Of Bradford County


The Florida Depart-
ment of Health earlier this
month identified a single
case of Salmonella Ty-
phimuirium in a resident
of Bradford County The
sample from this resident
matched the DNA finger-
print of the nationwide
peanut outbreak. The pa-
tient was briefly hospital-
ized, but has since been
discharged. It is not
known at this time which
product this person con-
sumed that caused their
illness. The investigation
is ongoing. The Depart-
ment of Health is continu-
ing its surveillance efforts
to identify any further cas-
es that may be linked to
this outbreak.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Health is working
with Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services and the Food and
Drug Administration to en-
sure that any recalled
peanut butter in food ser-
vice establishments li-


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$5700.00 ,

1003 Madison Hwy. Valdosta. 229-242-5617


censed by Florida Depart-
ment of Health is not dis-
tributed to the public.
According to FDA, ma-
jor national brands of
jarred peanut butter (like
the jars found on the
shelves at a store) are not
affected by the recalls. It is
recommended that prod-
ucts that have been re-
called be thrown away in a
* manner thatprevents oth-
ers from eating them.
The FDA recommends
that consumers postpone
eating other peanut butter
containing products (such
as cookies, crackers, cereal,
candy and ice cream) until
more information becomes
available about which
brands may be affected.
Salmonellosis is an in-
fection with bacteria
called Salmonella. Most
persons infected with Sal-
monella develop diarrhea,
fever and abdominal
cramps 12 to 72 hours after
infection. The illness usu-
ally lasts 4 to 7 days, and
most persons recover
without treatment. How-
ever, in some persons, the
diarrhea may be so severe
that the patient needs to be
hospitalized. In these pa-
tients, the Salmonella in-
fection may spread from
the intestines to the blood
stream, and then to other
body sites and can cause
death unless the person is
treated promptly with an-


tibiotics. The elderly, in-
fants and those with im-
paired immune systems
are more likely to have a
severe illness.
Anyone who has re-
cently consumed a
peanut butter product
and is worried about get-
ting sick should visit the
Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention Fre-
quently Asked Questions
about Salmonella at
www.cdc.gov/salmonella.
Anyone experiencing
symptoms of illness
should contact their pri-
mary care physician for
diagnosis and treatment.
To confirm a salmonel-
losis infection, one must
submit a stool sample to
their physician.
For questions about
any products related to
this outbreak, visit www.
fda.gov/oc/opacom/hot
topics/salmonellatyph
.html. FDA has created a
searchable list of prod-
ucts that will be updated
as information becomes
available: www.accessdata
.fda.gov/scripts/peanut
butterrecall/ index.cfm.
Those wanting to
know more about the Sal-
monella Typhimuirium
outbreak investigation
should go to the CDC Sal-
monella Typhimuirium
outbreak investigation
Web site: www.cdc.gov/
salmonella/typhimurium.


Local Boy Receives

Eagle Scout Award

Since becoming a cub part of camp that only a
scout in 1998, Brian Mc- few divers ever see." A
Cormick, 18, has always video of the cave system
kept his sights on becom- may be accessed from
ing an eagle scout. Satur- www.campindiansprings
day, Jan. 24, his vision .org/campamp/CAMP/
came true. CampAmp Video/61C10 74
McCormick, of Boy 0-6BD1-4B75-9EC5-DAB6D
Scout Troop 4 of St. EC89637.html.
Marks, was honored at a Boy Scout Troop 4 ex-
special eagle scout cere- tends its heartfelt thanks
mony at the YMCA Camp to the community and to
Indian Springs. all who supported Mc-
To earn Scouting's Cormick in his pursuit of
highest award, Mc- this major accomplish-
Cormick (a graduate of ment.
Wakulla High School, McCormick has been a
2008) had to earn 21 mer- member of Troop 4, char-
it badges, serve as a tered by a group of con-
leader in his troop, and cerned parents, for seven
complete a major com- years. He has served the
munity service project. troop as patrol leader, as-
McCormick's ser- sistant patrol leader, se-
vice project took nior patrol leader and
place at YMCA assistant senior pa-
Camp Indian trol leader. He
Springs also served as
He planned ( W den chief to
and led Pack 4, also of
scouts and St. Marks, for
adults in build- a three years. Mc-
ing a series of Cormick also
outdoor signs, worked for four
which are a part of an summers at Camp Wall-
interpretive trail of the wood, and as a volunteer at
underground spring sys- YMCA Camp Indian
tem below YMCA Camp Springs for two summers.
Indian Springs. Mc- Troop 4 and Scout
Cormick engineered five Master Penny Coshatt are
trail signs, explaining very proud of McCormick
and interpreting the earning his Eagle rank.
spring system. McCormick has not only
"The cave systems completed a difficult jour-
and our spring is part of ney, he is also the fourth
the Wakulla Springs sys- Eagle Scout from Troop 4.
tem," said A.L. Ferreira, McCormick is now an
camp executive director adult leader for the troop.
for the YMCA. "Brian He wants to help guide the
has helped us show our younger scouts to earn
campers and visitors a their eagle scout rank.


LDLLLJ


Famous Eagle Scouts


Neil Armstrong
First man on the moon


William C. DeVries, M.D.
Surgeon and educator,
transplanted the first artificial
heart

President GeraldR. Ford
Former president of the
United States

Steve Fossett
World record holder, first
person to circumnavigate
Earth solo in a hot air balloon

Chan Gailey
Offensive coordinator of the
Kansas City Chiefs, former '.
head coach of the Dallas
Cowboys

Michael F. Moore
Academy Award-winning
documentary filmmaker

H. Ross Perot
Founder of Perot Systems
Corp., former presidential
candidate

Mike Rowe
Host of Dirty Jobs on the
Discovery Channel

Steven Spielberg
Academy Award-winning film
director


SIA& S-A 12 C
'Illt, ynI:kju,2; 4 P,
Jul P "
'lip




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