Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00148
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla
Publication Date: February 4, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00148
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text




INSIDE TO

Rotary

Supports

Madison

Community


See Page 7A


VOL. 45 NO. 26 L Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


Phil Says,

"Six More

Weeks

Of Winter!"


Phil's official forecast.
as read Feb. 2 at sunrise at
Gobbler's Knob:
Hear Ye, Hear Ye,
On Gobbler's Knob
this glorious Groundhog
Day, February 2nd 2009,
Punxsutawney Phil, Seer
of Seers, Prognosticator of
all Prognosticators awoke
to the call of Bill Cooper,
and greeted his handlers,
Ben Hughes and John Grif-
fiths. After casting a joyful
eye towards thousands of
his faithful followers, Phil
proclaimed his beloved
Pittsburgh Steelers were
World Champions one
tiore time and a bright sky
above e me showed my shad-
ow beside me. So six more
weeks of winter it will be.
Family Loses

Home In Fire;

Needs Help
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Able Silverio fami-
ly lost their home in a fire
on January 20 at approxi-
mately 4 a.m.
Firefighters from Sir-
mans, Greenville and
Madison responded to the
blaze.
The Silverio family is
in need of a place to stay,
as well as clothing.
Sizes for the family are
as follows:
Men's pants, 36 (waist),
28 (inseam)
Men's shirts: extra
large
Men's shoes: 8 1/2
Women's slacks: 18-20
and 13-14 *'
Women's blouses: 20-22
Women's shoes: 10 and
9 2
Women's shirts: medi-
um or large
If anyone has clothing
or a camper trailer for the
family to stay in, they may
call (850) 843-0678 for in-
structions oh how to get
the items to them.
Miss Madison
County
Pageant And
Tots To Tween
Pageant Now
Accepting
Applications
Calling all kings and
queens of Madison Coun-
ty! Executive director, Toni
Blanton, is pleased to an-
nounce that applications
are being sought for the
2009 Miss Madison County
Pageant. Ages are as fol-
lows:


Please See Pageant,
Page 2A


Jaguar Gee Homicide...



Man Arrested For Murder


Fran Hunt
Special from the Monticello
News
The Madison Police
Department in. partner-
ship with the Florida De-
partment of Law Enforce-
ment (FDLE) and the Jef-
ferson County Sheriff's Of-
fice arrested Jimmy
Moore, 31, of Jefferson
County, Friday, Jan. 30, in
Jefferson County, for the
homicide of Madison resi-


dent, Jaguar Gee.
Gee was found dead in
the Arbors of Madison
apartment complex on Fri-
day, Aug. 1,2008. Moore, an
associate of Gee, became a
suspect early in the inves-
tigation through evidence
linking him to the crime
scene.
The death was investi-
gated as a homicide and of-
ficers secured the scene
and notified the FDLE, and


State Attorney's Office.
The FDLE Crime Lab Unit
was mobilized, and re-
sponded to the scene. Offi-
cers interviewed potential
witnesses and neighbors
trying to find out any in-
formation that could lead
them to those responsible
for Gee's death.
Investigators from
FDLE and the Madison Po-
lice Department processed'
the crime scene for evi-


dence,' Evidence was col-
lected and examined by
the crime lab in Tallahas-
see to assist in identifying
any suspects. The Medical
Examiners Office in Talla-
hassee examined the body
to determine that cause of
death and secure evidence,
which, in turn, resulted in
the arrest of Moore.
The arrest is a result of
Please See Murder,
Page 2A


JIMMY MOORE :


COWBOYS TO OST.


'BASEBALL, DOT Does,


AND APPLE PIE' EVENT
The 2009 Madison County High School baseball
team will be on display Friday night (February 6th) at a
special 'Baseball, Hot Dogs, and Apple Pie' event begin-
ning at 6 p.m. on Boot Hill. The night will feature this
year's squad in a scrimmage game followed by a display
of Cowboy power in a home run derby The derby will
also be open to alumni and celebrities. Former Cowboy
standouts and professional baseball players Lorenzo
Cain, Jeremy Haynes, and Robert Paulk will be on hand
to participate. Fans can enjoy hot dogs and apple pie
while watching America's pastime performed Cowboy
style.
The reigning district champion Cowboys are
coached by Terry Barrs. Seniors Jordan Carroll, Ja-
cobbi McDaniel, Brynne Wetherington, Evan Schnitker,
Scott Pleasant, and Drew Brown are set to lead the Cow-
boys to district title repeat. A host of underclassmen
including returning lettermen Kelvin Singletary,
Bladen Gudz, Justin Sirmon, and Marterrius McDaniel
along with Josh Timmons and Steven Rusinko are ex-
pected to make this Cowboy team a strong contender for
extended postseason play The Cowboys play at Live
Oak in the Suwannee Pre-Season Classic on February
12 before beginning regular season tilts the following
Please See Cowboys, Page 2A


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Life And That
More Abundantly (LAT-
MA) Academy has several
unique and culturally en-
riching features in its
broad curriculum, which
includes attending presi-
dential inaugurations.
Four years ago they at-
tended the inauguration
of President George W.
Bush. Now, one term later,
they have recently re-
turned from the inaugura-
tion of President Barack
Obama.
Director Emily
Spencer is devoted to grad-
uating both Christian
scholars and good citizens,
as is' Emma Hart, her
"part right-hand woman,
part miracle worker. Of
course, this year's celebra-
tion of the first African-
American President made
the journey that much
more of a celebration.
"We were blessed to be
able to take part in this
historic occasion and are
so grateful for everyone
that helped to make it hap-
pen. It was an absolutely
fantastic experience,"
Spencer noted.
Upon their return, two
exceptional seniors, Siera
Davis and Katisha Robin-
son, constructed a pictori-
al collage commemorating
the event. On a wall dis-
play, titled, "We Were
There," the ladies com-
bined trip photos with se-
lect memorabilia to recap-
ture the awesome, gather-
ing. It was included


among a larger project the
two produced for Black
History Month. For these
efforts and others, the
school was chosen by
WCTV-27, Tallahassee as
one of three honorees of
its Black History Month
celebration.
LATMA Academy
places a priority on field
trips to reinforce civic
and spiritual teaching, es-
pecially issues concern-
ing civil rights and cul-
tural heritage. The stu-
dents, however, exhibit no
lack of traditional acade-
mic development. In fact,
several students show-
cased their academic
knowledge in a recent
brain bowl sponsored by
Florida State University
The emphasis on college
education is not merely
emphasized; it is expect-
ed.
"We are constantly
working for resources to
ensure our students get a
well-rounded education. It
is a challenge though. To
raise funds for the presi-
dential inauguration, for
instance, we reached out
to 100 pastors for 100 dol-
lars each. We didn't get it
all, but we made progress.
It's really all about the stu-
dents. They're the most
wonderful and precious
resource," Spencer added.
LATMA Academy is
located at 491 SW Captain
Brown Road, Madison. For
additional program de-
tails, including informa-
tion regarding their high-
ly touted music ministry,


simply call (850) 973-2359.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@gr-
eenepublishing.com.


Iman Taylor Wins



District Spelling Bee


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Last year's runner-up
is this year's winner. Iman
Taylor, representing Madi-
son County Central
School, held off Matt
Bendl, also from the Cen-
tral School, to win the dis-
trict competition of the
annual Scripps Spelling
Bee. She will now move on
to the regional competi-
tion in Jacksonville on
Feb. 21.
The competitors fell
quickly this year. Unlike
previous years that went
well beyond ten rounds
with several competitors
from both public and pri-
vate schools remaining,
this year the final two
were head-to-head after
only round seven. Words
like "hypothesis" and "ca-
boose" took spellers out
quickly
In the final round,
Bendl missed the word "al-
batross," which Taylor
spelled correctly Then per
the rules of the competi-
tion, Taylor was required
to spell an additional.
word, which was "clemen-
tine."


ureene ruDiisning, inc. ulo00 oy micnael uruis, January ,2 /uu0
Karla Molnar presents the championship trophy to
Iman Taylor for winning the Madison County District
Spelling Bee. Taylor is in seventh grade student at the
Central School and was last year's runner-up.


As Taylor concluded
the word, the school board
meeting room consisting
of school staff, family and
friends exploded with ap-
plause. The quiet champi-
on was as gracious as she
was studious, smiling
warmly as she held her


trophy close.
Andy Barnes, district
director of finance, spoke
a few words to open the
event, providing several
references intended to re-
mind each participant of
Please See Spelling Bee,
Page 2A


2 Sections, 30 Pages Local & Regional Crime
Around Madison County 6-7A History
Bridal Guide 10A Obituaries
Classifieds/Legals 16-17A Health
Path of Faith B Section Sports


4A Wed0 Thu 5429 Fri 63137 Sat
18A 50124 J5 2 63137 67144
5A 2 2
14- 15A Mainly anny High around 50F. Abundant sunshine. Highs in the Sunshine. Highs in the low 60s Abundant sunshine. Highs in the
A WndaNW at 10 to20 mph. mid 50s and lows in the upper 20s. and lows in the upper 30s. uppe0s and lowsin themid 40s.
10A


LATMA Goes To Washington


rniuu ouuIIIuitt
Sierra Davis (left) and classmate Katisha Robinson (right center) join Emily
Spencer (left center) and Emma Hart (right) beside the commemorative wall the two
students constructed in celebration of Black History Month and their trip to the inau-
guration of President Barack Obama.








2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishin2.com Wednesday, February 4, 2009



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


I --TTEir


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word,
comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


Grandma and Pop






a r fiE rn


4^y'j| JYKt


onl uaA29, 1909

DiQd apiA l, 1998


Obama A Disaster,

For Change.
Republicans are having a conniption fit that the De-
mocratic stimulus package will provide $5.2 billion for
ACORN, the left-wing nonprofit group under federal in-
vestigation for voter fraud.
The $5.2 Billion dollars is hidden in the now $8 hun-
dred plus billion package, "that will actually cost we tax
payers over a trillion dollars" under the title "Neigh-
borhood Stabilization Progralhs."
Ordinarily, funds are distributed to local govern-
ments. But this bill will make the funds available di-
rectly to ACORN, the low-income housing organization
whose pro-Democrat voter-registration activities have
been blasted by Republicans. ACORN is most likely
what gave the Democrats the wins they received in 2008.
According to Fox news, "the only news media I watch"
Sen. David Vitter, R-La., says, this action appears to be a
"payoff" for community groups partisan political activ-
ities in this last election.
Blackburn a Republican Congressman said, '"Addi-
tional funds going to organizations such as ACORN that
have tried-to skew a two party system, causes me great
concern and r believe that it causes many of my col-
leagues great concern."
The three-term congressnian stopped short of sug-'
gesting the "neighborhood stabilization" money is, a
power grab by Democrats, however, I will say this, as did
Rush Limbaugh.
Rush said on Tuesday: "We, ladies & gentlemen,
are funding Obama, and the Democrats party's army on
the street. We are funding the forces of the Democrat
party's re-election."
The following will not stimulate the economy but
will enslave all those that actually work for a living to
the tune of $225,000.00 for the next 40 years
$1 billion stashed away in Community Development
Block Grant monies that ACORN often receives.
$10 million to develop or refurbish low-income hous-
ing, a specialty of ACORN's.
$4.19 billion to stave off foreclosures via the Neigh-
borhood Stabilization Program. The current version of
the bill would allow nonprofits organizations to compete
with cities and states for $3.44 billion of this give away
money
Although ACORN usually get their hands on such
funds after the funds have passed through the Housing
and Urban Development (HUD) or at least state and local
governments, this pay back ,eliminates these people,
making it easier to get our money to ACORN's fraudu-
lent bosses.
The charges of payback appear to be bouncing of
the walls in Congress, in part due to Obama's long time
association with partisan get-out-the-vote operations.
He was endorsed by ACORN, and during the cam-
paign, paid an ACORN affiliate $832,600 for the get-out-
the-vote assistance. Early in his career, Obama led a vot-
er drive for an ACORN-affiliated group called Project
Vote.
It's not the first time ACORN has been entangled in
a bailout controversy In September, House Republicans
objected that the original $700 billion bailout package
that included $100 million for ACORN this now is a tiny
fraction of the sum for ACORN being considered in this
so called stimulus package.
For a real stimulus package, give those that actually
work, a six month NO TAX COLLECTED BILL. That
ladies and Gentleman, would be a real (Stimulus Bill)
what we have now is nothing but Pork and Paybacks.
George Pouliotte


Orethea James "OJ" Akins
His spirit lives on and always will.
Times he laughed, gave advice, or just listened
Echo in the memories of those whose lives he touched.
And in being so remembered, his legacy will live on.
December 8, 1978 to February 5, 2004


REOPENING FEBRUARY 11,,2009

The Spaghett H house
(Home of The Bucket of Spaghetti)
2.91 SW Dade Street Madison, FL 32340
(850) 253-8096
Join Us For Valentine's Day!
Make Your Reservation Early!
Lover's Delight "The Tour of Italy"
Complete Dinner For Two $2495
(Includes Appetizer, Drink & Dessert)
Fresh Salads Napelotan Pizza
(Closer to New York Style Pizza Than You Will Ever Get)
Tuesday Friday 11:30 am 9:00 pm
Saturday 3:00 pm 9:00 pm
1qiNOWjj^^ ^B E OPNSNAS1:0a\ :0P


through twelve-year-old pageant will take place at: 9
a.m. The show for Miss and Teen Miss Madison will
start at 7 p.m.
For further information, feel free to contact Tonii
Blanton at (850) 673-1162 or email Madisoh-
pageants@aol.com.
Applications may be picked up at Becky's DanCe
Steps Studio located at 438 E Base Street in Madisop.
The deadline to receive an early bird discount on ep-
try is February 13, 2009. Hurry and enter today. Divi-
sions fill up fast!


I


Murder

cont from page 1A
an investigation by the Madison Police Department aid
special agents from the FDLE Live Oak Field Office. The
FDLE Crime Lab also assisted in the investigation and
Jefferson County deputies made the arrest.
Moore was transported to the Jefferson County Jail
where he was processed and later turned over to the
Madison County authorities to face charges.
"I would like to commend the investigators of the
Madison Police Department and FDLE agents for their
tenacity and endurance in solving this case," said Madi-
son Chief of Police Rick Davis. "We were successful be-
cause of the partnership these investigators and agen-
cies have developed over the years. Much of our success
is due our mutual partnerships with these agencies and
to the forensic and investigative assistance of the Flori-
da Department of Law Enforcement."


Cowboys

cont from page 1A
week.
Fans attending the event will notice significant i*-
provements to the baseball facility at Boot Hill including
a new 'fan-friendly' backstop that allows unobstructed
views of the field. The Cowboy field house is equipped
with new lockers, dugouts feature new improvements,
and a sponsor display has been added. Several improve-
ments to the playing field are noticeable, as well. The
Cowboy baseball program depends heavily upon dona-
tions from supporters. All Cowboy baseball fans are in-
vited to come out and join the festivities at the 'Baseball,
Hot Dogs, and Apple Pie' event.


Spelling Bee

cont from page 1A
the proud heritage they were joining. Quoting a related
source, he stated that the students should enjoy this
"time for new experience," and to "continue on this
path." From the reactions in the room, both spellers and
those who supported their efforts completely agreed.
Congratulations and certificates were given ftoll
competitors, as well as big thanks to judges Doris Bish-
op, Lucille Day and Faye Browning, who was very proud
to later point out that the winners were all in the Take
Stock In Children scholarship program. Additional ap-
preciation was extended to MCHS English Instructor
Karla Molnar for calling out words and presiding over
the occasion this year, also to Jan McHargue for orga-
nizing another successful program.
Following the main spelling contest, elementary
school students had their own spelling bee, which was
won by Shardesha Johnson of Pinetta Elementary. Bri-
ana Howard of Greenville Elementary was runner-up.,
This reporter joins the school district and entire
community in wishing Iman Taylor continued success
in Jacksonville, and -in telling Shardesha Johnson to
keep up the good work.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.

Pageant

cont from page 1A
0-11 months, both boys and girls
12-23 months, boys and girls
2-3 years, both boys and girls
4-6 years, Little Miss
7-9 years, Petite Miss
10-12 years, Junior Miss
13-15 years for the title of Teen Miss Madison
County.
Contestants who are 16 years or older will have
the opportunity to compete for the title of Miss
Madison County, along with a chance to win scholar-
ship money.
Due to the overwhelming success of last yeai's
Mr. and Miss Heart of Madison and Sweetheart Prp-
gram, they are pleased to announce once again that
anyone who wishes to participate can do so without
having to enter the actual pageant.
The Sweetheart Program raised a grand total that
surpassed one thousand dollars for the Miss Madi-
son Scholarship Fund which in return aided last
year's Miss Madison, Ashton Williams, in attending
N.F.C.C. Since this program holds such prestige,
everyone who participates and completes the re-
quirements will walk away with a beautiful crowti,
sash, or cape.
The pageant is scheduled for, Saturday, March 21,
2009, at Van H. Priest Auditorium. The birth








Wednesday, February 4, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Limelight
Jacob l embry




Congratulations To

Recipients Of Lee Honors
I hope everyone is having a great week!
Congratulations to John C. Webb, who was chosen
,Lee's Citizen of the Year. Also chosen were Elvira
,Brown for Honorary Miss Lee and Simon Kinsey for
Lee's Founding Forefather. All are great people!
Addison Nicole Webb, celebrated her birthday on
Friday, Jan. 30:
My cousin, Tulley King, will celebrate his birthday
on Thursday, February 5.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week
and a beautiful forever! May God bless each and every
one of you!





Chase Home Finance vs. Paul and Marie Kirkland -
mortgage foreclosure
Margaret Bailey vs. Lewis Grigsby UFISA
Patricia Barfield and DOR vs. Howard Medler, Jr. -
support
Barbara Broomfield and DOR vs. Darrell McRae, Sr.
support
Alesha Carter and DOR vs. Broderick Carter sup-
port
Jennifer Clark and DOR vs. Charles Butler sup-
port
Natasha Watson and DOR vs. Johnny Norwood II -
support
Elizabeth Maldonado and DOR vs. Jerry Hall sup-
-port


It would be nice of other drivers if they would
use their turn signals, I guess some aren't aware
'that turn the signal on before you turn, not turning
-them'on as you are making the turn. Let's use some
common sense people!
I am glad that we live in Madison County where
'people actually care for other people. The churches,
'the civic organizations, the Senior Citizens Center,
-everyone, does a fantastic job. Yea, Madison!
What's up with the rich people who cloned their.
'dog? Puh-leeeeze!

MCHS teachers do a wonderful job with
the resources they are given
With their hard work and dedication
one can see they are truly driven.
But, one can also see that this work is, not
noticed from afar
Because they must travel to work in the same ole car,
Thanks to very good fortune and a
lot of Cowboy luck,
The MCHS football coach travels to work
in a brand new truck

To contract new debts is not the way to pay old
ones. 9-17-1796. Does our president think he's smarter
than George?


Whatever You Need,

Greene Publishing, Inc.

Classifieds p


GREENE S
Publishing, Inc.


1695 S. SR 53 Madison 973-4141


I did not vote
for President
Obama last No-
vember, however
he is my presi-
dent. When I
catch him doing
something right,
I will praise him.
When I catch him
doing something
that I disagree


National

Security
Joe Boyles
Guest Columnist


with, then I will criticize him. You, the
reader, will decide whether or not my
praise and criticism are justified. I
The economy is in bad shape and has
the early attention of our new president
as it should. Economists is general agree
that our government needs to "stimu-
late" the economy to get it moving and in
recovery mode. To that end, the Obama
Administration and the Democrat lead-
ers in Congress have developed a "stimu-
lus" package worth close to a trillion dol-
lars. Since we have run a deficit through-
out this decade, the new administration
proposes to spend money we don't have,
piling on more 'debt that will eventually
have to be repaid. The danger is that this
might prove inflationary
But debt is justified in an emergency,
and just about everyone agrees we are in
a time of financial emergency Certainly,
these are the darkest days we have faced
since 9-11 seven and a half years ago.
And we are not alone. The economic cri-
sis is being felt in every corner of the
world. As the saying goes, "when Ameri-
ca sneezes, the world catches a cold."
So we need a stimulus package to'...
stimulate business to begin an economic
recovery The question is: does the Oba-
ma/Congressional leadership plan do
this? Or is this another pork-laden bill
that throws a lot of (since the money is
borrowed) funny money at pet projects
that have nothing whatsoever to do with
stimulating the economy As the saying
goes, "the devil is in the details" and
since the bill that passed the House last
week is nearly 650 pageslong, there are
plenty of details, many of them ugly
For example, there was a line item
for nearly a third of a billion dollars to
provide contraceptive aids to poor
women. Would someone please explain
how that is supposed to stimulate eco-
nomic activity? In defending this little
slice of pork, House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi said it would "cut costs." Well
maybe it will and maybe it won't but
again, how does this stimulate economic
activity? The object here is not to cut
costs (which we have, blown wide open
with another trillion dollars of debt) but
to jump-start the economy
Now in fairness, the Democrats


K
I



4


stripped this
turkey from the
final bill, but
how many other
"gobblers" are
laced through
650 pages such
as $350 billion
for prevention
of sexually


#i4w l transmitted dis-
eases? This bill
was fast-tracked through the House of
Representatives with minimal debate.
The Democrats said that the emergency
was too great and the need too urgent to
allow a seasoned debate ... on how to add
another trillion dollars to our national
debt!
When. the Republican opposition
voiced caution and tried to slow down
the process to debate what was stimula-
tive and what was not, they were steam-
rolled by the President ("I'm going to
trump you on that because I won.") and
his party It would appear that compro-
mise and bi-partisanship to Obama
means "you need to agree with me."
The Republicans say that about 12
cents on the dollar might be stimulative
and that most of the money will not be
spent for some time hardly the jump-
start that we are led to believe. Here the
Congressional Budget Office backs up
the Republican's claim.
This is the Obama plan. Not a single
Republican voted for it last week and 11
Blue Dogs, including Allen Boyd,
crossed the. aisle to vote against the De-
mocrat plan. Now the plan moves to the
Senate for their action. It will probably
change which means a conference com-
mittee to iron out the differences.
So we'll se how the President's plan
fares. We'll know in six months or so af-
ter signing. If the economy shows signs
of life (new investment, recovering real
-estate, retail sales up, more. consumer
confidence), then Obama is a hero. If
this doesn't happen and he returns to
the Congress asking for another, suppos-
edly better stimulus package, then he's a
goat.
A lot of people are comparing the
first days of the Obama Administration
to FDR's three-quarters of a century
ago. ,I don't see it that way Americans
in the 1930s were a tough-minded people
who knew hardship and were willing to
put up with more provided they had
hope, and Roosevelt delivered that hope.
Today's generation of Americans is
impatient and ready to return to the
good times. Obama will get a certain
amount of slack but if he doesn't pro-
duce ... and quickly, the goodwill will be
in short supply


Did yoi Know...

The/ worhV' ld'rst diamond wak the/ Cu&innm
foA inL&vSoutvhAfrcca ivl 1905. Itweghd' 3,106.75
carats uncut. It wav cutw Cvto- the G(reat St-ar of
Africa, we4hi&n 530.2 carcats, the Lea-wr Star of
Africa, whichwe SAs 317.40 carats, caid,104 other
dicWnoe of newly fLawle ac otss cr ciwrity.
They vtnow form prrt of the/ B r(twah crow nvjewels.


,iida Press Associo,


2008
Award Winning Newspaper

k-




Ch memnr forrit'sTmOuWtsta nNapet
P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
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PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene
EDITOR
Jacob Bembry
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Heather Bo en
STAFF WRITERS
Nlchael Crdis and Tyrra Meserve
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
Stephen Bnchnia and James Sulter
TYPESE ITE R/SLUBSCRIPTIONS
Bryant Thigpen
ADVERTISING
SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Mry Ellen Greene, '
Dorothy MeKinney,
Jeanette Dunn
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL PDS
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Deadline r c .oi-tfied& s Monday
Deadline I'r Legal AdsJert'ement is
Monda', i 5 pmn
There will be a'3" dicure fur Afidavi,s.
C[RCULATION DEPARTMENT
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In Co:uni, S10'Oji-jul-Couni) 38
iSuLIe A& IAl u.cs included

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes, to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper resei'ves the
right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the man-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene
Publishing, Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


.Stimulus?


1695 S. SR 53 Madison


973-4141








4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 4, 2009



LOCAL & REGIONAL GRIME BLOTTER


M |s SCounty



.- .E "O-SIDERED INNOCENT
:COHT OF LAW

MCSO K-9 Unit


Makes Second


Drug Bust


In County Park
On Wednesday Jan. 28, Corporal Michael Maurice
of the Madison County Sheriff's Office K-9 Unit was
conducting spot checks of county parks for criminal
activity
According to the Sheriff's Office, at 11:31 p.m., Cor-
poral Maurice located a vehicle parked behind the
basketball court at the Armwood Recreation Park. As
Maurice approached the vehicle, the driver, Michael
Dewayne Mitchell, 19, of Madison, opened his door
and threw an unknown object towards the rear of the
vehicle.
Maurice told the driver to close his door and asked
the three occupants for there I.D.'s. While the occu-
pants were getting their I.D.'s, Corporal Maurice ob-
served pieces of marijuana on the seats and their
clothes.
Maurice called the Madison Police Department for
assistance. Patrolman David Myers responded and,
when he arrived, the occupants were placed in hand-
cuffs and a complete search of the vehicle was con-
ducted.
During the search, marijuana and drug parapher-
nalia were located inside the vehicle.
During a search of the area where the driver
threw the unknown item, Patrolman Myers located
two additional bags of marijuana, which matched the
marijuana bag in the vehicle.
Mitchell and his two passengers, Johnny Lee
Stevenson IV, 20, of Madison, and Durrell Ulysess Cur-
ry, 20, of Madison, were arrested and transported to
the county jail. The three were booked on charges of
possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana.


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CAN BUY You A NEW CUSTOM


McCollum Names 2008 Law

Enforcement Officer Of The Year


Attorney General Bill McCollum named Lieu-
tenant Michael Howell, formerly of the Depart-
ment of Transportation (DOT), as the recipient of
the Attorney General's Law Enforcement Officer
of the Year award for 2008. Lieutenant Howell, now
serving with the Walton County Sheriff's Office,
was joined by 12 fellow officers from around the
.state at a ceremony recognizing them for their ded-
ication to law enforcement and their protection of
the public.
"I am honored to be among the very best of
Florida's law enforcement community today," At-
torney General McCollum said at the ceremony
honoring the nominees. "These men and women
have made the safety and security of our state and
our families their top priority, and for that they de-
serve our heartfelt honor and respect."
Lieutenant Howell served as a member of the
DOT Motor Carrier Compliance Office's Contra-
band Interdiction Program for eight years and was
the program's lead K-9 instructor. In 2008, Lieu-
tenant Howell then Officer Howell performed
604 safety inspections, issued 93 safety reports, re-
moved 71 unfit commercial drivers and 80 unsafe
vehicles from Florida's roadways, and made 48
criminal arrests. According to the Department of
Transportation, these actions directly reduced the
number of commercial vehicle crashes and related
fatalities in Florida.
On October 12, 2008, Officer Howell stopped a
commercial motor vehicle to conduct a vehicle in-
spection. Suspecting criminal activity, he deployed
a K-9 Unit to sniff the vehicle, and the dog alerted
to the presence of narcotics. A subsequent search
revealed 150 kilos of cocaine with a street value of
approximately $3 million, as well as $3,000 in cash.
Two suspects were arrested on trafficking charges
and the truck and trailer were seized.
The Department of Transportation noted that
as a result of his dedication, resourcefulness and
initiative, Lieutenant Howell is responsible.for the
largest seizure of marijuana and one of the largest
seizures of cocaine in the history of the Motor
Carrier Compliance Office. Each nominee for
the Attorney General's award had previously been
recognized as aft "Officer of the Year" by a Florida
law enforcement agency or organization that spon-
sors such a statewide award. Deputy Howell was
nominated by virtue of
his selection by the De-
U MN apartment of Trans-


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group of nominees from state agencies and organi-
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tion, the Florida Police Chiefs Association, the
State Law Enforcement Chiefs Association, the
Florida Gang Investigators Association and the
Florida Wildlife Federation.
Howell is the fifth recipient of the Attorney
General's annual award. Last year's recipient was
Florida Department of Law Enforcement Special
Agent Tammy Roane. The 2006 recipient was De-
tective Sergeant Contento of the Tampa Police De-
partment and the 2005 recipient was Detective
Kevin Kuschel of the Palm Beach County School
District Police Department. The recipient in 2004
was Tallahassee Police Officer Chuck Perry, and
Marion County Deputy Sheriff Mike Rolls was
honored as the first recipient of the award in 2003.
A list of the other nominees and their accom-
plishments is as follows:
Nominated by the Florida Police Chiefs Asso-
ciation Detective Nelson Camacho
Nominated by the Fraternal Order of Police,
Florida Lodge Hialeah Police Officer Gabriel
Casco
Nominated by the Department of Environ-
mental Protection, Division of Law Enforcement -
Corporal Daniel Dickson
Nominated by the 'State Law Enforcement
Chiefs Association State Trooper Joshua Earrey
Nominated by the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission and the Florida Wildlife
Federation Wildlife Officer Robert Johnston
Nominated by the Florida Retail Federation -
Detective James Ostojic
Nominated by the Department of Financial
Services, Division of Insurance Fraud Detective
Theodore Padich
Nominated by the Florida Gang Investigators
Association Detective Garrick Plonczynski
Nominated by the Florida Police Chiefs Asso-
ciation Corporal Brent Tyler
Nominated by the Department of Financial
Services, State Fire Marshal's Office Detective
Michael Vitta
Nominated by the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement Special Agent Ellen Wilcox
Nominated by the Florida Highway Patrbl -
Trooper Thomas Winders


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Wednesday, February 4, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



OBITUARIES/IN MEMORY


Phyllis Warren


Leslie


Viola


Corbin


Arlene


Phyllis S. Warren, age
83, flew home to Jesus on
Jan. 24, 2009. After her last
breath here, she began the
next phase of her life ever-
lasting. She is absent from
the body, but present with
our LORD!
., Phyllis was born in Blue
Island, IL on March 17, 1925
ty Stewart and Esther Sand-
berg. She attended Wheaton
College and received her
bachelor's and master's de-
grees in Piano Performance
from the American Conser-
vatory of Music in Chicago.
In 1950, she married Cecil
Clinton Warren, a young
dentist from Blue Island.
They honeymooned in
Naples at the Naples Beach
Olub. Upon. learning that
Cecil was a dentist, the
townspeople asked them to
stay as Collier County didn't
have a dentist. Phyllis
worked side by side with her
new husband until the birth
of their first child, Priscilla.
Their son, Richard, was
born 17 months later.
Several years later, they
moved to Coral Gables, but
kept their ties to Naples.
Phyllis was very active as a
piano teacher for most of
her life and many of her stu-
dents are professional musi-
cians at universities,
churches and on Broadway.
In 1985, her beloved Ce-
cil was killed in a freak acci-
dent at their farm in Madi-
son. Following his death,
Phyllis turned again to the
piano, only this time, she
started practicing for her-
self. *
' In 1990, she married
Adam Sluis and they re-
turned to Naples. Phyllis
Was very involved in the
Naples Music Club and was
co-chairman of the, Scholar-
ship Competition that pro-
vided music scholarships to
hundreds of students to al-
low them to pursue their
musical education.
Phyllis was a member of the
Crescendos, a group that
performed for each other
every month. Her greatest
jooy was to present a pro-
gram with her piano part-
ner which raised funds for
the Naples Music Club
Scholarship. Most recently,
She and her piano partner
presented a .program in
Phyllis' home at Moorings
Park to 20 residents and
raise in excess of $600 for
the Naples Music Club.
Phyllis brought out the
best in others and was al-


ways ready td lend a helping
hand. To know her was to
love her. She had a deep and
abiding love for the Lord
and knew she would be in
His presence when she left
this earth. Phyllis will be
greatly missed by her family
and friends.
She is survived by her
beloved daughter, Priscilla
W. Grannis and her hus-
band, Richard; her beloved
son, Richard C. Warren and
his wife, Karen and their
two children, Clinton
Charles and Rachel Caitlin;
her "adopted" son, Michael
Palij (Brenda); her sister,
Caryl S. Head and family;
her nieces, Barbara Hall
(Bob), Kathy Head, Marcia
Schneider, Marilee Schurke,
Leslie Freeman (Hunter),
Carroll Montalva; her
nephews, Stephen Sand-
berg, Bill Head and Larry
Head; and Adam's children,
grandchildren and great-
grandsons.
Phyllis was preceded in
death by her parents, her
brother, Stewart; her
beloved husband of 32 years,
Cecil Clinton Warren; and
her beloved husband of 15
years, Adam Sluis.
The family expresses
special thanks to Dr. Her-
mes Koop during this diffi-
cult time. The family also
thanks the exceptional nurs-
es and technicians in the
Emergency Room and on
four South at Naples Com-
munity Hospital. They
treated Phyllis and her fam-
ily with dignity and tender,
loving care. The family also
expresses a special thank
you to Carol and Barbara,
whose help and support in
recent years will never be
forgotten.
A memorial service cel-
ebrating the remarkable life
of Phyllis S. Warren was
held on Saturday, January
31, at 11 a.m., at Moorings
Presbyterian Church, 791
Harbour Drive, Naples, FL
34103.
In lieu of flowers, the
family suggests that dona-
tions be made to Moorings
Presbyterian Church, 791
Harbor Drive, Naples, FL
34103; the Jim Smith School
Scholarship c/o Moorings
Presbyterian Church; the
Latin American Mission
(Roblealto Center Child
Care Assoc.) Box 52-7900, Mi-
ami, FL 33152; or the Naples
Music Club Student Scholar-
ship, P.O. Box 2666, Naples,
FL 34106.


Albert

Dingess


Leslie Albert "Straw"
Dingess, age 57, formerly of
Chapmanville, WV, depart-
ed this life on Saturday,
January 24, 2009 at the Vet-
erans Hospital in
Gainesville.
A casual Memorial ser-
vice for Leslie will be held
Saturday, February 7, from
6-8 p.m., at 165 NW Crane
Ave., Madison, Florida, for
all family and friends in the
Madison area.
He was born December
22, 1951, at home on Rocky
Branch, Logan, WV., and
was the son of Victoria
Dingess and the late Romie
Dingess.
Leslie graduated from
High School in 1969 and
served his country during
the Vietnam War.
He is survived by his
mother, Victoria Dingess of
Cairo, WV; special compan-
ion, Nancy Cross of Madi-
son; his dog, Boots; daugh-
ter, Melissa Rogers and
(Joe) of West Virginia.; son,
Kevin Dingess and (Brit-
tani) of West Virginia; five
sisters, Cathy and (Daris)
Cooley of Madison, Rita
Caldwell and (Bill) of IL.,
Carrie Adkins, West Vir-
ginia, Bonnie Lavender and
(Rick) of KY, and Beverly
Lamp, and (Brian) of Tenn.;
four brothers, Mike
Dingess and (Teresa), Den-
nie Dingess and (Kathy),
Kenneth Dinngess and
(Lailla), and Greg Dingess
(Beth) Dingess all of West
Virginia; twp grandchil-
dren, Joseph and Jordan;
mother of his children, Re-
becca Dingess; several
nieces and nephews, sever-
al great nieces and
nephews.
Leslie's body was laid
to rest at the family ceme-
tery in Cairo, WV January
30, 2009.


WE'RE DOING IT AGAIN!!!

Sd>Utrusdafki* .qf MG4 14t 2009


Kroder


Viola E. Kroder, age 81, of
Norwich, NY and formerly of
Madison, passed away peace-
fully on Monday, Jan. 26,
2009, at the Gilmour Health
Care Facility in Norwich.
Born in Holmesville on
Dec. 24, 1927, Viola was the
daughter of Jady and Goldie
(Davis) Blackman. She grad-
uated from Mt. Upton High
School with the Class of 1945
and then worked as a book-
keeper at NBT until May of
1946. She became secretary
to the president of Wilber
Bank in Oneonta and secre-
tary to the Operating Depart-
ment of NYSEG in Oneonta
until her retirement in 1981.
Viola will be remem-
bered by her many friends as
being "a little artistic." She
always thanked God for her
many blessings and tried to
live by the "Golden Rule."
On May 18, 1946, in the
Broad Street United
Methodist Church, Viola
married George W. Kroder.
George died on August 29,
1999.
She is survived by two
daughters and their hus-
bands, Joan and David
Downs of Bradford, PA and
Paula and Kenneth Lorenz of
Norwich; four grandchildren
and their spouses, Christo-
pher and Kimberly Downs of
Montoursvill6, PA, Todd and
Amy Downs, also living in
Pennsylvania, Sean Lorenz
of Norwich and Rachel
Lorenz, also of Norwich and
three great grandchildren,
Brendan, Justin and Madi-
son Downs. Viola was prede-
ceased by a sister, Jessie
Stevens.
A memorial service for
Viola was held at 2 p.m., on
Sunday, February 1, at the
Wilson Funeral Home.
Friends were invited to call
at the funeral home from 1:00
pm until the time of the ser-
vice. Burial will take place at
a later date in Mt. Hope
Cemetery
Contributions in memo-
ry of Viola may be made to
Hospice of Chenango County,
21 Hayes Street, Norwich, NY
13815 or to the Broad Street
United Methodist Church, 74
No. Broad Street, Norwich,
NY 13815.
Condolences may be sent
to the family by visiting the
Wilson Funeral Home Web
site at wilsonfh.com.


Pelot

Bellamy
Corbin Pelot Bellamy, age
73, originally of Greenville,
died in Thomasville, Ga., on
Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2009.
Funeral services were held
at 11 a.m., on Saturday, Jan. 31,
at Young Reaper Missionary
Baptist Church in Greenville
with burial at Bellamy Ceme-
tery
Mr. Bellamy was a retired
farmer who was a true out-
doorsman. His passions were
hunting and fishing and "liv-
ing off the land./' A lifelong
resident of Greenville, he had
lived in Thonfk'sifle for the
past six months with his
daughter-caretaker, Jackie,
and her family.
Treasuring his love and
memory are his daughters:
Josephine Stevenson of Jack-
sonville; Jacqueline (Tommy)
Freeman of Thomasville, Ga.;
Crystal Bellamy of Tallahas-
see; and Rose Smith of
Greenville; his son, Kris Pelot
Bellamy of Monticello; sisters,
Cobbie Lee Robinson of Orlan-
do; Rosa Lee Williams of Buffa-
lo, N.Y.; Yvonne Bellamy of
Dallas, Tex.; and Betty Jean
(Roger) Williams of Greenville;
brothers, Corbin Bellamy and
James Bellamy of Greenville,
Gladwell Bellamy of Chicago,
Ill.; 12 grandchildren; and a
host of nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends.


Florence

Fitch
Arlene Florence Fitch,
age 71, died on Wednesday,
January 28, 2009, in Madi-
son.
Mrs. Fitch was born in
Pottsville, PA on June
21,1937. She is the daughter
of the late Norman and
Thelma Shultz. She moved
to Madison in 2004 from
Cape Coral. She was a
homemaker.
She is survived by her
husband, Thomas Fitch of
Madison; two sons, Donald
Fitch of Madison, and Tom
Fitch of Ft. Myers; two
daughters, Denise Fitch of
Madison, and Dottie
Williams of Cape Coral; one
sister, Dottie Ullrich of Jer-
rettsville, MD; eight grand-
children; and one great-
grandchild.
She was predeceased by
her parents and a son,
David Fitch.


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6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 4, 2009



AROUND MADISON COUNTY



Twelve Powerful Words That Change Children Forever


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
To many parents, teachers and students,
"FCAT" is a four-letter word that should join
the ranks of its offensive four-letter cousins.
Some parents aggressively oppose it, especial-
ly all the pressure leading up to it, and the
stigma that comes from scoring poorly There
are some, however, that are learning to mas-
ter it and not sweat it'Fortunrately that group
now includes the faculty and staff of the
Madison County School District.
Larry Bell isn't yet a household name in
Madison County but his work soon will be.
Filling the First Baptist Church sanctuary to
capacity for his second of three scheduled
workshops with school visits in between -
Bell is bringing his branded style of teaching
and a lesson plan that has many teachers nat.
tionwide joining his "100% er" club a special
designation for teachers who have 100 percent
of their students passing the FCAT or compa--
rable testing.
In the second workshop, titled, "Closing
the Gap," Bell reveals, reviews, reinforces,
and then repeats the Twelve Powerful Words.
These common testing words, when perma-
nently woven into a student's educational fab-
ric, will fan the dimmest flame to brilliance,
especially when offered up in a classroom cul-
ture of high expectations.
This is not a simple joy ride or hurray ses-
sion, although Bell's attitude could warm the
coldest heart. Instead, it is the culmination of
his years of practice and study in every set-
ting imaginable. Really though, it's just a ba-


sic understanding of knowing where misun-
derstanding cause test-takers to tumble.


S; LARRY BELL
For example, consider the following
- twelve words:
Trace
Analyze
Infer
Evaluate
Formulate
Describe
Support
Explain
Summarize
Compare
Contrast
Predict
These common testing words are so typi-
cally misunderstood that students frequently


Daniel
..Adam





Graduates






USF
Madi4~oH Covuty 1~h Schoola aw DckCnca, ErLkA4da4v
recently graduated' from the UvUversity of South Flor(da/ n',
Ta4pa' w v h Bachelors of Sciex-ce' DerVee w v av focus in
AccowitC( Davielthe w1ovofJer-zy & ad'CelZtawAd*wy, the'
owners of the/ Deerwood& Invt c nd MadCisn Ca4npgrodund,
and' brother to-Robert Adcam, aw prom i t ma n aqe' thera-
plst Cin Ma diso-. DVa ie graduated al esemester early andt 's,
curretidy pursuix4ng hCi Master'Wk eree' li Ac Mgountm, alo-
attheU nvery ty ofSout FlorLda'c. Datleebhopesto- receisve'hk
CPA Wice~ e' as he& receivers hC- Ma4tery. DVaanLe ha akso- alt-
talCned4 a' highly coveted, T'ea-cery Assistant postLoni th- s e'-
meeter for a' Principlese of Fina4nco A ccou4t*%g claA. 1Kge
teacher two- claes- w v a' total of 62 tude Int a4ddttony,
DanmCe was- requested by a. weU-knowiw southeast reglon
aCcoutng' ffrnv, Cherry, Beaert, aId/ oad, to- part i-
pate' ivW their .wnmner ntern&~hp programn. Th4k wUl be/
DVatCeVs second/ wmwnewr Lnternhip wtIhthts cornpavy.

1 !:'


miss questions where these terms are used. In
other words, testers often fail because they
misunderstand the questions, not because
they don't understand the subject.
"Once students are introduced to the
Twelve Powerful Words, it is followed by the
'FAB 5,' where instructors and parents have
the student: Say the word; Define the word;
Spell the word; Use the word in a sentence;
and Ask the word in a question. There are
then 20 additional activities the program in-
troduces as well," Bell explained
'As the process is reinforced over time,
the student is literally transformed forever."
Bell added with a contagious confidence.
The writing prompt of the FCAT takes
place in Madison County on Feb. 10-12, with
Reading, Math and Science following in early


March. It is highly recommended that each
parent reinforce this effort by contacting
teachers and schools to get connected as soon
as possible.
The Larry Bell program is best known for
its ongoing accomplishments with "at-risk"
students. Since its launch, however, thou-
sands of students in a variety of settings have
been turned around by the entire package.
Many of their instructors will be gathering in
Orlando later this year where more 100%ers
will be recognized.
Bell expressed his sincere desire to have
the Madison District well represented at these
future celebrations. To which they replied,
"Yes we can!"
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Rutherford Foundation

Holds Fifth Annual Dinner

The Wilbur and Randy Rutherford Foundation fifth annual dinner and gun raffle
was held Saturday, January 24,2009, at the Rutherford Farm. This annual event was orig-
inally known as the "Father and Son Cookout" and consists of an abundant southern
meal of collard greens, combread, pork and rice, and corn on the cob. Boiled peanuts
serve as an appetizer. Each year, the foundation committee selects a "Daddy of the Yearl'
a gentleman from our community who serves as a role model to the younger generation
that follows. This year's recipients shared this honor; Lee Gordon, Gordon Tractor Conm-
pany, and the Honorable Judge, Edwin B. Browning, Jr. The event culminates with the
drawing for an engraved Winchester Select 3" Magnum 12 Gauge. This year's winner
was Frank Mercer.
The Foundation was established in memory of Wilbur Rutherford and his son Randy
Rutherford. The predominant purpose of the foundation is to provide academic schol-
arships to students in need of financial aid as a result of an unforeseen life-altering oc-
currence. Students interested in applying for a scholarship, should submit a 250 word eo-
say explaining their situation/educational goals no later than April 15th each year. I
Additional information and submission of the essays should be made to the guid-
ance office at Madison County High School. Scholarship award is based on need and are
for attendance at North Florida Community College.
The Rutherford Family would like to thank the Rutherford Foundation's Board of
Directors, the NFCC Foundation, and their friends and supporters throughout the
community for their hard work and numerous donations of their time, contributions of
food for the event, tickets for the gun raffle and of course, their monetary donations. Pt
is due to the efforts of many that this tradition continues!

These Hatters Are


Just Tickled Red


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Founded locally about six years ago
by now Queen Mother Betty Williams,
Madison Chapter of Red Hat Society
ladies are both young at heart and full of
fun when they get together whenever and
wherever the mood strikes. And striking
they are as they talk over tea, col-
lect for coffee or just simply 0
gather to gab in their red
hats and purple dresses,
causing more and more
ladies around the
globe to join their
cause.
Just what is the *
cause that drives
these women in gar-
ishly colored gear to
get together for gig-
gles, one might ask.
Well, just that, according ,
to Red Hat Society Madi- 0 (
son Chapter Queen Mother
Betty Williams.
"It's about getting together with a
bunch of ladies who are young at heart to
have fun," the Queen Mother enlight-
ened. "No dues, no duties, just relax and
have a good time."
Founding members for the locally


hatted society include Queen Mother Bet-
ty Williams, Lady-in-Waiting Myya
Valentine, Bunny Maultsby, Jane Comer,
Jean Brandies and Faye Browning.
Grouping together when they feel thf
urge, these and newer members who hayb
joined the just-let-go spirit drive group i,
their giggle inspiring attire to remember
the downers in life, like getting
,W, older, can always be offset
with a hearty guffaw.
Unfortunately nqt
JL.\ able to gather in tiMr
for this year's annu-
al convention held
in Tallahassee
March 6 through
9, Williams said
these ladies are
trying to gather
soon, none the less.
"We're thinking at
4 the Wild Plum some-
,, time in February,"
S Williams predicted. "We're
still working on it."
Donned in red hats and purple dres-
es, it is almost guaranteed these ladies
will stand out as they stand together
wherever they group. No pressures.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be
reached at tyrra@greenepublishing.com.


ATTENTION ALL RED HATTERS
MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR
MARCH 6 9, 2009
AND JOIN THE
TALLAHASSEE RED HATTERS
FOR THEIR ANNUAL CAPITAL CAPER
"A SOUTHWESTERN WEEKEND"
RAMADA CONFERENCE CENTER
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT
PAT TODD @ 850-562-6679 OR
E-MAIL PTodd95733@aol.com
Supported by:


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Wednesday, February 4, 2009 www.2reenepublishin2.com Madison County Carrier 7A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY



Rotary Continues Community Support


-By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
:, During their Jan. 28 weekly luncheon at St. Vincent's fel-
'lowship hall, the Madison Rotary Club demonstrated its ongoing
-commitment to personal, professional and community growth.
'The program included final preparations for the inaugural Fifth
-Saturday Farmers and Friends Festival, key recognition of a
rclub member, presentation of a donation to the North Florida
Community College Foundation, and a guest presentation re-
garding Relay for Life.
, The Fifth Saturday Farmers and Friends Festival is an on-
gboing club-sponsored project scheduled for those months that
have a fifth Saturday, the first of which occurred on Jan. 31.
These themed gatherings are being offered to stimulate local
"business and raise money for Rotary charities and projects.
The recent festival showcased a hunting and fishing theme.
The farming and agriculture element of this initial event was
limited due to the season, although excitement regarding the fu-
ture prospects of the project was certainly present.
For decades, dedicated Rotarians have been recognized by
their contributions, financial and otherwise. One of the most re-
spected designations that can be bestowed from these is becom-


ety. Held in spring each year, the event raises money with an
eighteen hour walk-a-thon that includes a variety of entertain-
ment, and games, but mostly survivor support. Teams campout
and walk continually around the track at the Madison County
High School football field.
Relay for Life is much more than a fundraiser, however, as it
not only raises awareness of cancer, but also supports the sur-
vivors of cancer. Gorgeous lumanaria will be placed along the
track as the evening closes to honor loved ones who are survivors
of cancer, as well as to remember those who have been lost.
"Everybody stand up," Newman asked. "Now, if you or your
spouse have been touched by cancer, please sit down. Now,
everybody who has had a family member who was touched by
cancer sit down. Lastly, everybody who has a friend or loved one
touched by cancer, please sit down."
In the end, all were sitting. "That's how many are touched
by cancer. It's everybody," Newman added.
The American Cancer Society raises more dollars for re-
search than any other organization dedicated to these types of
medical research. Numerous Nobel Prize winning medical find-
ings, among other very worthwhile efforts, have emerged from
the organization's ongoing activities. These strides are made


possible from fundraising like Relay for Life.
ACS representative Kristina Downer passed out informa-
tional pamphlets to the very receptive audience, while Newman
spoke. In preparation for the spring gathering, a mini-relay, ti-
tled "Purple Party," is scheduled for Feb. 12 at Four Freedoms
Park.
"This will give everyone that isn't familiar with Relay for
Life a chance to become familiar with the event, creating more
awareness and participation," Newman went on to say.
The American Cancer Society has several aggressive goals
to be achieved by the year 2015: reduce the incidence of cancer
by 25 percent, reduce mortality by 50 percent, and improve the
quality of life for cancer patients and their families.
With support from organizations like the Madison Rotary
Club and events like Relay for Life, these goals may very well be-
come reality,
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael'@greene
publishing.com. :


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Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, January 28, 2009
Madison Rotary President Alston Kelley (far left) and guest sponsor Manning Hicks (far right) welcome Lori New-
man and Kristina Downer (center, left to right) who urged all to support the Relay for Life program sponsored by the
'American Cancer Society.


ing a Paul Harris Fellow, named for the Founder of Rotary In-
ternational. In this instance, the recognition went to Wayne
.onger, a respected clinical psychologist working out of Talla-
hassee. Members and guests, including wife Alicia, congratulat-
,e6 Conger for this notable club milestone.
- Madison Rotary's commitment to education was also com-
mended at the meeting following their $1,000 donation to the
North Florida Community College Foundation. Gina Ruther-
'ford, who accepted the donation on behalf of the college,
thanked the club for their consistent support. NFCC and Madi-
.sh Rotary Club Past President, Morris Steen, established a no-
hable legacy raising funds and awareness for the college
throughout the region, which current Rotary President Alston
,Kelley is pleased to maintain as a club priority.
.)I Following the several presentations, guest speaker Lori
14ewman spoke to the group about Relay for Life, a very popular
ffndraising program sponsored by the American Cancer Soci-


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Wednesday, February 4, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 9A



BRIDAL GUIDE


Tux, Gowns & Wedding ,
De'cor Rentals to meet your
A ,needs for that special day. o / o
Also socializing in efO f, /ey, owner
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Wedding

I 1
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Mrf.and Mrs. Burbba Greene of
Madison are pleased to announce the
upcoming marriage of their daughter, ,
Jennifer Brooke Greene, to John Joseph
Sabo, son of Jack and Anne Sabo of
Charleston, S.C.
Jennifer is a 1999 graduate of ',
Madison County High School and a
2000 graduate of North Florida Com- ,
munity College. In 2004, she received
her master's degree in political science
from Florida State University. She is
currently employed with RB Oppen- ,
heim Associates in Tallahassee as an
account manager. Her paternal grand-
parents are the late T.H. and Cora Lee
Greene of Madison. Her maternal
grandparents are the late Eladio and
Dominga Hernandez of Pensacola.
Johnny is a 2004 graduate of
Clemson University with a degree in
forestry. He is currently employed in
with the Division of Forestry as an op-
erations administrator in Panama
City.
His paternal grandparents are the ,
late John and Olga Sabo and his ma-
ternal grandparents are the late John
and Betty Cope of South Carolina.
Jennifer and Johnny will exchange
vows during an intimate ceremony on
Feb. 21, at Maclay Gardens in Talla-
hassee.
They will reside in Panama City.


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I Wedding


Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence and Emma
Franklin of Pinetta are proud to an-
nounce the engagement and forth
coming wedding of their daughter, Er-
ica Jenine Franklin, to Tommie Lee
Jones, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Tommie
Lee and Angela Jones, Sr., of Leesburg.
The bride-elect is a graduate of
Madison County High School and is
employed by First Health Services as a
certified pharmacy technician for
Florida Medicaid, Tallahassee.
The groom-elect is a graduate of
Leesburg High School and is em-
ployed by Pitney-Bowes in Tallahas-
see.
The wedding ceremony and recep-
tion will take place, Saturday, April
18, at 2 p.m., at Divine Events, in
Madison.
& Formal invitations will be sent.


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"' Leroy and Darlene Buchanan and
' Michael and Judy Smith of Madison ,
would like to announce the upcoming
marriage of their daughter, Cassey Lee ,
Lenora Smith, to Matthew Roy An-
drews.'
The bride-elect is the granddaughter :,
of Minnie Lee and the late Enoch New- ',
', born and Louise and Robert Smith of ,
Madison.
The groom-elect is the son of
Michael and Judy Andrews of
Bryceville. His grandparents are
Bert and Helen Sturdevant of Orange
Park and the late Roy and Grace An-
drews of Jacksonville.
Cassey is a graduate of Madison
County High School and recieved her
associate in science degree in nursing
from North Florida Community Col-
lege. She is currently employed at Madi-
son County Clerk of the Courts.
Matthew is a graduate of West Nas-
sau County High School. He is currently
working as an apprentice electrician in
*, Valdosta, Ga., where he is employed by
' A&M Electric. ,
' The wedding ceremony will take
' place on Saturday, April 4, at 5:00 pm,
at Grace Presbyterian Church, in Madi-
son, with a reception immediately fol-
lowing at the Madison Country Club.
No local invitations will be sent. The
couple wishes to invite all family and
friends to celebrate their special day.




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10A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 4, 2009




SPORTS


Plaines' Basketball Career Honored


JV COWGIRLS


By Fran Hunt
Special from the
Monticello News
Aucilla Christian
Academy senior Mallory
Plaines, 17, was honored
last week for having an ex-
ceptional high school bas-
ketball career while repre-
senting Aucilla on the
hardwood.
Following the game
against Georgia Christian,
Thursday, Jan. 22, Coach
Daryl Adams presented
Plaines with a plaque for
achieving her high school
career 1,000th point dur-
ing the game against Geor-
gia Christian. "Mallory hit
the 1,000-point mark after
she stole the ball and she
bucketed with just 20 sec-
onds left on the clock,"
said Adams.
"A high school student
reaching their 1,000th
point is something you
don't see very much," said*
Adams. There are very few
players who play varsity
for all four years during,
their high school career."
Adams said the last
Aucilla player who
reached the 1,000-point
mark was Becky Murphy
in 1999.
He added that Plaines
had been a starter for the
Aucilla varsity Lady War-


By Fran Hunt
Special from the
Monticello News
The Aucilla Christian'
Academy varsity War-
riors climbed to a 3-9 sea-
son after downing Geor-
gia Christian Jan. 22, 42-
35.
The Warriors hit 9 of
33 (27 percent) from the
field, 6 of 21 (29 percent)
from the three-point zone
and 6 of 14 (43 percent)
from the free-throw line.
They also snagged 14
assists, 15 offensive and 27
defensive rebounds, 12
block/steals and 21
turnovers.
Stephen Dollar
dropped in 2 of 8 (25 per-
cent) from the field, 2 of 3
(67 percent) from the
three-point zone and 1 of 4
(25 percent) from the free-
throw line. Dollar had 5 as-
sists, 1 offensive and 1 de-
fensive rebound, 4
block/steals and 3
turnovers.
Luke Witmer led the
Aucilla scoreboard with 4
of 8 (50 percent) from the
field, 2 of 10 (20 percent)
from the three-point zone



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riors for the past four
years, during which time
she averaged at least 10
points per game.
"Mallory has led the
team in every category for
the past four years, includ-
ing rebounds," said
Adams.
Plaines has proven to
be such a threat on the
hardwood, that, once dif-
ferent teams know of her
and her ability, they man-
up on her, attempting to
apply as much pressure as
they possibly can. "But
Mallory handles the pres-
sure pretty well," said
Adams.
"She has been a team
leader-a go-to girl on of-
fensive plays," he
added. "She hustles, she's
aggressive, and she is the
team captain this year,
which I am pretty sure led
to much of this year's suc-
cess (18-3)," said Adams.
During her entire high
school basketball career,
Plaines has averaged 12.2
points per game, 9.2 re-
bounds per game, 5.1 as-
sists per game, 3.2 steals
per game, and averages 60
percent form the free-
throw line.
Adams added that,
about two weeks ago, a
coach from Andrew Col-


and 3 of 5 (60 percent) from
the free-throw line for a to-
tal of 17 points. He also
had 2 assists, 3 offensive
and 7 defensive rebounds,
4 block/steals and 3
turnovers.
Alex Dunkle missed 5
from the field, missed 1
from the three-point zone
and bucketed 2 of 3 (67 per-
cent) from the free-throw
line. He had 3 assists, 1 de-
fensive rebound and 7
turnovers.
John Stephens netted 2
of 6 (33 percent) from the
field and had 2 assists, 3
defensive rebounds, 1
block/steal and 2
turnovers.
Clark Christy bucket-
ed 2 of 2 (100 percent) from
the field but missed 2 from
the free-throw line.
Christy had 1 assist, 7 of-
fensive and 6 defensive re-
bounds, 1 block/steal and 2
turnovers.
Joe Mizell had 2 offen-
sive rebounds and 2
turnovers; Randy Perry
hit 1 of 2 (50 percent) from
the field for 2 points and
had 4 defensive rebounds,
1 block/steal and 1
turnover; Brandon Dun-
bar missed 1 from the field
and had 1 offensive and 2
defensive rebounds, 1
block/steal and 1
turnover; Brandon Dar-
nell had 1 defensive re-
bound; and Matthew Har-
rington missed 7 from the
field and 1 from the three-
point zone with 1 assist,
and 1 offensive and 1 de-
fensive rebound.


WIN ONE, LOSE TWO


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, January 22, 2009
Aucilla Christian Academy senior Mallory Plaines
scored her 1,000th point during the Lady Warriors' Jan.
22 game against Georgia Christian. Here, Coach Daryl
Adams presents Plaines with a plaque.


lege, in Georgia, was at the
school observing Plaines
on the hardwood and want-
ing to acquire her skills for
that school's basketball
team. "I'm not sure, but I
think Mallory is probably


kicking around the idea of
attending the Alma Mater
of her parents, Auburn
University," said Adams.
Plaines is the daughter
of Marsha and Bobby
Plaines.


Cowboy Season Winds Down


By Eddie Richie
MCHS Varsity and JV Bas-
ketball Coach
Varsity Boys
January 23
Madison 61
Hamilton 54
Record 12-8 (4-2 Dis-
trict 3-3A)
January 24
Madison 79
Suwannee 69
The Madison County
Cowboys clinched the sec-
ond seed for the district
tournament by beating
Hamilton County Friday,
Jan. 23, 61-54. It was a close
game throughout, as both
teams played a very tough
and physical game.
DeAngelo Tucker led
Madison's scoring with 13
points, followed by Jacobbi
and Mar'Terrius McDaniel
with 11 each. Jacobbi Mc-
Daniel and Solomon Grif-
fin shared the rebounding
duties with 6 each. They
both had great rebounding
efforts in the second half,
which helped seal the vic-
tory.
Jermaine Hari, who
had 9 points through three
quarters, fell awkwardly
and was scheduled to be
checked out by doctors at
TOC on Monday for a pos-
sible severe knee injury
Chris McHargue and
two big first half threes
and ended the game with 8
points. Vincent Bailey led
all scores with 19 for
Hamilton.
Having just played a
tough match up the night
before at Central against
Hamilton, Saturday night,
the Cowboys had to get
ready to go to Live Oak and
battle a hungry team.
Madison pulled out a
10-point victory, but there


were times when it was
much closer.
The Cowboys were up
by 16 at one point. Live Oak
just would not give up and
continued to draw fouls
and hit their free throws.
DeAngelo Tucker had
a career high, scoring 32
points-21 in the first half
alone. He also added 6
boards, 7 steals and 6 as-
sists. Jacobbi McDaniel
had another double-double,
with 16 points and 12 re-
bounds. Chris McHargue
hit his first three 3-point-
ers and finished with 9
points, while battling foul
trouble. He did well defen-
sively. filling in for Jer-
maine Hart, who is out
with a knee injury, grab-
bing 3 boards and 4 steals.
Joseph Lowe did a
great job as well, filling in
for Solomon Griffin, who
was in foul trouble, and
Jordan Johnson, who was
out with an ankle injury
Lowe had 6 points, 3 re-
bounds and 2 steals.
Mar'terrius McDaniel
found his scoring niche
again, with 12 points, and
going perfect from the free-
throw line.
The Cowboys will have
a third rematch with
Hamilton on Feb. 13, in the
first round of the district
playoffs, which will be held
at Florida High. The game
will be at 6 p.m. The win-
ner of that game goes on to
play for the district cham-
pionship on Feb. 14, and
also gets and automatic
spot in the playoffs. The
loser of the Friday the 13th
game will have their sea-
son end abruptly. Madison
has not made the playoffs
since 2003, and has not won
district since '97.


By Tamika Brown
MCHS JV Girls Basketball
Coach
January 22
Madison 19
Godby 20
Jan. 22, the Madison
County High School JV
Cowgirls faced off against'
the Godby High Cougars.
The Cowgirls were
outscored by J. Parker of
the Godby Cougars. Park-
er had 16 points for the
night. She scored 8 points
in the third quarter, which
put them up by 1.
Forward Canissia Grif-


ensure that the team kept
the lead and closed the
game with a 47-29 victory
over the lady Trojans.
Stat Leaders:
Bri Davis ,#21: :
points
Abby Blanton #23:1 .
points -
Skyler Hanna #13::4;
points
Jawonda Boynton #25,;
16 points
Canissia Griffin #30: ,
points
Reiva Copeland #22: 2
points
Erika Hunter #11:"


tin contribute 5 points. points
Guard Skyler Hanna January 24
scored 2 points. Center Ja- Madison 32 ,4
wonda Boynton scored 5 Suwannee 47 :-
points and Erika Hunter The Suwannee County)
had 3 points. The score at JV Lady Bulldogs beat the,
the end of the first was 6-0, Madison JV Cowgirls 47-39
with Madison in the lead. Jan. 24. K. Loston led the
The JV Lady Cougars Bulldogs with 23 points.,
came back in the third The Cowgirls had trou-
quarter and outscored the ble keeping up with the of-
Cowgirls by 7 points after fense. Canissia Griffin led
halftime, which put them the Cowgirls with 12
up 14-13. Cowgirl Erika points in the low post. Ja*
Hunter went to the free- wonda Boynton and B1i
throw line with 3 seconds Davis, both had 6 point
on the clock. She was un- Jessica Clark-Solom$
able to score and the came up with 4 points .A
Cougars won 20-19. the first quarter. Botlh
Stat Leaders: Hannah Morris and'
Bri Davis #21: 4 points Brooke Turner coui
Skyler Hanna #13: 2 tribute 2 points. In thi
points first quarter, the CowgiZ
Jawonda Boynton #25: had the lead 12-6.
5 points' Suwanee County.
Canissia Griffin #30: 5 outscored the Cowgirls by
points 8 points at the end of the
Erika Hunter #11: 3 second quarter. By the
points third quarter, the Cowgirls
January 23 were down 40-28 and nevpe
Madison 47 regained their defensia
Hamilton 29 composer. The Cowgirllh
The MCHS JV Cow- lost 47-32. JV Cowgirls are.
girls conquered the Hamil- 4-2 in district games.
ton High Lady Trojans Fri- Stat Leaders:
day, Jan. 23. Bri Davis #21: 6 points
Center Jawonda Boyn- Jawonda Boynton #25;v
ton drove down in the paint 6 points
to lead the Cowgirls with 16 Canissia Griffin ss0k:
points. Point guard Bri 12 points .
. Davis contributed 11 points Jessica Clark-Solomoin
on fast breaks. Shooting #14: 4 points
guard Abigail Blanton got Hannah Morris #40: 2
into foul trouble, but man- points
aged to hit one 3-point shot Brooke Turner #31:,2
in the first quarter. For- point
ward Canissia Griffin got Thoughts from Codna
inside to draw a couple of Brown:
fouls and to put up 8 points "If you stick to it,"
in the paint as well. Guards you'll get through it."
Erika Hunter (4), Skyler Thanks to everyone
Hanna (4) and Reiva who came out and suppo
Copeland contributed a to- ed the basketball tear
tal of 9 points. Post players this year. We'll be bag
Hannah Morris and Jessi- next year stronger, wiser
ca Clark Solomon played better and ready for tha
defense well in the paint to new season.



ACA JV BASEBALL SCHEDULE


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Wednesday, February 4, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11A




SCHOOL & EDUCATION


HONORS


Sieene Publishing, Inc. Photos by Emerald Greene, January 29, 2009


Angela McCune, escorted by her father, David Mc-
tune.


, Rhegan Clark, escorted by her mother, Rhea Fore-
Oan.


Erin Kelly, escorted by her mother, Jeanna Kelly.


Savannah Reams, escorted by her parents, Kim and
Joe Reams.


Savannah Williams, escorted by her mother, Cindy
Wainwright.


- Chelsea Dobson, escorted by her parents, Ronda and
T~rry Dobson.


Randy Perry, escorted by his parents, Tami and Rob-
je Perry.


STUDENTS


By Fran Hunt
Special from the
Monticello News
Aucilla seniors who
participated in basketball,
cheerleading and cross-
country were honored
mid-court, Thursday, Jan.
29, during halftime in the
game against Hamilton
County
The Aucilla Athletic
Boosters sponsored the
special recognition for se-
niors and their families to
commemorate the last
time the seniors will play
or cheer in Aucilla's gym
as a team. The seniors and
their families were
thanked for the commit-
ment they made. to the
ACA athletic program.
The recognition be-
gan with the cross-coun-
try runners. During their
seven years of participa-
tion on the cross-country
team, the girls have repre-
sented Aucilla five times
at the State Champi-
onship Meet.
Angela McCune was
escorted by her father,
David McCune, of
Greenville. She has been
running for ACA's cross-
.country team for seven
years. After she gradu-
ates, she plans to attend
North Florida Communi-
ty College.
Michaela Roccanti is,
the daughter of Richard
and Kim Roccanti, of Tal-
lahassee. She has been
running for Aucilla's
cross-country team for
seven years and also
served as its captain. In
the fall, she will be attend-
ing Tallahassee Commu-
nity College.
Each of the girls was
then presented with a
team portrait auto-
graphed by all of their
team members.
Cheerleaders honored
included Rhegan Clark,
escorted by her mother,
Rhea Forehand, of Lam-
ont. She has been a cheer-
leader at Aucilla Christ-
ian Academy for two
years. After graduation,
she plans to attend Talla-
hassee Community Col-
lege's nursing program.
Kasey Joiner is the
daughter of Don and Tri-
cia Joiner, of Monticello.
She has been an Aucilla
cheerleader for five years.
She plans to attend South-
west Georgia Technical
College to pursue a career
in pediatric nursing after
she graduates.
Erin Kelly is the
daughter of Jeanna Kelly,
of Monticello, and Ken
Kelly, of Jesup, Ga. Her
mother escorted her. She
is captain of Aucilla's
cheerleading squad and
has been cheering for six
years. After graduation,
she will attend Southwest
Georgia Technical College
to pursue a career in radi-
ology
Katelyn Levine was
escorted by her parents,
Dale Levine and Mark
Levine, of Tallahassee.
She has been cheering for
Aucilla for six years. In
the fall, she will attend the
University of South Flori-
da, pursuing a law degree.
Savannah Reams is
the daughter of Kim and
Joe Reams, of Greenville.
She has been a cheer-
header for ACA for five
years. After graduation,
she is planning to attend
college to obtain a mas-
ter's degree in early child-
hood education.
Each of the young


ladies was presented with


ON


a megaphone signed by
their teammates.
There were two girls
who served Aucilla both
as a cheerleaders and as
basketball players.
Mallory Plaines, who
was accompanied by her
parents, Marsha and Bob-
by Plaines, of Monticello,
was one such girl. She has
been a cheerleader for
three years and is co-cap-
tain of the team. She is
also captain of the Aucilla
girl's varsity basketball
team and has played bas-
ketball for six years. After
graduation, she plans to
attend Auburn University
to pursue a degree in ei-
ther early childhood edu-
cation or sports medicine.
Savannah Williams,
the other dual-role girl, is
the daughter of Cindy and
the late Doug Wainwright,
of Monticello, and Conrad
Williams, of Lake Park,
Ga. Her mother, Cindy, es-
corted her. She has been
both a cheerleader and
basketball player at Aucil-
la Christian Academy for
six years. In the fall, she
will attend Florida State
University, seeking a de-
gree in optometry.
Both girls were pre-
sented with a megaphone
autographed by team
members, and a basket-
ball autographed by team-
mates.
Additional seniors
who served on the girl's
basketball team included
Jodie Bradford, who was
accompanied by her par-
ents, Pat Bradford, of
Quitman, Ga., and James
Bradford, of Morven, Ga.
She has been playing bas-
ketball for Aucilla for six
years. After graduation,
Jodie will be attending
Valdosta Technical Col-
lege, seeking a degree as
an X-ray technician.
Chelsea Dobson was
accompanied by her par-
ents, Ronda and Terry
Dobson, of Monticello.
She has been a basketball
player for ACA for four
years. She will attend
North Florida Communi-
ty College in the fall to fin-
ish her A.A. degree, fol-
lowed by Valdosta State
University, where she will
seek a degree in dental hy-
giene.
Senior recognition
ended with the boy's bas-
ketball players. Each
young man has served as
captain of the basketball
team at various times
throughout the season.
Stephen Dollar is the
son of Theresa and
Richard Dollar, of Monti-
cello. He has been a bas-
ketball player at Aucilla
for five years. After he
graduates, he will attend
Tallahassee Community
College, seeking a degree
in sports medicine.
Randy Perry was ac-
companied by his parents,
Tami and Robbie Perry, of
Lamont. This was his
first year playing basket-
ball for ACA. After gradu-
ation, he plans to seek a
degree in business.
Luke Witmer was ac-
companied by his parents,
Georgia Bellegarde, of
Greenville, and Buddy
Witmer, of Greenville.
Luke has played basket-
ball for Aucilla for six
years. In the fall, he will
attend Florida State Uni-
versity to pursue a mas-
ter's degree in business.
The basketball players
were each presented with


a basketball signed by
their teammates.


SENbO NIqHT

Greene Publishing, Inc. Photos by Emerald Greene, January 29, 2009


Michaela Roccanti, escorted by her parents, Richard
and Kim Roccanti.


Joiner.


Katelyn Levine, escorted by her parents, Dale Levine
and Mark Levine.


Mallory Plaines, escorted by her parents, Marsha and
Bobby Plaines.


Jodie Bradford, escorted by her parents, Pat Bradford
and James Bradford.













Stephen Dollar, escorted by his parents, Theresa and
Richard Dollar.


Luke Witmer, escorted by his parents, Georgia Belle-
garde and Buddy Witmer.


rAC








12A Madison County Carrier


Ol Emes Cont Bft



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Wednesday, February 4, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 13A




MONEY & FINANCE




Stimulus Dollars Coming To Florida


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
If the new administra-
tion's recommended stim-
ulus package passes Con-
gress, Florida could get
$4.25 billion over two
years to help expand med-
ical services for the state's
poor. In a study released
from Families USA, a
healthcare consumer ad-
vocacy group, researchers
say that provisions of the
proposal could provide $87
billion to relieve state
Medicaid programs, in-
cluding $4.25 billion for
Florida through 2010.
Based on projections
of the Bureau of Econom-
ic Analysis, the Medicaid
portion of the stimulus
package could create
42,100 jobs in Florida that


would add $1.5 billion in
wages. During the recent
special budget session of
the state legislature, law-


makers considered dip-
ping into the Lawton
Chiles Endowment Fund -
which was intended to
fund healthcare needs for
poor kids and the elderly -
to cover the state's budget
deficit in many areas, in-
cluding those not involv-
ing healthcare.
In the end, the legisla-
tors postponed taking


money from the Chiles
fund until later this year,
hoping that some federal
stimulus money could be


used instead. They did,
however, recommend that
any federal economic
stimulus funds be trans-
ferred to the General Rev-
enue Fund to the extent
permissible by federal re-
quirements. General Rev-
enue money can be used
for any purpose, not neces-
sarily connected with
healthcare. In either case,


such a move would mean
less money would be need-
ed from the Chiles fund to
cover the budget deficit.
The budget that did
pass the state cut $100 mil-
lion from Medicaid reim-
bursements to hospitals
instead. The budget said
increased Medicaid funds
from the federal stimulus
package should be used to
reduce the state's pay-
ments to Medicaid by an
equal amount or re-instate
hospital cuts, meaning
programs might not be ex-
panded as the new admin-
istration intended.
"This just doesn't
make sense,' says Laura
Goodhue of Florida
CHAIN, another consumer
advocacy group. "That
money is needed now for


the poor."
State Senator Nan
Rich, a Democrat from We-
ston, said she's confident
that Congress will put
"some accountability that
the funds be used in cer-
tain ways."
In a conference call
with journalists, Families
USA Executive Director
Ron Pollack agreed, say-
ing the new Medicaid dol-
lars could have a "pro-
found impact" on health-
care needs and state
economies if applied cor-
rectly He did warn that in
these economic times,
"Medicaid is a clear target
for cutbacks."
The Medically Needy


program, a state program
intended for serious med-
ical needs is scheduled to
expire this year as well. To
maintain the program, the
stimulus bill has a provi-
sion that requires states
keep their eligibility re-
quirements they had as of
July 1 if they want to re-
ceive the Medicaid money
Rich said the provi-
sion could guarantee the
future of several other
Medicaid programs in
Florida, including those
for the disabled and per-
sons needing dental, hear-
ing or vision services.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Unexpected Expenses Don't Have To Bust Your Budget


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Everybody has irregu-
lar expenses that are often
referred to as "unexpect-
ed." Think about it; is that
flat tire really unexpected?


Don't all cars need repairs
and maintenance?
The solution; start
counting on the car break-
ing down instead of hop-
ing it doesn't. Of course,
the car isn't the only area


Sweeten This Valentine's Day
With Financial Gifts


Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones


You could give flowers. You could give candy. You
could give jewelry, a Watch or a gift certificate.
They're all fine Valentine's Day presents, and your
recipient would appreciate any of them. But this year,
why not go beyond the usual gifts and give your
valentine something that can sweeten the rest of the
year and beyond? Specifically, why not give a
financial gift?
Of course, you can always write out a check, or stick
some money in a card. But why not think "outside
the box" a little bit?
Here are some possibilities to consider:
Give stocks. You might want to give shares of
stock in a company that makes products favored by
your loved one. As an alternative to buying stocks,
you could give some shares of your own. You'll need
to know what you origi nally paid for the stock (its tax
basis), how long you've held it and its fair market
value at the date of the gift. The recipient will need
this information to determine gains or losses when
he or she sells the stock. (You'll also need to deter-
mine if you have to pay gift taxes. You can give up to
$13,000 per year, free of gift taxes, to as many peo-
ple as you want.)
Give a savings bond. You might think that U.S.
government savings bonds were a quaint relic of the
past, but they're still around. Your valentine might
appreciate a low-risk, government-backed bond that
pays a guaranteed rate of interest. Plus, you can buy
a Series EE bond for as little as $50 or as much as
$5,000 (the limit for a calendar year).
Contribute to an IRA. The IRA contribution limit
for 2009 is $5,000. Investors who are 50 or older can
also make a "catch-up" contribution of an additional
$1,000. So, if your valentine hasn't fully funded his or
her IRA for this year, you can help. While you can't
put money directly into someone else's-IRA, you can
write a check for that purpose. Because of their tax
advantages, IRAs are great retirement-savings vehi-
cles, so they are well worth funding. (Traditional IRAs
grow tax-deferred; Roth IRAs grow tax-free, provided
the investor has had the account for at least five
years and is 59-1/2 or older.)
Make a charitable gift in your valentine's
name. Your loved one, like many people, probably
supports a variety of social and charitable organiza-
tions. By making a donation to one of these groups
in your valentine's name, you can add a special
meaning to this Valentine's Day. At the same time,
you'll be giving yourself a little valentine, because
you may be able to claim a tax deduction for your
charitable gift. In fact, if you give an asset, such as a
stock, which has appreciated in value, you'll get an
extra tax break because you won't be responsible for
capital gains when the charity eventually sells the
stock.

By making any of these gifts, you'll show your valen-
tine that you truly care about the most important part
of his or her life the future.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


EdwardJones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


to remember like this in
household budgeting.
Hoping and praying
that the hot water heater,
washer, dryer or some oth-
er major appliance doesn't
need to be repaired or re-
placed is okay. The Lord
does care, but history tells
us that He expects us to as-
sume the role of custodian
Home maintenance is
always a factor in finances.
Even renters have some
home-related expenses
waiting to creep up. These
are just a few examples of
expenses that are common
but not budgeted. Consider
these others:
Taxes-Property, Fed-
eral and State-if there is
going to be taxes owed to
Uncle Sam, prepare for it.
For a home or other prop-
erty investment, prepare
for the costs. Don't scram-
ble at the last minute to
come up with enough to
pay obligations if at all
possible.
Clothing-Try to avoid
letting clothes, especially
for the kids, rob thousands
in only a few years. Most
dwell on appearance, but it
seldom requires expensive
clothes to be good. Make a
clothing budget and keep
it.
School Supplies-This
is another one that just
can't be omitted with kids.
Pet Care-Pet care in-
volves significant expens-
es like vaccinations, flea
control, veterinarian and
food.
Gifts-Friends, family
and kids understand the
unrealistic demands of
the holidays. Best advice is
to set strict limits and be a
smart shopper. Seek out
the bargains and buy
when it's a deal-even if
it's months ahead of time.
Medical-Unless lucky,
there will be medical ex-
penses over and above the
cost of health insurance;
co-pays for doctors and
medicines, -over-the-
counter medications, den-
tal and eye care expenses.
Cigarettes-Most
smokers are victims of an
addiction they couldn't
predict, but at five percent
or more of your total bud-
get, it can break your
pocketbook like it breaks
your body Call 1-877-U-
CAN-NOW for an alterna-
tive.
Vacation-Get inven-
tive if income is limited.
Emergency Fund-An
emergency in this case
should be limited to an ac-
tual unexpected occur-
rence. Again, this isn't the
water pump on the car. A
real emergency might in-
clude; loss of income, se-


vere illness or death in the
family Although all hope
such occurrences never
happen, sometimes its im-
possible to escape these
unfortunate events. Try to
set aside a specific
amount, no matter how lit-
tle, each month in an
emergency fund to eventu-
ally equal at least three to
six months of current in-
come.
Living Above Your
Means-This is simply
spending more than
earned. When funds are
not set aside for variable
expenses and emergencies,
most turn to credit cards
to bail out. Spending more
than earned is a sure sign
that trouble is just a mat-
ter of time.
Eating Out, Lunch or
Dinner-This will make
meunpopular with my bel-
ly-challenged crew. Work-
ers that earn $8 or $10 an
hour regularly eat out at
lunch. A cost of $5 or more
for a meal is common. Do
the math. At forty hours
worked weekly, gross pay
before Social Security,
Medicare and any taxes is
$320 ($8 x 40). At $6 for
lunch-multiplied by five
days a week-equals $30
per week. That's almost 10
percent of all your money
for five weekday meals.
-Solution-Start by
putting aside five percent
... right off the top. Just do
it if at all possible and be-
gin a simple budget. If
you're still short, at least
Grandma will know you're
doing everything possible
when you ask for her for
help.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


0 4i Exemption thresholds were supposed to protect middle-
inoome taxpayers from the alternative minimum tax
(AMT), but these amounts are not adjusted for infla-
tion. In recent years, Congress has "patched" the AMT
problem by increasing the exemption amount one year at
a time. The 2008 AMT patch raised the exemption for 2008
to $46,200 for single filers and to $69,950 for joint filers.

I SCHOELLES
ASSOCIATES, INC
439 SW RANGE AVE MADISON, FL 32340 850-9734353






424 West Base Street Madison, Florida 32340


Phone 850.973.2600


* Fax 850.973.2606


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850-973-8714
fax 850-973-8723
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14A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 4, 2009



HEALTH & NUTRITION



Study Links Teen Smoking To Adult Depression


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A recent press release
from Florida State Univer-
sity noted, "Teenagers
who smoke could be set-
ting themselves Up for de-
pression later in life."
According to the
groundbreaking study,
Psychology Professor Car-
los Bolanos and a'team of


researchers found that
nicotine given to adoles-
cent rats induced a depres-
sion-like state character-
ized by a lack of pleasure
and heightened sensitivity
to stress in their adult
lives. The findings, pub-
lished online in the jour-
nal Neuropsychopharma-
cology, suggest that the
same may be true for hu-


Question: My denture is cracking down
the middle. I have glued it with super glue and
the crack keeps getting bigger and bigger.
What should I do?

Answer: I have seen this so many times. The
patients lament that "all I am eating is soft foods
and sandwiches, what else can I do?" No, you
don't need to go on a liquid diet like Ensure. Hard
food is not causing the problem.

The trouble is the gums under the denture have
dissolved unevenly. Typically the gums on each
side of your mouth dissolve and the roof of the
mouth does not. When the gums resorb the
denture develops a loose fit in the mouth and rocks
back and forth like a see-saw. Eventually the
see-saw will break along the fulcrum line in the roof
of the mouth.

If this sounds like you, loose dentures with a
quarter cup of adhesive inside, it is time to get
them fixed. Ask your dentists to refit your dentures
to your mouth. A dentist can do something called
a reline which will fill in the loose spots with fresh
acrylic and make the dentures good as new.

Roderick K Shaw III, DMD
Let us feature your questions. Contact us-at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqtnail.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to.answering your
questions about the Art .and Science of
Dentistry


mans.
"This study is unique
because it is the first one
to show that nicotine expo-
sure early in life can have
long-term neurobiological
consequences evidenced
in mood disorders,"
Bolanos said. "In addition,
the study indicates that
even brief exposure to
nicotine increases risk for
mood disorders later in
life."
Researchers injected
adolescent rats twice daily
with either nicotine or
saline for 15 days. After
the treatment period end-
ed, they subjected the rats
to several, experiments de-
signed to find out how
they would react to stress-
ful situations as well as
how they would respond to
the offering of rewards.
The study continues,
"The rats that were ex-
posed to nicotine engaged
in behaviors symptomatic
of depression and anxiety,
including repetitive
grooming, decreased con-
sumption of rewards of-
fered in the form of sug-
ary drinks and becoming
immobile in stressful situ-
ations instead of engaging
in typical escape-like be-
haviors. The researchers
were able to alleviate the
rats' symptoms with anti-
depressant drugs or, ironi-
cally, more nicotine."
Interestingly, adult ro-
dents that were exposed to
the same nicotine regimen
as the adolescents did not
display depression-like
traits. It is not known ex-
actly how nicotine works
on the brain and nervous
system to induce these ef-
fects, but exposure has
toxic effects in, several
brain regions and neuro-
transmitter systems at dis-
tinct periods of develop-
ment. Because various
neurotransmitter systems
in the brain continue to
develop throughout ado-
lescence, the researchers
theorize that nicotine may
negatively influence these
systems resulting in al-
tered functionality later in


life. The study's findings
underscore the need for
further research into how
this process occurs.
, Scientists have long
known there is a connec-
tion between smoking and
mood disorders, but they
have not been able to say
for sure that one causes
the other because there
are so many factors influ-
encing human behavior.
This study provides sup-
port for the idea that
smoking can induce symp-
toms of depression, and
paradoxically, can also be


a way of managing those
same symptoms and en-
hancing the risk for addic-
tion.
"The message to
young people of course is
don't smoke and don't
even try it," Bolanos con-
cluded. "If they do smoke,


MAKE NO BONES ABOU
YOU NEED TO ATTEND


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REE SEMINAR
day. February 10th. Noqn to 1:00 pm
e Oak Garden Club, 1100 11th Street

GUEST SPEAKER
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they need to be aware 'of
the potentially long-term
effects that recreationalor
even occasional cigarette
smoking can have on their
systems."
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


T IT, ;












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You may save $ on your prescriptions
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Please call 850-948-2840
for more information

Tri-County Family Health Care
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.


FINDING


Sysician


Shands
LiveOak


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Wednesday, February 4, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 15A




HEALTH & NUTRITION


Affordable Ways To



Keep Smiles Bright


inter lel[ness Starts With The Lips


In recent years, the as-
iation between oral
alth and one's overall
TIalth has been well docu-
inented.
i:'-. Research indicates
that there may be an asso-
ciation between cavities
and gum disease and dia-
betes, cardiovascular and
respiratory diseases and
even Alzheimer's disease.
In the United States, how-
ever, there are an estimat-
ed 47 million Americans
kwho have no health insur-
hnce, and for many others,
high co-pays make visiting
* he dentist a luxury.
Healthier Teeth
"For children between
he ages of 5 and 17 in the
U.S., tooth decay is more
common than asthma and
baay fever," says Dr. Mar-
tha Butler, DDS, vice pres-
ident, Global Oral Health
and Professional Rela-
tions, Colgate-Palmolive
company "Also, figures
from the Centers for Dis-
pase Control and Preven-


tion show that untreated
tooth decay began rising
this decade for the first
time in 50 years. These are
lean times, but there are
still several steps families
can take to promote good
oral health." Dr. Butler of-
fers this advice:
1. Brush -teeth and
gums with fluoride tooth-
paste twice a day, especial-
ly after eating breakfast
and before bedtime.
2. Floss teeth daily.
Parents may want to mod-
el proper techniques by
flossing with their kids.
3. Use fluoride rinse
for strong and healthy
teeth and gums.
4. Practice healthy
eating by getting plenty of
calcium and limiting daily
snacks.
5. If visiting the den-
tist regularly is cost pro-
hibitive, check with the lo-
cal board of health for
dentists who offer their
services on a sliding scale
or consider visiting a local


school of dentistry Gradu-
ate students at many of
these institutions offer ex-
cellent, low-cost care un-
der the supervision of li-
censed dentists.
6. Log on to www.col-
gatebsbf.com -the Web
site of Colgate's national
education program,
Bright Smiles, Bright Fu-
tures-to find out when
the company's mobile den-
tal vans will visit your
area. Manned by local den-
tal professionals, this fleet
of vans sets up free clinics
in target areas and at cul-
tural events across the
United States. In 2002, Col-
gate made a public com-
mitment to reach 100 mil-
lion children by the year
2010 with free screenings,
treatment referrals and
oral health education. The
company will realize this
goal in 2009, one year
ahead of schedule.
Taking care -of teeth
and gums is an important
part of total health.


r

-A'


-wv. ~


During cold and flu
season, one way to help
stay healthy may lie in
the lips.
According to Dr.
Charles Zugerman, asso-
ciate professor of clinical
dermatology at North-
western University Med-
ical School, dry, cracked
lips not only lead to dis-
comfort, but also make
one more susceptible to
infections.
"Skin serves as the
front line for your body's
defense system," said Dr.
Zugerman. "If your lips
are severely dry, they tend
to crack and create tears
that can invite viruses
and bacteria into the
body."
The frigid winds and
dry air that go hand in
hand with cold and flu
season make for an unfor-
giving environment for
lips. Dr. Zugerman advis-
es applying a good lip
balm regularly to protect
pouts from chapping and
cracking.
"Look for a lip prod-
uct that does double duty
in preventing and treat-
ing chapped lips," said Dr.


Zugerman. "For example,
Blistex Medicated Lip
Ointment offers hydra-
tion and penetrating anal-
gesics to ease the pain
from severely dry and
cracked lips."
For those who find
themselves constantly
battling bouts with the flu
or frequently suffering
from cold sores, Dr.
Zugerman recommends
making Blistex Medicat-
ed Lip Ointment a medi-
cine cabinet staple to en-
sure access to immediate
relief and comfort.
"Breathing through
the mouth due to a stuffy
nose, fevers and antihista-
mines found in cold reme-
dies really dries out the
lips," said Dr. Zugerman.
"Keeping lips well mois-
turized and in good condi-
tion makes dealing with
painful cold sores and oth-
er cold-causing side ef-
fects more bearable."
It's not just lip service.
Dr. Zugerman offers these
tips to help keep you well:
Wash Up-Follow
your mother's advice and
wash hands with soap
and water frequently If a


sink isn't available, use
the next best thing-a
hand sanitizer.
Don't Touch-Keep
your hands out of your
mouth and avoid rubbing
or touching your face.
Keep your distance from
others who may be sick
and wait to pucker up un-
til they aren't contagious
anymore.
Cover Your
Mouth-Avoid sneezing
into hands, which can
easily spread germs.
Sneeze into the crook of
your elbow or use a tis-
sue.
Be Fit-Exercise
regularly and get a good
night's sleep. Eat fruit
and vegetables to keep
your immune system
strong.
Always keep your lips
protected by using a lip
care product to maintain
their healthy condition.
For more lip care tips, vis-
it Blistex.com.
Since cracked lips can
invite viruses and bacte-
ria into the body, it's
smart to keep your lips
moisturized and protect-
ed.


* ,-4: i ?.-ri&tr--A-l .^1, /-f- - " *- e- K 'I .-t, .- SI .


Untangling 1

By the year 2050, over
$6 million people-or 21
percent of the total U.S.
population-will be age 65
pr older. Over that same
period, the number of peo-
ple living with
Alzheimer's disease is ex-
pected to increase almost
threefold, from 4.5 million
i'


The Mysteries Of The Brain


to 13.2 million.
Much evidence sug-
gests that Alzheimer's is
caused by amyloid plaque
deposits and tangles in the
brain, which lead to cogni-
tive decline, memory loss
and behavioral changes.
Amyloid, one of the main
components of plaques in


Alzheimer's, is known to
bind to Receptors for Ad-
vanced Glycated Endprod-
ucts (or RAGE, for short)
on the surface of brain
cells.
"The RAGE Inhibitor
Study represents the latest
frontier in AD research,"
said Dr. Paul Aisen, direc-
tor of the Alzheimer's Dis-
ease Cooperative Study at
the University of Califor-
nia San Diego. "With this
study, researchers across
the U.S. are now focused
on attacking the root of
the disease progression
versus solely focused on
improving the disease's
symptoms."
The Alzheimer's Dis-
ease Cooperative Study at
UCSD is coordinating the
RI Study to test this exper-
imental drug. The study is
taking place in more than
40 U.S. cities and seeks 399
volunteers age 50 or older
with mild to moderate
Alzheimer's to test this
novel approach to treating
the disease.
To learn more, contact
the National Institute on
Aging's Alzheimer's Dis-
ease Education and Refer-
ral (ADEAR) Center at
(800) 438-4380 or adcs.org/
studies/RI.aspx.


BEC

PRC

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Go
Sups. f
treaty
Ik arthri
know
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Don't
appoi


AUSE NOT EVERY HEALTH

)BLEM IS AN EMERGENCY.


ood health depends on regular medical check-
rom annual screenings and school physical. to
nent of chronic conditions like allergies or
tis. That's why it's important to see a doctor who
s you. We now offer:

Same week appointments for new patients
Walk-in appointments for established patients
Extended hours
wait for an emergency. Call us today for an
ntment.


1116 SW 11th St
Live Oak, FL 32064
386.362.0820
s lilI,, .i s I .


ShandsLiveOak
MedicalGroup


"k ... ,









16A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing


Wednesday, February 4, 2009


r Greenville Pointe

\- Apartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC
accessible apts. Rental assis-
tance may be available. HUD
vouchers accepted. Call 850-
948-3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn


Couthem illas of

0Aidison apartments

Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR HC &
non-HC accessible apts. Call
850-973-8582, TDD/TTY 711.
315 SW Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Se-
nior's and Disabled. 2 Bed-
room open with Subsidy
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd, Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY c

Madison Heights
Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed
for low income families
150 SW Burngardner Dr.
Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833 ext. 485
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn

House for Rent
in Greenville, FL
(near elementary school).
All Electric, Newly remodeled
3 bedrooms, 1 bath $600/mo.
1st & security deposit.
Housing Choice
Vouchers Accepted
Call 850-973-7349 or
617-4 37-1905
cc/rtn


DOWNTOWN APARTMENT
FOR RENT, NEWLY
RENOVATED 1BR, 1 BATH
$450.00 MO.
567-1523


12/19-rtn


For Rent:
4 Bedroom 2 Bath house with a
built in office, beautifully re-
modeled tile & wood floors
with carpet in 4 bedrooms.
Fireplace, large shaded yard,
large front porch, all electric.
Lee School district. Off HWY
6 near Blue Springs, 1 year
lease, References required.
$700 a month.
$700 Security Deposit
423-538-1206 or 423-845-0590


Private, quite, furnished,
one BR Mobile home
for one person.
Direct TV, near town, $350.00
plus Electricity
850-973-4030
rtn/cc

HOME FOR RENT
Restored 3 BR Home, CH &
Air. Oak floors, large storage,
1335 Sq Ft
Yard Maint. included.
Adult family only, no pets,
$800 rent and deposit.
Credit check.
432 NE Horry Ave. Madison.
Call George
973-8583, 557-0994
10/17- rtn


LAKE FRONT HOME
1 yr lease. 2 Bed, 2 Bth.
Includes kitchen appliances, wa-
ter, and lawn maintenance.
$800 per mth, $800 deposit.
850-973-3025
rtn

FOR RENT IN LEE, FL
3/2 M/H
2/1 M/H
PLEASE CALL
850-973-4606
OR 850-673-9564
112s 2'13



Home For Rent
3 Bed/2 Bth 3200 sq. ft.
$950 per moniith, $950 deposit.
850-869-0916
1/28-2/27





FOR SALE / OWNER
FINANCING
ALL LAND BELOW IS HIGH
AND DRY

5 acres Lee, North ofHwy 6,
Cayenne Rd., rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995
$5,000 down, $325/mo

10 acres Beulah Meadows Rd,
DWMH and houses allowed,
$49,500,, $5,000 down
$459/mo

10 acres Old Blue Springs Rd.
access, DWMH and houses al-
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down,
$459/mo

25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)

Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
12/24-rtn
Land Owners- with good or bad
credit!!! You can own a new
home with $0 down.
Call Will at 850-253-8001.


Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Views
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
Open and Covered Decks, Large
Screened Porch, Gas FP, CH/A,
Oak Floors & Cabinets,
and Appliances.
Offered Furnished at $179,900.
Call BJ Peters at 850-508-1900


For Sale 3 Bed/ 2 Bth w. A.C. on
1/2 Acre in Lee. Only $599mth.
Call Will for more info at
850-253-8001
rtn
FSBO- 3 Bed, 1.5 Bth, 1 Acre,
1500 sqft, built in 1994, recent
upgrades, Cherry Lake area.
$98,500.
850-464-1368
i rtn
For Sale in Hamilton Co.
on 5 Acres.
You Choose Floorplan.
Call Today
850-253-8001 "
rtn


HOME ONLY LOANS
No mortgage on your land. Put
Home on your land,'
family land, state land or rental
lot. Singlewides start at $350.00
month and
Doublewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn
HOME BUYERS.. GUARAN-
TEED FINANCING THRU
B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044
NEW 4 BEDROOM 2 BATH
READY TO MOVE IN. CALL
386-288-4560
LOW CREDIT SCORES???
I MAY BE ABLE TO HELP YOU
BUY A HOME.
386-288-4560
MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00 CALL 386-288-4560
ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00 P&I
per mo, Doublewide your land
$422.00 P&I per mo. Singlewide
& $30,000.00 for land $520.00
P&I per mo. or Doublewide with
$30,000.00 for land $602.00 P&I
per mo. Our land your land or buy
land. I specialize in credit chal-
lenged customers. Applications
over the phone, credit decision next
business day. Let me help make
your new home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn

BEST CASH DEALS ON
MOBILE HOMES. NO ONE
BEATS MY PRICES
386-719-0044
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/ 2
BATH EXCELLENT SHAPE
NEED CHAS, PRICED TO SELL
CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
MODULAR HOME FOR SALE
IN TOWN SAVE $20,000.00
TURN KEY DEAL OWNER
SAYS MAKE AN OFFER IT
MUST GO CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218


BRAND SPANKING NEW 2009
5 BEDROOM 3 BATH 2004 Sq Ft
$594.31 PER MO. SELLER PAYS
$3,500 TOWARD
CLOSING COST CALL MIKE
386-623-4218


PRICE REDUCED! SPACIOUS
MFG HOME WITH 4 BED-
ROOMS, 3 BATH, BONUS
ROOM WITH LOTS OF WIN-
DOWS. DISCONTINUED
FLOORPLAN. FOR MORE INFO
CALL SARAH
386-288-0964

BECOME A HOMEOWNER FOR
THE SAME MONTHLY PAY-
MENTS YOU ARE THROWING
AWAY ON RENT. CALL SARAH
FOR MORE INFO
386-288-0964
NEED MORE SPACE FOR A
GROWING FAMILY? 2001, 5
BEDROOM, 4 BATH TRADE-IN.
EXCELLENT CONDITION.
FOR MORE INFO CALL
SARAH 386-288-0964

FIRST TIME HOME BUYER
$7,500.00 CASH IN YOUR
POCKET CALL DAVID FOR
DETAILS 386-719-0044
WE PAY CASH..... FOR YOUR
USED MOBILE HOMES 1980
OR NEWER. LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129

FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY AND
LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE ZONED
COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT


Get Your

Message

Out For

Less.
Using classifieds gels your
message out for less money ,
than magazines, catalogs
or other types of publicort r.
Saves time and stress, too.
And you and your
customers still get all
the convenience of
doorstep delivery. .


GREENE E -
Publishing, Inc. I


Downtown Office/ Retail space
for rent. 700 to 1,400 Sql ft.
567-1523
10/22-rtn
FOR RENT
Office Building across street
from Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder
Office);
111 SE Shelby St. Madison
Newly renovated back to the
1920's era Call 973-4141
rtn






Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage
Corner lots.
Fronts both Harvey Greene Dr.
and Highway 53 South.
'Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line,
8 inch water main,
access to city utilities,
fire hydrant, and service from
two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141
rtn

-^ *ig] H^ g


FOR SALE:
Red, Queen Sleeper Sofa
Paid $9000 asking $500
Light oak colored computer
armoire with 2 front doors
$75 or will give away with
purchase of sleeper sofa.

850-971-2886


For Sale:
Oak China Cabinet
Call after 5:30.
253-1201


FOR SALE
4-seater Hot Tub
Blue Marble Desig
$500 CASH ONLY -
Call 850-973-414


Yorkie Pups
Call 850-584-9882


-



GREENE
Publishing, Inc, "





1987 Ford Bronco for Sale. Su-
per hot engine! 58k original
miles. Auto trans. Differentials
don't leak. Only rolled over
once but never "mud bogged".
Upper body has no glass but en-
gine and running gear awesome!
Now painted camo $500.
850-464-1165


Deputy Sheriff Position

The Madison County .Sheriff's
Department is accepting appli-
cations for a Deputy Sheriff.
Applicants must have a high
school diploma or GED equiva-
lent. Applicants may obtain an
application at the Sheriff's Of-
fice in the Courthouse from 8am
to 5pm Monday thru Friday. You
may also go online to the Flori-
da Sheriff's website to obtain an
application. The deadline for ac-
cepting applications is February
10, 2009. Starting salary:
$30,000.
1/28-2/6


Security Officer Needed at
NFCC.
Must have Class D Security Li-
cense. Call Capt. James at 850-
363-2807 Saturday and Sundays
3:30-11:30 pm

Sales Consultant
America's Home Place is seek-
ing an experienced sales per-
son for our Valdosta
location. The applicant must
have a proven successful sales
track record. Fax resume to
229-245-8790 or email to
bpolk@americahomeplace.co


Cooks & Waitresses
Spaghetti House
Apply in Person After
11am
at 291 A SW Dade Street
Madison, FL
No Phone Calls Please
Ask for Bob

Communications Officer
Position

The Madison County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for a Communications Officer.
Applicants must have a high
school diploma or GED equiva-
lent. Applicants may obtain an
application at the Sheriff's Of-
fice in the Courthouse from 8am
to 5pm Monday thru Friday. You
may also go online to the Flori-
da Sheriff's website to obtain an
application. The deadline for ac-
cepting applications is February
10, 2009. Starting salary: $27,
600.
1/28-2/6


b Jefferson County Road Dept. is
gn accepting applications for a
FIRM Shop Foreman/ mechanic.
1 Must have light and heavy
rtn/nc equipment experience, able to
work on gas and diesel equip-
S ment, possess a high school
diploma or GED. Clean Flori-
da drivers License with class B
or better. No felon
background. Pay range is
$9.75 to $15.42. Starting pay
will be

ence. Pick up application at
our office. Call for informa-
tion, 997-2036. Deadline for


Wanted: Chickens,
turkeys, guineas and
peafowl.
850-464-1165


BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004.F NO AN-
SWER, PLEASE LEAVE NAME,
TELEPHONE NUMBER AND
INFORMATION ABOUT THE
MILL.
rtn

Cash for Savage 99 Rifle,
and Colt Pistol.
Call: 971-5359




Part-time Southern Gospel Trio
has position open for a male
tenor or baritone or a female
alto. Please call for audition.
Must be ministry minded and in-
terested in performing on week-
ends. Auditions start immediate-
ly. For ore information call 850-
464-0114 or 904-472-7865.


MARTIN'S
CARPET REPAIR

Re-Stretching, Patching,
Seam Repair, Berber Pulls,
Burns, Water Damage, etc.

Don't waste money to buy new
carpet if you don't have to..-..
Call 850-879-0120
or
850-973-2003
for a FREE estimate!

DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts

850-978-4728
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340

ANYTHING LEFT OVER 30
DAYS WILL BE SOLD

Babysitting:
Weekends & Evenings Available.
Can provide great reference.
Call 850-879-0179


PLACE YOUR AD
HERE!
Call 850-973-4141





Multi Family Yard Sale
Jan. 30 & 31 (Fri. & Sat.):
Feb. 2-7 (Mon.-Sat.)
from 9-3 each day.
New/used items, household,'
tools, yard items, gifts, appli'
ances, toys, baby items, etc.
You name it we probably have
'it. Items added daily. 323 SE .
CR 255 Lee formallyy Bell's
Cars) 850-971-5860
1/28 2/6




Pit Bull on Colm Kelly Hwy.
on the Ga./Fla. Bridge (Florida
Side). Call Melissa Kent at
,850-673-1974 for more infor-
mation. Must have proof of


rtn For Sale 4 Bed/2 Bth w. A.C.
in Madison County
2 BR 1 bath Singlewide Mobile for only $649 per mth.
Home in Cherry Lake Area. Call to be re-approved.
$350.00 month, plus deposit 850-253J001
973-2353 rtnn
rtn
House for Rent
2Bed/l Bth. Great neighbor-
hood. Within city limits. Get lead stones,
$500mth. 1st and last mths rent dassffieds
due. Security deposit required. the Communiry
Calendar -
673-9425 s, - -.-


Good,


Morning!


Subscribe today to:
enjoy your local news
at the start of every
Wednesday and Fridayf

Just $30 in county
and $38 out of county.
Call us at 850-973-4141
to start your subscription

today!


-'I i.ChOS


Deadline For Classifieds


ICLASSIFF1 DS (850) 973-4141
3:00 p.m. Every Monday


I-


1










Wednesday, February 4, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
*(N AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
"CIVIL ACTION
4AYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC,
*t Plaintiff,

CASE NO. 2006-328-CA
vs. DIVISION
DOUGLAS E. PICKLES, et al,
Defendantss.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTIGE-IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated January 26, 2009 and entered in Case No. 2006-328-CA of the Circuit Court of the
THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for MADISON County, Florida wherein BAYVIEW LOAN
SERVICING, LLC, is the Plaintiff and DOUGLAS E. PICKLES; KIMBERLY J.
PICKLES; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at EAST
DOOR OF THE MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:OOAM, on the 24 day of
Feb, 2009, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:
ALL EAST OF STATE ROAD NO. 9 OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH,
RANGE 9 EAST, CONTAINING 25 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, CHERRY
LAKE FARMS PROJECT.
LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED IN O.R. BOOK 683,
PAGE 164, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BELOW:
THE SOUTH 10.00 ACRES OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN O.R.
BOOK 362, PAGE 85 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING THE SOUTH 10.00 ACRES OF THOSE
LANDS LYING EAST OF STATE ROAD 53 OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW 1/4) OF
SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST, BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
9REGIN AT AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID SE 1/4 OF NW 1/4; THENCE NORTH 89'36'09" WEST ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF NW 1/4 A DISTANCE OF 892.11 FEET
TO A D.O.T REBAR ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
STATE ROAD 53 AS DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 435, PAGE 169 OF THE
AFORESAID RECORDS; THENCE NORTH 02'04'41" EAST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 491.61 FEET TO A
JtEBAR; THENCE SOUTH 89'36'09" EAST A DISTANCE OF 881.15 FEET
TO AN IRON PIPE ON THE EAST LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF NW 1/4;
THENCE SOUTH 00'48'02" WEST ALONG SAID EAST LINE A
DISTANCE OF 491.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTAINING 10.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SAID LANDS SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED TO THE STATE
OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, O.R. BOOK 435,
PAGE 169, FOR ADDITIONAL ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY
&WK/A 6750 North State Road 53, Madison, FL 32340
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after
;$e sale.
-VITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on 1/29,2009.
Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
2/4, 2/11


IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 3rd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
,F FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as
Trustee for HSI Asset Securitization
Corporation 2006-OPT2 Mortgage Pass-
Through Certificates, Series 2006-OPT2,



s.-
Jeffery Bailey and Janet Terrill a/k/a
Janette Terrill a/k/a Janet Bailey


Case #: 2008-205-CA
Division #:

UNC:


'Defendant(s).

liOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated January 20, 2009, in Civil Case No. 2008-205-CA of the Circuit
Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Madison County, Florida, wherein Deutsche
Bank National Trust Company as Trustee for HSI Asset Securitization Corporation
2006-OPT2 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-OPT2, Plaintiff and
Jeffery Bailey and Janet Terrill a/k/a Janette Terrill a/k/a Janet Bailey are
defendantss, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST SIDE
OF THE MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 125 SW RANGE AVE.,
MADISON, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on
February 12, 2009 the following described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 4, BLOCK C, OF BLUE RIDGE LANDING SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION,
AS PER THE PLAT THEREOF, FILED AT PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE B, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODA-
TION INORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TOYOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT MADISONCOUNTY COURTHOUSE, 101 SOUTH RANGE STREET,
MADISON, FL 32340 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF TllS NO-
TICE OF SALE: IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955-8771; IF YOU
ARE VOICE IMPAIRED CALL; 1-800-955-8770
DATED at MADISON, Florida, this 21 day of January, 2009.
TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Madison County, Florida
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
10004 North Dale Mabry Hwy, Suite 112
Tampa, Florida 33618
08-096714


- www.greenepublishing.com


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
CASE NO. 2008-CA-000418
v.
ORLANDO DEL REY, et al,
Defendants. /
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in
this cause, in the Circuit Court of Madison County, Florida, I wilt sell the property situat-
ed in Madison County, Florida described as:
TRACT 77, AUCILLA PLANTATIONS UNRECORDED, MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT AN IRON
ROD MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1
SOUTH, RANGE 6 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH
00005'02' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 2698.30 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE
SOUTH 88045'34' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 3035.79 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE SOUTH 01052'30' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 893.87 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE SOUTH 7652'551 WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1894.59 FEET TO A POINT
IN THE CENTERLINE OF AN 80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND
DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD 3008), THENCE RUN ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 36048'00' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 111.05
FEET TO A POINT, SOUTH 42052'46' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 292.12 FEET TO
A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 3606'38' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 136.54 'FEET TO
A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 22032'06 EAST, A DISTANCE OF 83.63 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 10029'49' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 90.83 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE, RUN SOUTH 1926'48'
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 888.34 FEET MORE OR LESS TO A POINT, IN THE
CENTER OF ALLIGATOR CREEK, FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 19o26'48' EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 888.34 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF SAID 80
FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT (ROAD
3008), THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH
1029'49' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 90.83 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
2232'06' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 83.63 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
3606'38' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 136.54 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
4252'45' WEST A DISTANCE OF 292.12 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
36048'00' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 111.05 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
3343'11' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 139.65 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
5024'46' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 163.33 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
3853'10' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 52.13 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
2753'05' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 77.52 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
164746' WEST, DISTANCE OF 145.58 FEETTO A POINT, THENCE NORTH
09006'29' WEST. A DISTANCE OF 66.30 FEET TO A POINT OF
INTERSECTION WITH AN 80 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY. UTILITY AND
DRAINAGE EASEMENT (140TH STREET), THENCE RUN ALONG THE
CENTERLINE OF SAID 140TH STREET AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 54048'50'
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 515.89 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 53o39'59'
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 61.07 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 37o23'56'
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 271.19 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 11016'371
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 129.16 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 16057'46'
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 234.67 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 09049'31'
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 115.24 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 383328'
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 280.42 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 51014'00'
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 269.55 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTER OF A 50
FOOT RADIUS CUL-DE-SAC, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE, RUN
SOUTH 02*59'52' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 719.64 FEET MORE OR LESS TO A
POINT IN THE CENTER OF ALLIGATOR CREEK, THENCE RUN IN A
NORTHEASTERLY, EASTERLY AND SOUTHEASTERLY DIRECTION
ALONG-THE CENTER OF SAID ALLIGATOR CREEK, (CHORD OF SAID
CREEK BEING NORTH 83002'55' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1393.10 FEET) TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
and commonly known as: TRACT 77, Aucilla Plantation Greenville, FL 32331, at public
sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the West Front Steps of the Madison Coun-
ty Courthouse, 125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida 32341 at 11:00 a.m., on February
24, 2009.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate
in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact Nancy K. Nydam, Court Administrator, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, Florida
32056-1569 (904) 758-2163 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
Dated this 1/29/09
TIM SANDERS
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
2/4,2/11


HINT #45

A one-of-a-kind hat






~-.--




. -


BY: Ramona Dickinson newspaper, dontthrow It away.
DEPUTY CLERK 'Find another uie for it.
The above is to be published.N s "[ 1p
in Enterprise Recorder/MADISON Ne pper makes aw some p y,
COUNTY CARRIER hats, sWre to ga ention.As.
s e boss' 1ove -
1/28,2/4 Alo;

: c d ter near yo'
Iegal Notice "
Madison Superstorage, 298 SW Martin Luther King Drive, Madison, Florida and Jasper .
Spperstorage, 1213 US HWY 129N, Jasper, Florida, will have a liquidation sale on
delinquent storage units on February 14,2009. Storage units to be sold will be, in V
,lIadison are, Dozier Davis Unit #4A, Dawnmarie Snedeker Unit #6A, John Mays Unit #
8'A, Shorea Aikens Unit #12B, Robert Bachman Unit # 7C, Pearly Jones Unit # 3D, Sandy
Smith Unit #1 ID, Faith Deliverance Church Unit # 2E, Jerry Pridgeon Unit# 2H and
Stephanie Scott Unit # 7E.
In Jasper, Mary Beth Windham Unit #1; Earnest Brown Units # 24 & 25, Chris Cornette
and Kim Wiser Unit #28, Stephanie Blakely Unit #31, Teny Rayam Unit # 43, Sharon
,Dedge Unit #44, Sammy Newsome Unit # 47, Keyona Bennett Unit # 53, Wayne
Rahming Unit #56, John Mc Cormack Unit # 60;,Sadie Bembry Unit # 69, and Monica iII
Green Lee Unit # 78, Contents are believed to be WI I.I
1/28, 2/4
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Madison County Carrier 17A









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18A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, February 4, 2009



HISTORY


Madison's


By Alfa Hunt I.
Greene Publishing, Inc. '
One interesting place *
within Madison is the ,.ip
building which originally ,
housed the Yates Sanatori- \
um. .f *
A resident of Madison, -
Dr. D.H. Yates, established
the Yates Sanitarium in a
building located on the
corner of Base and Horry
streets in Madison, which
would later expand to a
building on the corner of
Base and Range streets.
Yates was renowned for be-
ing a pioneer in the use of
"electric machines" to -- -
treat various types of ill-
ness.
At the new Yates Sani-
tarium, the Doctor seemed
to have success in treating Madison County Men
the disease of pellagra,
which is caused by a deficiency of niacin or tryptophan,
with his machines. Although, it is debated whether it
was the diet he served his patients that aided the pa-
tients instead of the machines.
Patients arrived from all neighboring areas, and
Yates proposed to obtain a grant for a government pel-
lagra hospital.
One incident reports that at least one patient had it
out for the good doctor. A young man who had been ad-
mitted to the hospital as a mental patient locked Yates'
door and forced him to take five doses of the same seda-
tive which was prepared for the patient. After Yates
agreed to get whiskey and morphine for the patient,
Yates was set free. Immediately afterwards, Yates made
good use of a stomach pump and continued his rounds
for the day.
In February of 1922, the two buildings which were
used by the Yates Sanitarium were destroyed by a fire,
which was more than likely started by a short in one of
Dr. Yates' electrical machines. The Yates Sanitarium
was rebuilt, using its original brick walls, and became
the location for the Madison Guest House retirement
home.
Dr. Yates was always active in the community and in
county dealings. He became the first president of the
Chamber of Commerce, which was organized in De-
cember of 1921. One fact about Yates that he was sorely


Medical,


normal Hospital in March 1955 si


Yates Sanitarium, on the
Ing is now used for the Madis


History


F- .f! remembered for was that he was one of the first men in
Madison to own an automobile, which he used to drive
around the county, scaring people, chickens and live-
stock.
In June of 1934, Dr. Yates passed away at the age of
68. He was remembered as a man who had been active in
i the affairs of his community and county, as well as be-
ing the founder of a hospital which managed to attract
patients from miles around.
After the death of Dr. Yates, Dr. Frank V Chappell,
as well as several other doctors, attempted to run the
Yates Sanatorium, which they renamed the Yates
Memorial Hospital. Unfortunately, within a year, it
closed, and plans were made to convert the building into
an apartment house.
Under the protection of the Madison County Com-
S'mission, and with the help of government funds, the
hospital, now known as the Madison County Memorial
Hospital, opened its doors on Dec. 10, 1937. The board of
-- - trustees which was appointed to manage the new hospi-
tal comprised C.M. Buie; VS. Smith; G. Frank Andrews,
SA.E. Hendry; S.E. Whitty; T.J. Beggs, Jr.; J.G. Ashley;
C.S. Blalock; along with T.C. Merchant.
oon after its opening. The hospital operated in the building until after
World War II, when it
moved to the two-story
"Yankee's Hunting Club"
building. The interior of
the building was remod-
Now. eled into wards and pri-,
vate rooms.
The building housed
the hospital until 1955. In
." -1954, the entire building
was. moved-amazingly,
with the patients still in-
side-across the street to
n G the east. It would serve un-
l til the new brick hospital
was built on the original
lot. After the completion of
the new hospital, the old
Yates building served as
office space for several
doctors.
kb In the early 1980s, the
St building was moved again.
This time, the Yates build-
ing was relocated to a lot
on Livingston St., where it
corner of Base and Horry streets, in Madison. This build- was remodeled and re-
son Guest House Retirement Home. stored by the new owners.
The brick building had
been added onto over the years, but now, it was more than twice the size of the 1955
building.
The Yates building was used as an apartment house for a while and gradually
slumped into a terrible state of appearance. The North Florida Junior College Ath-
letic Association acquired it as a means to use it as a dormitory for the college bas-
ketball team, the Sentinels.
Nevertheless, its deterioration continued until the building was considered "un-
fit" for habitation. After several years of abandonment, the Yates building was pur-
chased by private parties who repaired and remodeled the building with the goal to
restore it to its former glory


Whatever You Need,

Greene Publishing, Inc.


Classifieds


GREENEc
Publishing, Inc.


1695 S. SR 53 Madison


973-4141


FARMERS COOPERATIVE
EARLY SPRING SPECIALS


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