Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00146
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: January 21, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00146
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text




INSIDE TOD.


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Basketball

Enjoys Ups,

Endures Downs
See Page 7A


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VOL. 45 NO. 24 Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper




Hospital Forced To Cut Payroll


See Section C

MLK Speaker:

"Freedom And

Change Now"


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo uy Micnael
Curtis, January 19, 2009
Rev. Dr. Charlie
Barfield declared, "Today
is a time of freedom and
change."
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
This year's national
observance of the birth-
day of civil rights leader
SM artin Luther King, Jr.
was celebrated at the
Madison County Court-
house on Monday, Jan.
21, where hundreds gath-
ered to remember the
fallen champion of
equality and freedom for
all Americans- Spon-
sored by the Madison*
County Charmettes, in-,
vited guests, elected off!i-
cials and friends from,
throughout the commu-
nity spoke, sang and c.ele-
brated, which was made
all the more impassioned
by the fact that the inau-
guration of Barack Oba-
ma was scheduled for the
next day.
Featured speaker,
Rev. Dr. Charlie Barfield
provided a moving mes-
sage that culminated.
with the insight that
King's work was mani-
fest in the new presiden-
cy. In fact, Barfield com-
bined King's historic
message of freedom,
with Obama's modern
.call for change, to an-
nounce the arrival of
"freedom and change
now.'"
Local officials, in-
cluding County Commis-
sioner Alfred Martin,
Sheriff Ben Stewart, Su-
perintendent Lou Miller
and City Commissioner
Sumpter James, joined
faith-based leadership in
acknowledging the
solemn, yet festive, occa-
sion. In the end, all sang
in celebration of those
like King who made the
ultimate sacrifice, carry-
ing the torch of freedom
and change, so one day
those like Obama could
live the dream.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at
michael@greenepublishin
g.com.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Madison County
Memorial Hospital CEO
David Abercrombie an-
nounced Friday, Jan. 16,
that the hospital would
be making a five percent
payroll cut across the
board, including a ten
percent cut to his own
pay. The action was obvi-


ously not desirable, but
considering the circum-
stances, few options re-
mained.
"It was ultimately
done to preserve jobs,
and I'm so grateful at the
way the hospital family is
committed to getting
through these times,"
Abercrombie explained.
"One of the keys to


our financial health is
timely insurance pay-
ments from Medicaid,
Medicare and other
health plans that have se-
riously delayed pay-
ments, now stretching to
nine months and even
more convoluted billing
systems which defy
'clean claims.'"
MCMH has added sev-


eral key resources over
the last six months, in-
cluding two doctors, in
response to the growing
needs of the community
In the end though, these
quality services must be
accompanied by timely
payments, most of which
are outside the hospital's
control, making the
process financially un-


sustainable.
The hospital is the
third large Madison
County employer behind
Nestle and Pilgrim's
Pride to announce pay-
roll and employee cut-
backs.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at
michael(a),@reenepublishin
f.com


Murdered Woman


Srnoiosuumintteu y onerifl DBI oIewarU
Members of the Madison County Sheriff's Office posse search an area west of Greenville last Saturday, January 17. They were search-
ing for additionaliclues which might be able to assist the Sheriffs Office and the.FDLE in solving the crime.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The body of a 52-year-old'
woman was found by hunters in
a wooded area off Pettis Springs
Road, west of Greenville on-
Thursday morning, January 15,
at approximately 11 a.m. Follow-


ing an autopsy on Friday, Janu-
ary .16, the woman was identi-
fied as Marilyn Harris of
Woodville. The identification
came following a fingerprint
check by the Florida Depart7-
ment of Law Enforcement
(FDLE).
According to Madison Coun-
ty Sheriff Ben Stewart, the
death was not a natural one and
Harris was murdered. Stewart
said that the Sheriff's Office
'could not release how she was
killed, due to the case being an
ongoing investigation.
Stewart said that the FDLE
and the State Attorney's office


are assisting with the investiga-
tion: Stewart also noted that the
Jefferson County Sheriff's Of-
fice had also been called, be-
cause of the proximity of Pettis
Springs Road to Jefferson Coun-
ty. The Leon County Sheriff's Of-
fice is also assisting with the in-
vestigation because Harris was
from that area.
FDLE crime scene investiga-
tors processed the scene where
the body was found on Thursday.
Harris' truck was found in
western Jefferson "County on
Wednesday night, according to
Jefferson County Sheriff's Of-
fice Major Bill Bullock said. At


Photo submitted by Sheriff Ben Stewart
Members of the Sheriff's Posse leave a ceme-
tery, where they had been looking for clues into
the murder of Marilyn Harris. It is unknown
whether the murder occurred in Madison County
or elsewhere. Harris' truck was found in the west-
ern part of Jefferson County before Harris' body
was found.


the time, law enforcement had
no report of Harris being miss-
ing.
The Sheriff's Posse searched
the wooded area where Harris'
body on Saturday, searching for
more clues.
Captain Mark Joost is the
chief investigator ihn the homi-
cide investigation for the Madi-
son County Sheriff's Office.,
If anyone has any infor-
mation on the murder, they
are asked to call the Madison
County. Sheriff's Office at
(850) 973-4001.
Your help is greatly appre-
ciated.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, January 15, 2009

Madison County Sheriff's Capt. Mark W. Joost
speaks with hunters in the area where the body of Mar-
ilyn Harris was found last Thursday, January 15.


Local & Regional Crime 4A7 W T hu Fri st
S History 9A 5230 I 2/40 'I 1/23 14 2450

S SpoRegitsonal Happenings 9A NW at 5 to 10h W inthe low 40s, the lOw 70s and iows in the low storm.
n Sports 7A s o$.


A person of interest, in A
death of Marilyn Harris, is pic-
ured above, He was the driver of a
black Ford truck seen in the Petti,
Springs area of Madison County,
on Wednesday, Jan. 14. He is ap-
proximatively 5'2,11150 pounds, has
a thin build, medium complexion,
no accent, no facial hair, and is 40-
50 years old. Last seen wearing a
canvas type jacket, jeans, medium
toned ball cap, and black work
shoes.
The occupant of the same vehi-
cle is approximately 25-30 years old
6'2", 225 pounds, medium build
black niale, last seen wearing a
black jogging suite possibly with
red and white stripes down the side
of the legs, and white athletic shoes.


. .---








2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 21, 2009



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS




I^ i Wandering : 1 iHappy Birt Bioy


Today, January 21, is
my youngest daughter's
* birthday Brooke turns 14
years old today.
Each year just seems to
fly by It seems like just last
year, truly, that I had two
young children. Now, they
are 14 and 16, which would
also bring on the reality M e
that if they are now 14 and
16 that means I'm not in
my 20's anymore. My, oh
my, where have the years Tf
gone? e n
Brooke hasn't changed
much through the years.
Her personality has re-
mained true in the last 14 years. She is ten-
der hearted, but refuses to allow anyone
to see her cry She will tough out any
situation and remain "strong" to
the'end.
We have always lovingly
called Brooke our "problem
child." Brooke IS the reason
we have to keep health insur-
ance. From the time she was
born, everything that could
happen, did happen to
Brooke.
At four months old, I
had Brooke in and out of
eye doctor's offices with
the threat of a "lazy eye"
looming over our head.
One week after her first
birthday the left side of
her face swelled up, and,
she looked like "The Ele-
phant Man." That episode
landed her in the hospital
for eight days,- including
surgery on her face.
From age three to five,-
she had strep throat continu-
ally We finally had her tonsils
taken out when she was: five
years old, and in kindergarten.
Since Kindergarten, and now up
into the 8th grade, she hasn't
slowed down, glasses/contacts,.
braces, several trips to the hospital for
stomach problems in the third grade,


cracked wrists from
gymnastics, sprained an-
kles from, gymnastics,
The Shriner's Hospital
for ankle and knee pain,
multi hand/finger in-
juries from basketball
and -softball, being
rammed into fences by
cows, pneumonia and
several cases of bronchi-
tis, and now the most re-
cent includes bruised
ribs from basketball and
I Greene Kinsley an MRI on a bad shoul-
Publisher- der.
The doctor bills
continue to grow and
grow and we still affectionately call her "our
problem child."- But as any parent
knows.... There is no greater love
than the love for your child.
All good memories always out-
weigh the bad/problems.
Memories of vacations,
excitement on Christmas
mornings opening up pre-
sents, losing teeth and ex-
citement over The Tooth
Fairy learning to ride a bi-
cycle, being crowned May
Fete Queen, riding horses
together, going shopping
together,, going -to the
beach together, !watching
all those dance. recitals;
piano recitals;, pageantsi
gymnastic meets, baskets
ballgames, cheerleading,
and softball games are
worth everything to me;
and there is no greater
warmth, than a hug
from your child.
Be with your children,
love your children, and share
with your children.
Today's moments are to-
morrow's memories. Your mem-
ories AND their memories.
Happy Birthday, Brooke. I love.
you!n
Until then .... see you around the


Mike Cuppett is a long-time Madison resi-
dent. A vocational instructor at Jefferson Correc-
tional Institution, Cuppett jokingly refers to his
job as a "glorified mechanic." What he and his
crew does is to keep the fleet going. Working
there for over 12 years, Cuppett and his wife of
30 years, Sharon, raised their son on Madison
soil as well. Cuppett is heavily involved with his
church, Faith Baptist, and spends much of his
spare time there as the choir director and assis-
tant music director.


QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Do you have some Christmas decorations including outside
Christmas lights that you leave up all year long?





Yes





No




Log on to GreenePublishing.com to vote on next week's question:

"What temperature for you is too cold?"
Voting for this question ends 1/26/09 at 9 a.m.








idnesday, January 21, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS
] .4


Pageant Registration

To Be Held Sunday

At Lee Town Hall
The Lee Day Committee is still looking for interp st-
memories you may have of you or your family living
Lee. Pictures are also welcome. Please send your sto-
s and photos to mayorekinsey@embarqmail.com I or
manager@leeflorida.org. Deadline for all entries liaa
en extended until Feb. 15. Please help Lee have 1 the
Jggest and best book they can of "Lee Memories."
The Lee Homecoming Beauty Pageant registrati ton
set for Jan. 25, from 2-4 p.m. at Lee City Hall. Thi ere
ll be a pageant for younger children, as well.as M iss
ke and Junior Miss Lee pageants. For more inforr na-
on, please call Charlene Rye at (850) 694-0814 or A: )ril
'erring at 971-4414.
Happy birthday wishes go out to my father, Bot)by
embry, who is celebrating his 73rd birthday today H' ap-
Sbithday, Daddy!
That's all the news for this week. Have a great w cek
d a beautiful forever. May God bless each and ev ry
e of you!


I


Jenine Clay and DOR vs. Reginald Florence Si ap-
ort
Kimala Hunter and DOR vs. Richard Wade uifs tI
Shirley Alvey vs. James Pridgeon rep. injunctio: n
Henry J. Raines vs. Priscilla M, Mitchell auto nmig.
Reginald M. Epkins vs. Edwin Curtis McMulle: n -
ther neg.
CSB vs. Steven Nesmith mtg. fore.
Linda Jean Arnold vs. Kim Thomas rep. domes, tic
injunction,


Benteen At Little Big Horn


One of my
Christmas. gifts
was a new book Na:onal
about one of the
controversies Se
surrounding E..u.I
"Custer's Last Joe Boyles
Stand." Brazen Guest Columnist
Trumpet: Fred-
erick W. Benteen
and the Battle of
the Little Big
Horn is by test pilot Terry Donovan, an
aviator who flies with my brother-in-law
Russ Stewart at the National Test Pilot
School in Mojave, CA.
It is safe to say that the Battle of the
Little Big Horn has more myth associat-
ed with it than any other battle in the
history of the American Army '.In'a
short period of time at mid-afternoon of
June 25, 1876, about half the 7th Cavalry
Regiment and their commander, Lieu-
tenant Colonel George A. Custer, were
destroyed by the Lakota Sioux. No one
survived from Custer's immediate com-
mand arid since he left no written battle
plans, the myth of what actually hap-
pened exploded as soon as news reached
civilization.
To recount what happened, the,U. S.
Army made plans to round up thp Sioux
that had departed their reservation.
Three prongs of the Army advanced on
what is today Southern Montana and'
the valley of the Little Big Horn River.
Custer and his boss, General Alfred Ter-
ry, departed Bismarck in the Dakota Ter-
ritory headed east. Custer's 7th Cavalry
was Terry's .scouting arm and was sent
forward to roust the Indians.
As the 7th Cav approached the valley
of the Little Big Horn, Custer split his
force of 675 into four groups. The pack
mules, their logistics lifeline which
moved slower than the mounted troop-
ers, were commanded by Captain Mc-
Dougall. Next, Custer split off a battal-
ion of three companies under his
deputy, Major Marcus Reno, with orders
to move down to the river, engage the en-
emy, and drive them north. Next, he
split off his senior captain Frederick
Benteen with another three companies
on an oblique march to the left to cross a
series of ridges looking for Indians.
Custer took the remaining five compa-
nies and rode along a high ridge line to.
the north ... and oblivion.
Reno's battalion made it to the river,
found the enemy, and had more than
they could handle. Reno retreated to a
fallback position and then retreated
again to an adequate defensive fighting
position on a bluff overlooking the Lit-
tle Big Horn.
Meanwhile, Benteen had very rough
and slow going over rugged country At
mid-afternoon, a trumpeter from
Custer's command, Italian immigrant
Giovani Martini rode up with a note
from adjutant Cooke which read: "Come
on. Big village. Be quick. Bring packs."
In the aftermath of the battle, Captain
Benteen was accused of tarrying on the
trail, failing to expedite, and conse-
quently, missing his rendezvous with
destiny Of course, he did not have the
pack mules which were behind him on
the trail. Even before the pack mules ar-
rived, Benteen located the shattered
remnants of Reno's command, hastily
trying to organize a defense against a
far greater number of Sioux warriors.


Renod was
in a true pickle
and the tactical
situation over-
whelmed him.
When Benteen
showed him the
adjutant's note,
Reno ordered
him to stay and
add to the de-
fense, a reason-
able request under the circumstances.
For the remainder of the battle which
lasted through the next day, Benteen was
ain effective command of what remained
of the six companies and their packs.
By all accounts, he was fearless. The
survival of what remained of the shat-
tered 7th Cavalry was dependent on Cap-
tain Benteen, and he rose to the occ t,
sion.
On June 27th, Lieutenant Bradley
from Terry's commandifound the bodies
of George -Custer and the 240 officers
and tmen who perished with him. Short-
ly thereafter, the remnants of the Reno-
Benteen force were located, minus 55-
dead and about the same number
wounded. Thw 7th Cavalry Regiment
had effectively been destroyed.
Author Donovan completes the story'
of Benteen's performance in the battle
by doing a scientific analysis of the
timeline to show that Benteen did not
drag his feet. Because Custer split this
battalion off and gave them rough ter-
rain to cross with ambiguous orders,
they trailed about 90 minutes behind the
larger force.' When Benteen caught up
'with the retreating Reno, he had a big-
ger and more immediate problem to
work than reinforcing Custer. Five or so
miles to the north at that moment,
Custer was in the process of being en-
gaged by the forces of Gall and Crazy
Horse that outnumbered the cavalry by
8 to 1. The massacre was probably com-
plete within the hour.
George Custer was really to blame
for the destruction of his regiment, but
he became a martyr when his widow
Libby wrote several books defending her
late husband and laying the blame at
other's feet. Libby survived her hus-
band by more than sixty years, never re-
married, and made it her mission to
raise her husband to sainthood. -Major
Reno and Captain Benteen, the two most
senior commanders to survive, caught
most of the blame.
It is important for a commander to
be brave under fire, but not reckless
with the lives of those entrusted to his
command. George Custer was both
reckless and foolhardy. His lack of per-
sonal discipline was identified first at
West Point twenty years before: At the
Little Big Horn, this failing was exposed
and the 7th Cavalry paid the price.
Custer did not assess the strength of his
opponent. He split his command but did
not give them actionable, written or-
ders. And, he did not give his command
an escape route if the trap he intended
fell instead on him. It was a disaster
waiting for a place to happen.
From the standpoint of history and
strategy, the Indians won the battle, but
lost the war just like the Japanese at
Pearl Harbor. The Plains Indians were
destroyed fairly quickly in this clash of
civilizations. It was a sad but inevitable
ending to a sordid affair.


rija Press Assoc60
20IS


Award Winning Newspaper






Choma om For id's T 0sadl NesMapers
P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Website:
www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
Sports
news@greenepublishing.com
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
Classifieds / Legals
classifieds@greenepublishing.com

PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene
EDITOR
Jacob Bembry
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Heather Bowen
STAFF WRITERS.
Michael Curi and Trra Meserve
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
Stephen Bochnia & James utter
TYPESETTER/SuBSCRIPTIONS
Bryant Thigpen
ADVERTISING
SALES EPRESENTATIVES
Mary Ellen Greene, :
Doroihy McKinney,
Jeanette Dunn G
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
I IStacy Martin
Deadline for classified is Monday
I ,:? at 3;p.m. ;sS i:
deadline for alAdvertisementis
Monday at 5pm.,
There will be a13 charge forAffidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Sheree Miller antd Bobbi Light
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
n County $30' Out-of-County $38
(State & local taxes included)

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the
right to reject any advertisement.
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the man-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene
Publishing, Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


Cljv'jrNews


I".







4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 21, 209



LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


A woman was arrested
for shoplifting in Green-
ville on Thursday, Jan. 15.
According to a Madison
County Sheriff's Office re-
port, Deputy Kevin Odom
responded to the Dollar
General Store in reference
to a theft. When he arrived,
he made contact with two
women. One of the women
said she saw Brittany
Demps, 19, of Monticello,
put store merchandise in
her purse.
The woman confronted
Demps and found that she
had a bottle of children's
Tylenol, hair gel and a bar


of soap in her ptprse. Sh
said that Demps beggl he
Iot to report the incident.
Demps"': mtihr wa
also in the' sdre, attemp
ing to purchase candy wit
no money. It appeared tha
the mother was attemptin
to keep the clerk bus
while Demps stole th
items.
Demps advised that sh
didn't have money an
would have paid the stor
back at a later date.
-Both Demps and he
mother, Joyce Williams
were issued trespass war
ings for the store.


I

h


State Children And Families Employee

Arrested For Grand Theft


Woman Arrested

For Shoplifting


tg
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le

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*e
Sr
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1-


Mik's upRepair,

WlD i'lllngInc.
35Ye arEx reco L 0


Our Madison office has been moved to Live Oak and we
are pleased to continue to-service your area.
For your convenience, the Madison phone number,
973-8877, is still available to take your calls.
610 Industrial Ave, SW* Live Oak, FL
(386) 634-5630,
.k 24 Hour Emergency
S(386 5900888 .


sistance to be withdrawn from automatic teller ta-
chines, and enabling food stamps able to be used to lir-
chase authorized food products from approved retails.
The improper authorizations were conducted. e-
tween Oct. 2 and Dec. 29, 2008 and included $18,45ian
TANF and $6,225 in food stamps for a total of $24,684n
illegally authorized public assistance.
The DCF created the Internal Controls Workgrap
two years ago when the agency suspected'theft by an n-
ployee. The former employee was later ,arrested o:a
theft of $1.5 million and was sentenced, to 17 -yearsn
prison.
"Criminal activity of any sort at DCF will not be l-
erated," said DCF Secretary George Sheldon. "Flor:i-
ans depend on us for critical public assistance, and E-
traying their trust in this manner is unacceptable. 'e
Internal Controls Workgroup detected this activity a-4
ly on and this is proof their monitoring works."


Florida Canine Tealims Receive Nationl

Certification In Bomb Detection


Special Agent in
Charge Virginia O'Brien
of the Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Ex-
plosives, Tampa Field Di-
vision and Deputy Chief
Michael P. Hayes, ATF Na-
tional Center for Explo-
sives Training and Re-
search, announced the
graduation of 13 law-en-
forcement canine teams
from the ATF "National
Canine Initiative Course."
The week-long train-
ing was conducted by the
ATF Canine Training
Branch and hosted by the
ATF Tampa Field Division
and was held at Tropicana
Field in St. Petersburg. It
is the first time that ATF
has offered this training
away from the ATF Canine
''araiiiig Center iii Fron''


Royal, Va. The training
was specifically brought to
the Tampa Bay area to.
help local canine teams
prepare for Super Bowl
XLIII and is the third ca-
nine training session held
in the Tampa Bay area in
recent months. The Na-
tional Canine Initiative
Course is only available to
those canine teams that
have previously completed
the .ATF National Odor
Recognition Course and
upon completion of this
training the canine teams
are nationally certified
through the U.S. Depart-
ment of Justice.
These 13 canine teams
that have graduated from
this course now join an
elite group of only 78 ca-
nine teams from around


the United States to
this prestigious; cer
tion. The training i.
ed instruction for t
nine teams in relati
conducting preven
sweeps, searching
scenes and searchin!
blast scenes
The canine team
spent many hours h
their skills and ability
locating and ident:
firearms, shell ca
and explosive mat
that might be found
ingaa sweep or search
"This training
helped prepare our
canine teams for
Bowl XLIII, and theI
of Tampa should fe(
knowing that we
some of the best tr
'explosive detection c


hold teams in the county
tifica- working .in our commui-
nclud- ty," said O'Brien.
he ca- The lead instructor t
ion to the course, ATFCanife -
tative structor Tim- Dawsc,
crime said, "The canine teaB
g post that graduated this coub
worked extremely hal
s. also this week and are all hig-
oning ly qualified and compete
ties in' in detecting explosive m
ifying terials."
Sings The-canine teams th
erials graduated the course we
d dur- four teams from the Tai
h. pa Police Departmei,.
has three teams from the Hil.
local borough County Sheriff
Super Office, three teams fro.
people the Lee County Sheriff
el safe Office, two teams from tl
have Pinellas County Sheriff.
rained Office, and the Port A
;anine thority featis. i


8:00 am 6:00 pm Monday Saturday


Fax I Notahy


12655 CR 137 Wellborn


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Used Tires

Knives


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jewelry -

Gun Repair

Gun Smithing

Concealed:

Weapon classes


Jewelry Repair

& Cleaning





Paintball Guns

Accesories
Refills,Co2,

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WELLBORNPAWN & GUN IS LOCATED aM IMB Di


I The Florida Department of Law Enforcement ar-
rested Florida Department of Children and Families
employee Susan Curry Wolfe, 47, an economic self suffi-
ciency eligibility supervisor in the ACCESS Florida
Program located in the Jacksonville office. ACCESS is
the DCF's Automated Community Connection to Self
Sufficiency that connects clients with food stamps, Tem-
porary Assistance for Needy Families, and Medicaid.
Wolfe was arrested at work and charged with,grand
theft, criminal use of personal information, and scheme
to defraud. She was booked into the Duval County Jail.
DCF's Office of the Inspector General contacted
e FDLE regarding alleged improprieties in; the adminis-
r ration of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and
Food Stamp programs. The allegations implied that
.s Wolfe had improperly, re-opened two closed benefit cas-
t- es and created six fictitious cases in her capacity as a'su-
h pervisor. Wolfe's actions issued TANF, enabling cash as-


. I


r-


L



l









Wednesday, January 21, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


101,INUNI


IALW0AI


Carlton

Croom

Burnette


Mr. Carlton Croom Burnette,
age 82, died on Saturday, Jan 17,
2009, in Madison,
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, at 2 p.m.; at Beggs Fu-
neral Home, in Madison. He was
buried at Oak Ridge Cemetery
The family received friends
at Beggs Chapel on Monday, from
6-8 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, contribu-
tions may be made to the Madi-
son County Shrine Club, 186 SE
Oak St., Madison, FL 32340.
Carlton was born Feb. 23,
1926, in Cherry Lake. He is the
son of the late George F Bur-
nette, Sr., and Martha Croom
Burnette. He was a lifelong resi-
dent of Madison County. He was
a Christian and a member of the
Cherry Lake Methodist Church.
Burnette was a U.S. Navy Vet-
eran of World War II and a U.S.
Army Veteran of the Korean War.
He was manager of the C6ca-Cola
Bottling Co. in Madison, worked
for Bassett Dairy, and worked as
an Emergency Medical Techni-
cian with the Madison County
Ambulance Service.
He was a member of Madison
Lodge #1 F&A.M. and the Madi-
son County Shrine Club. He loved
to fish, and most conversations
with Carlton ended with a laugh
and a good feeling for having
been in his presence. He was a de-
voted husband, father and grand-
father and was always ready to
lend a helping hand to others.
He is survived by a son, Carl-
ton Mortimer Burnette, and wife,
Sherry Lamb Burnette, of Madi-
son; a grandson, Carlton M. Bur-
nette, Jr., and a granddaughter,
Kathryn Elizabeth Burnette,
both of Madison; and many other
relatives and friends.
He was predeceased by his.
wife, Cora "Betty" Bunting Bur-
nette.


January 22
On the Wings of
Freedom: An American
Portrait, featuring pi-
anist Mac Frampton and
the powerful voices of
Sam Hagan and Dawn-
Marie James, will be
held at Van H. Priest Au-
ditorium (NFCC campus)
on Thursday, Jan. 22, at 7
p.m. "Celebrate two cen-
turies of American mile-
stones as our country's
story is told through the
songs that unifed and in-
spired its people." For
more information, call
(850) 973-1653 or visit
www.nfcc.edu (keyword
Artist Series).
January 22
The Area Agency on
Aging for North Florida
Inc. will hold its board of
directors meeting on
Thursday, Jan. 22, at
10:30 a.m. The meeting
will be held at Area
Agency on Aging for
North Florida, 2414 Ma-
han Dr., Tallahassee. The
meeting is open and free
to the public.
January 24
The Craft Rendezvous
at the Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park on U.S. 41 in White
Springs is on Jan. 24,
from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Come
and enjoy crafters from
all over the state, as they
gather at the craft demon-
stration area to demon-
strate and sell their hand-
crafted art. The demon-
strations will include
photography, jelly mak-
ing, pottery, stained glass,
blacksmithing, wood-
working, fabric arts, aro-
matherapy, jewelry, quilt-
ing, walking sticks, paint-
ing and herbs. The Craft
Rendezvous is free with
paid park admission, $4
per vehicle up to 8 per-
sons. For more informa-
tion, call Craft Square at
(386) 397-1920 or visit
www.StephenFosterCSO
.org.
January 24
The Florida Museum
of Natural History in
Gainesville will host its
30th annual Collectors
Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Jan. 24. Visitors will en-
counter a wide variety of
personal collections at
this family-oriented
event, ranging from
corkscrews and antique
cars to sports and war


memorabilia. The event
is free and open to the
public. For more informa-
tion, call (352) 273-2061.
January 24
LifeSong will. be in
concert at Lamont
Methodist Church on Sat-
urday, Jan. 24, at 7 p.m.
Admission is free. Re-
freshments will be served
following the concert.
January 25
Grammy-nominated
Karen Peck and New Riv-
er will be in concert at
Faith Baptist Church on
Sunday, Jan. 25, at 2:30
p.m. Admission is free. A
love offering will be re-
ceived during the concert.
For more information;,
please call (850) 973-2887.
January 30 & 31
February 6 & 7
The Monticello
Opera House proudly
presents Later Life, a ro-
mantic comedy dinner
theater production, Jan.
30 & 31 and Feb. 6 & 7. En-
joy a delicious meal and a
delightfully funny show,
the ending of which is
voted upon by the audi-
ence! The doors open at
6:30, dinner is at 7:00, and
the show starts at 8:00.
Tickets are $35 for dinner
and the show, with dis-
counts for members.
Reservations are needed.
Call (850) 997-4242.
February 7
West Virginia Na-
tive's annual West Vir-
ginia Day celebration
will be held at the Ma-
sonic Lodge in Lake 'City
on Saturday, Feb. 7,
at 11:30 a.m. For
more information,
call (850) 973-2070.
.February 21
The Pinetree
Craft and Quilters an-
nounbe their 15th an-
nual quilt show and
brunch. The show
and brunch will be
held Feb. 21, 9 a.m.-1
p.m., at .the U.M.C.
Community Center
on Colin Kelly Hwy
There will be beauti-
ful quilts on display,
crafts and quilts for
sale, and prizes to be
won. There is no
charge, but donations
are greatfully accept-
ed, as this is their
only fund raiser to
purchase materials to
make quilts for needy
children.


February 22-27
The Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park will host an Elder-
hostel program for adults
age 55 and older entitled
"Suwannee River Adven-
ture: Canoeing, Hiking
and Folklore in Florida."
Three dates are being of-
fered for this active edu-
cational program during
the months of February
and March. This unique
program offers partici-
pants the opportunity for'
canoeing and hiking
along with educational
classes about the folklore
of the Suwannee River
Valley All meals, lodging
and classroom supplies
are included. For infor-
mation on program fees
and registration, please
call Kelly Green at
(386) 397-4478. Partici-
pants can register for
this program at
www.elderhostel.org or
call 1-800-454-5768.
Each Weekday
Except Tuesday
The Senior Citi-
zens Center offers
computer classes to
seniors 60 and older
each weekday except
Tuesday .For more in-
formation or to sign
up, please -call (850)
973-4241. A regular in-
structor is needed to
teach these classes. In-
terested individuals
should ask to speak
with Sharon concern-
ing the opening at the


number above.


Every Tues.-Sat.
The Diamonds in the
Ruff Adoption Program
at the Suwannee Valley
Humane Society is -open
every Tuesday through
Saturday from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. It is located on 1156
SE Bisbee Loop, Madi-
son, FL 32340. For more
information, or direc-
tions, ;call (866) 236-7812
or (850) 971-9904.
Third Tuesday of
Each Month
The Greater Green-
ville Area Diabetes Sup-
port Group is a free edu-
cational service and sup-
port for diabetes and
those wanting to prevent
diabetes. The group
meets the 'third Tuesday
of each month at the
Greenville Public Li-


brary Conference Room
at 312 SW Church St.,
Greenville, 11-11:30 a.m.
Everyone is welcome!
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison County
Health Education Club is
holding a free educatioh-
al service and support
group for people interest-
ed in preventing or con-
trolling diabetes, high
blood pressure, elevated
cholesterol levels, obesity
and other chronic health
conditions. The club
meets the third Wednes-
day of each month at the
Madison Public Library
Conference Room at 378
NW College Loop, Madi-
son, 12:15-12:45 p.m.
Everyone is welcome to
bring their own lunch.


Monday-Saturday
7:00 pm

Monticello, FL 850-997-2561


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6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 21, 2009



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Madison Law Firm Continues

Tradition Of Giving

By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The law firm of
Davis, Schnitker, Reeves
& Browning has made an-
othet generous donation,
this. time to the Madison'
County. Foundation for
Excellence in Education
(MCFEE), which will pur-
chase a Take Stock in
Children (TSIC) scholar-
ship. This donatiQn,
when matched, will pro-
Photo Submitted vide three four-year full-
The law firm of Davis, Schnitker, Reeves and Brown- tuition scholarships to dq-
ing continue to support the Madison Community with do- serving Madison County
nations like the one made recently to the Madison Coun- students.
ty Foundation for Excellence in Education. Pictured left The Take Stock in
to right: Bailey Browning, Clay Schnitker and Tommy Children Board of Direc-
Reeves. tors made the matching
funds available in a spe-
cial incentive drive called
Turbo-Charge. The idea
was to enlarge the local
donor base by adding the
matching incentive.
MCFEE is very grate-
ful to the law firm for re-
sponding so graciously.
Se within the time limit set
anuary usde afor this TSIC offer.
First Month's Rent $99.00 MCFEE recently wel-
(For January only Offer expires January 31,2009) comed two other scholar-
Spacious 1,2 & 3 Bedroom Apartment Homes ships in this manner and
Expects the third in the
Lighted Ceiling Fans in All Rooms near future.
SCentral A/C. The funds will be as-
SFull Size Washer & Dryer Included signed to students with
the ability and motivation
Private Balcony Outside Storage to complete four years of
Pets Welcome (Restrictions Apply) college, while exhibiting
Rents Starting As Low As $399 good citizenship, and, of
course, remaining drug
and crime free. Because of
Madison's Newest Apartment Homes donations like these, re-
Phone (850) 253-0126 cipientsh are often the first
Fax (850) 253-0127 EULHOUSING in their families to com-
OPPORTUNFY plete a college degree.


Farmers Cooperative, INC.
P.O. Box 390 Madison, FL 32341 (850) 973-2269 *fax (850) 973-3478







NEW YEAR SPECIALS

FEED SPECIALS:
12% STOCKER PELLETS $6.95
225# PVM TUB $86.50
20% RANGE PELLETS $8.25
COOP HI-MAG MINERAL $12.25

POST & WIRE:'
3" TO 0 1/2" 61/2' $2.99
5"'TO 6" 8' $7.95
1047 RB FIELD FENCE 330' $169.95
8' RED GATE $52.95
10' RED GATE $59.95
12' RED GATE $65.95
16' RED GATE $79.95
6:5' STEEL FENCE POST WICLIPS $4.99

LP GAS:
20# CYLINDER REFILL $11.99
20# CYLINDER (TANK ONLY) $32.95
DOUBLE BURNER COOKER (2685) $122.95
18" TALL COOKER W/CAST IRON POT (2546) $54.95
PIONEER COOKER W/ALUMINUM POT (2538) $49.95

CALL FOR OUR LP GAS PRICES FOR BOTH
RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL

ANIMAL HEALTH:
IVERMECTIN POUR-ON 5L $75.00
APPLE FLAVORED 1.87% IVERMECTIN HORSE WORMER $4.95


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, January 8, 2009
Madison Woman's Club President Ethel Barefoot (center) and Program Chair Betty
Williams (left) welcomed District Hope Chair (and past District Director) Ina Putnal to
the Jan. 8 meeting. Putnal shared a timely message and urged everyone to continue
her support of the Heifer International project.




WOmlaHn'S Club Builds Ark


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
During their monthly
luncheon held on Jan. 8,
the Madison Woman's
Club was treated to a pre-
sentation from District
Hope Chair Ina Putnal
who gave a rousing pre-
sentation about the Inter-
national Affair Presi-
dent's Project: Heifer
International. Janu-
ary Program Chair
Betty Williams intro-
duced Putnal, who has
long been a fan fa-
vorite with Madison
membership, having
recently served dis-
trict three as district
director
Madison Club
President Ethel 'Barefoot
got things started off, re-
ceiving congratulations
for doing a great job play-
ing club catch-up from the
demands of the holidays
and the sad loss of her
mother-in-law, Ruby Bare-
foot. She provided a de-
tailed review of recent
club praises and accom-
plishments, including a
thank you from Maria
Greene for the club's holi-
day decorations at the
Mansion and the introduc-


tion of two new club mem- fo
bers: Vicki Howerton and w
Penny Peterson. je
Following an invoca- F(
tion from Florida Smith, C]
whom this reporter has Di
noted on numerous occa- er
sions as providing the cl
most moving dedications, T,
members and guests en- to






HEIFER
INTERNATIONAL

www.heifer.org

joyed a tasty lunch. 'Her ra
message, regarding spiri- sl:
tual, light, was taken the h(
Book of Matthew and from te
excerpts of the works of
Meghan McKenna and is
John Ruskin. Smith refer- fo
enced, "You can always pi
know when you have been. gi
in the presence of a Chris- in
tian by the light." be
The program of the in
month, titled "Give the at
Gift of Hope," introduced ov
the Heifer International ti(
program, which can be in


und on the Internet at
ww.heifer.org. The pro-
ct, selected by Florida
federation of Women's
lubs President Linda
ennis, has received great
ithusiasm by each local
ub, including Madison.
ypical of Madison's his-
)ry of giving, prior to
Putnal's visit, the club
was already just shy of
its goal.
Heifer Interna-
tional is a simple, yet
highly effective, chari-
table approach to sup-
porting underdeveb,
oped countries. In a
nutshell, cash contri-
butions of $20 to $5,000
are used to purchase
and deliver livestock
rnging from chicks and
ieep to goats and heifers,
nce the name "Heifer In-
rnational."
Again, the philosophy
simple. By providing
od sources that can re-
roduce and be shared re-
onally, millions suffer-
ig from hunger needs can
steadily helped. Accord-
.g to organizational liter-
ure, "Heifer has learned
rer the years that a holis-
c approach is necessary
i order to build sustain-
ble communities. So
e've developed a set of
obal initiatives areas of
nphasis that must be ad-
rcssed if we're to meet
ir mission of ending
orld hunger and poverty
id caring for the earth."
These noble goals re-
ect the heart and soul of
le Madison Woman's
lub as well. In fact, local
forts are building to the-
[timate project goal, that
being the "Gift of an
RK." For a combined
contribution of $5,000,
eedy recipients will liter-
ly be delivered two of
ich of the livestock ani-
ials indigenous to that re-
Lon. Even hardworking
honeybees will be aboard
lis life-giving gift.
The next Madison
oman's Club meeting is
heduled for Feb. 12 at
:45 a.m. at the historic
ub hall located on Lake
dances. February Pro-
ram Chairman Suzanne
heavy will be facilitating
ie Arts & Crafts Show,
Lhich is always an annual
it. Anyone seeking infor-
ation about member-
lip, facility rental or pro-
'am inquiries may call
thel Barefoot at (850) 973-
19.


Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


SAFEGUARD WORMER BLOCKS 25# $31.95

FARMERS COOPERATIVE
VISIT OUR NEW AND IMPROVED WEB SITE
www.farmerscooperative.org
Call for delivery rates and other one day specials
1-888-581-6801 toll free 850-973-2269
i I I I I








Wednesday, January 21, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A



SPORTS




Corinth Warrors Enloy Ups, Endurt Downs


By Tom Parks
CCA Boys Basketball Team Head Coach

Lady Warriors Lose Heartbreaker
The Corinth Christian Academy Lady Warriors
dropped a heartbreaking decision 47-45 to. the Victory
Baptist Eagles Thursday night, Jan. 8, in Valdosta, Ga.
.The Lady Warriors traveled to the Eagles' home
court looking for revenge after losing a 21-point lead and
the game to the Eagles in December. Both squads start-
ed slowly, with the Eagles leading 7-4 at the end of the
first quarter. The pace picked up, but Victory Baptist
widened their lead to 20-16 at halftime.
The third quarter saw Victory Baptist extend their
lead, as CCA could not contain the Eagles. With less
than 8 minutes to play, the Lady Warriors were down by
9. Up that point, they trailed the entire game in front of
a hostile crowd. Coach Mike Boatright changed the CCA
defense to a full court press at the start of. the fourth-
quarter, and momentum began to swing back toward
the Lady Warriors.,
With three minutes left to play, the 9-point deficit
turned into a 3-point lead. With less than 30 seconds to
go,, and the game on the line, two controversial calls
were called and the the ball was taken away from the
Lady Warriors and turned into points for the Eagles.
Two final shots for CCA fell short and a monumental
comeback fell just short.
Tiffany Phillips scored 17 points, while grabbing 11
rebounds and snagging 4 steals. Andrea Abbott also had
17 points, while leading the team with 7 steals. Kayla
Rye contributed 4 rebounds and 5 steals, while Alayna
Abbott scored 5 points and pulled down 5 boards.

Warriors Drop Decision To Eagles
The Corinth Christian Academy Warriors were de-
feated by the Victory Baptist Eagles 63-20, Thursday
night, Jan. 8, in Valdosta, Ga.
The Warriors, who are in the midst of a rebuilding
year, struggled early against the Eagles. The Warriors
were unable to penetrate the zone defense of the Eagles,,
and were forced to shoot over a third of their shots from
3-point range.
Leading 34-10 at the half; Victory Baptist substituted
liberally in the third quarter, only to return to their
starting lineup for the fourth quarter. Although the out-
come was never in doubt, the Warriors never gave up,
playing their hardest to the final whistle.
The Warriors were led in scoring by Jordan Fenne-
man with 13 points, including 3 3 pointers. Fenneman
also contributed 3 rebounds. Daniel Norris. scored 3
points, while pulling down 4 rebounds and dishing&out 6
assists. Trevor Small rounded out the scoring -with 4
points, while snagging 5 boards.

Lady Warriors Take District Opener
The Corinth Christian Academy. Lady Warriors
opened their' districtbasketball'season with a resound-
ing 45-15 victory Friday night, Jan. 9, at Lee Gym.
Taking control fr6m the opening tip, the Lady War-
riors opened up with a 12-0 run on the way to a 33-7 half-
time lead. With the game in hand, Coach Mike Boatright
went to the bench for most of the second half, as every-
one in uniform played: "
'The Lady Warriors shot 36 percent from the field,
with Andrea Abbott leading all scorers with 15 points.
Tiffany Phillips scored 9 points, while grabbing 9 re-
bounds anad dishing outt 3 assists. Miranda. Mulkey
scored .6 points', while .pulling .down a team high 11 re-
bounds. Kayla Rye and. Alayna Abbott both sc6red'6
points, with Rye contributing 8 rebounds: Ciera Burnett
scored the lone 3 pointer of, the game for the Lady War-
riors, who improve their rec6d to (4-2) (1-0),

CCA Warriors Lose District Opener
The Corinth Christian Academy Warriors lost their
first district basketball game 61-22 in front of a home
crowd at Lee Gym on Friday night, Jan. 9.
Facing the tall atid experienced team from Starke,
the Warriors held their own in the opening minutes be-
fore the veteran Nortfiside team took control of the


Greene.Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, January 16, 2009
The Corinth Christian Academy Lady Warriors have enjoyed several wins in 2009. The Lady Warriors are (from
left to right) Coach Mike Boatright, Alayna Abbott, Andrea Abbott, Brittany Goyette, Ciera Burnett, Tiffany Phillips,
Sharon Bontrager, Jessica Taylor, Kayla Rye, Allison Parks and Coach Shonda Boatright.


game. Once again, being forced to shoot from the
perimeter by a tenacious Eagle defense, the Warriors
were held to 5 for 28 shooting from beyond the arc.
Jordan Fenneman' led the Warrior scoring with 13
points and 2 rebounds, while Zach Bray scored 4 points
and contributed 3"rebounds. Daniel Norris scored .5
points and dished out 3 assists to go with 3 rebounds.

Lady Warriors Win Again In District
Using a 13-0 run to start the game, the Corinth,
Christian Academy Lady Warriors cruised to a 56-13
victory over the visiting Hope Christian Lions at Lee.
Gym on Tuesday, Jan. 13.
The Lions were playing in only their second game as
a team, but were not intimidated by. the more experi-
enced Lady Warriors. Scoring 5 points with a free throw
and two straight shots from the wing, thp Lions kept
pace with the Lady Warriors through the first quarter.
However, the Lady Warriors defense stepped up and,
shut out the Lions the rest of the first halffh -.., a ,-,
The Lions came out strong in the second half,.scor-
ing the first two times they touched'the ball'. But once
again, the Lady Warrior defense stepped up and domi-'
nated the rest of the game.
The Lady Warriors were led by Sharon Bdntrager
and Andrea Abbott with 14 points apiece, with Bon-
trager scoring on 7 of 9 shots. Tiffany Phillips knocked


down 10 points; while grabbing 11 rebounds-and leading
the team with 4 assists. Alayna Abbbtt added 6 points
with a team high 13 rebounds. Allison Parks le& the
team with 4 steals.

Warriors Stopped By Hope Christian
With the. team back at full strength after the return
of two players, the Corinth Christian Academy War-
riors basketball team hoped to even their conference
record with a victory over the Hope Christian Lions
Tuesday night. The. Lions are a first-year team, but it
was obvious from the tipoff that they were far from the
typical-first-year team.
Using a 14-0 run, the Lions jumped out on top and
never let up. The Warriors' normally dependable out-
side shooting was absent, and an aggressive zone de-
fense kept the Warriors out of the paint. The 27-6 half-
time score did not discourage the; Warrior spirit, as
DanielNorris and Zac Rye led the fight inside in the sec-
ond haf. However, the, Lions defense stiffened and, de-_
spite several starters in foul trouble, dominated, the
boards inr a 53-14 victory
Daniel Norris led the scoring with 5 points, while
Zac Rye scored 4 points and grabbed a team high 11 re-
bounds. Jordan Fenneman scored 3 points, while
Hunter Levan rounded out the scoring with 2 points and
3 boards.,


ACA Warriors Fal To' John Paul II


By Fran Hunt
Speciaifrom the-.
Monticello News :
The Aucilla Christian
Academy Warriors fell 60-
39 to John Paul II, Jan. 15,
to stand 1-9 on the season.
As,, a team, the War-
riors sunk 10 of 31 (32 per-
cent) from the field, 6 of 17
(35 percent) from the
three-point zone, and 1 of
2 (50 percent) from the
free-throw line for 39
points. They collected 9 as-
sists, 9 offensive and 16 de-
fensive rebounds, 7
block/steals and 23
turnovers.
Stephen Dollar bucket-
ed 1 of 4 (25 percent) from


the field and 1 of 1 (10G
.percent) from the three-
point 'zone for 5 points;
had 2 assists, 1 block/steal
and 2 turnovers.
Luke Witmer netted 3
of 7 (43 percent) from the
field and 2 of 5 (40 percent)
from the three-point zone
for 12 points, with 1 assist,
2 offensive and 3 defensive
rebounds, 1 block/steal
and 2 turnovers.
Randy Perry missed' 4
from the field and 1 from
the three-point zone, had'2
assists, 2 offensive' and 3
defensive rebounds, 1
block/steal and 1
turnover.
.Brandon Dunbar


bucketed;: 3 of 4 (75 per-
cent) from the field and 1
of 2 (50 percent) from the
three-point zone for 9
points, had 1 assist, 1 of-
fensive and 4 defensive re-
bounds, 1 block/steal and
2 turnovers.
Alex Dunkle hit 1 of 2
(50 percent) from the field
and 1 of 3 (33 percent)
from the three-point zone.
fo .i'5 points, had 1
bjk/steal and. 6
t 4novers.
Brandon Darnell
"missed from the field and
had 1 offensive and 1 'de-
;fensive rebound, 1
block/steal and 4
'turnovers.
1''"7 *' 'Q ^


Matthew Harrington
missed 3 from the field and
2 from the 3-point zone,
but bucketed 1 of 2 (50 per-
cent) from the free-throw
line for 1 point He had 1 as-
sist and 3 offensive and- 1
defensive rebounds.
John Stephens missed
.2 from the field and
dropped ini 1 6f3 (233.per-
- cent) fromnithe three-point
zone for 3 points. He also
had 1 assist.
Clar 'Christy netted 2
of 4,(50 percent) from the
field for 4 points, had 4 de-
fensive rebounds, 1
block/steal and 1 turnover.
Joe Mizell had 5
turnovers.


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Public Service Announcement
From the City of MadiSon

NATURAL' AS:

A Gas leak could be dangerous but gas itself
has no odor. So, for your safety, a smell like
rotten eggs is added. If you smell such an
odor:

1. Don't use the telephone
2. Don't turn lights on or off, or use anything
electrical.
3. Go outside right away.
4. Ask a neighbor to call the Gas company.
5. Don't go back into the house until the gas
company says it's safe.

PLEASE KEEP GAS SAFE.

(850) 973-5081 City Hall Working Hours
(850) 973-5075 Fire Department After Hours


City of Madison
Public Service Announcement

DAMAGE PREVENTION IS EVERYONE'S
RESPONSIBILITY

The City of Madison requests that. you
please call Sunshine at 1-800-432-4770
at least 48 hours before you dig, but not
more than 5 days. Have information
ready when calling: company name/ad-
dress, contact person, phone number,
location of dig site, extent and type of
work, and date/start time of excavation.
Wait 48 hours for underground facilities
to be marked. Respect and protect the
facility operator's marks. Dig with care!
Always hand dig when within two feet on
either side of any marked lines.








8A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 21, 2009



REGIONAL HAPPENINGS


Steve Green Coming


To Dowling Park
Advent Christian Village in Dowling Park has an-
nounced its lineup for Winter Retreat 2009, March
14-17.
Kicking off the events on Saturday evening,
March 14, is an exciting concert by Christian vocalist
Steve Green. Green has been a well-known Christian
singer since,1984. Throughout his career, he has
-.. shared Christ's love
through his songs, includ-
ing 13 No. 1 radio songs,
like "People Need the
Lord" and "God and sGod
Alone." He is also the win-
ner of 7 Dove awards,
Tickets for the concert
are for reserved seating,
aand are $12. For tickets,
call (386) 658-5343 weekdays
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m'
Tickets purchased via tele-
phone may *be picked up
prior to the concert in the
Swill call area near the
main door of the church.,
Beginning Sunday
Morning, keynote speaker,
Dr. Tim Laniak, author and
dean of Gordon Conwell
Theological Seminary in
E G Charlotte, N.C. He will be
STEVE GREEN speaking on the topic
"Shepherds After My Own
Heart," dealing with God's provision, protection and,
guidance for us.
Laniak is a dynamic teacher, who comes highly
recommended by those who have heard his messages.
After spending a year in Israel living with, working
with, and studying shepherds, as well as Bedouin
tribes in Jordan, Sinai, and Israel, Laniak brings a
unique view to his messages concerhing Christ as the
high shepherd. He will share with us each morning
and evening, March 15-17. (No tickets are necessary
for the keynote sessions.)
In addition to Laniak's messages, Winter Retreat
2009 will offer special music, interesting workshops,
fun activities and delicious meals, not to mention rich
fellowship.
Mark your calendars and plan now to attend Win-
ter Retreat 2009.


State History Glimpsed From Collection


The State Library and
Archives of Florida has
added a collection of Flori-
da broadsides and other
ephemera, titled Selling,
Telling and Yelling: Flori-
da Broadsides and Other
Ephemera, 1800-2000, to
the Florida Memory Pro-
ject Web site: The collec-
tion, which consists of
over 200 broadsides and
other print items, is avail-
able for viewing online at
www.floridamemory.com/
collections/broadsides.
Before television,, ra-
dio and the Internet, Flori-
da society often communi-


cated through broadsides,
advertisements, flyers and
other ephemera. Broad-
sides are large, one-sided
printed posters used for
public communication.
They were usually posted
in prominent public
spaces such as churches,
street corners and town
halls. Typical examples of
broadsides include cam-
paign posters, playbills,
public notices, announce-
ments, petitions, procla-
mations and advertise-
ments.
However, print com-
piunications were not lim-


ited to broadsides, and in-
cluded pamphlets, cards,
tickets, blank forms, fly-
ers, reprinted newspaper
.articles and political car-
toons. These materials are
often referred to as
ephemera because of their
transitory nature. They
were meant to quickly con-
vey a message and then to
be disposed of. Fortunate-
ly for this and future gen-
erations, much of this ma-
terial has been preserved.
Today, they offer a unique
window into Florida's past
in much the same way that
billboards, television and


newspaper ads, e-mails
and blogs will reveal much
about our present society
to tomorrow's historians.
The images available
online represent only a
small portion of the broad-
sides and ephemera found
in the State Library's
Florida Collection, which
is one of the most compre-
hensive collections about
Florida and Floridians in
existence.
For more information
on the Florida Collection,
visit dlis.dos.state.fl.us/
li brary /flco llectio ri/
index.cfm.


Scans Courtesy the Florida Memory Project Web Site








Wednesday, January 21, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 9A



HISTORY


Josiah Wlalls


Florida Black Achiever


Photograph of Josiah T. Walls, Florida's
=farmer, successful lawyer and newspaper I

By Alfa Hunt
Greene Publishing, Inc.
"He rose from slavery to become
Florida's first black politician of nation-
_al prominence at a time when it was
tBrisky, business for, any man,, especially a
black man, to be in politics at all," wrote
historian Gene Burnett in an article
about Josiah Walls.
Walls was born to slave parents in
Virginia on Dec. 30, 1842. He was later
forced to serve under the confederate
banner against the Union. He was even-
tually captured and freed by union forces
in 1863 and joined the first black U.S. in-
fantry regiment. He served through the
war untilhis discharge as a sergeant ma-
jor at Jacksonville, n 1865. -
He moved toI the farmlands of
Alachua County, near Gainesville. He
met and married the young Helen Fer-
gueson. Luckily, he was able to obtain a
teaching job in nearby Archer because of
some early schooling on his part and an
intense self tutoring program.
With the military beginning recon-
struction in March, 1861, the 'newly freed
men began flocking to Florida's republi-
can party, or Lincoln's party Inr Alachua,


s first U.S. congressman, as well as a mayors
publisher.

black voters far outnumbered white.
Many conservative white voters resented
the dominating Yankee forces flooding in
from the North whom they gave the name
"carpetbaggers," and refused to sponsor
candidates or even vote.
Walls was elected delegate to the con-
vention, and although he aligned himself
with the radical republican faction, he
voted for the somewhat moderate state
constitution, which was finally adopted.
Walls felt that it was important for the
politicians to keep- a black presence in
the mainly white political structure, as
well as to seek out future alliances with
whites, such as Ossian B. Hart and Mar-
cellus Stearns, both of whom later be-
came governors.
Upon returning home, Walls discov-
ered that he had a "solid" political base
inAlachua among whites and blacks. He
easily won the election and became a leg-
islator in the lower state assembly (the
House) in 1868. Later in the year, he won
a state senate seat.
He, along with many other black sup-
porters, found it increasingly frustrating
to secure their civil rights, such as the
right to 'use, public hotels "without dis-
\ ~~~Y,


tinction," or protection against terrorist
activities by the Ku Klux Klan and the fa-
natics of the Young Men's Democratic
Clubs. The "groups were leading a "cam-
paign of terror" against blacks, as well as
white Republicans statewide with intimi-
dation, beatings, burnouts, murders, vot-
ing frauds and armed blockades of roads
leading to voting precincts.
In Alachua County alone, the period
of 1867-1871 had a total of 19 murders
and numerous disturbances, which were
all instigated by the two groups.
Walls decided to run for a higher of-
fice seat. In 1870, he squared off against
the conservative candidate, Silas LY'
Niblack, a confederate veteran and for-
mer slave owner, in a race for Congress.'
During the election, Niblack made sure
to make an issue of Walls self-education
and ex-slave background.
The election was marked by voter-
fraud, ballot-stuffing, and sporadic fight-
ing. In onie instance, at a rally, a shot was
fired at Walls and missed him by only
"inches." Walls eventually won by a 627-
vote margin and took his- seat in the
House of Representatives March 4, 1871.
The U.S. House Committee on Elec-
tions held a lengthy witness hearings on
the matter of Niblack, contesting the
election earlier 'in the year
The witness hearings were so
lengthy, they finally took Niblack's side
on the matter in January 1873 by accept-
ing three Duval County precinct returns
that the state canvassing board had first
thrown out as fraudulent.
Unfortunately, for Niblack, Walls ran
against him for a second term and won
by 1,662 votes. The Conservatives didn't
contest the outcome this time.
During the next few years, Walls was
also busy in. other pursuits. He studied
various subjects, passed exams and was
admitted to the Florida Bar. Along with
two other black acquaintances, he
formed a law firm. He also served brief
terms as Gainesville's, mayor and as
county commissioner. He was also named


brigadier general in the Florida State
Militia.
Most of his savings were invested in
a 1,175-acre farm, and.he eventually be-
came one of the state's most successful
truck farmers.
In 1874, Walls won his third congres-
sional term against the former confeder-
ate General Jesse Finley by a margin of
371 votes. Finley contested the outcome.
The House committee ended:up finding
"irregularities" in one aladk precinct
sufficient to void its terms, which includ-
ed 588 votes given to Walls. As a result,
Walls was unseated in March of 1876.
While he served in legislature, Walls
sought to be responsive to all the state's
needs. He boosted Florida's appeal to new
settlers and investors, including a secure
railroad system, waterway and other in-
ternal improvements. He Liushed to im-
prove the state's mail system and, above
all, to increase the educational opportu-
nities for blacks.
In one of his races for a political seat,
he argued that southern lawmakers used
"state's rights" to deny bdth blacks and
poor white children' education. Arguing
for the state's first federal education bill,
he declared that, if edJucaioio was left
solely to the states, black would suffer.
He was able t6 secure 90,000 acres of pub-
lic land in Tallahassee for Florida Nor-
mal College, which is now Florida A&M.
In one Tallahassee newspaper, Walls
was termed as "able, clearheaded [and]
honest." The far away St. Louis newspa-
per, The Globe, called him "an effective,
tireless worker; tactful, foresighted and
practical."
When power began to return to the
Democrats in 1880, Walls retreated from
the "ineffective" political activities. With
the death of his wife and his own failing
health, as well as financial ruin after his
citrus groves were wiped put in the 1895
freeze, Walls was prompted to move to
Tallahassee, where he became the direc-
tor of the Florida Normal College farm
until hisMdeath in May 1905: "


LIVE OAK GAS


Th0MdionCont Crre
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1OA Madison County Carrier www.2reenepublishing.com WednesdayJanuary 21, 2009


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10A Madison County Carrier








Wednesday, January 21, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11 A



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Hood, Texas.
The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Buddy and
Ruth Parrish of Bell and Bob and Kathy Sarvis of
Hartford, Ala.
The groom-elect is the son of Arthur and Deborah
Colson of Plantation. His grandparents are Mrs. MaryF.
Colson and the late Arthur, C. Colson, Sr., of Madison,
Mrs. Marilyn Brothers of Gainesville and the late Ladell Brothers of Madison.
The bride-elect is a graduate of Santa Fe High School in Alachua and Santa Fe
College in Gainesville, where she received her associate of arts degree in elementary
education. She is currently attending the University of Florida, pursing her master's
degree in elementary education.
The groom-elect is a graduate of South Plantation High School in Plantation. He is a
sergeant in the U.S. Army Special Forces, with whom he is currently serving his third tour
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Taylor-Bland Wedding


SMr. and Mrs. Denny C. Taylor ofAlma, Ga., are proud to
announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their
daughter, Kristen Leigh, to Daniel Edwin Bland, son of Ms.
Darlene Bland of Live Oak, and Mr. Jim Bland of Panacea.
The bride-elect's maternal grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. William B. Law of Alma and paternal grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. D.C. Taylor of Alma.
Kristen is a graduate of Bacon County High School
and received a bachelor of science degree in nursing from
Valdosta State University. She is currently employed by
Archbold Memorial Hospital.
The groom-elect's maternal grandparents are the late Mr. and Mrs. James Lewis Porter
q and the late Mr. Daniel Bryant Thigpen. The paternal grandparents are Mrs. Louise Bland of
Madison and the late Mr. Richard Bland.
Daniel is a graduate of Madison County High School and received a certificate of
completion from Taylor Technical Institute in electrical & instrumentation technology. He is
currently employed with the City of Tallahassee as an apprentice lineman.
The wedding ceremony will take place Saturday, Feb. 28, 2009, at 6p.m., at the Alma
United Methodist Church in Alma, Ga. A reception will follow at' asmine Acres.
The couple wishes to invite all family and friends to the celebration of this joyous occasion.


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12A* Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 21, 2009




MONEY & FINANCE




Investors Buy $32 Billion In


T-bills At Zero Percent Interest


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Ihc.
For the average in-
vestor, or for that matter
experienced one, hearing
that anyone would put $32
billion into an investment
earning zero-percent in-
terest would sound ab-
solutely ridiculous. In this
current investment cli-
mate, however, where safe-
ty of principal is the first
priority and rates are be-
ing kept low to make sure
money keeps flowing, the
United States T-bill, con-,
sidered the safest invest-
ment on the planet, is pay-
ing nothing to, investors.
Its like Uncle Sam has be-
come the proverbial mat-
tress old timers were
known to fill with their
valuables.
That's right, for now,
the U.S. government is get-
ting the same deal as some
car. buyers: zero-percent
financing, as they auc-
tioned $32 billion in four-
week T-bills at zero per-
cent interest Tuesday, Jan.
13, obviously the lowest


auction rate ever. Again,
the credit crisis has in-
vestors so worried; they
simply want the govern-
ment's guarantee of safe-
ty even if they don't earn
any interest.
"Clients are looking
for a safe harbor from
whatever terrible things
may be ,out there," says
Deborah Cunningham,
chief investment officer at
Federated Investments. "It
has nothing to do with re-
turns."
Demand for the no-in-


terest T-bills was feverish.
The Treasury received
$128.5 billion in bids, or
more than four dollars in
bids for every one dollar it
accepted. In comparison,
the Treasury sold $23 bil-
lion in one-month T-bills a
year ago and received
$57.5 billion in offers, and
that was with a yield of
2.95 percent.
It is difficult to appre-
ciate the unique circum-
stances in which Ameri-
cans find themselves. It is-
n't that they have' never


experienced financial
challenges. It is that lead-
ers, both public and pri-
vate, are working fever-
ishly for a different out-
come than those previous
downfalls in history.
Frankly, it's more compli-
cated now than most will
ever understand, but, the
basics remain. Money
must keep flowing, and it
has to be available at very
low rates.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Many Companies Unable To


Weather Economic Storm


By Michael Curtis.
Greene.Publishing, Inc.
When Pilgrim's Pride
began talking bankruptcy.
several months ago, they
certainly weren't alone. As
this process occurs, of
course, there will be peo-
ple speaking out. against


Don't Forget About Inflation
When You Retire
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones

During your working years, you put money away, hoping that it
will grow enough to help provide you with a comfortable retire-
ment. But once you retire, haven't you reached your goal? You
'don't still need to invest for growth, do you?

Actually, you do.You may be retiring, but the cost of living march-
es on. In fact, even with a relatively mild inflation rate of three per-
cent, you'll pay about twice as much for goods and services in 25
years as you do today. And since you could easily spend two or
three decades in retirement, you need to be prepared for these
costs.

At first glance, you might think that this situation presents you
with a daunting challenge. Historically, stocks are the only finan-
cial assets that have significantly outperformed inflation. Yet, as a
retiree, you may be nervous about investing in equities, especial-
ly given the)stock market's performance last year. How can you
stay ahead of inflation without taking on too much risk?

Unquestionably, you'll have to manage your investment portfolio
very carefully during your retirement years. But it's important to
realize that you do have options. Here are a few suggestions:

Consider dividend-paying stocks.. By doing some
research, you can find stocks that have paid -. and even
increased dividends for many consecutive years. Obviously, a
source of rising income can help you in your battle against infla-
tion and many dividend-paying stocks also offer the potential
for long-term growth. Keep in mind, 'though, that a company can
decrease or eliminate its stock'dividend at any time.
Create an inflation-fighting withdrawal strategy. During
your retirement, you will probably need to take withdrawals from
all your resources your taxable brokerage and savings
accounts; your tax-deferred accounts, such as your Traditional
IRA and your 401(k); and your tax-free accounts, such as your
Roth IRA. (A Roth IRA's earnings grow tax-free if you've had your
account for at least five years and don't start taking withdrawals
until you're 59-1/2). Obviously, the longer you can preserveyour
tax-advantaged growth potential, the better off you'll be when it
comes to staying ahead of inflation. Consequently, you may want
to take withdrawals from your taxable account first, tap into your
Traditional IRA and your 401(k) next and save the Roth IRA for
last. (If you're 70-1/2,or older, however, you need to take required
'minimum distributions from your Traditional IRA and yor 4..i(k).)
That said, this is just a rule.of thumb, as your actual strategy may
change from year to year, depending on your expected tax bur-
den.
Think about some TIPS. Most types of Treasury bills or
bonds pay a fixed rate of return, which makes them susceptible
to inflation. However, you can also invest in Treasury Inflation-
Protected Securities, or TIPS. The principal of a TIPS increases
with inflation and decreases with deflation, as measured by the
Consumer Price Index. When yourTIPS mature, you are paid the
adjusted principal or original principal, whichever is greater. Be
aware, though, that you'll be taxed:on the annual inflation adjust-
ments, even though you won't receive this money until your bond
is redeemed. Consult with your tax advisor to determine if you
should put your TIPS in a tax-deferred account, such as a
Traditional IRA.

You'll have to cope with inflation throughout your retirement
years. But by making the right moves, at the right time, you can
greatly boost your chances of enjoying the lifestyle you've envi-
sioned.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


J ward Jones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.6dwardjones.com
* Sve.n ina tl s~u] i-v-vlftp seJ/ti ll


management, but frankly,
whether management is
completely, partly or not at
fault, it can divide and dec-
imate a community.
Following the an-
nouncement last year that
several financial and in-
surance institutions had
collapsed, which triggered
the official declaration'
that the U.S. was in a re-
cession, other large em-
ployers followed suit the
most recent household
name: Circuit City
Bankrupt Circuit City
Stores Inc., unable to work
out a sale of the company,
said it would go out of
business, closing its 567
U.S. stores and cutting
30,000 jobs. The nation's
second-biggest consumer
electronics retailer is the
latest casualty of an un-
precedented pullback in
consumer spending that
has driven other brands
such as KB Toys, Mervyns
LLC and Linens 'N Things
into bankruptcy. Experts
believe there will be more
to come.
"This is the only possi-
ble path for our company,"
Circuit City's acting Chief
Executive James A. Mar-
eum said in a statement.
"We are extremely disap-


pointed by this outcome."
The company had been
seeking a buyer or a deal
to refinance its debt, but
the still-recovering credit
market and consumer wor-
ries proved insurmount-
able. Negotiations for an
acquisition went down to
the wire, but both prospec-
tive buyers Mexican bil-
lionaire Ricardo Salinas
Pliego, who controls a
chain of electronics stores
in Latin America, and the
Golden Gate Capital pri-
vate equity firm couldn't
come to terms.
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge
Kevin Huennekens gave fi-
nal approval to the liqui-
dation plan. "This is a
very sad day for manage-
ment, the employees, cus-
tomers and the communi-
ty" the judge said.
Employers obviously
had little, if any, warning
of the rapid decay that
would occur in the retail
market over the holiday
shopping season. People
often think of themselves
as living week-to-week, un-
fortunately, many corpo-
rate giants aren't far be-
hind.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Other Companies In

Bankruptcy Or Gone

Retailers:
Steve and Barry's filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy
protection in July, then later abandoned plans to keep
stores open and said it would liquidate.
The Bombay Co. declared bankruptcy in September
2007 and shuttered the last of its stores in January 2008.
Sharper Image Corp. filed for bankruptcy protec-
tion in February and closed all its stores in the past year.
Banks or Investment Firms
Bear Stearns Cos. was bought by JPMorgan Chase
and Co. in March in a deal orchestrated by the govern-
ment after a sharp decline in shares and a collapse in
confidence in the company
Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. declared bankrupt-
cy in September, the largest-ever case in the United
States, less than a week after reporting a $4 billion loss.
Airlines
ATA Airlines filed for bankruptcy April 2 and
ceased operations the next day.
Aloha Airlines shut down its passenger service in
March, shortly after filing for bankruptcy
Skybus Airlines, a low-cost carrier, filed for bank-
ruptcy protection in April, less than a year after it be-
gan.





Even though 2008 is history, you might still be able .
I to cut your 2008 tax bill. Possible tax-cutters include
making a deductible 2008 IRA contribution by April
15, 2009, tallying up reinvested dividends on stocks
yI sold in 2008, and.getting written documentation for
2008 charitable contributions. For assistance, please call.

M SCHOELLES

& ASSOCIATES, INC.

439 SW RANGE AVE MADISON, FL 32340 850-973-4353 /
m..........m---- --- ..--mm. .g


424 West Base Street Madison, Florida 32340
Phone 850.973.2600 Fax 850.973.2606




www.csbfl.net



FDIC EQUAL HOUSING
-- LENDER CITIZENS STATE BANK








Wednesday, January 21, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 13A



HEALTH & NUTRITION


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
1.21.08
I didn't exactly look
fondly upon the idea of giv-
ing up smoking. Cigarettes
have been a part of my
days for so long, it's hard to
imagine making it a day
without one. They're there
when I first wake up, and
every time I get stressed.
They go out dancing and
singing karaoke, and they,
love to hang out and be so-
cial. They've always been'
there for me whenever I've
been blue. They're smooth,
warm and don't judge me
when I'm having a hard
time.
Still, it hit me that I
subconsciously. acknowl-
edged what cigarettes were
doing to me when I men-


tioned to the maintenance
man fixing my air condi-
tioner that, basically, it
boiled down to the fact
that,, if I wanted to truly
"off" myself, there were-
quicker and cheaper ways
of doing it.
He put his needle-noseI
pliers down and looked at
me with a look that sug-
gested he should be calling
in another profession-one
with a plaque, a notepad
and a pipe, whose idealolo-
gy of Freudianism could
possibly save this wayward
single mother's soul before
she plummeted into an
endless pit worse than that
of nicotine servitude.
"Wait," I stammered,
chuckling nervously, "that
came out wrong."
What I meant was that
I had finally realized I had
been justifying their exis-
tence in my life. A life that
cigarettes were actively
made to shorten. I had
been rationalizing since
age 14-when I had picked
up my first cigarette to re-
place the cloves that were
too harsh on my throat
when smoked during bad
poetry recital nights-that


lake Park Of M adison I

A skAiled nursingandrehabilitation facility,
serving the long term care and rehabilitation
needs of Madison and the surrounding area.


these little rolls of cylin-
drical death were simply
"not so good for me."
More specifically, they
were starting to hinder my
breathing ... right when I
was getting serious about
breathing and breathing
right.
I had started paying at-
tention to my breathing
again when I picked back
up my yoga regime. I was
getting serious and I was
proud of myself. I was
starting to see improve-
ment. Yet, deep down in my
newly "centered" self, I
knew that yogi masters
probably frowned upon
hacking out the universal
grounding sound of
"Ohm" when in the lotus
position. More important-
ly, being as though the


AP X-"f


-"breath of life" Was just
that, it's hard to remain
centered when every
morning is greeted with a
nice fresh coughing fit that
ends with "Mommie? Are
you K?"
That was a big red flag.
Yeah, I have a tendency
to ignore those. Warning'
labels? We don't need no
stinkin' warning labels. I
used to smoke DeathHeads.
Their label was a skull and
crossbones.
But that was then, and
now I have wee ones that I
do not want following in
Mommie's cloudy foot-
steps; so it's time to set a
good example.
I like living. I like liv-
ing a lot. And in all the liv-
ing I've done thus far, I've
discovered something. I re-


Its Official: Breakfast Is The

Most Important Meal Of The Day


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Although it's a com-
monly accepted fact
among dieticians and
grandmothers every-
where, the Florida's Gov-
ernor and Cabinet made it
official on Jan. 13 when
they adopted a resolution
recognizing the creation of
the Florida Breakfast Pait-
nership, an, organization
dedicated to educating
consumers about the im-.
portance of eating, a
healthy breakfast every
day.
The partnership is an
alliance of the Florida De-
partment of Citrus, Flori-
da Deparfm eit f 'Agricui-
ture and Consumer Ser-
vices, Dairy Council of
Florida, Florida Poultry
Federation and the Florida
Pork Improvement Group.
Research suggests that
eating breakfast on a regu-.
lar basis provides nutri-
tional benefits and may
help with weight control
and cognitive perfor-
mance. The 'Florida Break-
fast Partnership will con-
duct marketing outreach


efforts to consumers, edu-
cators and health profes-
sionals to increase aware-
ness of nutritious Florida
products that can be a part
of a healthy breakfast.
The newly launched
Web site www.floridabreak
fast.com provides educa-
tional resources for par-
ents and teachers, health
and nutrition research up-
dates, recipes, educational
games for children and
links to partners' web
sites.
For its inaugural
event, the Florida Break-
fast Partnership will host
the "Fresh from Florida"
Breakfast at the' Florida'
sta Fairf on Fridayr,9'Fe.
6, at 7:30 a.m.
In Madison County, ed-
ucators continue to urge
students to eat a nutritious
breakfast everyday, espe-
cially in preparation for
the FCAT. Last year, each
school sent home advi-
sories detailing the impor.-
tance of breakfast for the
peak performance and
concentration necessary
for academic achievement
and testing.


IKO I, PART 1


ally like air. It's free, it's
clean,, and it's natural. It's
easy to find and even easi-
er to carry around with
you. Air comes in different
scents and is light enough
to bring extra along in case
you want to change. It car-
ries all of the promise of
tomorrow, while still
bringing back all of the
memories of yesterday. I
like ,air and I'd like to be


able to enjoy more of it. I
have little braves that are
concerned about Mom-
mie's breathing.
I want them to grow up
knowing how to live and
breathe ... right.
To do that, I must show
them:how ... set a good ex-
ample.
I'm giving up my ciga-
rettes so that I may start to
breathe again.


Question: I have been missing my teeth on the
lower left side for over 5 years. All of a sudden I am
having sharp pains like a toothache where I don't have
teeth. Can you have a toothache without teeth?

Answer: This sounds like a special case and cer-
tainly a trick question. Surprisingly, it is possible to have
"toothache like" pains in places where you do not have
teeth. Most often these pains are referred pains from
other teeth in the mouth. Teeth can play tricks on you.
See your dentist to have referred pain ruled out first. If
he rules that out, pains like this can be caused by a
range of problems, some simple and some which are
subtle; if your dentist does not find any teeth referring
pain he may refer you to an Oral Surgeon., Oral
Surgeons are highly trained specialists in the pain of the
head and neck. They will look for cysts, Neuralgias,
Myofacial pain disorders, and NICO lesions all of which
can cause the pain you describe. I have seen many
neuralgias like Tic douloureux and Trigeminal neuralgia
which are extremely painful. I have patients which
describe the feeling of being stabbed with a knife. It is a
radiating pain which comes on without warning but goes
away quickly. There can also be cysts within jaws called
NICO lesions which can cause pain. TMJ & Myofacial
pain disorders can cause muscle spasms in the face
which can bep very; painful.,.

Most importantly, go get a good diagnosis. The sooner
it is diagnosed the better. Problems like this tend to
become worse and more difficult to treat the longer you
wait.


You may save
on your prescriptions
as a patient of
Tri-County Family
Health Care and our
partnership with
Jackson's Drugs

Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician



Please call 850-948-2840
for more information

Tri-County Family Health Care
193 NW US 221. *Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.


ysici an


PilRY OF A


i









14A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, January 21, 2009


FOR RE


House for Ren
fin,'Greenville, F
(near elementary sc
'All Electric, Newly rc
3 bedrooms, 1 bath $
1st & security dep
,Housing Choic
Vouchers Accep
Call 850-973-734
617-4 37-190f


DOWNTOWN APAR
FOR RENT, NEY
RENOVATED 1BR,
$450.00 MO.
567-1523


For Rent:
4 Bedroom 2 Bath hou
built in office, beauti:


Mobile Home For Rent
12'x60'- 2 Bed/ 1 Bath
Rodger's Sink Road. 2 miles
South of 1-10 off St. Rt. 53
South. Lee School District.
$350 per mth/ $300 deposit.
Call: 850-971-5856
1/21-1/23


1290
ext. 485
ortunity
rtn

it
FL
chool).
modeled
600/mo.


For Sale in Hamilton Co.
on 5 Acres.
You Choose Floorplan.
SCall Today
850-253-8001
rtnl


I


For Sale
2 BR/2 BTH Town House
at 346 SW Macon Street.
Call After 5:30
253-1201.
1/21-1/30
2.25 Acres on Suwannee River
in Hamilton Co.
Approx. 170ft. of River Front.
High and Dry.
$55;000 firm.
Call Pamela Hood
at 850-673-6409
rtn


posit. Haywood Realty
ae 352-369-0900
ted FOR SALE
19 or 30 Acres with septic and (2).4"
wells Fenced and Cross Fenced
c also with Pond. Approx 25
cc/rtn acres in pasture with bahaya
TMEN grass and a beautiful 5 acre
ENT homesite with canopy entrance
NLY to property. Excellent location
1 BATH just 5 miles north of Madison.
on Rocky-Ford Road. Asking
$7,000.00 per acre.
12/19-rtn Owner will take 1/2 Down and
Finance Balance at 10%.
Call
ise with a Associate Pamela Hood
fully re- 850-673-6409


modeled tile & wood floors
with carpet in 4 bedrooms.
Fireplace, large shaded yard,
large front porch, all electric.
Lee School district.. Off HWY
6 near Blue Springs, 1 year
lease, References required.
$700 a month.
$700 Security Deposit
423-538-1206 or 423-845-0590
rtn.


2 BR 1 bath Singlewide
Home in Cherry Lake
$350.00 month, plus d
S 973-2353

House for Rent,
2Bed/1 Bth. Great neig
hood. Within city lin
$500mth. 1st and last m
due. Security deposit re
673-9425


Mobile
Area.
l1 .. 11


10/8-rtn


For Sale 3 Bed/ 2 Bth w. A.C. on
1/2 Acre in Lee. Only $599mth.
Call Will for more info at
850-253-8001
rtn

FSBO- 3 Bed, 1.5 Bth, 1 Acre,
1500 sqft, built in 1994, ireent
upgrades, Cherry Lake area.
$98,500.
850-464-1368'i


deposit
For Sale 4 Bed/2 Bth w. A.C.
tn .in Madison County
for only $649 per mth.
Call to be pre-approved.
ghbor- 850-253-8001
mits. rmt


.ths 'rent
quired.


Private, quite, furnished,
,one BR Mobile home
for one person.
Direct TV, near town, $350.00
plus Electricity
850-973-4030.
rtn/cc

HOME FOR RENT
Restored 3 BR Home, CH &
Air. Oak floors, large storage,
1335 Sq Ft
Yard Maint. included.
Adult family only, no pets,
$800 rent and deposit.
Credit check.
432 NEtorry'Ave. Madison.
Call George
973-8583, 557-0994
10/17- rtn


Land Owners- with good or bad
credit!!! You can own a new
home with $0 down.
Call Will at 850-253-8001.
rtn


HOME BUYERS.. GUARAN-
TEED FINANCING THRU
B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044
WE PAY CASH..... FOR YOUR
USED MOBILE HOMES 1980
OR NEWER. LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129


FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY AND
LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE ZONED
COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT
FIRST TIME HOME BUYER
$7,500.00 CASH IN YOUR
POCKET CALL DAVID FOR DE-
TAILS 386-719-0044
MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00 CALL'386-288-4560
LOW CREDIT SCORES???
I MAY BE ABLE TO HELP YOU
BUY A HOME.
386-288-4560
NEW 4 BEDROOM 2 BATH
READY TO MOVE IN. CALL
386-288-4560
HOME ONLY LOANS
No mortgage on your land. Put
Home on your land,
family land, state land or rental lot.
Singlewides start at $350.00 month
and
Doublewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
Call Steve 386-365-5370


FOR SALE/OWNER.
FINANCING "."
ALL LAND BELOW IS HIGH
AND DRY

5 acres Lee, North of Hwy 6,
Cayenne Rd., rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995
$5,000 down, $325/mo

10 acres Beulah Meadows Rd,
DWMH and houses allowed,
$49,500,, $5,000 down
$459/mo

10 acres Old Blue Springs Rd.
access, DWMH and houses al-
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down,
$459/mo

25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)

Larger tracts 'available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
12/24-rtn


PRICE REDUCED! SPACIOUS
MFG HOME WITH 4 BED-
ROOMS, 3 BATH, BONUS
ROOM WITH LOTS OF WIN-
DOWS. DISCONTINUED
FLOORPLAN. FOR MORE INFO-
CALL SARAH
386-288-0964,

BECOME A HOMEOWNER FOR,
THE SAME MONTHLY PAY-
MENTS YOU ARE THROWING,
AWAY ON RENT. CALL SARAH
FOR MORE INFO
386-288-0964


NEED MORE SPACE FOR A
GROWING FAMILY? 2001, 5
BEDROOM, 4 BATH TRADE-IN;
EXCELLENT CONDITION. FOR
MORE INFO CALL SARAH 386-
288-0964






Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage
Corner lots.
Fronts both Harvey Greene Dr.
and Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line,
8 inch water main,
access to city utilities,
fire hydrant, and service from
two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141
rtn


*


I build decks, sheds, exterior
carpentry work
Call 850-242-9342
ask for Bob
Srtn




Part-time Southern Gospel Trio
has position open for a male tenor
or baritone or a female alto.
Please call for audition. Must be
ministry minded and interested in
performing' on weekends. Audi-
tions start immediately. For ore
information call 850-464-0114 or
904-472-7865.
1/14-rtn (nc)





BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004.
IF NO ANSWER, PLEASE
LEAVE NAME, TELEPHONE
NUMBER AND INFORMATION
ABOUT THE MILL.


Downtown Office/ Retail space
for rent. 700 to 1,400 Sql ft.
567-1523
10/22-rtn

FOR RENT
Office Building across street
from Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder
Office);
111 SE Shelby St. Madison.
Newly renovated back to the
1920's era Call 973-4141
rtn




For Sale:
Oak China Cabinet
Call after 5:30.
253-1201
1/21-1/30

FOR SALE
4-seaterHot Tub,
Blue Marblo Design
$500 CASH ONLY FIRM
Call 850-973-4141
; rtn/nc





1987 Ford Bronco for Sale. Super
hot engine! 58k original miles.
Auto trans. Differentials don't
leak. Only rolled over once but
never "mud bogged". Upper
body has no glass but engine and
running gear awesome! Now
painted camo $500. 850-464-1165








MARTIN'S
CARPET REPAIR

Re-Stretching, Patching,
Seam Repair, Berber Pulls,
Burns, Water Damage, etc.

'Don't waste money to buy new
carpet if you don't have to....
Call 850 879 0.120
or
850-973-2003
for a FREE estimate!

DUNN'1
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts

850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340

ANYTHING LEFT OVER 30
DAYS WILL BE SOLD

Backhoe Cat 526B
Work Available
$45 per hr. Experienced Opera-
tor. 8ft. Bush-hog work available.
850-929-4823


Jefferson County Road Dept. is
accepting applications for a
Shop Foreman/ mechanic. Must
have light and heavy equipment
experience, able to work on gas
and diesel equipment, possess a
high school diploma or GED.
Clean Florida drivers License
with class B or better.. No felon
background. Pay range is $9.75
to $15.42. Starting pay will be
commensurate with experience.
Pick up application at our of-
fice. Call for information, 997-
2036. Deadline for applications
is January 31, 2009.

Sales Consultant
America's Home Place is seek-
ing an experienced sales person
for our Valdosta
location. The applicant must
have a proven successful sales
track record. Fax resume to
229-245-8790 or email to
bpolk@americahomeplace.com


GREENE
S Publishing, Inc.


Are you highly motivated?
Are you a self starter? Do
you posses a strong desire to
succeed? If you answered
yes to any of the above
questions we are looking for you.





.(FOOD srof.-

We are currently accepting
applications for'Managers in
the Madison area. Interested
applicants please call Ms.
Kim @ 352-494-7551

Advent Christian Village
Current JOBS
Line Advertisement
Call: 658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24hrs/day, 7days/week

Charming residential communi-
ty on the Suwannee River


LPN (GPNs Welcome)
FT/PT/long-term care setting; un-
restricted license required.

CNA
FT/PT/long-term care setting;
Florida certification required.

ACCOUNTING A/R CLERK
FT position, HSD or equivalent re-
quired; prior experience in insur-
ance billing and coding, PC opera-
tions with MS applications. includ-
Sing word professor, spreadsheet,
and database required. Must be de-
tail oriented. .

FOOD SERVICE STAFF
'PT/FT in various settings includ-
ing summer seasonal, institution-
al, and cafeteria. Prior experience
*in-institutional or cafeteria food
service a plus bfit not required.

WATER/ WASTEWATER
TREATMENT OPERATIONS
FT water/waste water treatment
- operator; valid FL C wateror
waste treatment certification re-
quired; dual certification strongly
preferred: Experience in all aspects
of water/ wastewater & distribu-
tion/collection systems required.


Excellent benefits package and
competitive wages. Apply in per-
son at Personnel Office Monday
through Friday from 9:00a.m. until
4:00 p.m., or fax re-
sume/credentials to 386-658-5160.
EOE/Drug-Free Workplace/ Crimi-
nal Background checks required'.


GED. The City of Madison will
be accepting applications for this
position from January 19, 2009
through January 30, 2009.
Applications may be picked up
at City Hall, Monday through
Friday from8:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m. The City of Madison
is an EOE, a drug free work-
place and recognizes veteran's
preference.


ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00 P&I
per mo, Doublewide your land
$422.00 P&ILper mo. Singlewide
& $30,000.00 for land $520.00
P&I per mo. or Doublewide with
$30,000.00 for land $602.00 P&I
per mo. Our land your land or buy
land. I specialize in credit chal-
lenged customers. Applications
over the phone, credit decision next
business day. Let me help make
your new home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
Call Steve 386-365,-5370 :-.,,-,...
rtn

BEST CASH DEALS ON
MOBILE HOMES. NO ONE
BEATS MY PRICES
386-719-0044
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/ 2
BATH EXCELLENT SHAPE
NEED CHAS, PRICED TO SELL
CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
MODULAR HOME FOR SALE
IN TOWN SAVE $20,000.00
TURN KEY DEAL OWNER
SAYS. MAKE AN OFFER IT
MUST GO CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
BRAND SPANKING NEW 2009 5
BEDROOM 3 BATH 2004 Sq Ft.
$594.31 PER MO. SELLER PAYS
$3,500 TOWARD
CLOSING COST CALL MIKE
386-623-4218


ANTsy
to sell those
old items you
have just
lying around
the house?

Sell Them In
The Classifieds

850-973-4141


DeadinF orClassified

[MI^Vfi~~~ ~ 850 973IM j^^^^iBB-414
ICLASSIFI Ds 3:00 p^^^^^^^am. Every ond~ayiB


The Madison County Solid
Waste/ Recycling Department is
advertising for (2) part-time Col-
lection Center Attendants. Major
responsibilities will include the'
opening and closing of the col-
lection center, assisting residents
with proper disposal and recy-
cling techniques as well as the
distribution of educational mate-
rial. Attendant must maintain
center grounds in a clean and or-
derly fashion. Employee must
have the ability to establish and
maintain positive working rela-
tiqnships with residents who use
the Drop-Off Center. Employee
must report any problems and
concerns to the office of the Sol-
id Waste Coordinator. Other re-
lated duties may be required as
assigned by the Administrative
Staff. 20-30 hour work week is
required with flexible hours be-
ing a must, able to cover week-
ends and holiday time schedules.
Position will remain open until
filled. For additional information
contact the Solid Waste Office at
973-261. A completed Madison
County Employment Application
is required. Madison County is
an equal opportunity employer
and a Drug Free Workplace. All
applications must be submitted
to the following address by Janu-
ary 23, 2009 at 5:00pm.

Madison County Board of Com-
missioners
Attn: Allen Cherry
Courthouse Annex,"Rm 219
112 E Pickney Street
PO Box.539
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-3179


The City of Madison will be ac-
cepting applications for a Water'
Maintenance Technician/Meter
Reader for the Potable Water De-
partment. Applicants must be 18
years of age, possess a valid
Florida "B" Commercial Driver's
S. License
or obtain such within 6 months
after employment, High Sch661ol
Diploma or GED, and pass
a drug test,backgrourid check
and physical examination. We
prefer someone with at least two
years involving the installation
and minintenance of water distri-
bution system. Job applications
and job descriptions may be
picked up at City Hall
between the hours of 8:00 am
and 5.00 pm Monday through
Friday. We will be accepting
applications for this position
from January 19,2009 until Janu-
ary 30,2009. The City of Madi-
son is an Equal Opportunity Em-
ployer and recognizes
veteran's preference.


The City of Madison has one
pening in the Potable Water De-
partment for a heavy
equipment operator. Applicants
must have a valid FLorida Class
B Commercial Driver's -
License, or obtain the.same
within six months after being
hired. Applicants must be able
to read and write the English
language, be able to communi-
cate orally and be able to
follow oral or written instruc-
tions. This position requires a lot
of medium to heavy
physical labor, and also requires
the applicants to be able to oper-
ate a backhoe with the
confidence to dig around water,
sewer, gas telephone and electric
lines. The applicant
hired for this position will also
be required to get a water
distribution license and work in
any other pan of the water de-
partment when necessary.
The persons hired for this posi-
tion must pass a physical exami-
nation, background check
and drug test. Applicants must
have a high school diploma or









Wednesday, January 21, 2009







IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
BAILEY GREEN, AS TRUSTEE OF THE
WEST FARMS TRUST NUMBER ONE
DATED JANUARY 3, 2006, Case No.; 2008-377-CA
Plaintiff,
vs.
PETER BAKOWSKI, a married man,
and KEDAMICA, INC., a Florida
corporation,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment
for Foreclosure, entered in this caus e on January 6, 2009, in
the Circuit Court of Madison County, Florida, I, Tim Sanders,
Clerk Of the Circuit court, will sell the property situated in
Madison County, Florida, described as:
Lot 32, WEST FARMS SUBDIVISION, according to the map
or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page W, of
the Public Records of Madison County, Florida,
at public sale to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the
west front steps of the Madison County Courthouse located at 125
SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida 32340, at 11:00 am, on
January 27, 2009.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Within two (2) working days of your receipt of this summons/notice, please contact the
Clerk of the Court, 125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida 32340, (850) 973-1500.
Tim Sanders
Clerl of the Circuit Court
125 SW Range Ave.
Madison, Florida 32340
By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
01/14/09 and 01/21/09


CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING SERVICES
The City of Madisob, Florida, hereby requests proposals.from qualified individuals or
firms to provide professional engineering services under a "continuing contract", as
such term is defined in Section 287:055(2)(g), Florida Statutes. The City desires to
establish a continuing contract with one or more firms. The continuing contract(s)
negotiated as a result of this request will be non-exclusive and shall give the City the
right, but not the- obligation, to use any such firm(s)'under continuing contract'for any
particular project or part of a project. Award of a continuing contract does not guar-
antee that a firm will be employed on a regular basis rior does it guarantee a mini-
mum number of tasks or minimum compensation. The City may, from time to time,
issue separate requests for proposals and enterinto separate contracts for the per-
formance of services which are similar or identical to the services indicated in this
request. All such actions shall be subject to the sole discretion of the City. Specific
.detail regarding scope of workand information related to submitting proposals may
be obtained by contacting: Harold Emrich, City Manager, (850) 973-5081, madis-
oncitymgr@embarqmail.com.
1/21






No-Mini-n-- ~ --No-Reserves


"(i-OERDIR

teL~iIn M[


* Excellent RE Investment Opportunity Good Cropland
SPrime Growth Area Beautiful Potential Homesites
* Great timber Investment Tracts 1 & 2 Zoned EA
* Just 1 Mile to Wild Adventures Tracts 3 -5 Zoned RA

N Rowell Auctions, Inc. 800-323-8388
AucTIons 10% Riets Premium GAL AU-CO025948
Ro el ctos So


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 15A


Advertising Networks of Florida

a company of the Florida Press Association
FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM


ADOPTION
Are you Pregnant? Considering adoption? A sin-
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
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AUCTIONS
FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION FLORIDA
STATEWIDE-Auction starts Feb 7th 1000 Homes
MUST BE SOLD! Free Brochure (800)491-8064
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AUTO DONATIONS
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000
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BUILDING SUPPLIES
METAL ROOFING. 40yr Warranty-Buy direct
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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
100% RECESSION PROOF! Do you earn $800
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CARS FOR SALE
$500! Police Impounds for Sale!
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9482

Honda Accord 97 $500! Police Impounds for
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EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
Post Office Now Hiring! Avg Pay $20/hr or
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HELP WANTED
13 DRIVERS NEEDED Sign-On Bonus 35-41
cpm Earn over $1000 weekly Excellent Benefits
Need CDL- A & 3 most recent OTR (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS. CDL-A teams & dri-
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HVAC Tech Training! GET TO WORK! Avg
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EARN Extra Income Mailing Brochures. Weekly
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Driver- Join PTL today! Company drivers earn
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HOMES FOR SALE
FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION FLORIDA
STATEWIDE Auction starts Feb 7th 1000 Homes
MUST BE SOLD! Free Brochure (800)678-0517
USHomeAuction.com REDC.

LAND FOR SALE
BIG LOT SMALLEST PRICE 12 acres just
$99,900. Best neighborhood in Tallahassee area!
Rare spacious country living close to everything!
Great for kids w/horse privileges. Best Price EVER,
A Must See. Great Financing (866)938-1521

LOTS & ACREAGE
Florida Foreclosure! 37 AC- $39,900 Nice home-
site setting in picturesque oak grove. Tons of deer &
wildlife. Perfect for hunters! Call Jack at (800)242-
1802

Florida Land Bargain of the Century! 2 acre wa-
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Just 90 minutes Orlando! Excellent financing. 'Call
now (866)352-2249, x 2184. FLlandbargains.com

MISCELLANEOUS
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Com-
puter available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call
,(866)858-2121, www.CenturaOnline.com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high pay-
ing Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved
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(888)349-5387,

NOW AVAILABLE! 2009 POST OFFICE JOBS.
$18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE, PAID TRAINING,
FED BENEFITS, VACATIONS. CALL (800)910-
9941 TODAY! REF #FL08.


Buckler's CRAFT FAIR Indoor Shows...Art,
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Decor..FREE admission with 1 paid. Exhibitors call
for special discount (386)860-0092. www.bucklerpro-
motions.com

PETS
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NOW! No Shipping Or No Minimum Charge. Call
your dependable source for pets meds NOW!
(239)248-7915; www.PetBuddySupply.com

REAL ESTATE
NC Mountain Land 5+ acres w/10ft waterfall, in
established community, great views, lots of options,
only $99,500, owner (866)789-8535.

Golf Lot Bargain! NOW $39,900 (was $139,900)
Includes Membership! Rare opportunity to own a
beautiful view homesite in upstate SC's finest golf
community- NOW for a fraction of it's value. Paved
rds, water, sewer, all infrastructure completed. Get
much more for much less. Low rate financing avail.
Call now (866)334-3253 x 2126.

NOW is the time to buy your TENNESSEE lake
property. Four seasons & no state income tax. Call
Lakeside Realty (888)291-5253 or visit
www.lakesiderealty-tn.com

STEEL BUILDINGS
"BUILDING SALE!"..."ROCK BOTTOM
PRICES" BEAT NEXT INCREASE. 25X40 $5,190.
30X50 $6,390. 35X60 $8,990. 40X60 $12,700. 60X100
$33,600. MANY OTHERS! Pioneer Steel. (800)668-
5422. Since 1980


Get More Than The Headlines...

Get The Whole Story

When you want the best source of the local news, turn
to the newspaper. Because you'll get the complete story
with all the details on breaking news and sports, plus
all the people news-wedding, anniversary, birth and
engagement announcements.





Deson eof P ads 1to O ndgnip.ew r


ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA
Classified | Display l M tro Paly


The key to advertising success








1-866-742-1373


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iGA Madison County Carder www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 21., 2009


The Business Card Directory



Listings For


A


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,,,UALTY UARNTEED"


Wednesday, January 21, 2009


16A Madison County Carrier




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