Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00145
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: January 14, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00145
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text



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VOL. 45 NO. 24 Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


Pilgrim's Growers Urgently Search For Options


Local growers and employees of Pilgrim's Pride say
that the company isn't handling layoffs and cutbacks
fairly. "The fat cats in the big hats are stepping on the lit-
tle guy and hurting the community."


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County Sheriff's Office is investigat-
ing two burglaries and is asking for the public's help in
catching the criminals.
According to Chief Deputy Epp Richardson, one
burglary took place on January 8 on Byrd Street in
Madison. Items stolen included an Xbox, Xbox games,
jewelry and tennis shoes.
The total value of the items was in excess of'$1,000.
The other burglary took place in the Cherry Lake
area between January 2 and January 9. Items stolen in-
cluded a 41" Panasonic plasma television, a framed pic-
ture of a river scene with trees, a Browning .12-gauge
shotgun and a glass picture window.
The total value of the items is $5,500.
If anyone has any information on the crimes or have
seen any of the stolen, items, they are asked to call the
Sheriff's Office at (850) 973-4001.

Wilmer Strickland Dies


Wilmer Strickland, 74,
went home to be with the
Lord on Saturday, Jan. 10,
surrounded by family
Wilmer was born in
Hanson on April 2, 1934,
and lived in Madison
County his entire' life. He
was.a postal clerk and rur-
almail carrier for 35 years
with the Madison Post Of-
fice. While on his route, he
made many friends
throughout the years and
his customers 'always said
a person could set a watch
by him.
Wilmer and .his wife,
Pauline, have owned and
published The Swapper
for 26 years. He was an ac-
tive member of Hanson
United Methodist Church,
where he served in many
different positions. His
love of the Lord was ap-
parent in everything that
he did. He was also a mem-
ber of the Gideons Inter-
national.
Funeral services cele-


WILMER STRICKLAND
brating his life will be at 2
p.m., Wednesday, at Han-
son United Methodist
Church with burial at the
church cemetery
The family received
friends from 6-8 p.m.,
Tuesday, at Beggs' Funeral
Home in Madison.
He is survived by his
wife of 55 years, Pauline
Zipperer Strickland, of
Madison; two sons, Archie
Please See Strickland,
Page 2A


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Dozens of local growers who supplied services to
Pilgrim's Pride are reacting to the company's recent de-
cision to cancel contracts representing tens of millions
of pounds of chicken annually. In order to discuss op-
tions and unite efforts, these displaced broiler growers
will be meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 14, at 7 p.m. in down-
town Branford at the recently opened banquet and event
hall, A Perfect Setting.
The news of Pilgrim's Pride cutbacks and layoffs
has been in the media nonstop since the company filed
for bankruptcy late last year. Further announcements
that the Live Oak facility intends to dismiss over 500
workers next month, coupled with the elimination of
approximately 100 grow houses, has left few optimistic
of a turnaround anytime soon.
Locally, both growers and plant workers have ex-
pressed their concern, not only at the cutbacks, but also
at the manner in which they occurred. As one aggrieved
party noted, "Each time we hear from the company, they
make it sound like things aren't falling apart, and then
we get worse news. Now with so many growers being
cutoff, many of whom were courted by Pilgrim's Pride
to take on large mortgages to build and expand opera-
Please See Pilgrim's Growers, Page 2A

Sheriff's Office To Enforce

Tinting, Noise .Laws


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, January 12, 2009
Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart, left, and Jason
Whitfield, right, stand in front of the tint meters, which
Whitfield was able to procure from the Florida Depart-


ment of Transportation.

By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Deputy Jason Whit-
field of the Madison Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office was able
to obtain 10 tint meters, on
loan from the Florida De-
partment of Transporta-
tion. The meters will allow
deputies, to check illegal
window tint on vehicles
throughout Madison
County for Florida Statute
316.610 and 316.2953 com-
pliance.
The tint meters will be
assigned to deputies
throughout the Sheriff's
Office, including School
Resource Officers.
According to Sheriff
Ben Stewart, law officers
will check for a window's
tint. If the tint is rated
from 28 down to 12 per-
cent, the officers will give
drivers a cor-rection ticket
to have their front driver
and passenger windows
fixed. Anything 11 percent
or lower will be an auto-
matic non-moving viola-
'tion.


"Drivers can get a
deputy to check their tint
after they have it correct-
ed," Stewart said. '"After
they do, they can take the
ticket to the clerk's office
and have it removed. It
will cost $10, instead of
$86." *
Window tint on the
front is illegal beneath a
line, which can be seen on
the vehicle's windshield
on, the driver's side.
Stewart said that the
two principal reasons for
enforcing proper window
tinting are 1) officer safety
and 2) driver safety,
Deputy Doug Haskell
stopped a Hopkins, S.C.
man on Interstate 10 for
having windows that vio-
lated" the tinting statutes.
The man was Wanted in
Hamilton County on a
warrant for failure to ap-
pear.
Deputies were also as-
signed a "Fatal Visual"
training aid to be used to
Please See Tinting,
Page 2A


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by MJichael Curtis, January 9, 2009
Judge John W. Peach, pictured here with his lovely
wife, Lorena, emphasized how much they will miss
working in Madison County at Peach's retirement cere-
mony Jan. 8. However, both added they look forward to
spending plenty of time with the cherished friends they
have made along the way.

.Judge John Peach Retires

By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
After thirty short years, Third Circuit Judge John
W. Peach laid down his gavel to the sadness, but enor-
mous praise of colleagues and friends alike. As the Civ-
'il Circuit Judge for Madison County, in addition to du-
ties as the Criminal Circuit, Civil Circuit and Domestic
Relations Judge for Hamilton County, Peach has devel-
oped close and deep ties to those with whom he served,
building a lasting reputation for fairness, and perhaps
just as importantly, a reputation for friendliness.
A retirement ceremony was held at the Madison
Courthouse on Thursday, Jan. 8, where dozens came to
hear and say a few words about the esteemed jurist.
County Judge Wetzel Blair hosted the gathering that in-
cluded staff and a host of county leadership. All stated
how much he would be missed, not to mention his love-
Please See.Peach, Page 2A

Kelsi Reams' Hot Chocolate

SaleSetForSaturday


Twelve-year-old Kelsi Reams, center, will host a hot
chocolate fundraiser for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
on Saturday, Jan. 17, in Greenville. She is pictured with
her sisters, Abby, age 6, and Chloe, age 7.

Dear Friends and Neighbors of Madison County,
I would like to announce my sixth annual hot choco-
late sale to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. It
will be held Saturday, Jan. 17, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in
Greenville on Highway 221, one block south of US 90 at
Witmer Realty
I started having this sale to help my sister, Abby, who
is six years old and has cystic fibrosis, as well as all the
other CF'ers around the country
With our,:help' we have raised nearly $10,000.00
since we started this in 2004.
Abby, my other sister Chloe, family
members, friends and I will be serving coffee and donuts
and my famous hot chocolate.
All the money that is raised will go to the Cystic Fi-
brosis Foundation to help find a cure. .So I hope to see
you there to help support Abby and other CFer's that
have to fight this disease every day.
Sincerely,
Kelsi Reams


Lee Prepares For Productive 2009 Year


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Lee Town Council
held its first meeting of 2009
on Tuesday Jan. 6 at the ex-
panding Lee City Hall. With
the construction of Ernes-
tine E. Kinsey Hall nearing
completion, which will be
the future meeting room for


the council, town leadership
is excited not only for the
practicality of the expan-
sion, but also for the oppor-
tunity to honor the Mayor
for her years of dedicated
service.
The official dedication
of the wing will be an-
nounced soon, as the council


anticipates using the room
as early as next month.
Town Manager Cheryl Ar-
chambault really put an-
other feather in her cap
with this one, as the entire
project is effectively being
covered by a $50,000 grant.
"We are so pleased to
have this addition to City.


Hall and to honor Mayor
Kinsey as well. Our cur-
rent room has some
acoustic challenges, which
are completely eliminated
in the new room. We also
want to give an enormous
thanks to Madison Correc-
Please See Lee,
Page 2A


2 Sections. 32 Pa
Around Madison County
Bridal Guide
Classifieds/Legals
Path of Faith


ges ILocal.& Regional Crime
5-7A History
12A Obituaries
18-19A N Sports
B Section I Health & Nuitrition


.4A
13A
5A
9A
16 -17A


Wed 1/4


1 / IM


m







2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 14, 2009



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee

Continued from Page 1A


tions for providing inmate
labor to the project. It was
a definitely a team effort,
and we really want to
thank them, and every-
body throughout the com-
munity, for all their sup-
port," Archambault ex-
plained.
The Lee Town Council
has no new faces going
into the new year, al-
though Roger Parsons,
who took the seat left open
following the retirement
of Thehla Thompson; is
just completing his first
full year, notably to the
great pleasure of all near
. the council. The veteran of
the council, Doug McNi-
col, entering his 17th year
as councilman, with
terms spanning four
decades, remains a cor-
nerstone of the council.
The "Shirley's", con-
tinue their commitment to
the community. Shirley
Yeager i$ entering her sev-
enth year, with Shirley
vonRoden serving similar-
ly. Councilwoman vonRo-
den continues her close in-
volvement with the Lee
Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment, along with her hus-
band, Jim. The other
youngster on the council,
Donna Mueller, is enter-
ing her third year.
Of course, no acknowl-
edgement would, be com-
plete without recognizing
Mayor Ernestine Kinsey,
now entering her 13th
year. In turn, the mayor
would say that there isn't
enough praise to appreci-
ate the huge contributions
of Town Manager Cheryl
Arhcmbault and her
Deputy Clerk Janice
Miller, entering their 11th
and seventh year respec-
tively,
Adding these numbers
together, one couldn't be-
gin to count the heart and
soul that accompanies
these fine men and womeri


Strickland


Continued from Page 1A


in their undertakings.
Just consider any of the
many over-and-above pro-
jects and programs spon-
sored by the council.
For instance, the
Building Blocks Summer
Camp program, which Ar-
chambault reviewed with
council for renewal, was
organized and launched
through the tireless ef-
forts of the town manager,
along with a broad base of
staff and community sup-
port. In the erid, dozens of
children were educated,
recreated, fed; nurtured
and introduced to a,
brighter future, all with-
out costing the taxpayers
a penny The list goes on
and on, including, of
course, business and in-
frastructure development
and the huge 100th birth-
day celebration planned
for April.
Before the meeting ad-
journed, VFD Leroy
Rutherford provided a
brief review of depart-
ment activity for 2908. For
the year, Lee VFD an-
swered 261 calls, which
was down slightly from
the previous year, thanks
in part to a lower than av-
erage December.
Other agenda items in-
cluded water system
maintenance and policy
review, in particular a
planned cleaning of the
tower and a modification
to the ground tank. There
was agreement by council
to develop a policy for
backflow valves required
for, both residential and
commercial state water
compliance. This year will
also see a review of the
Comprehensive Plan, a
working document for city
and county planning,
which is also a require-
ment of the state.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@greene
publishing.com. .


(Opal) Strickland, of Madison, and Rickie Strickland, of
Madison; one daughter, Wanda Cox, of Jasper; six
grandchildren, Travis Strickland, of Madison, Chrystal
Barrs, of Madison, Tiah Barrs, of Jacksonville, Ben
Cox, Jr., of Jasper, Charlie Strickland, of Valdosta, Ga.,
and Lance Strickland, of Fort Walton Beach; two great-
grandchildren, Rylan "Buckshot" Barrs, of Madison,
and Logan Strickland, of Fort Walton Beach; two broth-
ers, Elbert (Louise) Strickland and Leon Strickland, of
Madison; one sister, Eunice Rowell, of Madison; two
brothers-in-law, Billy (Jo Ann) Zipperer, of Lake Park,
Ga., and Edgar (Patricia) Zipperer, of Valdosta, Ga.; and
two sisters-in-law, Betty Parker (BJ), of Valdosta, Ga.,
and Wilma Pearl (Larry) Howell, of Valdosta, Ga.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be
made to Hanson United Methodist Building Fund, P.O,
Box 514, Madison, FL 32340 or to the Gideons, P.O. Box
511, Lee, FL.32059.


Tinting


Continued from Page 1A


make the public aware of driving under the influence.
The Sheriff's Office will also be enforcing a noise or-
dinance. If music can be heard more than 25 feet from a
vehicle, drivers can be cited.


Question Of The Week
Did youimake at least at one New Year's
resolution for 2009?


Log on to GreenePublishing.com
to vote on next week's question:
"Do you have some Christmas
decorations including outside :'-
Christmas lights that you leave up'
allyear?"

Voting for this question ends
January 19, 2009 9 a.m.


SeC


Gem ^I3


Publisher


Your Input

Matters To Us
Too many times in life, we get caught up in our "own
world" and forget the importance of the thoughts and
ideas of others. We are all guilty of this, from time to
time.
In the "business world," this holds true, also. What-
ever our job may be, sometimes we forget to step back
and really look at what others might see or think.
I'd like to take this time to thank our readers and pa-
trons for the telephone calls, letters and Letters To The
Editor that we receive. Whether the intention is positive
or negative, it is good to hear from "the public." This
feedback lets us (the newspaper) know what you like
and don't like.
We try our best, as your local hometown newspa-
pers, to serve the public in the best way that we can. We
try to stay abreast of the local news and happenings so
that we may pass that same information on to you.
As hard as we try, sometimes, we just don't know of
EVERYTHING that might be coming up in the commu-
nity.'I.would like to encourage everyone to please call
our office and let us know if an event is happening that
you would like (or think needs to be) covered. We win do
our best to be there and cover it to the best of our abili-
ty'
Letters To The Editor are encouraged as well, as our
new feature "Stingers" that we publish from time to
time in our newspapers.
I know that we can't please everyone in our commu-
nity. With each story that is 'printed, some will like it;
some will not. "We don't make the news; we just report
it," has become my favorite quote, as it holds the same
for all media. It is our job io let the citizens of Madison
Cottnty know what is happening in Madison County
The good, the bad and the ugly are all a part of that sce-
nario.
Thank you for your patr'dnage and please feel freeto'
call our office at any time. We truly appreciate your
thoughts and ideas and welcome any suggestions that
you might have. We especially look forward to learning
of events happening in our county that we might not
know about.
Have a great week!
Until then ... see you around the town.


Pilgrim's Growers

Continued from Page 1A

tions, how can we expect or believe anything will get
better."
The meeting at A Perfect Setting, located on Suwan-
nee Ave. in downtown Branford, is the second of its kind
leading up to the bankruptcy meeting scheduled for the
27th in Texas, which some affected parties plan to at-
tend. Madison County has a rich, albeit currently chal-
lenging, history of poultry farming. This agricultural
pride and community commitment is being demonstrat-
ed in the support being shown to both growers and em-
ployees of the ailing poultry giant. Organizers grateful-
ly invite all who have a stake, or know someone who
does, to come out and let their opinions be known.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


Peach

Continued from Page 1A

ly lady, Lorena, whom Peach passionately thanked for
all her support over the years.
Forever the Gator fan, University of Florida booster
buddy, Joe Akerman, playfully roasted Peach with a few
gamp day stories, emphasizing how much he looks for-
ward to continuing the tradition in upcoming years. Fel-
low judges, county and law enforcement officials, as well
as staff of the court followed with similar heartfelt sto-
ries, each bringing a smile to the judge's stately gaze.
Peach was admitted to the Florida Bar Association
in 1966, served as a county judge from 1973-78, then
moved to the circuit court, where he has served since
1978. On Jan. 1, Greg Parker assumed the duties of the
Third Judicial Circuit judge, with County Judge Sonny
Scaff being sworn in as acting circuit judge. As acting
circuit judge, Scaff will be available to hear cases from
which Parker may recuse himself.
Peach noted, "I have always enjoyed my time in
Madison County In addition to my duties as judge, I
have especially enjoyed spending time with the fine peo-
ple that I am fortunate to call friend."
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


A t








Wednesday, January 14, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Deadline For Lee Pay

Memories Is This Thursday
Danny and Lori Blount hosted a get-together for the
children's and youth Sunday School classes at Midway
Church of God last Saturday Everyone had a great time
and Danny and Lori were gracious hosts!
The Lee Day Committee is still looking for interest-
ing memories you may have of you or your family in and
around Lee. Pictures are also welcomed. Please send
your stories and photos to mayorkinsey@embarqmail
.com or leemanager@leeflorida.org. Deadline for all en-'
tries is this Thursday, Jan. 15. Please help Lee have the
biggest and best book they can of "Lee Memories."
The Lee Homecoming Beauty Pageant registration
is set for Jan. 25, 2-4 p.m., at Lee City Hall. There will be
a pageant for younger children, as well as the Miss Lee
and Junior Miss Lee pageants.. For more information,
.please call Charlene Rye at (850) 694-0814 or April Her-
ring at 971-4414. Remember, this is the 160ith birthday
Let's get it right this time: A big salute goes out to
Jake Kinard, who was able to extricate Brad Forrest (not
Brad Flowers) from a hole that he was stuck in on New
Year's Day, saving Brad's life. If you see Jake, give him a
big hearty thank you!
That's all the news for now! Have a great week and a
beautiful forever! May God bless each and every one of
you!.





Leisa Harrelson vs. Diane H. Thompson domestic
injunction
In Re: Forfeiture 1988 Chevy Impala
Thomas J. Beggs, IV vs. Althea Russell -. mortgage
foreclosure
Larry Jackson vs. Lin'da Gail Jackson dissolution
of marriage
Tricia Kniffin-Presswo and Department of Revenue
vs. Curtis Kniffin, Sr. support
Wells Fargo Bank vs. William D. Lovett mortgage
foreclosure
Larry Pride vs. Pilgrim's Pride civil
Mark E. Timmons vs. Virginia Timmons dissolu-
tion of marriage
In Re: Oliviveira (name change) other domestic


Gaza Pre Associ


Israel is at
war again with
one of her neigh- Nal onal
bors. Since the
tiny Jewish na- Security
tion is surround-
ed by enemies, Joe Boyles
this is a frequent
occurrence. This
time, the war is
with Hamas-led
Gaza. Let's talk
about Gaza because it is truly a unique
place in all the world.
Located along the Mediterranean at.
Israel's southwest corner, this tiny na-
tion only covers about 140 square miles,
much smaller than Madison County Let
me be more specific. Imagine a nation
from 1-10 to the Georgia border between
Highways 53 and 255. That's about the
size of the Gaza strip. For orientation
purposes, the Mediterranean would be to
the west of 53 while Israel would be east
of 255. Have you got it?
Now, sandwiched in this little strip of
land are 1.5 million Palestinians in-
credible population density Their annu-
al income is about $600, and they are
highly dependent on outside aid. Unfor-
tunately, a lot of this aid isn't in the form
of medicine, food ,and clothing, but
rather in the form of rockets and ammu-
nition that the native Palestinians can
use to kill Jews. Launching rockets with
explosive warheads is not- your typical
"good neighbor" policy!
In fact, the Palestinian people are not
highly regarded in the Arab world. The
Jordanians were glad to be rid of them. It
seems as if the Palestinians are primari-
ly valued as a foil to Israel nothing
more.
Israel gained ownership of Gaza as
part of the spoils from their 1967 war
against Syria, Egypt and Jordan. In 2000,
Israel began to dismantle their settle-
ments in Gaza and withdraw in accor-
dance with the Oslo Accords, and the
process was complete five years later.
Shortly thereafter, the people of Gaza
elected the terrorist organization Hamas
as their representative government. The
official policy of Hamas (and other orga-
nizations like Hezbollah) is that Israel
will be destroyed and the Jews annihilat-
ed. I suppose that Adolph Hitler and the
Nazis are their role model for this enter-
prise.
Actually, it seems as if Hamas is at
war with everyone, but the Jews are at
the top oF the list. For several years,
Hamas has targeted Fatah, the ruling
party of the majority of the Palestinian
people who occupy the West Bank of the
Jordan River, but the enemy-de-jour is Is-
rael. Their current tactic is to launch un-
guided rockets over the border into Is-
rael, hoping to murder innocent Jews


and destroy
property in the
process. In 2008,
they "air-
mailed" about
ten Kitusha
Rockets a day in
d this fashion.
Finally, Is-
Srael had enough
of turning the
other cheek and
decided to shoot back with the goal of de-
stroying the terrorists and sites firing
these rockets. But there is a big differ-
ence between the types of weapons em-
ployed. While Hamas fires unguided, in-
discriminate rockets. in terror fashion
against civilians, Israel is attacking with
precision guided weapons that destroy
targets while limiting collateral damage.
Hamas uses a tactic of "hiding be-
hind the skirts of women and children."
They set up their rocket launchers adja-
cent to schools, hospitals,~ and mosques to
ensure that their own people will be in-
jured by the Israeli attacks. This is con-
trary to the international law of armed
conflict but Hamas will not recognize
any such rules that constrain the likes of
law-abiding Israel. In every respect,
Hamas and organizations like it are un-
lawful, but they don't care.
Many leftists in the press and else-
where condemn Israel for disproportion-
ate response, but who started this mess?
The Israelis are protecting their people
by destroying the sites and terrorists
who attack them. Civilian casualties and
collateral damage are directly related to
where Hamas places its launchers. And
let's not lose sight of the fact that by a
significant majority, the people of Gaza
elected Hamas to. represent them. As the
old saying goes; "we get the government
we deserve."
It is an ugly affair, but I really don't
see the matter being resolved as long as
Hamas is in charge and fails to recognize
Israel as the Jewish homeland. In the
meantime, Israel will root-out those who
are attacking them and destroy their in-
frastructure. Then they will stop shoot-
ing and pull back. When that happens,
Hamas will rearm and the murderous cy-
cle will begin again.
The new Obama Administration may
be naive enough to think they can
-achieve a lasting resolution between
these two warring sides, but as long as
Hamas seeks the destruction of Israel, I
cannot see how that is possible. Every
ceasefire is another opportunity for the
terrorists to rearm their stockpiles of
weapons and kill more Jews. Resolution
to Israel is a peaceful two-state solution.
Resolution to Hamas is. a second Holo-
caust. How do you reconcile those posi-
tions?


Did you KmOWD...



The first Ford cars




f- had Dodge engines.


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Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
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4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 14, 2009


LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER

SFour Defendants Sentenced For
Roles In Scheme To Enslave
Farmworkers In Florida


Pinetta Man Arrested On Man And Woman Arrested


Out-Of-County Warrants
A Pinetta man was arrested on out-of-county war-
rants after being stopped on Scruggs St.
According to the Madison County Sheriff's Office,
on Jan. 7, the deputy who stopped Danny Eugene Davis,
44, for having a faulty brake light discovered that Davis
had a suspended drivers license and that his license
plate was out-of-date by more than six months.
When dispatch was contacted, it was discovered that
Davis had out-of-county warrants from Hillsborough
County for fraudulent use of personal information, giv-
ing a false name to a law enforcement officer, driving
while license suspended and plays at games of chance.
Davis was arrested and taken to the Madison Coun-.
ty Jail.

Woman Arrested

For Perjury
Judy Sever, 32, of Madison, was arrested on counts
of perjury by a false written document and perjury in
an official proceeding.
According to a Madison County Sheriff's Office re-
port, during a violation of probation hearing, Sever
gave testimony under oath that she had previously lied
and made false statements in a domestic violence re-
port.
Sever was placed under arrest by Cpl. Tim Nagy and
taken to the Madison County Jail.


I.


For Breach Of Peace


A Madison man and woman were arrested for
breach of peace on Saturday, Jan. 10.
According to the Madison Police Department, the
department was advised by dispatchers that they had
just received a 911 hang-up call.
As Patrolman Reggie Alexander turned off Base St.
into the trailer park where the call had come from, he
could hear yelling in the road. As Alexander drove into
the park, he saw Sandra Gee, 37, and Raymond Ghent,
43, yelling from the doorway of their home.
The actions by Gee and Ghent had started awaken-
ing the neighborhood.
Both Gee and Ghent were arrested and taken to the
Madison County Jail.

Two Men Arrested For

Robbery And Battery
Two men were arrested for battery and robbery on
Jan. 1.
According to the Madison County Sheriff's Office,
the victim was standing in a friend's yard socializing
when Dennis Murray, 22, and Anthony Straws, 18, con-
fronted him. Both Murray and Straws hit the victim
with closed fists, knocking him to the ground. They then
took the victim's wallet from him by force.
Deputy Josh Harris and Sgt. Art Deno arrested Mur-
ray and Straws without incident at a later time.


973 -


CALL


i illS


Four defendants were
sentenced in federal district
court in Fort Myers after
pleading guilty to a scheme
to enslave Mexican and
Guatemalan nationals and
compel their labor as farm-
workers, the Justice De-
partment announced.
Cesar and Geovanni
Navarrete were each sen-
tenced to 12 years in prison
and held jointly and sever-
ally liable, along with other
co-defendants, for
$239,882.46 in restitution
payable to the victims. De-
fendant Ismael Michael
Navarrete was sentenced to
46 months in prison, and
Defendant Villhina Navar-
rete was sentenced to time
served. Both Ismael and
Villhina were also joined in
the order of restitution. All
defendants will be removed
from the United States fol-
lowing the completion of
their sentences.
A total of six defen-
dants have pleaded guilty
in connection with the
scheme. All defendants
pleaded guilty to harboring
undocumented foreign na-
tionals for private financial
gain and: related felonies.
Defendants Cesar Navar-
rete and Geovanni Navar-
rete also pleaded guilty to
beating, threatening; re-e
straining and locking work-
ers in trucks to force them
to work as agricultural la-
borers, in addition to other
related crimes. According
to documents filed in court,
the defendants were ac-
cused of paying the work,
ers minimal wages and dri-


8:00 am 6:00 pm Monday-Saturday


I


ving them into debt, while
simultaneously threaten-
ing physical harm if the
workers left their employ-
ment before their debts had
been repaid to the Navar-
rete family
The prosecution of hu-
man trafficking'offenses is
a top priority of the Justice
Department. Since the en-
actment of the Trafficking
Victims Protection Act in
2000, human trafficking
prosecutions brought by
the Civil Rights Division
and U.S. Attorneys offices
have resulted in a 455 per-
cent increase in defendants
charged, and a 581 percent
increase in convictions and
guilty pleas, as compared to
the prior eight-year period.
In Fiscal Year 2098, the De-
partment filed a record
number of both labor traf-
ficking and sex trafficking
cases.
This case was investi-
gated by agents from the
Bureau of Immigration
and Customs Enforcement,
the Federal Bureau of In-
vestigation, and investiga-
tors from the Collier Coun-
ty Sheriffs Department.
Victim assistance was pro-
vided by the Coalition of
Immokalee Workers, the
Florida Immigrant Advoca-
cy Center, and the Florida
Freedom Partnership. This
case was prosecuted by Tri-
pl Attorneys Susan French
and Adriana Vieco of the
Justice Department's Civil
Rights Division and Chief
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Doug Molloy of the Middle
District of Florida.

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Wednesday, January 14, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


EALI40Fj


Wilmer

Howard

Strickland


Viv'yanne Veronica Wilmer Strickland, 74,
Jackson, age 78, a home- went home to be with the
maker, died Sunday, Jan. 4, Lord on Saturday, Jan. 10,
in Madison, surrounded by family
The Mass was held Wilmer was born in
Thursday, Jan. 8, at 11 a.m., Hanson on April 2, 1934,
at St. Vincent de Paul and lived in Madison.
Catholic Church in Madi- County his entire life. He
son. A rosary was said was a postal clerk and rur-.
Wednesday evening, 'Jan. al mail carrier for 35 years
7, during the visitation with the Madison Post Of-
from 6-8 p.m. at Beggs Fu- fice. While on his route, he
neral Home, Madison made- many friends
Chapel. throughout the years and
In lieu of flowers, do- his customers always said
nations may be made to a person could set a watch
Madison Pink Ladies Aux- by him.
iliary, 309 NE Marion St., Wilmer and his wife,
Madison, FL 32340, or Big Pauline, have owned and
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan published The Swapper for
Center Blvd., Tallahassee, 26 years. He was an active
FL 32308. member of Hanson United
She was born in Brook- Methodist Church, where
lyn, N.Y, and had lived in he served in many differ-
Jacksonville before mov- ent positions. His love of
ing to Lee in 1969. In Jack- the Lord was apparent in
sonville, she volunteered everything that he did. He
as a Cub Scouts den moth- was also a riember of the
er, at the St. Joseph Par- Gideons International.
rish Ladies Guild, and as a Funeral services cele-
leader for 4-H Clubs. In brating his life will beat 2
Madison, she was involved p.m., Wednesday, at Han-
in thee Madison County son United Methodist
Memorial Auxiliary Pink Church with burial at the
Ladies and the Parish church cemetery
Council of Catholic The family received
Women at St Vincent de- friends from 6-8 p.m.,
Paul Catholic Church, Tuesday at Beggs Funeral
where she was a member. Home in Madison.
She is survived by two He is survived by his
sons (Kevin Jackson [wife, wife' of 55 years, Pauline
Jean Marie] of Clarksville, Zippererr Strickland, of
Tenn., and Jonathan Jack- Madison; two sons, Archie
son of Lake City), one (Opal) Strickland, of Madi-
daughter (Elizabeth son, and Rickie Strickland,
Williams [husband, Mike] of Madison; one daughter,
of Lee), one brother Wanda Cox, of Jasper; six
(Christian Jakob [wife, grandchildren, Travis
Norma] of Jacksonville), Strickland, of Madison,
and six grandchildren Chrystal Barrs, of Madi-
(Mary Catherine Jackson son, Tiah Barrs, of Jack-
of Boulder, Colo.; David sonville, Ben Cox, Jr., of
Jackson of Chicago, Ill.; Jasper, Charlie Strickland,
SA Matthew Jackson [wife, of Valdosta, Ga., and
Katie] of Biloxi, Miss.; and Lance Strickland, of Fort
Meredith Jackson, Brian Walton Beach; two great-
Williams and Chris grandchildren, Rylan
Williams of Lee). "Buckshot" Barrs, of Madi-
son, and Logan Strickland,
of Fort Walton. Beach;. two
brothers, Elbert (Louise)
Strickland and Leon
I Strickland, of Madison;
one .sister, Eunice Rowell,
of Madison; two brothers-
in-law, Billy (Jo Ann) Zip-
perer, of Lake Park, Ga.,
and Edgar .(Patricia) Zip-
perer, of Valdosta, Ga.; and
two sisters-in-law, Betty,
Parker (BJ), of. Valdosta,
Ga., and Wilma Pearl (Lar-
ry) Howell, of Valdosta,
Ga.
In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions
may be made to Hanson
United Methodist Building
Fund, P.0,.Box 513, Madi-
son, FL 32340 or to the
Gideons, P.O. Box 511, Lee,
FL 32059
R :.^^^^.,_,M~p(BIIBBBM|^BM|M|Ha^^


Vivyanne

Veronica

Jackson


M-- I r


January 14
55 Plus Club will meet
Wednesday, Jan. 14. The
speaker for this kickoff
meeting will be Mr. Ted
Ensminger, Executive Di-
rector, Madison Chamber
of Commerce. 55 Plus Club
meets at 12 Noon for lunch
at the United Methodist
Community Center at the
corner of Highway 145
and Dill Street. There -are
no fees of any kind and no
reservations are neces-
sary for the luncheon.
Anyone in the community
55 years old and older is
.cordially invited. For
more information about 55
Plus Club or any outreach
of the United Methodist
Cooperative, call the coor-
dinator, Linda Gaston at.
850-929-4938.
January 16
Crabb Revival will be
in concert at the North-
side Church of God in Per-
ry on Friday, January 16,
at 7 p.m. For more infor-
mation, please call (850)
464-0114 or visit our web-
site at www.northflorida-
concerts.com.
January 19
Madison County Chap-
ter of the Charmettes will
sponsor a program to ob-
serve the life of Rev. Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. on
Monday, January 19, at the
Madison County Court-
house, at 11 a.m. Rev. Dr.
Charlie Barfield will. be
the guest speaker and the
Mt. Zion AME Church
choir will perform. The
festivity will start by wallk-,
ing. from Mt. Zion 'AME
Church at 10:30 a.m. to the
Madison County Court-
house. For more informa-
tion, please call (850) 973-
3932.
January 22
On the Wings of Free-
dom: An American Por-
trait featuring pianist Mac
Frampton and the power-
ful voices of Sam Hagan
and Dawn-Marie James
will be held at Van H.
Priest Auditorium (NFCC
campus) on January 22, at
7 p.m. Celebrate two cen-
turies of American mile-
stones as our country sto-
ry is told through the
songs that united and in-
spired its people. For more
information, call (850) 973-
1653 or visit www.nfcc.edu
(keyword Artist Series).
January 24
LifeSong will be in
concert at Lamont
Methodist Church on Sat-
urday, January 24, at 7 p.m.
Admission is free. Refresh-
ments will be served fol-
lowing the concert.
January 25
Grammy-nominated
Karen Peck and New River

_7


Tomorrow
Wheh you listen to the radio. do you
remember everything? When you're
driving down the road, if's hard to
.get a phone number. With classifieds,
If people forget the message, 'they
coa look agoin-ond the phone'
number's altfady on paper

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will be in concert at Faith life more fulfilled. For
Baptist Church on Sunday, more information, or di-
January '25, at 2:30 p.m. rections, call (866) 236-7812
Admission is free, howev- or (850) 971-9904.
er a love offering will be Everyday Except
received during the con- Tuesdays
cert. For more informa- The : Senior Citizens
tion, please call (850) 973- Center offers computer
2887. classes to seniors 60 and
January 30 older everyday except
A Rally in the Alley Tuesdays. For more infor-
will be held on January 30, mation or to sign up,
from 7-9 p.m., at Janet please call (850) 973-4241.
Moses and Company Song- Third Tuesday of
writer Jeffrey Todd,. New 'Each Month
to Madison, don't miss his The' Greater
performance! Great food, Greenville. Area Diabetes
fun, friends, tea tasting, -Support Group is a free ed-
art, antiques, unique gifts, ucational service and sup-
crafts and more! For more port for diabetes and those
information, please call wanting to prevent dia-
(850) 973-3971., betes. The group meets the
Every Monday In third Tuesday of each
January month at the Greenville
Mommy's Club is an Public Library Conference
opportunity for Mother's Room at 312 SW Church
and Mothers-to- be to Street, Greenville, 11 -
share, discuss and explore 11:30 a.m. Everyone is wel-
concerns regarding child- come!
birth, baby care and life Every Wednesday and
choices after birth. All are Friday
welcome and it is free. We The Senior Citizens
will meet at Madison Pub- Center's sewing club to se-
lic Library every Monday niors 60 and older meets
in December from 10 am every Wednesday and Fri-
til 12 noon. Kathy Harvey, day. For more information
a Certified Doula and or to sign up, please call
Childbirth Educator, will (850) 973-4241.
host. For more informa- Third Wednesday of
tion call 850-929-2951 or Each Month
850-464-0487. The Madison 'County
Every Tuesday Health Education Club is
Saturday holding a free educational
The Diamonds in the service and support group
Ruff Adoption Program at for people interested in
the Suwannee Valley Hu- preventing or controlling
mane Society is open diabetes, high blood pres-
every Tuesday through sure, elevated cholesterol
"Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 level obety, anc'otlhr
p.m.' It is located-on 1156... chronic.. health condi-
S.E Bisbee Loop Madison+ ,tions. The club meets-the
FL, 32340. For a healthy third Wednesday of each
lifestyle, adopt an animal month at the Madison
and they will make your Public Library Confer-


ence Room at 378 NW Col-
lege Loop, Madison, 12:15 -
12:45 p.m. Everyone is wel-
come to bring their own
lunch!'
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison County
Diabetes Support Group is
a free:educational service
and support group for dia-
betes and those wanting to
prevent diabetes. The
group meets the third
Wednesday of each month
at the Madison Public Li-
brary Conference Room at
378 NW College Loop,
Madison, 11:45 a.m. 12:10
p.m. Everyone is welcome
is bring their own lunch!
Details: contact Marcia
Kazmierski at (386)-752-.
2461 or Lorraine Miller at
(386)-752-6439.
Fourth Wednesday of
Each Month
An informational
meeting for those injured
and needing help return-
ing to work will be held
the fourth Wednesday of
each month from 12-3.p.m.
at the Madison County Ex-
tension Office located on
184 College Loop. The
meeting is free and open to
the public. For more infor-
mation, please call (850)-
245-3489.
Every Friday Night
Area 'line dancers that
would like to come are invit-
ed to join in line dancing
open to the public at the
new Elks Club in Valdosta,
Ga. each Friday night from
7:30-11:30 pm. It is located
gt a mile west of 1-75 on
-the Quitman Hwy., 2309
Hwy.84 West. Cover charge
will be $5 per person at the
door to the dancehall. Call
(229)-455-2267.


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6A* Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 14, 2009



AROUND MADISON COUNTY




Studstill Proves Giving Still Reason For The Season


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, December 24, 2008
Revonda Frith (left) and her mother, Betty Jewel Thomas (right), serve up hundreds
of Christmas dinners ... Madison style!


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, December 24, 2008
Lovely Lee ladies, Dorothy Twitty (left) and Myra Tillman (right), share a table and a
few laughs with new friends, Bryant Thigpen (left) and Jacob Bembry, who is seen here
in his new Ditch Witch cap.he received as a stocking stuffer during the annual Studstill
Christmas lunch.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Dec. 23, Studstill Lum-
ber continued their annual
Christmas tradition of pro-
viding a tasty meal, some
handy gifts and a whole lot of
smiles to. all who wished to
stop by for a helping of holi-
day cheer. Owners Glenn
Frith and Elvoye Thomas
have a tradition of giving
back to the Madison commu-
nity they feel so blessed to
serve.
"We just want people to
know how much we appreci-
ate them and also to wish
everyone a safe and blessed
holiday," Thomas noted.
Watching the family and
staff serving food and hahd-
ing out treats, it is. apparent
that their holiday love ~ffair
runs, deep. In fact, thir Greene Publishing,Inc. Photo
wives, Revonda Frith 'and
Betty Thomas, made sure Gary Bailey slices t
plates were full and smiles during the Studstill Lu
wide for the entire gathering, held on Dec. 23.
Even grandson, Daryl Frith,
was seen in,his Santa hat helping whenever and wher-
ever needed.


by
up
mb


By the look and speed of
plates flying off the serving
table, lunch was obviously
delicious and well enjoyed by
e erybody 'in attendance.
With entrees like Boston
butt, sliced pork and barbe-
qued chicken, not to mention
baked potatoes so fat they. al-
most broke the plate, it was
no surprise that everyone
took a moment to praise the
hosts.as they took a moment
to remember the reason for
the season.
The parking lot of
Studstill remained packed
throughout the afternoon.
Literally, no one went away
hungry. Again, for those who
know the family, this came as
no surprise. What may sur-
prise some, however, is that
ini this season of rampant re-
Michael Curtis, Decemniber 24, 2008 tailing and concerns about-
where the next gift is coming
some Christmas cheer from, there are still those
er annual holiday lunch that understand the season is
1' really all about giving and
sharing.
Michael Curtis can be reached at.
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, December 24, 2008
Daryl Frith (left) helps his grandfather, Elvoye
Thomas (right), and the rest of the Studstill family pro-
viding lunch on Dec. 23 to all who stopped by the busi-
ness, which is located on SR 53, just before the bridge, in
Madison.







Wednesday, January 14, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY
m__ -


Announces 2009 Fifth


Saturday Program Schedule


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The 2009 Fifth Saturday Farmers & Friends Festi-
vals are coming together and the Madison Rotary Club
wishes to thank local civic, business and community
leaders who are working together to ensure the success
of the program.
"Four times in 2009, North Range Avenue will be
lined with booths and displays heralding our rich her-
itage and quality local products. We personally invite all
interested to be a sponsor of these festive events," Brian
O'Connell, club president-elect noted.
"In addition to the farmers market, agricultural dis-
plays, food and nursery products, arid arts and crafts
vendors, each Fifth Saturday Festival will feature a dif-
ferent theme and coordinated local events," he added.
The 2009 schedule and themes are as follows:
Jan. 31 Fishing and Hunting Show, featuring a
Turkey Calling Contest
May 30 Gospel and Bluegrass Music Festival
Aug. 29 Classic and Antique Car Show
Oct. 31 Bicycle Tourism, featuring a Road Trip
Fifth Saturday Festivals will showcase historic


Madison as it creates large crowds to shop, dine and
tour. Promotions will extend into Jacksonville, Talla-
hassee and Southern Georgia to ensure regional expo-
sure.
Entertainment and commerce represent the win-
ning combination necessary to give these events lasting
appeal, which is exactly the goal in its design. To their
immense credit, Madison Rotary Club has demonstrat-
ed their ability to deliver as promised and is looking to
add Fifth Saturday Farmers & Friends Festivals to an
already impressive resume. Proceeds from the event
will be added to the club's local commitments.
Rotary is synonymous with worldwide charity, striv-
ing to reflect its motto of "Service Above Self" in all un-
dertakings. The Madison Rotary Club meets weekly on
Wednesdays at noon at the St. Vincent's fellowship hall.
Sponsorship applications, donations and additional de-
tails of Fifth Saturday, as well as membership and pro-
gram information, may be obtained by calling Brian
O'Connell at (850) 973-3356 or by mail at Madison Rotary
Club, P.O. Box 745, Madison, FL 32341.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


NFCC And Local Leaders Establish Student Leadership Program


Photo Submitted
NFCC's Minority Student LeadershipProgram steering committee includes (pictured left to right) NFCC SGA President Greg Bruton, Jeremy Weatherspoon, Lonnie Ford,
Clyde Alexander, Larry Hollander, Alfred Martin,Taylor McGrew, Jasmine Richardson, Izell Montgomery, Dr. Kelvin Norton, Doug Biown, Efrain Bonilla, Bobby.Scott, Tiffany Bel-
lenger and NFCC acting President John Grosskopf. Members of the Leadership steering committee missing from the photo are Linda Branch, Marcus Hawkins, Mary Frances
Mauldin, Jerome Wyche, Darrell Cherry and Gary Edwards.


North Florida Community College ,and local leaders
met Dec. 8 to discuss building a minority student lead-
ership program at the college. Members of the steering
committee discussed core values such -as academic
achievement, civic engagement and personal enricih-
mnt i Anolved in establishing a successful program fori
area minority students.
Theprogra will assist NFCC's recruitment and re-
tention team, with' aocus on placing minority students
in an environment that accepts and nurtures each stu-
dent as an individual. Th end result of the leadership
program is to empower these students to become lead-
ersin their own communities nd beyond, while creat-
ing role models for future NFCC studets.
The Minority Student Leadership Program cohort


will consist of 15 minority students, each receiving a tu-
ition and book scholarship to attend NFCC. Students
will be expected to move through academic curriculum
independently following their own abilities and inter-
ests. The group will meet each month to discuss impor-
tant topics such as minority health issues, personal fi-
nance management and personal enrichment. Each stu-
dent will alsoQbe expected to complete required civic en-
,gagements, volunteer activities and mentoring.
Program eligibility is contingent upon academic
performance and participation once in the program. In
addition, each applicant will need letters of commit-
ment from a sponsoring mentor or group within the six
county service areas, of Madison, Hamilton, Jefferson,
Lafayette, Taylor and Suwannee counties.


NFCC's Minority Student Leadership Program
steering committee is made up of NFCC students,; em-
ployees and local leaders NFCC students on the com-
mittee are Student Government Association President
Greg Bruton, Jeremy Weatherspoon and Jasmine
Richardson. Local leaders Larry Hollander, Alfred Mar-
tin, Dr. Kelvin Norton, Tiffany Bellenger, Linda Branch,
Marcus Hawkins, Izell Montgomery Taylor McGrew,
Jerome Wyche, Darrell Cherry and Gary Edwards are
on the steering committee with NFCC acting President
John Grosskopf and NFCC employees Clyde Alexander,
Efrain Bonilla, Doug Brown, Lonnie Ford, Bobby Scott
and Mary Frances Mauldin.
For more information, contact Clyde Alexander at
(850) 973-1609 or email alexanderc@nfcc.edu.


LIVE OAK GAS


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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
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8A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 14, 2009



ARO UND MADISON COUNTY


Looking F

Do you have a family historian? Do
you love a mystery?
Gaines Starling, a Madison native,
has appreciated both.
In one case, too late.
In the leadoff talk
for this year, Starling
outlined his trials and
tribulations on his re-
search to the Madison
County Genealogical
Society at their
monthly meeting,
It all' started, for
him, when his older,
sister, Peggy McGhin,
became interested in
knowing about their
family history
It was then that
they fully realized the
role their family histo- Gaines Starli
rian, Lora Gibson, showing his family
who passed away in to the Madison Co
1993, had represented. Society's January
That fountain of
wisdom was no more. What had been un-
written is no more.
But now, Gaines was on a quest, to get
into writing what could be salvaged.
His primary interest is the Pearson,
Leavins and McDaniels families.
In 16 years of research, he has deter-.


)r History Church Of Jesus Christ Of
-m --m- m ii


mined that you take into stride what can't
be. But his biggest frustration is not only
that people don't write things down, but
the people put up road-
blocks as well -- that is,
they deliberately and
intentionally withhold
information. He also
believes that misun-
derstandings help in a
manufactured sort of
way to hinder or stop
research.
He addressed two
obstacles. One was of a
family Bible. He has a
fifth cousin once re-
moved from the
Cordele/Nashville, Ga.,
area, who so far at
Least, has prevented the
ng, of Madison, inspection of its known
book for his talk historical entrys.
unty Genealogical His second obsta-
meeting. cle is based in Texas.
STrying to find a com-
mon .ancestor, he has made a DNA dis-
covery request, but has had no luck.
The speaker is the son of Marie and
Gaines Starling.
Next month's speaker will be Nell
Dobbs, who will speak on Madison fami-
lies she-has known.


Later-nay saints noins


Groundbreaking Ceremony


Photo Submitted
Ten men from the Madison Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints turned the
dirt with golden shovels Saturday on the west side of the church's existing location
where their new church expansion will be built. Standing left to right are Bruce Camp-
bell, Mike Ladle, Patrick Lightcap, Blair Burton, Shaun Robinson, Joe Stansel, Jay Lee,
William Gilliam, Frank Williamson and Curtis Austin.


_i The setting was a cool and breezy
hilltop and the occasion.was a ground-
breaking ceremony to kick off the con-
struction of a significant addition to the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints. About 75 members and friends of
the church gathered on the property at
Hwy 90 W and Pickle Ln. on Saturday, to
celebrate the growth of the gospel of Je-
sus Christ in Madison County Branch
President Shaun Robinson conducted the
service that was presided over by Stake
President Blair Burton of Tallahassee.
After the opening hymn, "I Believe in
Christ," Brother Jay Lee gave the invoca-
tion. Brother Patrick Lightcap gave a
Brief history of the the Madison Branch'
of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
day Saints dating back to the early 1900's.
He noted that the first groundbreaking
ceremony on this land was Feb. 10, 1975,
when the present building was begun.
Prior to that time, members of the
church had to use other locations for Sun-
day meetings, including the American
Legi6n hall, the Seventh Day Adventist
Church, and the Madison Women's Club
building on Lake Francis.
The Women's Chorus under the lead-
ership of Sister Jennifer Stansel, sang,
"The Spirit of God," prior to President
Shaun Robinson making his remarks. He
reviewed what has helped the church
stand strong over the years. He men-
tioned making and keeping covenants
with Heavenly Father, staying personally
righteous, studying the words of the Sav-
ior and of the prophets, following the


promptings of the Holy .Spirit, participat-
ing in sincere personal and family prayer,
having weekly Family Home Evening,
and practicing principles of self-relia ce
and provident living.
President Curtis .C. Austin, prior
stake president, spoke briefly about the
growth in the Madison Branch and the
leadership that is needed for growth to
happen. He emphasized the principle of
obedience and the importance of being
led by inspiration.
President Blair Burton, current pres-
ident of the Tallahassee Florida Stake,
reminded all present that faith precedes
,theblessing, He said, "The Lord blesses
'us after, exercise our faith,",,. ,:
After the Women's Chorus sang
"Abide with Me, 'Tis Eventide," Brother
Joseph Stansel gave the closing prayer
and the blessing on the food.
The actual groundbreaking took
place with 10 men of the church taking
golden shovels and turning the earth on
the west side of the existing building as
the sun was setting and a full moon was
rising.-Construction of the new chapel
with additional classrooms and re-
strooms should begin in about four
weeks. Completion of the project should
be six months later.
For more information about the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints speak to one of the local members
or call the Missionaries at 673-1544. Arti-
cles about the Church are also available
online at www.mormon.org and
,www.lds.org.






i^ North Florida Community College

AMERICAN

PORTRAIT


Featuring
PIANIST MAC FRAMPTON
Vocalists Sam Hagan & Dawn-Marie
Thurs, Jan.22
7:00 p.m.
Van H. Priest Auditorium
Madison, Florida

Tickets on Sale Npwl
$12 adults/$6 Child
UPCOMING SHOWS
2/19: The Ritz Chamber Players
3/31: Barrage: High Strung
WWW.NFCC.EDU


I1-


Gordon Selman will celebrate

his 90th Birthday on January

18 with his family and friends,

.


ly
)L








Wednesday, January 14, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 9A



SPORTS


ACA Middle AyC Qm MfLfg


School G irls Beat By Fran Hunt there, but of 27 attempts, we only suni


Maclay 29-27


By Fran Hunt
Special from the Monticello
News
The Aucilla Christian
Academy middle school
girls defeated the Maclay
Marauders, 29-27, Tuesday,
Jan. 6, in overtime, to re-
main undefeated at 6-0.
Maclay was first to
score, but the first quarter
ended with Aucilla on top,
7-4. The second quarter
-was closer, with Aiucilla
squeaking by Maclay, 8-7.
In the third quarter, Aucil-
la inched past Maclay, 4-
3, and Maclay rallied in the
fourth, scoring 10 to Aucil-
la's 5, and tying the game,
forcing the competition
into overtime.
The Lady Warriors
stepped up. their game and
scored two buckets
from the field and one free-
throw to Maclay's single
three-point bucket and
won the game by 2.
Scoring for the young
Lady Warriors were
Brooke Kinsley, leading
the charge with 9 points;
Pamela Watt made 4 steals
and 1 three-point bucket;
Michaela Metcalfe made 5
steals and scored 2 points;
Ashli Cline scored 8 points
and made 4 rebounds;
Brooke Kinsey scored 5
points; and Ashley Schofill
scored 2 points.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, January 6, 2009
The Aucilla Christian Academy middle school girls
basketball team is enjoying an undefeated season. Their
win over Maclay on Jan. 6 gives them a commendable 6-0
record.


Special from the Monticello ews
After downing Maclay, 32-28, on Jan.
6, the Aucilla Christian Academy middle
school boys basketball team remained
undefeated at 8-0 on the season.
"We are not usually the bigger play-
ers on the court, but Maclay had some
pretty small players," said Warriors
Coach Mac Finlayson.
"They were small, but they were
quick; though, they didn't really play that
well. And we did not dp well at all at the
free-throw line. We did a good job getting


eight, Finlayson continued.
Hans Sorensen led the young War-
riors with 12 points; Jay Finlayson scored
7 points, which included 2 three-point
shots; and Jared Jackson scored 6 points,
which included going four of six at the
free-throw line.
Bradley Holm racked up 4 points.
"Bradley had really come along, and I am
seeing considerable improvement in his
abilities every day," said Finlayson.
Tres Copeland scored 2 points, and
Jared Turner scored 1 point.


Warriors Fall To John Paul

By Fran Hunt throw line for 9 points. He had 1 assist, 1
Specidifrom the Monticello News offensive and 1 defensive rebound, 6
The ACA Warriors fell to John Paul block/steals and 4 turriovers.
II, 54-29, Jan 8, to stand 1-7 on the season. Alex Dunkle hit two of 11 (18 percent)
Coach Dan Nennstiel said the War- from the field, and missed one from the
riors fell behind early in the game, but three-point zone for 4 points, had 3 as-
they continued to fight hard. "I admire sists, 2 offensive rebounds, 2 block/steals,
them for their fighting spirit and the fact and 5 turnovers.
that they never give up during a game," John Stephens missed three from the
said Nennstiel. "I'm really proud of them field' and one from the three-point zone,
for that." had 1 assist and 1 defensive rebound.
Warriors bucketed 12 of 42 (29 per- Brandon Dunbar missed two from the
cent) from the field, missed three from field, had 1 defensive rebound, 2-
the three-point zone, and hit five of nine 5ilock/steals and 3 turnovers.
.(56 percent) from the free-throw line for Matthew Harrington connected with
29 points. two of four (50 percent) from the field for
They collected 7 assists, 15 offensive 4 points He had-1 assist, 3 offensive and 2
and 13 defensive rebounds, committed no defensive rebounds, I block/steal and 3
fouls, had 20 block/steals, and 23' turnovers.
turnovers. Randy Perry netted one of three (33
Clark Christy connected with two of percent) from the field for 2 points, had 2-
eight (25 percent) from the field, and offensive and 2 defensive rebounds, 4
dropped in four of six (67 percent) from block/steals and Iturnover.
the free-throw line for 8 points. He had 1 Brandon Darnell bucketed one of two
assist, 5 offensive and 5 defensive re- (50 percent) from the field for 2 points,
bounds, 3, block/steals and 2 turnovers, had 1 defensive rebound, 2 block/steals
Stephen Dollar netted four of eight arid 1 turnover.
(50 percent) from the field, missed one Joe Mizell missed 1 from the field,
from the three-point zone, and droppedn had en rebounds and 4
one of three" (33 percent)' from the free- turnovers.' ..,


973-2300


!:








10A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 14, 2009



SCHOOL & EDUCATION




SURVEY SHOWS EIGHTH GRADE CRITICAL


TO COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS


By Michael Curtis. "
Greene Publishing, Inc. ,-
According to recent re- "',
search by ACT Inc., an or-
ganization best known for
its college entrance exam,
most U.S. eighth graders
aren't on track and will
face an uphill battle to
catch up, where college
and career readiness is
concerned. Students who
aren't on track by eighth
grade .are unlikely to at-
tain that level of readiness
by-high school graduation,
according to "The Forgot-,
ten Middle," a new re-,
search report by ACT.
The findings suggest
the level of academic
achievement that students
attain by eighth grade has
a bigger impact on
whether they are ready for
college and career by the
time they graduatethan
any single factor exam-
ined, including courses
taken, grades earned in Madison County elemer
high school and demo- s County
graphic characteristics entrance exams, eighth-grac
such as gender, race and ness by high school gradu,
household income. Neal Brown and Cedric Dav
"Eighth grade is a crit-.
ical, defining point for stu-
dents in the college and ca- Conversely, the report
reer planning process," suggests being on target
said Cynthia B. Schmeiser, for college and career
president and chief oper- readiness by eighth grade
ating officer of ACT's Edu- puts students on a trajec-
cation division. "If stu- tory for success in high
dents.are not on target for school and beyond. Among
college and career readi- three groups of eighth
ness by the time they grade students studied-
reach "'his'poi; theim- those who were on target,
pac'may b nearly ire-, those. who just missed be-
versible." ing on target, and those
The findings also sug- who were more substan-
gest that few U.S. eighth tially off target-only
graders are currently on those who were on target
target to be ready for col-
lege-level work by the time
they graduate from high Our future
school. Only 16 percent of ,-\
the recent high school will ..be affect
graduates studied in .f
ACT's research had met or readiness
surpassed the organiza- l-no rA
tion's College Readiness o ,i woA(
Benchmarks in all four
subject areas: English,
math, reading and science: in igth grade were ulti-
Students who meet those mately ready for college
benchmarks are consid- and career by their junior
ered on target to be col- or senior year of high,
lege-ready by the time school.
they graduate from high "The implications of
school. College readiness this research are clear,"
is defined by ACT as hav- said, Schmeiser., "If we
ing a high likelihood of want to improve college
earning a "C" or higher in readiness among U.S. high
first-year college courses school graduates, we need
in each subject area. to intervene before stu-


.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis,January 12, 2009
itary and middle school teachers have an important task ahead of them: preparing Madi-
ready for their futures. According to ACT Inc.,'an organization best known for its college
de students who aren't college and career ready are unlikely to attain that level of readi-
ation. Fortunately, Central School eighth graders, such as Koras Williams, Tr6 Arnold,
is, pictured here left to right, realize the importance of a good education.


dents reach high school, in
upper elementary and
middle school. The find-
ings impact not only how
we prepare students lead-
ing up to high school, but
in what strategic ways we
intervene with those who
are behind academically
in high school. Both ele-
ments are critical for, en-
suring that our high'
school grads are ready for*
college and career. Our
students deserve it, and


ma's education
which places sign:
emphasis on imp:
high school achieve
and graduation ra
reforming educati
the upper elementa
middle school grade
plan would require
to develop early-w;
systems that ident
risk students in
five through eight an
vide interventions
help those student


U.S. workforce and econor
ted by the college and care
our eighth graders today,
CT Inc,


our nation demands it."
The need to build the
foundation for college and
career readiness well' be-
fore high school is a topic
that has at times been
overshadowed on a crowd-
ed education reform agen-
da. Perhaps the most no-
table recent focus on re-
form has. been in U.S. Pres-
ident-elect ,Barack Oba-


ceed.
ACT's report su
that the impact o
:problem 'extends b
college preparation
U S. workforce an
economy. Apparent
skills necessary for
into the majority
fastest growing job
require a. high
diploma and offer a
wage are compare
those needed. for s
in first-year college
es, ACT's researc
lowed .approxi:
216,000 students in t


m m0mmml mmmma


plan, graduating classes of 2005
ificant and 2006 from eighth
roving grade through high school
cement graduation.
tes by The study also found
on- in that improving certain be-
ry and haviors of middle school
es. The students can help increase
states their readiness for college
arning and career by the time-
ify at- they graduate. Two acade-
grades mic behaviors were found
nd pro- to have the greatest impact
s that on both eighth grade
:s suc- course failure and ninth
grade GPA: academic dis-
cipline (e.g., good work
y and study habits) and or-
y derly conduct (behaving
?er appropriately in class).
ACT's report lays out
ZC- the specific' knowledge
and skills in English,
math, reading and science
that students must attain
by the end of eighth grade
to be on target for college
iggests and career success. ACT is
)f this a not-for-profit organiza-
)eyond tion that serves millions of'
to the people in schools, colleges,
id the professional associations,
ly, the businesses and govern-
entry ment agencies with pro-
of the grams and services that
)s that, have one guiding purpose:
school to help people achieve edu-
livable cation and workplace suc-
ible to cess: For more informa-
uccess tion about ACT, visit
cours- www.act.org.
3h fol- Michael Curtis can be
lately reached at michael@
he U.S. greenepublishing.com.


School


Continues


To Excel

By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
As this school year
opened, Principal Eliza-
beth Hodge issued a state-
ment that has become a
motto for the Excel 'Alter-
native School:
"A New Year, at the
'New School, under a New
Administrator, brings New
Expectations."
She further noted in a
recent report, "The Excel
Alternative School held its
monthly PTO/Advisory
Council Meeting on Thurs-
day, Nov. 20, at 6 p.m. A
large crowd of students,
parents, community sup-
porters, administrators,
faculty and staff filled the
cafeteria for this meeting.
Students, Mary Sweat, Ja-
cob Bailey, Akeem Watson,
Tyjuan Fayson, Quiniesia
Farmer, Unique Gnann
and lesha Robinson, and
Mrs. Bailey, a parent, en-
tertained the audience
with a Thanksgiving skit,
Trevor Turkey."
This was the fourth
meeting of the school year,
and, like the previous
meetings, it was well sup-
ported. PTO President De-
loris Jones continues to
"lead the group, while
Emma Barfield serves as
president of the SAC com-
mittee. Working together,
these ladies and their re-
spective teams continue to
sponsor various key fund
raising activities, for
which students, faculty
and staff. gratefully re-
quest additional communi-
ty support in their quest to
obtain funding for essen-
tial physical fitness equip-
ment.
Hodge went on to
thank parents and the
community for their con-
tinued support.' She also
reported that they are still
looking for good men and
women to. spend at least 30
minutes a week with stu-
dents to ensure their
progress to performance.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing corn.


I - -l 1 1 1 1 1 1 l- 1 1- 1 - 1 -


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Wednesday, January 14, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11A



SCHOOL & EDUCATION




Managing A Mountain Of Paperwork


By Michael'Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
If there was ever one
of those behind-the-scenes
positions that plays such
an important role that,
without it, the system
would practically
come to a halt, it is the
one performed by Ter-
ry Bowen at Madison
County Central
School. As a produc-
tion aid,, her job de-
scription doesn't ap-
pear too complicated,
but wow, does it gener-
ate a mountain of pa-
perwork. In fact, one of
her "desks" had over
four million pages of
information come over
it in the last three
years, which she was
then required to clear
out within hours.
Seriously; it's easy
to walk through a copy
room without realiz-
ing that it is the main
artery for information
in larger\ institutions.
Consider the numbers
of teachers alone.
There are over 100.
Each has at least 20
students who constant-
ly receive handouts of
(papers to take home). m
Literally dozens of dif- th
ferent types of pages ro


flow through the school
daily, and they all start in
the production room. At
the Central School, they
start with Terry Bowen,
and that .is in addition to
her laminating and mail-


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo
SMichael Curtis, January 7, 2
Terry Bowen serves up millio
pages each year, along with
ountain of smiles for everybo
at comes though her producti
)om.n


box duties.
Bowen joined the dis-
trict about eight years ago.
She recalls with great
fondness how the now-Su-
perintendent, then-princi-
pal, Lou Miller, befriended
her, including a heart-
warming story about-
how Miller and
,Miller's sister, Julia
Waldrep, truly stepped
Wup to "save the day"
just after Bowen start-
ed in the position. She
then tearfully added
huge praise for the
way the sisters rose to
support her following
the tragic loss of
Bowen's husband, Ed-
ward, just a few years
ago.
Bowen makes it
look easy at this point,
which may not always
work in her favor, be-
cause colleagues can
easily overlook the vi-
tal nature of the job
and not appreciate
how long it takes to
make it look easy.
Bowen doesn't com-
i by plain about it though,
009 and according to one
ns colleague, Susanne
a Griffin, "She is an ab-
dy solute gem in the way
on she works and how
well she does it."


MCFEE Challenges Students


To Dream And Succeed


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County
Foundation for Excellence
in Education Inc. contin-
ues to deliver its goal of
helping students live their
dreams by reaching their
fullest potential through a
good college education.
Currently, 34 Madison'
County students who re-
ceived full tuition scholar-
ships are enrolled in col-
lege. For over 17 years,
MCFEE has been dedicated
to this worthwhile cause.
In 1991, a group of con-
cerned Madison County
volunteers gathering to
address the rising dropout'
rate in the county, and the
rising rate of those who
did not continue their edu-
cation after completing
high school. Four years
later, in J995, MCFEE was
incorporated, with Mon-
teen. Cave serving as its
president. The board of di-
rectors consisted of 13
concerned citizens, three
of whom still serve on the
board today: Cave, Tim
Sanders. and George
Willis. Faye Browning cur-
rently serves as president.
MCFEE adopted a mis-
sion to coordinate and so-
licit community support,
commitment and re-
sources to enhance public
education in Madison
County, focusing on the
following goals:
* Linking schools and
community
* Increasing public aware-
ness of the need for com-
munity involvement in
public schools.
* Serving as a catalyst for
the establishment of
business and citizen
partnerships for the ben-
efit of public education.
* Establishing teacher en-
hancement programs
and teacher recognition.
* Motivating at-risk -stu-
dents to graduate
through the Take Stock
in Children Scholarship
program.
These goals resulted in
the three major projects
that comprise the corner-


stone of MCFEE activi-
ties: the scholarship pro-
gram, the Teacher of the
Year program and the
mini-grant program.
Initially, the board
made raising funds for
scholarships its top priori-
ty As a result, it launched
its "Dream and Succeed"
campaign. By 1999,
MCFEE had raised $80,000
for scholarships from indi-
viduals and business and
civic leadership. The
monies were then invested
in the Florida pre-paid
scholarship program.
Later that year,
MCFEE joined with Flori-
da's Take Stock in Chil-
dren program. Raising
scholarship funds remains
a continued commitment.
Most of these funds are de-
posited in the North Flori-
da Community College
Foundation and are
matched by contributions
from the state.
The students who
qualify and are approved,
to participate in the Take
Stock in Children pro-
gram must maintain high
grade point averages, re-
main drug and crime free,
meet with assigned men-
tors and, of course, gradu-
ate from high school. If
the student fulfills these
commitments, he or she'
will receive the scholar-
ship to college. As noted,
the 34 students attending
college now are therefore
all graduates of the Take
Stock in Children pro-
gram.
As far as the future,
there are 11 seniors who
are on track to receive
scholarships in 2009 and 12
juniors who will receive
scholarships in 2010. Addi-
tionally, there are 35 stu-
dents in grades six
through 10 who are TSIC
scholars. This week, 12
more students will become
part of the TSIC program.
Adult volunteers are
still needed because each
scholar requires a mentor
as part of the agreement.
One need not know calcu-
lus in order to apply The


role is less tutoring and
more encouragement. In-
terested citizens should
contact Jo Willis, coordina-
tor of the program, or B.J.
Curtis, who serves as theI
student advocate. Simply"
phone the Madison County
School District office at
(850) 973-5022 for details.
Each year, MCFEE
also sponsors the Golden
Apple Teacher of the Year
program., Teachers, stiu-
dents, former students and
residents of the communi-
ty nominate teachers by
submitting written appli-
cations to the selection
committee. The commit-
tee then interviews the'
nominees and selects the
District Teacher of the
Year. The District Teacher
of the Year is announced
at a gala banquet and
recognition ceremony in
February, and later repre-
sent Madison County in
the state competition for
Florida Teacher of the
Year. This year's ,Teacher
of the Year is Gail Wash-
ington of Pinetta Elemen-
tary School.
MCFEE also facilitates
mini-grants for teachers.
Often, teachers have inno-
vative ideas that they
would like to introduce to
their students, but sup-
plies for the project have
not been previously bud-
geted. MCFEE therefore
sponsors the mini-grant
program, which awards
funding between $50 and
$400 for special projects.
Teachers simply submit
proposals for these innov-
ative projects and a final
report is provided to the
board during its May
meeting.
MCFEE is actively
working to make a differ-
ence in Madison County as
it seeks to enhance public
education. With ongoing
support of its scholarship
and teacher's programs, it
will continue to make it
possible for students to
"Dream and Succeed."
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Bowen does have two
something-specials that
make her even prouder
than her work, and that's
her daughters: Taylor, who
is graduating from MCHS
this year, and Tiffani, who
recently graduated from


Southeast University. She
always makes plenty of
time for them, her church
and a lot of friends and
family she loves to spoil.
So, if one is needing to
move a mountain of paper-
work, or perhaps just need-


ing a warm smile to bright-
en a day, look no further
than the production room
at-Madison County Central
School and Terry Bowen.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com


MCHS Offers Professional


Business And Health Classes


By Laurie Smith
MCMH Career and Technical Education
Career and Technical Education at
Madison County High School also offers
classes in business management and
health occupations, These two classes of-
fer three consecutive courses, allowing-
students to work to their fullest poten-
tial, and to complete tasks in different ar-
eas. A child who completes all three
classes in one course area is considered a
vocational program completer and may
be eligible for the 75 percent Bright Fu-
ture Scholarship. Though both programs
have similarities, they offer very differ-
ent experiences, and cover different cur-
riculum.
The Madison County High School
health program offers a wide range of ex-
periences. The class involves hands-on
activities, including off-site, clinical ex-
periences to medical facilities in Madi-
son.
A student can start the program in
the ninth grade in the class medical
skills. This class teaches the bases of the
medical field and gives students a feel for
the program.
In a student's sophomore year, they
may choose to begin the program with
Health Science I. Through this class and
Health Science II.(which is taken during
a student's junior year), students can
learn many kinds of medical practices
and skills.
In the final year of high school, par-
ticipating students can complete the pro-
gram by taking the Allied Health In class.
This class offers clinical skills check-offs


with patient care technician students
from NFCC, off-campus clinical days,
and, at the end of the program, the stu-
dents can take the test to become a cer-
tificated nursing assistant. The final
class requires scrub days, hard work and
a willingness to perform difficult tasks,
but it certainly pays off.
The business management program
at MCHS also offers a variety of lessons.
Just like the health occupations program,
students cah complete a three-year
course to become a business manage-
ment program completer.
Through this class, students learn
skills such as correct typing technique
and computer basics. Students who com-
plete the program will be ready for hire at
any office job with full knowledge of Mi-
crosoft's Word, Excel and PowerPoint.
Participating students also learn how
to run copy machines and video cameras
and learn the ins and outs of digital pic-
tures. After completing this course, a stu-
dent can complete Microsoft testing.
Students already at MCHS or who are
upcoming ninth graders and are interest-
ed in these programs should get involved
and use the classes to their advantage.
Taking the time to learn these skills now
will save time in the future and give a
jump start on higher education.
Community members who are inter-
ested should also get involved. Those who
have a job in one of these fields can offer
to come speak to .students, or to ask stui-.,
dents to particpate in a real-life project.
These experiences would help make the
class worthwhile and exciting.


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12A* Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 14, 2009



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Wednesday, January 14, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 13A



HISTORY


By Alfa Hunt
Greene Publishing, Inc.
With the presidential inauguration just around the
corner, it seemed an appro- -
priate time., to focus on a
part of Florida's history ,
having to do with the hero-
'ines for suffrage.
Women have come a
long way in the last few
generations because / of
their overall struggle for "
equality, specifically, their .
fight for suffrage. Much of .
the conflict was still being.
fought here in Florida as
recently as the late 1960's.
It took nearly 60 years for
Florida to ratify the 19th
amendment, which gave
women the right to vote,
but the suffragettes
pushed on.
The American
woman's fight for the right Z,
to vote, born in the mid
1800's, was formed from a
vast level qf unfairness re-.
garding the sexes. Women
were barred from many .
professions as well as from .
enrolling in "colleges or
universities. They were
denied a voting right and
had little if any rights re- A cartoon depicting the I
garding buying, and selling
property, or even retaining their own salaries.
Yet, with leaders such as Elizabeth Stanton, Lucy
Stone, Sojourner Truth, 'Susan B. Anthony.and others,
the movement was steadily progressing. By the end of
the 19th century, many women were attending universi-
ties, engaging in business and "manly" professions and,
in a few states, were given the right to vote.
However, throughout most of the South, including
Florida, the, subject of a woman being allowed to decide
who gets into office was most unpopular, particularly to
politicians. Political men viewed the subject as any-
thing from an attempt to "soil ... women's purity ... with
the filth of masculine politics" to a "socialist's Negro-
radical element" out to overthrow the government.
Here in Florida, the movement began in Tampa, in
1893, after Mrs. Ella Chamberlain returned from a suf-
frage conference in Des Moines, Iowa. She was deter-
mined to bring the crusading idea to her state. First, she
obtained permission from a local newspaper to write a
column. When the paper suggested that she write on
topics that pertain to women and children, she replied:.
"The world- was not suffering for another cake recipe,
and the children seemed to be getting along better than
the women."
With this reply, the newspaper agreed, to let her
write on women's rights, but there was little sympathy
with her ideals. Later, she began to speak in front of so-
cial groups, using the theme, "taxation without repre-
sentation," declaring, "I deny that my brother Ameri-
cancan properly represent me."
Her audience grew and soonienabled her to organize
the Florida Woman Suffrage Association with 20 mem-
bers, eight of which were men. The group spoke, wrote
and give out literature on the movement: It also affiliat-
ed itself with the National, American Woman Suffrage
Association, which was headed by Susan B. Anthony.
Members steadily accumulated, but after Chamberlain
left Florida in 1897, the group's activities practically fell
into dormancy.
The movement picked back up in 1912 when Mrs.
Roselle Cooley and 30 other women organized the Flori-
da Equal Franchise League in Jacksonville. The league


began to branch out. By. 1916, they had 21 groups in
cities from Pensacola to Miami, with more than 800
members. Several other leagues formed by men also


National American Women Suffrage Association speaking

sprang up.
In the 1913 session of the legislature, they began lob-
bying the lawmakers for a voting bill for a state consti-
tutional amendment granting women the right to vote.
H.L. Bussey, of Palm Beach County, was persuaded to in-
troduce a bill, but the House rejected it, 39-26. One op-,
posing official stated that women "would be lowered
from the exalted position which they now hold," and


The emblem of the Florida Federation of Women's
Clubs.

their "purity would suffer at the polls."
Regardless, the suffrage groups pursued their goal.
They sponsored teas, 'banquets, musicals and booths at
fairs. They mailed literature statewide and enlisted the
aid of such notable Florida residents as Mr. and Mrs.
William Jennings Bryan and Mrs. Frank Strananhan.
They would soon win endorsements from such


groups as the Florida Federation of Women's Clubs, the
state's school principals and the State Federation of La-
bor. They invited well-known suffragist lecturers such
as Jeannette Rankin, who
later became a U.S. Con-
,gresswoman, and Anna
Howard Shaw
One of Shaw's speech-
es was recognized by the
Miami Herald as "one of
the wittiest, wisest and
sanest expressions of the
suffrage arguments."
However, views of the
w n' ot state press in general were
mixed. Some supported
the suffrage movement,
others opposed it, and the
rest were lukewarm on the
subject.
Even though they suf-
fered a setback in the 1915
legislative session, the suf-
fragists found someone-
who cared in the 1917 ses-
sion. A.C. Hamblin of
Hillsborough argued that
he did not believe male
voters were any better
qualified to govern than fe-
male, adding that in the
realm of moral fitness,.the
female might be'the 'supe-
rior.
in front of an audience. "Go to the saloons and
see which sex will be
found there," he, once observed.
His opponent George Brooks declared that he
"would not lower women from their traditional pinna-
cle. Politics is a dirty gaine ... and women cannot mix
with the filth without some of 'it sticking." A majority of
both houses carried the bill, but it failed for lack of the
required three-fifths vote. However, the suffragists did
meet with a minor victory with the local bills permit-
ting.them to vote in local election in 23 different Florida
cities.
By 1919, the movement's strong national effort,
thrust before the U.S. Congress, passed the 19th amend-'
ment,.which granted nationwide suffrage for women. In
emotional debate, there came from the Florida delega-
tions blatant racism. They noted that "two million
black women" would also have the right to vote.
Senator Duncan Fletcher declared the amendment
would also authorize federal intervention to protect
their voting rights, which violated the state's rights,
Fletcher warned, under which "the Republic cannot.
long endure.'" Senator Park Trammel agreed. He re-
minded his colleagues that "in ourstate at present, elec-
tions are exclusively in the hands of white men."
In the house, Frank Clark, of Gainesville, angrily
denounced the suffrage movement as dominated by a
"socialist's Negro-raldical element," out to upset the gov-
ernment. "Let us leave a woman where she is,".he de-
clared, "and not soil her noble character with the filth of
masculine politics ... the loveliest of all creation ..
undisputed dictator of the destiny of man."
On June 4, 1919, the amendment passed in the U.S.
Congress, 66-30 in the senate and 304-89 in the house.
Florida suffragists pleaded with the Florida legislature,
which was about to adjourn, to secure the honor of be-
ing the first state to ratify the 19th Amendment.
The lawmakers declined. Governor Sidney Catts re-
fused to call a special session because he was sure the
statesmen would vote against it. By August of 1920, Ten-
nessee became the required 36th state to ratify, just in
time for general elections and the polls took on 25 mil-
lion new voters: Florida won the honor of being the last
state to finally ratify the amendment, in 1969.


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14A Madison County Carrier









Wednesday, January 14, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 15A



MONEY & FINANCE





Recovery Is First Priority


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
As Madison County faces its toughest
economy since the big crop loses earlier
in the century, it joins all 67 Florida coun-
ties apd every state in the nation in their
hope that the economic stimulus package
currently being bounced around Con-
gress will be effective, so that recession
ddes not slide into depression.
Locally, city and county government,
as well as the school district, are looking
for ways to cut back financially without
losing ground on operational objectives.
Mostly though, just like the private sector,
they are all concerned about jobs-keep-
ing them, finding them and creating them.
President-elect Barack Obama recent-
ly stated that an analysis of his stimulus
proposals shows that up to 4 million U.S.
jobs could be saved or created by 2010,
nearly 90 percent of them in the private
sector. Obama had previously said his es-
timated $800 billion plan to lift the coun-
try out of a yearlong recession would cre-.


ate or save 3 million jobs, but the new
analysis showed that number would
range between 3 million and 4 million.
Hundreds of Madison County resi-
dents have been placed' in a financial
dilemma and an emotional daze as they
watch jobs disappear at both of the coun-.
ty's largest employers, Pilgrim's Pride
and Nestle Waters. Regional workforce
leadership is already working feverishly
to address these layoffs, and although
they are dedicated professionals, main-
taining and creating jobs in this climate
is not simply a matter of retraining and
preparation, though both will be vital for
future jobs.
"The jobs we create will be in busi-
nesses large and small across a wide
range of industries," Obama said in his
weekly radio and internet address. "And.
they'll be the kind of jobs that don't just
put people to work in the short term, but
position our economy to lead the world in
the long-term."
Of course, Republicans and Democ-


rats alike have hopes that these declara-
tions are firmly backed with plans to be
launched immediately after he takes the
oath of office on Jan. 20 (although-skep-
tics everywhere accuse, the President-
elect of political maneuvering and liber-
al money policies). Interestingly, one ul-'
tra-conservative, republican Madison
business owner stated, "I may not have
voted for him, but I like the way he's
picked his Cabinet so far, and I believe he
has the skills to work urgently to correct
the situation he inherited."'
The jobs analysis was submitted by
the head of Obama's council of economic
advisers, Christina Romer, and Vice Pres-
ident-elect Joe Biden's chief economic
adviser, Jared Bernstein, coming soon af-
ter official figures showed U.S. employers
slashed more than half a million jobs in
December, pushing the unemployment
rate to 7.2 percent and bringing the num-
ber of jobs lost last year to 2.6 million-
the most since 1945.
Obama further stated his plan would


create nearly 500,000 jobs by investing in
clean energy, by committing to double the
production of alternative energy in the
next three years, and by improving the
energy efficiency of 2 million American
homes.
"These made-in-America jobs build-
ing solar panels and wind turbines, de-
veloping fuel-efficient cars and new ener-
gy technologies pay well, and they can't
be outsourced," Obama continued.
The question of "Who is going to pay
for it?" is still a moot point, but most
economists and financial specialists
agree, "Better to keep printing the money
and throwing it at a good plan" (the oper-
ative words there being "good plan"),
than to repeat the mistakes of the past,
where 'these conditions were handled
with restrictive monetary policies. In
gambling terms, which might have more
relevance here than most care to admit,
government has to "Let it ride."
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


IRS Gets A Heart, Offers Payment Alternatives


By Michael Curtis
GreenePublishing, Inc.
As the nation sinks
deeper into recession, the
IRS is offering to waive
late penalties, negotiate
new payment plans and
postpone asset seizures for
delinquent taxpayers who
are financially strapped,
but make a good-faith ef-
fort to settle their tax
debts. IRS Commissioner
Doug Shulman stated that
tax agents are being given
new authority 'to work
with victims of the na-
tion's economic woes who
are struggling to pay their
bills.
S"We, need to recognize
1 that it's an extraordinary,
challenging time," Shul-
man said in an interview.
"We need to understand
the taxpayers' perspective.
We need to walk a mile in
their shoes. It's unrealistic
to expect some taxpayers
to make timely payments
inthis economy,"
He did caution those'
seeking help that they will
have to demonstrate their
inability to pay. Those who
fail to file tax returns, or


who simply ignore collec-
tion notices, will not be el-
igible. for help, he ex-
plained. "The most impor-
tant thing for people.t6 do
is to get on the phone or
walk into an IRS office,"
he said. "The worst thing
someone can do is go dark
and not be in a discussion
with us."
Just last month, the
agency announced a pro-
gram making it-easier for
homeowners with an IRS
-,lien on their property to
refinance their mortgages
or sell their homes. With
the filing season for 2008
tax returns opening this
,month, the IRS expects to.
process 250 million re-
turns over the next few
months, including 130 mil-
lion from individuals.
The new leniency pro-
gram is geared toward peo-
ple who have paid their tax-
es in the past, but who are
now facing financial hard-
ship. "This is not a free ride
for people who can actually
pay their taxes," Shulman
went on to say
The IRS doesn't know
how many taxpayers


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
State lawmakers agreed on Sunday, Jan. 11, to raid
state trust funds and proceed with deep cuts to health
care and education to balance the $2.4 billion budget
deficit. After heated and lengthy debate, .budget writers
were directed to tap trust funds, including the tobacco
settlement fund, to the tune of $1.6 billion and cut state
spending by more than $1 billion annually. Another $400
million -as earmarked as a budget reserve in anticipa-
tion of the regular session in March, as state officials
expect continued erosion of revenue streams.
Medicaid faces cuts of $170 million to $180 million,
although the state's 460-plus nursing homes were
spared; Public schools though, are facing a loss of about
$140 per student. The deal clears the way for the House
and Senate to vote on the cuts. as soon as Wednesday,
Jan. 14, three days before the special session is sched-
uled to close.
In spite of the, evident economic challenges, opposi-
tion to the outlined cuts have emerged, asking lawmak-
ers to stop raiding the trust fund and balancing the bud-
get on the backs of needy children. Bud Chiles, son of
the late Governor Lawton Chiles, has threatened to sue
the state if it continues to raid the $1.2 billion state trust






424 West Base Street Madison, Florida 32340
Phone 850.973.2600 Fax 850.973.2606




www.csbfl.net



EQUAL HOUSING
LENDER CITIZENS STATE BANK


might take advantage of
the new program for
stretching out payments
on overdue taxes or even
reducing their tax liabili-
ty, but currently millions
could be eligible. In the fis-
cal year ending last Sept.
30, the IRS took enforce-
ment action against more
than 3 million taxpayers.
The actions included prop-
erty liens and asset
seizures, including homes,
cars, bank accounts and
garnishing wages.
This year, even more
taxpayers could fall be,
hind in their tax payments.
as the economy continues
to, decline. Record num.-
bers of homeowners are
falling behind on mort-
gage payments and the
U.S. economy is losing jobs
at an alarming rate.
The leniency program
is an extraordinary step by
the IRS, said Ellis Reemer,
head of tax litigation at
the law firm of DLA Piper.
IRS agents, he said, are
generally well-meaning
public servants who 'want:
to work with taxpayers but
are often bound by policies


that limit their discretion.
"This is not a normal
course of events," Reemer.
-said. "This is an institu-
tional determination that
we are in very difficult eco-
nomic times."
Finally, the program
was described as the "give
the tax man a heart plan,"
said Steve Ellis, vice presi-
dent of Taxpayers for
Common Sense, a budget
watchdog group.
Ellis said the program.
makes sense given the
state of the economy, but
he cautioned that it should
be closely monitored for
consistency and fairness.
:"You don't want people to
get off, the hook and not
pay their fair share," he
said. "They need to make
sure that it's consistent."
Essentially the IRS is
doing the same. thing
many private creditors are
doing. The mortgage cri-
sis, Wall Street meltdown
and job losses have left'
many families unable to
pay their bills, and taxes
could be the straw that
broke the cameFs back. To
help explain the leniency


created in the name of his father to sustain health pro-
grams for the young and elderly Despite his warnings,
Florida legislators borrowed more than $300 million
from the fund in April to help balance the budget. Chiles
and others continue to plea for lawmakers to curb
ridiculous tax loopholes and reform inefficiencies, in-
stead of raiding even more trust funds to address the
multi billion-dollar deficit.
To many, Florida is quickly becoming the laughing-
stock of the nation when it comes to serving children's
needs. Report after report knocks Florida for problems
in premature births, lack of health insurance, reading
standards, school dropout rates, juvenile incarceration
and college graduation rates, just to name a few. Florida
spends over $2 billion annually on education remedia-
tion-treating childhood problems-and too little on
prevention, Chiles noted. Preventive programs, from
those that offer prenatal care to others that help prepare
poor children for kindergarten, save the public $7 for
every $1 invested up front.
While prevention is critical, state officials also have
to use dollars more efficiently by taking advantage of
technology Online educational programs to serve pre-
kindergartners as well as other students are examples.
Clayton M. Christensen, an innovation specialist and
professor at Harvard Business School, projects in his
book, Disrupting Class, that by 2019, half of all high
school classes will be offered online.
Lastly, all agree that fiscal prudence is essential. Part
of keeping the state healthy-financially and physical-
ly-is to increase the state's tobacco tax, currently a mere
34 cents per. pack, sixth lowest in the nation. It hasn't
been raised in 18 years. An increase to just the national
average would bring an estimated $1 billion per year.
One Madison child service provider who smokes ac-
tually said she would welcome paying more for a pack-if
children's programs could be maintained. It is also con-
tended that the additional expense would cause some-
people to stop smoking, which likely would help to save
billions of dollars burned to take care of ill smokers.
Apparently, the tobacco lobby is stronger than those rep-
resenting children's health and education.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


program, the IRS has post-
ed answers to common
taxpayer questions on its
Web site, www.irs.gov, un-
der the "What if I can't
pay my taxes?" tab. Con-


sistent with its new heart,
the section begins with the
words, "Don't panic."
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Will New Administration Affect
Your Investment Moves?
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones
Next week, President-elect Obama will become President
Obama. Like people across the country, you will no doubt be
greatly interested in how his actions will affect a wide variety
of domestic and foreign-policy issues. But from a personal
point of view, you may also be thinking about what an Obama
Administration will mean for your investment strategy.
In reality, the actions of any administration generally have
only a limited impact on the financial markets. In our complex,
interconnected world, a variety of factors from actions of
the Federal Reserve to corporate profits to oil prices to politi-
cal instability abroad all play a key role in determining the
fortunes of the stock and bond markets.

Consequently, you need to take a truly global perspective on
your investment strategy and avoid getting caught up in the
potential ramifications of who's in charge in Washington.
Nonetheless, you may still want to pay some attention to
potential changes introduced by the new administration.

Here are a couple of areas to consider:

New-legislation You may want to follow the progress
of new legislation proposed by the Obama Administration. For
example, will a successful push toward "green" energy bene-
fit renewable energy companies? Right now, no one can
answer this question. In fact, even if these changes are enact-
ed, it will take some time to sort them out to determine what,
if any, impact they could have on various market sectors. So,
your best bet is to watch the course of legislation and its after-
math.
Investment taxes It seems likely that the Obama
Administration and Congress will allow the Bush tax cuts on
capital gains and dividends to expire. While you need to be
aware of this development, you don't necessarily have to
make major changes to your investment strategy. In the case
of capital gains taxes, you can delay them by simply holding
on to your stocks for the long term which you should be
doing anyway, as stocks are a long-term investment. And
even if the dividend tax increases, dividend-paying stocks
may still be good investment choices, because they usually
represent solid,, profitable companies that seek to reward their
investors. However, if you are concerned about the effect of
higher capital gains and dividend taxes, you might want to
consider an investment such as tax-exempt municipal bonds.
You'll benefit most from these "munis" if you're in one of the
higher tax brackets.

As you,review possible changes in your investment strategy
due to moves made by the new administration, you may want
to take the opportunity to "rebalance" your portfolio by adjust-
ing your investment mix. Under normal circumstances, such
rebalancing could involve capital gains considerations, since
you might be selling appreciated assets. However, given the
steep market decline of recent months, it's quite possible that
you can now sell part of your assets at a loss to offset any
gains you might have and if you don't have any gains, you
can carry the loss forward to future years.

So, pay attention to what's happening in Washington, and, at
the same time, look for opportunities to rebalance. But keep
in mind that your long-term investment strategy should be
based on your individual needs, goals, risk tolerance and time
horizon. And that's true in all political and economic environ-
ments.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


Edward Jones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
s^Tv^ (vd~ai]--v1ftt-n ^


Lawmakers Raid Florida Trust Fund







16A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 14, 2009



HEALTH & NUTRITION




What Dreams May Come


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
"All men dream: but not
equally. Those who dream by
night in the dusty recesses of
their minds wake in the day to
find that it was vanity: but the
dreamers of the day are danger-
ous men, for they may act their
dreams with open eyes, to make it
possible. "-T.E. Lawrence
Hiding behind a thin veil of
consciousness, the land of
dreams becomes accessible, for
most only during sleep. Coming
in cycles comprised of four
stages, one-third of a human's
life is spent visiting the sand-
man in the land of midnight
hours. Adding up to an average
of over six years spent dream-
ing, the word itself is music to
the mind. For, without dreams,
mankind is lost, starving for
possibilities in the stark light of
reality What is now being stud-
ied is whether dreams are in fact
practice for how to live and sur-
vive everyday life.
Mankind needs dreams, and
a lack of dreaming can signify a
,number of underlying issues in-
cluding a protein deficiency or a
personality or mental disorder.
Studies have shown that a de-.
crease in the R.E.M. stage of
sleep (the stage' at which our
minds produce dreams) is a di-
rect cause of an increase in ten-
sion, anxiety and loss of motor
skills. In a recent study done by
the University of Wisconsin at
Madison, researchers found that.
rats-an animal thought to ex-
perience R.E.M. dreaming much
like humans-even lost instinc-
tive reactions after sleep depra-
vation. It is thought that the rea-
son for this is due to the dream
process allowing the dreamer to
literally practice scenarios in
, ;;:-. ; i ;f, ..in;,.


sleep that may arise during wak-
ing mode.
"I think of practice as neces-
sary to doing anything," said
Wally Davis of Farmer's Supply,
who teaches classes on
gun safety "It solves
and calms. When
someone prac-
tices doing
something, it
solves any
probl ems
they may
have over
their fear of
A i4, MHtly
while at
the same
time, it
builds
confidence. It is
practice that al-
lows response to
become automatic."
It is this practice time
that may be so important
to the human psyche that,
to go without for long
stretches, means to let
these automatic re-
sponse liuscles atro-
phy New research is
bringing to light the
possibility that dreams
are more than just re-
plays of the day that was,
and fantasies of what may dome,
but practice for what may need
to be faced.
Now it appears that dreams
may even dictate how quickly
one reacts in everyday situa-
tions. A recent study done by the
University of Wisconsin at
Madison showed that laboratory
rats who were repeatedly awok-
en prior to reaching R.E.M.
stage of sleep became increas-
ingly unable to react instinctive-
ly compared to their non-R.E.M.


deprived counterparts. Standing
still, for example, when startled
in exposed surroundings, it is
thought that these sleepy ro-
dents were more than just grog-
gy; they had become un-
able to react automati-
cally. It is this auto-
matic practice
that dreams are
nbw thought to
invoke.
The word
drea m,,
through a
long series
of vernac-
u 1 a r
twists, is
thought to
have origi-
nated kom the Middle,
English .word
"dremi," meaning joy
and music. This is a
loose translation of the Saxon
"drom," meaning mirth. Turn-
ing the mundane into the fan-
ciful, it is during the time
spent dreaming that the
brain is thought,to decom-
press the events of the day
Tapping into the subcon-
scious, dreams come in
flash images that, when'
studied, turn out to be as
unique as the finger-
prints of the dreamer that holds
them.. Having, on average, four
to seven dreams per night, most
would have spent a total of six
years, or 2,100 days, in the land
of the dreams. Even the blind
dream, though whether or not
those dreams include visual im-
ages depends on if they were
blind at birth or lost their vision
later in life.
Mankind ltas been fascinat-
ed with his dreams since he first
noticed their occurrence. Fre-


quently confusing the bound-
aries of the dream world and re-
ality, primal societies often
chose not to make that distinc-
tion. Seen as an extension of re-
ality, the realm of dreams was
considered a more powerful
world. It wasn't until the Greek
and Roman eras that religious
context was applied to the land
of the sandman. Looking to
dreams for solutions to everyday
problems, they believed dreams
were messages from the gods or
dead relations, thus forewarn-
ings, predictions and (solutions
for the future.
Some dream interpretations
can be traced back as far as
3,000-4,000 B.C., where they
were documented on clay
tablets. Shrines were built and
military strategies calculated by
the interpretation of dreams. In
ancient Greece, temples were
built for oracles, which through
dream interpretation, deci-
phered .messages brought forth
into the waking world. Mor-
pheus, meaning "he who forms,
shapes and molds" in Greek, is
the dream ruler. His name signi-
fied his importance to the hu-
man psyche. As focus grew,
there came a belief that dreams
even held the power to heal, off-
ing vital clues during sleep as to
what was ailing the dreamer.
It was priests in Egypt who
acted as dream interpreters,
recording the dreams of their
people in hieroglyphics. Those
with particularly vivid dreams
were believed to be specially
blessed, while those that could
interpret those dreams where
seen as divinely gifted. It wasn't
until the 'Middle Ages that
dreams began to be seen as evil
images, temptations sent by the
devil. Referred to in the Bible as


"visions" brought by angels,
sent from God, dreams and their
mystical meanings took on an
unholy form in the eyes of reli-
gious society.
Sigmund Freud in the 19th
century was responsible for
turning the tables back on
dreams. Applying significance
to their images, Freud rev9lu-
tionized the study of dreams.
Believing that the subconscious
applied symbolism to mask hid-
den desires, his theory of the
battle between the Id versus the
Ego shaped how the future
looked at dreams. Through
Freudism, the future began to
take notes on dreams and the
recollection of them.
Dreams are continuing to be
studied in the scientific world
today Though mankind doesn't
understand dreams or their in-
terpretation, much more now
than he did when he first awoke
in this world, the fascination
with dreams and dreaming has
left a strong impression on his
psyche. Each dream is unique to
the dreamer. Each setting, sight,
smell and -message tells the
mind of the dreamer that there
is more going oh under the sur-
face of consciousness than, is
seen by the awoken eye.
Recalled or not, dreams visit
everyone. Whether man goes
there to wish or replay, desire or
practice, dreams are his mode of
transportation on a road that
passes from this world and the
one that lies behind the lids of
the inner eye. To lose his
dreams, man may risk losing
himself, or alt least the part of
.him that's instinctively creative
and subconsciously alert.
Staff writer Tyrra B Mederve
can be reached at tyrra@
greenepublishing.com.


Because a healthy

diet and physical


exercise are

important at

all ages, we've

cooked up some

great ways to

get in shape!


Try these guidelines
health:


to good


* Strive for a healthy weight.
* Do some physical activity


every day.
* Make your diet choices
based on the food, pyramid.
* Eat a variety of grains,
especially whole grains,
every day.
* Make sure food is safe-
keep hot foods hot and cold
foods cold and don't use
food that is past its expira-
tion date.


* Work toward a diet that is
low in saturated fat and
cholesterol.
* Limit your consumption of
sugar and salt.
* Drink alcohol in modera-
tion.

It's never too late
to start eating right and
leading a more active life.
Even
small changes can have a
big result!


Auto, Lfe, Health, o Pits














Sat. 8am -8:30 pm
Jimmy. Kingn
Agent

Agent
233 W.Base St. W Madison
850-973-4071
Servin. MAadinregsorson. Taylor ". L&/'a e',e l u ines
Auto, LifeHealth, Homeg






Hot Pizza Made Fresh Daily!
850-948-3034
Hours: Mon. -Fri. 7 am 8:30 pm
Sat. 8 am 8:30 pm
1809 S. W Main St.


Health and Repair
All In One juice!

For More. Information, Contact

Timothy Emeis
Independent Distributor
Dist. #23743


386-288-6031







l jwww.mymonavie.com/timothyremeis







( Wednesday, January 14, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 17A


HEALTH & NUTRITION


Will /i's Utmifrms
monogramming INC.

1407 Mahan Drive
Tallahassee, Fl 32308

- (850) 878-0204


850-973-2277
1607 US HWY 90 EAST MADISON, FL
Farm/ Construction
Off-Road Fuel
PRODL SEVIG TE ADIONARE SNC


I First United
Methodist Church
348 SW Rutledge St. Madison
(850) 973-6295
'Always Observe
Good Nutrition!"
U


setter NewYear's



Resolutions For Mei's Health


Most men's New Year's resolutions sound
the same: we all want to get healthier and make
or save more money
This year, why not get a little more specific in
ways that'delve beyond simply trying to quit smok-
ing, drink less or exercise more? This year, resolve
to get healthier by developing a plan for keeping
your prostate healthy and preventing prostate cancer.
The shocking truth is that a man is 35 percent
more likely to get prostate cancer than a woman is to
get breast cancer-yet it's a topic most men and their
families never address before they are diagnosed.
And it's not just an old man's disease. While 75
percent of new cases occur in men over 50,
many younger men have had to face prostate
cancer as they approached their 40th birth-
days.
The good news is there are many ways
"j to keep your prostate healthy, especially if
you buckle down and get proactive
about it.
"There are a number of
easy things you can do, rang-
ing from getting annual
screenings to developing
the right eating and
lifestyle habits that
can help promote
good prostate
health," says Dr.
Jonathan Simons,
CEO and president of
the Prostate Cancer
Foundation.
For starters, speak
with your doctor about
when to get tested. Ear-
ly detection and treat-
ment are the best
weapons against
prostate cancer.
With early treat-
ment, the five-year
survival rate is
more than 90 per-
cent-among the
highest of all types
of cancers.
The American
Cancer Society rec-
ommends all men
over 50 get checked



Keep Your Brain in Shane As You"Age


It's easy to forget that
your brain, like the rest of
your body, needs to be ex-
ercised to stay in shape.
It is precisely this for-
getfulness that medical re-
searchers are trying to
curb, by encouraging a
three-pronged system for
strengthening memory
and keeping a sharp men-
tal edge.
"We're seeing baby
boomers and even people
in their thirties worrying
about brain fitness," says
Asenath LaRue, a senior
scientist at University of
Wisconsin School of Medi-
cine and Public Health.
"It's not a stretch to think
we may begin hiring brain
coaches in addition to
physical fitness trainers."
Observational studies


have led LaRue and col-
leagues to agree on three
main brain workouts that
are especially helpful as
we age:
Be Physically Active:
This does not necessarily
mean the exercise has to
be planned. But basic day-
to-day activity seems to re-
late to brain fitness, says
LaRue. Activities like gar-
dening, dancing and even
cleaning-basically any-
thing that keeps you up
and moving-could help
maintain brain health.
Challenge Your
Brain: Word search games
and crossword puzzles are
more than just games to
fill up the morning hours.
As lifting weights
strengthens muscles,.
thinking intently for a


Bart Alford
Madison County
School Board Member,
District 5

Fuel Up
Oon &e KokstPff


chunk of time each day
can help strengthen brain
activity Lectures, concerts
and museums are other
fun and healthy activities
people could explore.
Stay Socially Active:
Activity in broad social
networks helps keep the
brain chimed in with the
rest of the world and actu-
ally helps maintain brain
health, more so than for
those who participate less
socially
"While we don't know
at what point in an indi-
vidual's life the three fac-
tors have maximum im-


pact, the theory is that the
better developed your cop-
ing resources, the more
likely you are to withstand
brain changes affecting
memory and thinking,"
says LaRue.
While these methods
are helpful for maintaining
a healthy brain, LaRue and
colleagues do not think
brain workouts could re-
verse Alzheimer's or de-
mentia. Nonetheless, they
do help to hinder memory
loss and confusion, and
should be used by anyone
looking to keep his or her
mental edge sharpened.


North Florida

PHARMACY
139 SW Macon St (Former MCCB)
Phone: 850-973-8120


yearly, and those with family histories begin at 45. In
short: All men over 40 should speak with their doctors
to develop proactive prostate health plans that are right
for them.
But visiting the doctor is only one thing that should
be on your agenda.
"There are strong indicators in our research that
diet and lifestyle are very important with this particu-
lar form of cancer," said Dr..Meir Stampfer, professor of
epidemiology and nutrition, Harvard School of Public
Health. "When we look at men from other cultures like
in Asia, the rates of prostate cancer are significantly
lower than in the U.S. Yet, when these same men move
here, within one generation, the rates increase very
rapidly. We believe there is a clear correlation to how we
live and eat."
Here are some things you can resolve to do in your
daily life:
Eat prostate-healthful foods. Eat more broccoli and
drink pomegranate juice. The science may be compli-
cated, with talk of antioxidants, compounds and elec-
trons. But the conclusions are clear: Consuming broc-
coli and pomegranate juice. or pomegranate extract is
good for the prostate.
Don't char meat. Charring meats at high tempera-
tures can produce cancer-causing carcinogens that
lodge in the prostate. These may cause errors in reading
and replicating DNA, resulting in mutations that con-
tribute to prostate cancer formation. Flip meat often so
the outside does not burn, marinate meat in ingredients
that don't create crusts, precook burgers in the mi-
crowave, and scrape off charred material. Try broiling
or stir-frying meats instead of grilling them.
Eat less meat. You don't need to become vegetarian,
but consider replacing chicken, beef, veal or lamb with
soy protein or fish, taking a page from the Asian diet.
Keep fat off your middle. Research indicates men
with more belly fat are at a higher risk for prostate can-
cer. So consult your doctor and start an exercise plan
and maintain an active lifestyle.
For more information on prostate cancer preven-
tion, detection and treatment visit www.pcforg.


Question: Is it true they put lead in dental
crowns?

Answer: Sounds like you want to get the
"lead out" if you will let me use a 70's expres-
sion. Joking aside, there is not lead in dental
crowns. The crowns I complete have porce-
lain, gold, platinum, palladium, silver, and
other trace metals none of which are lead.

There was a case of a crown in the Midwest
which did have lead. This case had been
sent for fabrication to a "Mega" lab in Califor-
nia which is fine. The trouble arose when the
lab shipped the case for fabrication to a third
world country without the dentists knowledge.
It turns out, costs were cut and some amount
of lead was substituted for some metal within
the alloy of the crown. The Florida Legislature
has changed the dental practice act as a
result of this case.. Dentists in Florida must
be informed by the lab if the case is shipped
overseas and the alloy within the crown must
be certified by the lab with a certifying Idental-
loy sticker. So don't worry, you don't need to
ask your dentist for regular or unleaded.









18A Madison County Carrier


www.areeneoublishin2.com


Wednesday, January 14, 2009


Greenville Pointe

Apartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC
accessible apts. Rental assistance
may be available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-3056.
TDD/TTY 711.192 NW
Greenville Pointe Trail,
Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity



6Oouthem V111as of

C 1adison apartments

Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR HC &
non-HC accessible apts. Call
850-973-8582, TDD/TTY 711.
315 SW Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn

Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
S and Disabled. 1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.) Subsidy available
at times. HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd, Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider
and Employer




EQUAL HOUSING

Madison Heights Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed for
low income families
150 SW Burngardner Dr.
Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833 ext. 485
Equal Housing Opportunity
rtn
House for Rent
2Bed/1 Bth. Great neighborhood.
Within city limits. $500nith. 1st
and last mths rent due. Security
deposit required.
673-9425
House for Rent in Greenville, FL
(located near elementary school).
All Electric, Newly remodeled 3
bedrooms, 1 bath $600/mo. 1st &
security deposit. Housing Choice
Vouchers Accepted Call
850-973-7349 or 617-4 37-1905
cc/rtn
HOME FOR RENT
Restored 3 BR Home, CH & Air.
Oak floors, large storage,
1335 Sq Ft Yard Maint. included.
Adult family only, no pets, $800
rent and deposit. Credit check.
432 NE Horry Ave. Madison.
Call George 973-8583, 557-0994
10/17- rtn
DOWNTOWN APARTMENT
FOR RENT, NEWLY
RENOVATED 1BR, 1 BATH
$450.00 MO.
567-1523
12/19-rtn
Private, quite, furnished, one BR
Mobile home for one person.
Direct TV, near town, $350.00
plus Electricity
850-973-4030
rtn/cc
For Rent:
4 Bedroom 2 Bath house with a
built in office, beautifully remod-
eled tile & wood floors with car-
pet in 4 bedrooms. Fireplace,
large shaded yard, large front
porch, all electric. Lee School
district Off HWY 6 near Blue
Springs, 1' year lease, References
required. $700 a month.
$700 Security Deposit
423-538-1206 or 423-845-0590
rtn
4 BR Doublewide Mobile Home
in Lee. $550.00 month, plus
deposit. 973-2353
rtn
2 BR 1 bath Singlewide Mobile
Home in Cherry Lake Area.
$350.00 month, plus deposit .
973-2353
rtn
Haywood Realty
352-369-0900
FOR SALE
30 Acres with septic and (2) 4"
wells Fenced and Cross Fenced


also with Pond. Approx 25 acres
in posture with bahaya grass
and a beautiful 5 acre homsite
with canopy entrance to
property. Excellent location just
5 miles north of Madison on
Rocky Ford Road. Asking
$8,000.00 per acre. Call
Associate Pamela Hood
850-673-6409
10/8-rtn


FOR SALE / OWNER
FINANCING
ALL LAND BELOW IS HIGH
AND DRY

5 acres Lee, North of Hwy 6,
Cayenne Rd., rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995
$5,000 down, $325/mo

10 acres Beulah Meadows Rd,
DWMH and houses allowed,
$49,500,, $5,000 down
$459/mo

10 acres Old Blue Springs Rd.
access, DWMH and houses al-
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down,
$459/mo

25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)

Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
12/24-rtn
For Sale 3 Bed/ 2 Bth w. A.C. on
1/2 Acre in Lee. Only $599mth.
Call Will for more info at
850-253-8001
1/14, 1/16
For Sale in Hamilton Co.
on 5 Acres.
You Choose Floorplan.
Call Today
850-253-8001
1/14, 1/16
For Sale 4 Bed/2 Bth w. A.C.
in Madison County
for only $649 per mth.
Call to be pre-approved.
850-253-8001
1/14, 1/16
Land Owners- with good or bad
credit!!! You can own a new
Some with $0 down.
Call Will at 850-253-8001.
1/14, 1/16
FSBO- 3 Bed, 1.5 Bth, 1 Acre,
1500 sqft, built in 1994, recent
upgrades, Cherry Lake area.
$98,500.
850-464-1368
1/14, 1/16







Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage
Corner lots.
Fronts both Harvey Greene Dr.
and Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line,
.8 inch water main,
access to city utilities,
fire hydrant, and service from
two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.


.Call Tommy Gree
850.973-4141






Downtown Office/ Reta
for rent. 700 to 1,400
567-1523

FOR RENT
I Office Buildinoacros


from Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder
Office);
111 SE Shelby St. Madison
Newly renovatfeack to the
1920's era'Call 973-4141


ANTsy

to sell those

old items you

have just

lying around

the house?


HOME BUYERS.. GUARAN-
TEED FINANCING THRU
B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044

WE PAY CASH..... FOR YOUR
USED MOBILE HOMES 1980
OR NEWER. LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129

FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY AND
LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE ZONED
COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT
FIRST TIME HOME BUYER
$7,500.00 CASH IN YOUR
POCKET CALL DAVID FOR
DETAILS 386-719-0044
MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00 CALL 386-288-4560
LOW CREDIT SCORES???
I MAY BE ABLE TO HELP
YOU BUY A HOME.
386-288-4560
NEW 4 BEDROOM 2 BATH
READY TO MOVE IN. CALL
386-288-4560
HOME ONLY LOANS
No mortgage on your land. Put
Home on your land,
family land, state land or rental
lot. Singlewides start at $350.00
month aMnd
Doublewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
CINDY 386-365-5370
ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00
P&I per mo, Doublewide your
land $422.00 P&I per mo. Sin-
glewide & $30,000.00 for land
$520.00 P&I per mo. or Dou-
blewide with $30,000.00 for land
$602.00 P&I per mo. Our land
your land or buy land. I special-
ize in credit challenged cus-
tomers. Applications over the
phone, credit decision next busi-
ness day. Let me help make your
new home dream come true.
Trades welcome, .,
Cindy 386-365-5370
rtn
BEST CASH DEALS ON
MOBILE HOMES. NO ONE
BEATS MY PRICES
386-719-0044.
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/ 2
BATH EXCELLENT SHAPE
NEED CHAS, PRICED TO
SELL CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
MODULAR HOME FOR SALE
IN TOWN SAVE $20,000.00
TURN KEY DEAL OWNER
SAYS MAKE AN OFFER IT
MUST GO CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218


ene BRAND SPANKING NEW 2009
S 5 BEDROOM 3 BATH 2004 Sq
rftn Ft $594.3.1 PER MO. SELLER
PAYS $3,500 TOWARD
CLOSING COST CALL MIKE
386-623-4218
PRICE REDUCED! SPACIOUS
MFG HOME WITH 4 BED-
ail space ROOMS, 3 BATH, BONUS
Sql ft. ROOM WITH LOTS OF WIN-
DOWS. DISCONTINUED
10/22-rtn FLOORPLAN. FOR MORE
INFO CALL SARAH
s street 386-288-0964


BECOME A HOMEOWNER
FOR THE SAME MONTHLY
PAYMENTS YOU ARE
THROWING AWAY ON RENT.
CALL SARAH FOR MORE .
INFO 386-288-0964
NEED MORE SPACE FOR A
GROWING FAMILY? 2001, 5
BEDROOM, 4 BATH TRADE-
IN. EXCELLENT CONDI-
TION. FOR MORE INFO
CALL SARAH 386-288-0964


For Sale
FISH FOR STOCKIN
POND OR LAK
Coppernose bluegill, she
channel catfish, mosquito
grass carp.
Call:850-547-22

FOR SALE
4-seater Hot T
Blue Marble Des
$500 CASH ONLY-


Get lead stories,
Sell Them In classifeds,
The Classifieds Calendar mmuny

850-973-4141 'muL re
OtiJV"^/J"""lH ~ .HBfltB .


G YOUR
KE


Are you highly motivated?
Are you a self starter? Do
you posses a strong desire to
succeed? If you answered
yes to any of the above
questions we are looking for you.


FSTO




We are currently accepting
applications for Managers in
the Madison area. Interested
appllicants please call Ms.
Kim @ 352-494-7551

Johnson & Johnson, Inc. seeks a
qualified, self-motivated individ-
ual who is willing to grow with the
company. Must be a high school
graduate and have office experi-
ence. Proficient computer skills
required. Must have experience
with Windows, MS Word, Excel
and knowledge of general office
equipment. Retail and barcode
scanning experience are a plus.
Pay commensurate with experi-
ence; we have 401 (k), health ben-
efits, paid holidays, vacation and
sick leave. Resumes may be faxed
to 850-973-3702.
Part-time Southern Gospel Trio
has position open for a male tenor
or baritone or a female alto.
Please call for audition. Must be
ministry minded and interested in
perfoming on weekends. Audi-.
tions start immediately. For ore
information call 850-464-0114 or
904-472-7865.
1/14-rtn (nc)
Advent Christian Village
Current JOBS
Line Advertisement
Call: 658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24hrs/day, 7days/week

Charming residential community
on the Suwannee River


LPN (GPNs Welcome)
FT/PT/long-term care setting; unre-
stricted license required.

CNA
FT/PT/long-term care setting;
Florida cirtification required.

ACCOUNTING A/R CLERK
FT position, HSD or equivalent re-
quired; prior experience in insur-
ance billing and coding, PC opera-
tions with MS applications, includ-
ing word processor, spreadsheet,
and database required. Must be de-
tail oriented.

FOOD SERVICE STAFF
PT/FT in various settings including
summer seasonal, institutional,
and cafeteria. Prior experience in
institutional or cafeteria food ser-
vice a plus but not required.

WATER/ WASTEWATER
TREATMENT OPERATIONS
FT water/waste water treatment op-
erator; valid FL C water or waste
treatment cirtification required;
dual cirtification strongly preferred.
Experience in all aspects of water/
wastewater & distribution/collec-
tion systems required.


Excellent benefits package and
competitive wages. Apply in per-
son at Personnel Office Monday
through Friday from 9:00a.m. until
4:00 p.m., or fax resume/creden-
tials to 386-658-5160. EOE/Drug-
Free Workplace/ Crimainal Back-
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Madison County Carrier 19A


l o w
I


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

THOMAS J. BEGGS, IV

CASE NO: 08-621-CA

Plaintiff,

vs.

BEVERLEY GEORGE-JORDAN; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH. UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED,


NOTICE OF ACTION

To: All Above Named Unknown Defendants, including Unknown Tenant
No. I and Unknown Tenant No. 2.
Addresses Unknown

YOU, ALL ABOVE NAMED UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS, INCLUDING
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1 AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, ARE NOTIFIED
that an action seeking foreclosure and other relief on the following property in Madison
County, Florida, as shown in the legal descriptions attached hereto as Composite Exhibit
"A" has been filed against you, and each of you. are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Scot B. Copeland, the plaintiffs attorney, whose address
is 174 East Base Street, Madison, Florida 32340 on or before February 7, 2009, and file
the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.

Dated this 5 day of January, 2009.

TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

Composite Exhibit A


DESCRIPTION:


Oak Hills 19


Part of: 15-2n-10-5965


A portion of section 15, Township 2 north, Range 10 East, being more particularly described
as follows:
Commence at a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of said section 15; thence
south 00"09'21" West aloig the east line of said Section 15 a distance of 1321.10 feet to a
concrete monument marking the northeast corner of the south half (s _) of the Northeast
Quarter (NE _) of said section 15; thence continue south 00-09'21" West along said east line
and along the east line of the North half (N 1/2) of the southeast Quarter (SE _) of said sec-
tion 15 a distance of 2642.19 feet to a concrete monument marking the southeast corner of
said N of SE _; thence north 89-56'14" West along the south line of said N of SE a dis.
tance of 1194.15 feet to the southeast corner and POINT OF BEGINNING of the following
described parcel;'thence continue north 89-56'14" West along said south line a distance of
397.24 feet; thence north 00-15'42" East a distance of 1320.41 feet to the centerline of a 60
foot easement; thence south 89-44'18" East along said centerline a distance.of 397.24 feet;
thence south 00-15'42" West a distance of 1319.03 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 12.03 acres, more or less.
TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO a 60 foot easement for ingress and egress as
recorded in O.R. Book 673, page 140 of the public records of Madison County, Florida.
Said lands situate, lying and being in Madison County,,Florida.
Subject to ARTICLES OF THE ASSOCIATION OF THE OAK HILLS PROPERTY OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION RESTRICTIONS AND PROTECTIVE COVENANTS for OAK
HILLS as more particularly described in OR Book 705 page 96 through 706 and OR Book
705 page 94 of the public records of Madison County, Florida.
Also subject to that easement for utilities granted to TriCounty Electric Corporation and
recorded in OR Book 708 Page 199 to 203 of the public records of Madison County, Flori-
da.
ALSO SUBJECT TO existing county graded road.rights-of-way.
ALSO SUBJECT TO a 10 foot wide easement for utilities along the east and west line of the
above described parcel.
Said lands situate, lying and being in Madison County, Florida.
Said property is not the homestead of the Grantor(s) under the laws and constitution of the
State of Florida in that neither Grantor(s) or any members of the household of Grantor(s)
reside thereon.

Filed for Record in
MADISON
TIM SANDERS
09-30-2004 at 2:31 p.n.
MORTGAGE 230.25
OR Volume 730 Page 292-293


DESCRIPTION: LEE FARMS C ID NUMBER: 31-1N-6227-00C-000
A portion of Section 31, Township 1 North, Range 11 East, being more particularly de-
scribed as follows:

Commence at a rebar marking the southwest corner of said section 31; thence south 89-
55'28" East along the south line of said section 31 a distance of 1325.23 feet to a concrete
*monument; thence south 89-55'47" East a distance of 530.77 feet to the southwest corner
and POINT OF BEGINNING of the following described parcel; thence contue NORTH
00-17'20" East a distance of 265.30 feet; thence south 89-59'21" East a distance of 886.03
feet to the east line of the south Half (s of the Southwest quarter (SW _) of said section
31; thence south 00-26'25" West along said east line a distance of 26531 feet; thence North
89-59'21" West a distance of 85.33 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 5.39 acres, more or less. Building exception: 03-08-b
SUBJECT TO existing county road rights-of-way along the easterly line of the above-de-
scribed parcel.
ALSO SUBJECT TO those easements for utilities as more particularly described in the of-
ficial records for Madison County Florida OR book 690 Pages 215 through 219..
AND ALSO SUBJECT TO those restrictions and protective covenants as more particularly
described in OR Book 685 pages 194 through 197.

Said lands situate, lying and being in Madison County, Florida.
Said property is not the homestead of the Grantor(s) under the laws and constitution of the
State of Florida in that neither Grantor(s) or any members of the household of Grantor(s)
reside thereon.

01/07/09 and 01/14/09

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,

IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA,


IVY FINANCIAL CORPORATION,
a Florida Corporation,


CASE NO:08-624-CA


Plaintiff,

vs.

NORMAN BALDIE; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT
NO. 2; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY. THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING
TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

To: All Above Named Unknown Defendants, including Unknown Tenant .it
No. 1 and Unknown Tenant No. 2,
Addresses Unknown

YOU, ALL ABOVE NAMED UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS, INCLUDING
UNKNOWN TENANT NO, 1 AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, ARE NOTIFIED
that all action seeking foreclosure and other relief on the following properties in Madison
County, Florida:

3 and Lot 74, NORTON CREEK SUBDIVISION, according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in PlatBook 2, Pages 31 through 33 inclusive, of the
Public Records of Madison County, Florida.

has been filed against you, and each of you, are required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Scot B. Copeland, the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 174
East Base Street, Madison, Florida 32340 on or before .February 7, 2009, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.

Dated this 5 day of January, 2009.

TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson .
As Deputy Clerk


01/07/09 and 01/14/09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOIl MADISON COUNTY. FLORIDA


IVY FINANCIAL CORPORATION,
a Florida Corporation.


Plaintiff,

vs.

ROSE DORSAINVIL; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT
NO. 2; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

To: All Above Named Unknown Defendants, including Unknown Tenant
No. I and Unknown Tenant No. 2,
Addresses Unknown

YOU, ALL ABOVE NAMED UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS, INCLUDING
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1 AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, ARE NOTIFIED
that an action seeking foreclosure and other relief on the following property in Madison
County, Florida:
Lot 28, NORTON CREEK SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 31 through 33 inclusive, of the Public
Records of Madison County, Florida. has been filed against you, and each of you, are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Scot B. Copeland, the plain-
tiffs attorney, whose address is 174 East Base Street, Madison, Florida 32340 on or before
February 7, 2009, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on
the plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.

Dated this 5 day of January, 2009.

TIM SANDERS
As Clerk Of The Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

01/07/09 and 01/14/09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF

ALBERTA HAYNES JOHNSON
Deceased.

File No. 2008-127-CP
Division FR-A

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Alberta Haynes Johnson, deceased, whose date of death
was November 29, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is P.O. Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341. The names
and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representatives' attorney
are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE W SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate roust file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.

The date of first publication of this notice is January 7, 2009.

01/07/09 and 01/14/09

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

Proposed Base Flood Elevation Determinations for the Town of Lee and the
Unincorporated Areas of Madison County, Florida

The Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency
has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Study (FIS) and Flood Insurance Rate Map,
(FIRM) reflecting new or modified Base (1% annual chance) Flood Elevations (BFEs)
within the Town of Lee and the Unincorporated Areas of Madison County. Technical in-
formation or comments are solicited on the proposed and proposed modified BFEs shown
on the preliminary FIS and FIRM for the aforementioned communities.
These BFEs and modified BFEs are the basis for the floodplain management mea-
sures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of having in effect
in order to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance
Program. However, before the BFEs or modified BFEs are effective for floodplain man-
agement purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed elevations.
For information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, as well as a detailed
listing of the proposed and proposed modified BFEs and the addresses where copies of the
FIRM are available for review, please visit our website at http://www.fema.gov/plan/pre-
vent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Assistance Center toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-
877-336-2627).

01/07/09 and 01/14/09

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAM HINTON SALE
Deceased.


PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 2008-CP-128


NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the estate of SAM HINTON SALE, deceased, File Number
2008-CP-128, is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida 32340. The
name and address of the personal representative is set forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:.

All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the va-
lidity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue or jurisdiction of
this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date
of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of the first publication of this Notice is the 7th day of January, 2009.


JAMES HINTON SALE
Personal Representative


THOMAS E. STONE
Attorney for Personal Representative
P.O. Box 292

Madison, Florida 32341
Telephone: 850-973-6560
Attorney at Law-Fla. Bar No. 2124190


01/07/09 and 01/14/09


973-

CALL I KN


CASE NO: 08-623-CA


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

BAILEY GREEN, AS TRUSTEE OF THE
WEST FARMS TRUST NUMBER ONE


DATED JANUARY 3,2006,


Case No.; 2008-377-CA


Plaintiff,
vs.

PETER BAKOWSKI, a married man,
and KEDAMICA, INC., a Florida
corporation,

Defendants.

________/I /

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment
for Foreclosure, entered in this cause on January 6, 20Q9, in
the Circuit Court of Madison County, Florida, I, Tim Sanders,
Clerk Of the Circuit court, will sell the property situated in
Madison County, Florida, described as:

Lot 32, WEST FARMS SUBDIVISION, according to the map
or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page W, of
the Public Records of Madison County, Florida,

at public sale to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the
west front steps of the Madison County Courthouse located at 125
SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida 32340, at 11:00 am, on
January 27, 2009.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Within two (2) working days of your receipt of this summons/notice, please contact the
Clerk of the Court, 125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida 32340, (850) 973-1500,

Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Circuit Court
125 SW Range Ave.
Madison, Florida 32340

By Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

01/14/09 and 01/21/09

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 2008-121-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF

DOROTHY L. BECKNER

Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of'DOROTHY L. BECKNER, deceased, whose
date of death was June 9,2008; is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Flori-
da
Probate Division; File Number 20DS-121-CP; the names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands
against decedent's estate,' including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and
who
have been served 'a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or
demands against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIMS FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS January
14, 2009.


01/14/09 and 01/21/09





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