Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00144
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: January 7, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00144
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text



INSIDE TODR



Mason


Celebrates


SCH 3-DIGIT 326
er Fiornia Ltrary
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60 Years


Y 1 See Page 6A
Spi t fMadison Count
Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper



There's A New Sheriff In Town


Greene Publishing, Inc, Photo by Michael Curtis, January 5, 2008
Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart took office Jan. 6 prepared to
fulfill his campaign commitments: to be accessible, aggressively com-
bat the drug trade, and foster community involvement.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Ben Stewart made his first
official action as sheriff of
Madison County soon after tak-
ing office on Jan. 6, when he an-
nounced that, effective immedi-
ately, the department is launch-
ing a Drug Task Force consist-
ing of three investigators dedi-
cated solely to combatting the
growing drug trade in Madison
County
When asked about another
pressing problem-that being
the need for more deputies in
Greenville-he responded, "I in-
herited a department without a
full-time officer assigned strict-
ly to Greenville. There used to
be a four-man station located
there. Just as soon as the budget


can be reworked, I'm looking to
get at least a part-time deputy
assigned just to Greenville and
we'll go from there. It is certain-
ly needed and justified."
These priorities are, among
the strategic planning that ac-
company the enormous com-
mitment Stewart brings to the
office. Along with Chief Deputy
Epp Richardson, the Sheriff is
committed to finding a way, es-
pecially where drugs are con-
cerned.
"The process of arresting
and convicting drug dealers can
be a drawn out legal process, so
we will also be working closely
with the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement and other
agencies with similar priori-
ties. The Drug Task Force, how-


ever, is independent, and will
operate on their own, having
the latitude necessary to put to-
gether cases and make arrests,"
Stewart added.
Stewart expressed enor-
mous confidence in the depart-
ment personnel he inherited as
well, which he stated would re-
main unchanged.
"During my campaign, I
promised to be accessible,, to
form the Drug Task Force and
to solicit more community in-
volvement. Each piece will
come as soon as possible, and I
am pleased and proud to serve
Madison County as sheriff," he
went on to say.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


McDaniel And Thompson Showcased


At Under Armour AllIAmerica Game


Dry ucuu j oUImury
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A number of counter-
feit bills have been report-
ed in Madison County.
According to the Madi-
son Police Department,
,,Sgt. Chris Cooks was dis-
patched to a local store odn
Sunday, Jan. 4. At the
store, the clerk told him
that a black male had
come into the store and at-
tempted' to pay using a
counterfeit $20 bill.
The clerk told the man
that the bill was counter-
feit and he left the store.
The $20 bill bore a seri-
al number of GJ78733930B.
If anyone has any in-
formation on the counter-
feit bills or they have come
into. possession of coun-
terfeit bills, please call the
Madison Police Depart-
ment at (850) 973-5077 or
the Madison County Sher-,
iff's Office at (850) 973-
4001.

Fundraising

Lunch To Be

Held For

Cancer Patient

By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.,
Hopewell Baptist
Church will hold a
fundraising dinner on Fri-
day, Jan. 9, from, 11 a.m.-3
p.m. for Clint Minter, a
cancer patient.
Clint, who is married
to the former Kelli Fox, ,is
in Stage 3B of lymphoma.
The lunch, which will
be available for a $5 dona-
tion, will consist of chick-
en and, rice,, green beans,
rolls and dessert.
A yard sale will also be
held on Saturday, Jan. 17,
from 8 a.m.-until at 135 SE
Oak St. in Madison. All
proceeds from the sale will
benefit the Minter family
For more information,
please call (850) 973-2040.
A bank account has
been set up at Madison
Please See Fundraiser,
Page 2A


Bridal Guide
Classifieds/Legals
Path of Faith


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, January 5, 2009
Cowboy Offensive Coordinator Mike Coe proudly ac-
companied two Cowboys, Jacobbi McDaniel (left) and
Chris Thompson (right), to the 2.009 Under Armour All-
America Game played at the Citrus Bowl in Orlando on
Jan. 4.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing,Inc.
The 2009 Under Ar-
mour All-America Gamie
was held Sunday night,
Jan. 4, at the Citrus Bowl
in Orlando. Hundreds of
scouts' coaches and media
joined 30,000 fans in cheer-
ing for their favorites. The
White Team took the
Black Team 27-16, al-
though the score meant
very little, as all the par-


ticipants were winners.
Among these talented
standouts were Madison's
own, Jacobbi McDaniel
and Chris Thompson.'
Cowboy Offensive Co-
ordinator Mike Coe ac-
companied the FSU-bound
players to the game, where
he joined collegiate' insid-
ers from around the na-
tion. in welcoming both
players to the next level, a
rare honor that few of the


tens of thousands who
play high school football
each year ever experience.
Both Madison County all-
'stars played for the Black
Team, as both squads
were made up of the very
best from across the. na-
tion, including the top re-
cruiting prospects as de-
termined by Sports Illus-
trated and ESPN, among
other media services. In
fact, parts of the crowd
and ESPN viewers literal-
ly exploded, when several
last-minute holdouts an-
nounced their .college of
choice.
Regarding the Madi-
son players, one Sports Il-
lustrated writer noted,.
"After watching McDaniel
play against some of the
nation's best linemen
Sunday, ... he's downright
unblockable ... It will take
perfect technique to block
McDaniel, and few line-
men can maintain perfect
technique every play Ex-
pect McDaniel ... to play
early and often for the
Seminoles."
The game was also an
Please See
All-Americans, Page 2A


Bembry Files First Bill As Legislator


For the 2008-10 leg-
islative term, new State
Representative Leonard
Bembry. (D-Greenville),
has been given commit-
tee assignments that he
says will make him effec-
tive in protecting con-
stituents of House Dis-
trict 10.
He will serve as a
member on the Natural
Resources. Appropria-
tions Committee, the
Agriculture & Natural
Resources Policy Com-
mittee, the Economic De-
velopment Policy. Com-
mittee, and the State &
Community Colleges &
Workforce Policy Com-
mittee.
Bembry expressed
his joy in the appoint-
ments and said, "I am ex-
cited that Speaker San-
som has placed this con-
fidence in me. With my
longtime background in
farming and business, I


10A
14-15A
B Section


Local & Regional Crime
History
Obituaries
Money & Finance
Health


feel I can effectively steer
solid ideas by working
with my colleagues to
make good things happen
for the state."
.Rep. Bembry has also
filed his first House Bill
for the 2009 Legislative
Session. It is HB 109 and
is titled Clinical, Coun-
seling and Psychotherapy
Services. The legislation
will assist licensed clini-
cal social workers to bet-
ter monitor the mental
health of their clients
and be able to get addi-
tional help for ,their
clients by waiving confi-
dential communications
under some circum-
stances.
Bembry commented,
"Filing my first bill is
very exciting. I am proud
to be able to serve the cit-
izens of Florida in this
capacity where I believe I
can make a difference."
"In this time of eco-


4A
8A
5A
11A
12- 13A


STATE REP. LEONARD BEMBRY
D-GREENVILLE
nomic hardship, our fam-
ilies are struggling. Such
stress will oftentimes
make someone think in a
way that they would not
under more normal con-
ditions. Protecting our
citizens is paramount,"
continued Bembry.
The 2009 Legislative
Session will begin on
March 3, 2009; however,
legislators are in Talla-
hassee Jan. 5-16, 2009 for
a Special Session on the
budget.


Devoted Grandmother


Offers Reward


To Stop Graverobbers


ureene PuDlisning, Inc. rnoto py Micnael Curtis, January 5, zuu9
Adam Hughes is missed by family, friends and a com-
munity that loved him. His grandmother, Betty Blair, re-
spectfully asks for help in catching the thief that robbed
from his gravesite.
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
As a nearby resident, this reporter joins an out-
raged community and a devoted grandmother in her ef-
fort to catch the thief who stole from her grandson's
gravesite at Lee Memnorial Cemetery
For Betty Blair, the pain of losing 17-year-old grand-
son, Adam Hughes, in March 2004 is a memory never
forgotten and a loss her family can never replace. Now,
unbelievably her sadness has been stirred by the un-
thinkable act of his grave being robbed of a keepsake she
placed there in memory of his birthday Nov. 5.
'"Adam loved baseball, as his picture on his headstone
shows. So, when I saw that baseball statuette with the
character and expression Adam brought to the game, I
bought it immediately and put it by his headstone. And
now it's gone. Someone actually stole it. It's not the mon-
ey, of course; it just meant so much. Everybody agreed, it
captured Adam," Blair explains.
She went on to say, "I don't really know what to do, but
the memory of my grandson means so much to the fami-
ly People that would rob a grave, or do.anything like that,
need to be stopped. So, I'm offering a $500 reward in the
hopes we can catch the thief."
Lee Memorial Cemetery is located at the corner of SE
CR 255 and SE Benchmark, about halfway between US 90
and 1-10.
Unfortunately it wasn't the first time Blair noticed
something missing from the grounds; but hopefully, with
help from the community this will be the last time, at
least for this thief. Anyone with information is strongly
urged to call Betty Blair at (850) 971-5737.
Michael Curtis can be reached by email at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Wed 70141 Fri 67142 70143
A few shower early, followed by Sunny. Highs in the low 70s and Abundant sunshine. Highs in the Times of sun and clouds. Highs in
lsoled thunderstorms later in the lows in the low 40P1. upper 60s and lows in the low 40s. the low 70s and lows in the low
day, Ana







2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 7, 2009



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
While preparing for an upcoming meeting to dis-
cuss economic development, it was very difficult
coming up with the right words. Wanting to make
sure I wasn't overly critical, I considered ways to sep-
arate the issues between those that haven't,moved
forward because of lack of effort, those that haven't
moved for lack of ability, and those that haven't pro-
gressed due to lack of availability
Suddenly, it occurred to me: Officials and civic or-
ganizers often do a GREAT JOB running a county, but
few are focused on leading the county, if, leading is
defined by a ceaseless effort for economic growth.
Then it occurred to me plain as day. I would just say,
"We (the residents of Madison County) need people
to LEAD the county, not just RUN the county"
In times of great upheaval, whether from a chang-
ing presidency or a declining economy, we are look-
ing for leaders, not administrators. As a reminder, I
recommend that job titles should be changed to re-
flect it.
"County commissioner" should be chafiged to
"county leader." The financial arm of the clerk of the
court would be changed to "financial leadership of
Madison County." The Madison County Development'
Council should be changed to the "Madison County
Leadership Most Directly Responsible for Developing
Business In Madison County," and so, on down. the
line. Each must realize that failure is not an option,
and that simply doing the best you can is not a busi-
ness model.
We can't just'be "custodians" anymore. Perhaps
our faith-based leadership should remind us of the
story of the talents in the Bible, where county lead-
ership receives either one, two or five talents from
the community, which plays the role of the master,
and the leadership is expected-no, actually "obligat-
ed"-to do something with it. .
"Lead, follow or get out 6f the way!" is the old
school outcry for these times. There are no bums
leading Madison County, which I know all too e11l,
having had the opportunity to speak and work with
all of them. In fact, I would go so far. to say that we,
lf^1 ^^^ ^^^s^K^k^r^^^^ ^^^


.I TIan aCgagagem i ea iaar m in se Rcorder I


AllAmericans

Continued from Page 1A

opportunity for McDaniel to finally lay to rest any lin-
gering opinions about his height. Just ask Cowboy Head
Coach Frankie Carroll and he will tell you that Vlc
Daniel Plays like a giant Now, all agree, including Mc-
Daniel.
"People always say everything about my height,"
McDaniel said. "Now, on national TV, they finally saw
what I'm capable of doing."
McDaniel was one of three captains for the Black
Team, which he proudly justified with his play the en-
tire evening. He was also exceptionally proud to be shar-
ing the field with teammate Chris Thompson.
Thompson has been amazing Madison fans for
years, turning 1,000-yard seasons with half a season to
go. His explosive speed and great,hands will no-doubt
get him playing time at FSU. A Rivals.com recruiting an-
alyst noted, "One of my favorite players in the entire
(FSU) class, period, is Chris Thompson. Pound for
pound, he is one of the best players ... because he can do
so many things ... [He is] a versatile, big-play guy."
The game program also gave him a unique and very
flattering assessment as a scat-back. It reads that he is
"an excellent scat-back prospect and could develop into
a great offensive weapon at the next level... [He] is wiry
and deceptively strong. What separates him from other
talented scat-backs is his outstanding receiving skills
out of the backfield and in the slot. [He] possesses great
hands, concentration and knows how to high-point the
football."
Madison County High School is steadily building a
heritage for football as McDaniel and Thompson join the
founding fathers that have come before them. Of course,
every generation has their favorites, and every fan has
their fantasy. The glory days are far from over for these
two, though. Actually, the real glory just got a game clos-
er.
GO, COWBOYS!


Fundraiser


Continued from Page 1A


County Community Bank for Clint Minter, who is suf-
fering from lymphoma. Anyone wishing to make a do-
nation to the bank account can do so by stopping by
Madison County Community Bank.
All donations are tax deductible.


have so much unrealized potential that it's almost a
sin. Just look at the strength on the commission.
Lastly, and this goes out to both my Republican
and Democrat brothers and sisters: Neither political
model works by itself. Neither the "tax and spend" de-
mocratic philosophy, nor the "unregulated business",
republican philosophy gets the job done or gets any of
us closer to Heaven. Please remember, it was republi-
can policies and republican business leaders that
drove the massive mortgage and financial inrstitu-,
tions to ruin, and it is Democrats that have made Illi-
nois politics look like an episode of The Sopranos.
Fortunately, however, the greatness of America is.
not measured by a political party, or the height of its
skyscrapers, the power of its military, or even the
president (although, I would like tb go on record say-
ing that everyone should support the office of the
president, even if they don't support the man, and all
should support the military, even if they don't sup-
port the war).
The greatness of America is measured by one
very simple idea, summed up in a declaration made
over 200 years ago: "We hold these truths to be self-ev-
ident, that all men are created equal, that they are en-
dowed by their Creator with certain inalienable
rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pur-
suit of happiness."
The true genius of America is built around these
simple, timeless qualities; the very qualities that
every resident of Madison County can find etched in
the stone monuments in Four Freedoms Park.
We demand to be able to tuck our children in at
night and know that they aren't hungry or cold or
scared or sick from conditions that can be prevented.
We demand to be heard, and to be able to say. and
write what we think, without fear of unfair reprisals.
We demand to have the opportunity to have an idea
and start our own business without government in-
terference or cronyism blocking the way. We demand
to participate in the political process without fear of
retribution, and that our votes willibe counted.
Please lead us!
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Editorial Comment

PleaseLead U


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word,
comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


The ..Year 1908
This will boggle your mind, I kaow it did mine! The year is
1908. One hundred years ago. What a difference a century
makes! Here are some statistics for the Year 1908 :
r The average life expectancy was47 years.
'* Only 14 percent of the homes had a bathtub.
Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone.
There were only 8,000 cars and only 144 miles Of paved
roads.
The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.
The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower!
The average wage in 1908 was 22 cents per hour.
The average worker made between $200 and $400 per
year A competent accountant oould expect to earn $2000 per
year, A dentist $2,500 per year, a veterinarian between $1,500
and $4,000 per year, and a mechanical engineer about $5,000
per year.





















More than 95 percent of all births,took place at HOME.
Ninety percent of all doctors had NO COLLEGE EDU-
CATION! Instead; they attended so-called medical schools,
many of which were condemned in the prets AND the govern-
ment as 'substandard..' ,'
., Sugar cost four cents a pound.
Eggs were fourteen cents a dozen.
Coffee was fifteen cents a pound.
Most women only washed their hair once a month, and
used Borax or egg yolks for shampoo.
Canada passed a law that prohibited poor people from en-
tering into their country for any reason.
Five leading causes of death were:
1. Pneumonia and influenza ,
2. Tuberculosis
3. Diarrhea
4. Heart disease
5. Stroke
The American flag had 45 stars.
The population of Las Vegas, Nevada, was only 30!!!!
Crossword puzzles, canned beer, and ice tea Hadn't been
invented yet.
'there was no Mother's Day or Father's Day.
Two out of every 10 adults couldn't read or write.
Only 6 percent of all Americans had graduated from high
school.
Marijuana, heroin, and morphine were all available over
the counter at the local comer drugstores. Back then pharmacists
said, 'Heroin clears the complexion, gives buoyancy to the mind,
regulates the stomach and bowels, and is, in fact, a perfect
guardian of health'
Eighteen percent of households had at least One full-time
servant or domestic help. *
There were about 230 reported murders in the ENTIRE
U.S.A. ([How many unreported murders?)
Try. to imagine what it may be like in another 100 years.


Question Of The Week

Is your Christmas Tree real or fake?





Fresh cut real
tree.




Fake store
bought



log on,to greenepublishing.com to vote on this week's question:
"Did you make at least one New Year's resolution for 2009?"
voting for this question ends 1/12/09







Wednesday, January 7, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee

Limelight
Jacob Bembry
Columnit /


Looking For Memories And

Pageant Contestants
The Lee Day Committee is still looking for interest-
ing memories you may have of you or your family living
in Lee. Pictures are also welcome. Please send your sto-
ries and photos to mayorkinsey@embarqmail.com or lee
manager@leeflorida.org. Deadline for all entries is Jan.
15. Please help Lee have the biggest and best book they
can of "Lee memories."
The Lee Homecoming Beauty Pageant registration
is set for Jan. 25, from 2-4 p.m. at Lee City Hall. There
will be a pageant for younger children, as well as a Miss
Lee and. Junior Miss Lee pageant. For more informa-
tion, please call Charlene Rye at (850) 694-8012.
A big salute goes out to Jake Kinard, who was able to
extricate Brad Flowers from a hole that he was. stuck in
on New Year's Day, saving Brad's life. If you see Jake,
give him a big thanks!
Happy birthday wishes go out to Janie Ruth Penny,
who celebrates her big day on Wednesday, Jan. 7. Angie
Hauss will celebrate her birthday on Thursday, Jan. 8.
Margaret Rutherford celebrates her birthday on Sunday,
Jan. 11, as does Zane Herring. Hope you all have great
birthdays!
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week
and a beautiful forever. May God bless each and every
one of- you!





Susan McClain vs. Jason Hayling domestic in-
junction
Ford Motor Credit Company vs. Phyllis Branch
- contracts


1| R .N1




P acking material

T. ,moving.


ureene ruuiisning, Inc. rPhuou, oeptemuer io, 1i



Passing The Buck


It's that time
of year, when all
of us that own
real property
(land and things Se
attached to it) purity
have to ante up Joe Boyles
and pay the local
tax office ... for Guest Columnist
the previous
year. Now, does
this make any
sense to you? We are paying our 2008
property taxes based on what the people
we have elected say the property was
worth at the end of 2007. Only a politi-
cian could dream up such a convoluted
system.
There are so many things to com-
plain about with respect to property tax-
es that I hardly know where to begin,
but you know me-I'll give it thQi old col- ,
lege try
Let's start with the name. Unless I'm
mistaken, the Florida Statutes still refer
to this tax as Ad Valorem. That is Latin
for "added value." Yep, you guessed it-
this tax was dreamed up by the Romans
before Christ was born. Now, has any-
thing changed with respect to land use
and ownership demographics over the
past 20 centuries? You bet there has; and
yet, this onerous tax that our local gov-
ernment is positively wedded to is based
on an ancient and very outdated model.
You can always count on the govern-
ment to live in the past.
Here is a big mismatch: property
taxes are a wealth tax, yet, like all taxes,
they are paid with income. Sometimes
(such as with elderly people on fixed in-
comes and in rapidly escalating real es-
tate markets), there isn't enough income
to pay the property tax. Then, the gov-
ernment (of, by and for the people) has
the legal right to take your home away,
or worse, give it to someone who can pa#
the taxes.
There are horrible examples every
year of people who have lived in homes
for decades and have great emotional at-
tachment to the property, and their local
government forecloses on them for fail-
ure to pay their property taxes. There
was even a recent example in a New
England state (where property taxes are
through the roof) where the locals
"hired" property owners to do some-
thing so they would have sufficient in-
come to pay their taxes. If that makes
any sense to you, you need to stop read-
ing this column.
Inevitably, when you go to complain
to the local office about a tax bill or ap-
praisal, they will play "pass the buck." It


p isn't the fault of
S the local office
which is made
up of our neigh-
p bors; rather it is
the fault of the
legislature that
passed the laws
or the regula-
tors in the state
offices.
As a tax-
payer, you really, hate to see someone
point fingers in another direction. Here
is the dilemma: Do you blame the legis-
lature that passes the law, or do you
blame the revenuers who interpret the
law, or do you blame the local appraiser
who fixes the value, or do you blame the
county commission that determines
mileage rate, or do you blame the tax
collector who takes your check? Since
nearly everyone has a piece of the ac-
tion, blame becomes a moving target.
A constant source of criticism for a
property appraisal is that it doesn't re-
flect the current market. For one thing,
it is always a year in arrears. "Don't
blame me," says the property appraiser,
"blame the legislature." Well, it is a little
hard for John Q. Citizen to get the atten-
tion of 120 legislators and 40 senators, or
some faceless office of bureaucrats in
Tallahassee; but I can surely get the at-
tention of the local people we put in of-
fice every four years to administer this
onerous tax. Of course, my frustration
might get the sheriff's attention, but I
think I know when to stop pushing be-
fore matters get that far.
We have professionals in the real es-
tate business that make real property
appraisals every day based on compara-
bles, recent sales and a whole list of oth-
er industry-approved methods. They
wouldn't dream of making an appraisal
based on what something was worth a
year ago. A banker wouldn't dream of
loaning money based on an outdated ap-
praisal, yet this is what we get from our
government. Simply put, the property
tax system is out of touch with the mar-
ket; but isn't that a universal problem
with government?
This diatribe might sound like I'm
condemning our local officials, but I'm
not. Instead, I'm blaming the system. I
don't really have an answer to this prob-
lem. After all, this tax has been part of
our landscape for 2,000 years, and is now
so imbedded in our tax structure, it is
unlikely to be replaced. But I get frus-
trated with this at least once a year, and
I thought I'd share my frustration with
you.


? orida Press Assoc, ,o



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A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 800] designed for the
.express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the
right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the man-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or 'the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene
Publishing, Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.







4A Madison County Carrer www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 7, 2009



LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


Two Bank insiders And Six Others Charged

In. Bank Fraud Scheme To Defraud Bank Of

America And Wachovia Of $1 Million


Woman Arrested For
Disorderly Conduct

A Madison woman was arrested for disorderly con-
duct on Monday, Dec. 29.
According to a Madison Police Department report,
Patrolman Reggie Alexander was dispatched to. Madison
Heights in reference to drug activity Upon his arrival,
he advised Gwendolyn Richardson, 39, to calm down and
give him the information.
Richardson became belligerent and began using pro-
fanity, yelling loudly all over the parking lot.
Richardson walked off, stating that since the police
weren't going to do anything, she would handle it her-
self.
Alexander instructed the defendant to leave the area
and she began yelling loudly, using profanity Her ac-
tions got the attention of people in the area and also
brought people out of their apartments to see what was
going on.
Richardson was arrested and taken to the Madison.
County Jail.


R. Alexander Acosta, U.S. Attorney for the south-
ern district of Florida and Jonathan I. Solomon, spe-
cial agent in charge, Federal Bureau of Investigation,
announced that, on Dec. 18, a federal grand jury re-
turned a five-count indictment charging Bienvenido
"Benny" Benach, Jr., Ramon Puentes,, Danny Flores,
Rolando Alfonso, Jorge Nobrega, Jorge Arrieta, Se-
bastian Kishinevsky and Adriana Cruz with a bank
fraud scheme that resulted in the approval and dis-
bursement of two home equity loans, totaling approx-
imately $1 million.
As alleged in the indictment, the scheme was di-
rected at Bank of America and Wachovia. The defen-
dants have been charged with conspiracy to commit
bank fraud, bank fraud and aggravated identity theft,
in violation of Title 18, U.S. Code, Sections 1349, 1344
and 1028A. All of the defendants have made their ini-
tial appearances before a magistrate judge and the
case will be set for trial by the district court judge pre-
siding over the matter.
According to the indictment, Benach, Puentes, Flo-
res and Alfonso decided to submit simultaneous appli-
cations for fraudulent home equity lines of credit
("HELOCs") to Bank of America and Wachovia for the
total amount of $1 million, requesting $500,000 from


Dowling Park Man


Arrested For Battery


On Sunday, Dec. 28, Suwannee:
County Sheriff's' Deputy Brad Mincks
arrested Johnathan M Sizemore, 20,
11293 237th Ct., Dowling Park. Size-
more was charged with battery
According to a Suwannee County
Sheriff's Office report, at approximate-
ly 2:30 a.m. D/S Mincks was dispatched
to a.residence off 237th Ct. in reference
to a disturbance involve a gun. When
en route, D/S Mincks was advised one
of the persons present had been shot
with a BB gun. Upon arrival, he made
contact with the victims, who advised,
after investigating a noise outside the
residence, their dog ran down the road
following a vehicle, which they fol-
lowed to retrieve the dog. The vehicle


was occupied by Sizemore and two oth-
er subjects. A verbal altercation oc-
curred and threats were made involv-
ing a BB gun. One of the victims was
shot in the chest with a BB, as well as
the vehicle they were in. The victims
returned home and reported the inci-
dent. D/S Mincks made contact with
Sizemore, who advised one of the vic-
tims threatened him with a flashlight
and that is why he defended himself.
Sizemore also stated he did not believe
the gun worked.
Sizemore was arrested and trans-
ported to the Suwannee County Jail on
the stated charges. Bond was set at
$1,000 and he bonded through a local
bonding agency.


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each bank. Each HELOC application listed Benach's
mother-in-law as the purported borrower, and a home
owned by Benach's mother-in-law as the collateral. To
prepare and process the HELOC applications, Be-
nach's mother-in-law's name and social security num-
ber were used without her knowledge, 'input or au-
thority.
Flores and Alfonso submitted the fraudulent Bank
of America HELOC application to Arrieta, a personal
banker at Bank .of America, and gave the fraudulent
Wachovia HELOC application to Kishinevsky, a finan-
cial specialist at Wachovia. For a fee, each bank insider
agreed to process'the fraudulent HELOC. At the time of
the submission of the fraudulent HELOC applications,
neither bank was made aware of'the other pending HE-
LOC application. After the HELOC at each bank was
funded and the funds were made available, the defen-
dants disbursed and shared the fraudulently obtained
loan proceeds, receiving in total approximately $800,000.
Mr. Acosta commended the investigative efforts of
the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other federal
law enforcement agencies comprising the Mortgage
Fraud Strike Force. The case is being prosecuted by
Assistant United States Attorney Joseph B. Shumof-
sky


O'Brien Man Arrested For


Domestic Battery
On Thursday, Dec. 25, Suwannee County Sheriff's Deputy Justin Stout arrested
Richard Allen Mallett, 31, 11712 202nd St., O'Brien. Mallett was charged with domes-
tic battery.
According to a Suwannee County Sheriff's Office report, at approximately 6:35
p.m. D/S Stout was dispatched to a residence on 202nd St. in reference to a family dis-
pute. Upon arrival, he made contact with family members who advised Mallett had
been drinking most of the day and got upset when they would not leave in his vehicle.
Mallett then threw the victim to the ground attempting to choke him when another
family member pulled him off. He then slapped another family member across the
'face. D/S Stout made contact with Mallett who advised they all were against him and
that they started the fight. Each victim gave a written statement and Mallett was
placed in custody.
Mallett was arrested and transported to the Suwannee County Jail on the stated
charges. Bond was set at $5,000 and he remains in custody.

Live Oak Woman Arrested


For Child Neglect


On Saturday, Dec. 27, Suwannee
County Sheriff's Deputy Tommy Roberts
arrested Alma' Elizabeth Westberry, 30,
12708 72nd Ter., Live Oak. Westberry was
charged with child neglect.
According to a Suwannee County
Sheriff's Office report, at approximately
6:00 p.m., D/S Roberts was dispatched to
a residence in reference to a juvenile
complaint.
Upon arrival, he made contact with a
neighbor who advised two small children
had been left unattended most of the day.
The witness observed one of the children
without clothes and had stopped them
from walking down the road unaccompa-
nied. The neighbor had repeatedly, at-
tempted to get an adult to come to. the


door of the residence and no one an-
swered. D/S Roberts made contact with
Westberry, who had been asleep on the
couch inside the unlocked residence, af-
ter hearing the children inside. Westber-
ry stated she had not slept in several
days and did not know how long she had
been asleep. D/S Roberts observed sever-
al holes in the flooring on the porch and
other apparent dangers present that
would be hazardous to small children.
The father arrived prior to Westberry be-
ing placed in custody.
Westberry was arrested and trans-
ported to the Suwannee County Jail on
the stated charges. Bond was set at $2,500
and she bonded through a local bonding
agency


973~.


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CALL


LIVE OAK GAS


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Wednesday, January 7, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY



Ty's Devilish Eggs


Charles

William

Carter
Charles William
Carter, age 86, died Sunday,
in Madison.
Funeral services will
be Wednesday, Jan. 7, at 2
p.m., at Lee Baptist Church
in Lee. The family will re-
ceive friends Tuesday, Jan.
6, from 6-8 p.m., at Beggs,
Funeral Home,
Mr. Carter served in
the U.S. Army He worked
at Cherry Farms in Lee
and was a member of Lee
First Baptist Church.
He is survived by his
wife, Mary Elizabeth
Carter, of Lee; three sons,
David Carter and Charlie
Carter of Lee, Raymond
Carter of Sanford, N.C.;
two daughters, Nancy Fox
of Moundsville, WVa., and
Diane Carter of Madison;
two brothers, Junior
Carter of Lee and Earnest
Carter of Merritt Island;
and two sisters, Lela Pearl
Summey of Merritt Island
and Betty Woods of Lee.


Vivyanne Veronica,
Jackson, age 78, a homemak-
er, died Sunday, in Madison,
The Mass will be Thurs-
day, Jan. 8, at 11 a.m., at St.
Vincent de Paul Catholic
Church in Madison. A
rosary will be said Wednes-
day evening during the visi-
tation from 6-8 p.m. at Beggs
Funeral Home, Madison
Chapel.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to Madi-
son Pink Ladies Auxiliary,
309 NE Marion St., Madison,
FL 32340, or Big Bend Hos-
pice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308.
She was born in Brook-
lyn, N.Y, and had lived in
Jacksonville before moving,
to Lee in 1969. In Jack-
sonville, she volunteered as
a Cub Scouts den mother, at
the St. Joseph Parrish
Ladies Guild, and as a
leader for 4-H Clubs. In
Madison, she was involved
in the Madison County
Memorial Auxiliary Pink
Ladies and the Parish Coun-
cil of Catholic Women at St
Vincent de-Paul Catholic
Church, where she was a
member.
She is survived by two
sons (Kevin Jackson [wife,
Jean Marie] of Clarksville,
Tenn., and Jonathan Jack-
son [wife, Theresa] of Lake
City), one daughter (Eliza-.
beth Williams [husband,
Mike] of Lee), one brother
(Christian Jakob [wife,, Nor-
ma] of Jacksonville), and
six grandchildren (Mary
Catherine Jackson of Boul-
der, Colo.; David Jackson of
Chicago, Ill.; SA Matthew
Jackson [wife, Katie] of
Biloxi, Miss.; and Meredith
Jackson, Brian Williams
and Chris Williams of Lee).


Mary Eugenia Means
Christmas, age 85, died
Wednesday, Dec. 31, 20,08,
in Madison.
Funeral services were
held Sunday, at 3 p.m., at
Beggs Funeral Home
Madison Chapel.
The family received
friends from 1:30 p.m., un-
til the time of the service.
Burial will be at Oak
Ridge Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, con-
tributions may be made in
her memory to Florida
United Methodist Chil-
dren's Home, P.O. Box
6299, Deltona, FL 32728-
6299.
Mary Jean was born
in Unadilla, Ga., Dboly
County, on March 28, 1923.
Her parents were Frank
Lane Means and Ruth
Meadow Means of Valdos-
ta, Ga. Her sister, Frances
Means Hjort, and hus-
band, Paul, of
Thomasville, Ga., survive
her.
She is survived by a
son (G.E. "Bucky" Christ-
mas and wife, Jeannie, of
Madison) and six grand-
children (Amy Dale Burns
and husband, Danny, of
Lee; Molly Lynn Bingham
and husband, Chris, of
Riverview; Jacob Newton
Kinard and wife, MJ, of
Madison; Frank Austin
Christmas and wife, Joy, of
Jacksonville; Christopher
David Christmas and wife,
Danielle, also of Jack-
sonville; and Dean Ed-
ward Christmas and wife,
of St. Mary's, Ga.).
Mary Jean leaves be-
hind 12 great-grandchil-
dren: Alex Burns, Jarrod
Burns, Dillon Burns, Ha-
ley Burns, Sadie Meadows
Bingham, Ana Bingham,
Daisy Kinard, Jesse Tren-
ton Kinard, Anika Faith
Christmas, Alena Hope
Christmas, Lexi Ann
Christmas and Abri Tay-
lor Christmas; her loving
niece, Ellen Hjort Walton;
nephews, Frank Hjort and
wife, Nancy, and Andrew
Hjort and wife, Carol, of
Winston Salem, N.C.; and
husband, Jeff, of
Charleston, S.C.
Her husband, Guin Ed-
ward Christmas; daughter,
Mary Frances Kinard; and
grandchild, Jesse Lane Ki-
nard, preceded her in


death.
Mrs. Christmas gradu-
ated from high school at
age 16 and attended Val-
dosta State College for
.Women, finishing at age
18. She, married Buster
Christmas of Madison,
son of Jesse L. Christmas
and Gwendolyn Horton
Christmas. Her husband
finished Madison High
School and went into the
Army Air Corps in De-
cember 1941. With her hus-
band stationed in Italy
overseas, Mary Jean
worked in Washington,
D.C., at the war office.
During her work, she be-
came an acquaintance of
Gen. Omar Bradley, and
was soon bookkeeping and
typing for him.
When her husband re-
turned to the states, Mary
went with him all over the
country from South Dako-
ta to New Mexico. She and
Buster were both eyewit-
nesses to the top secret ex-
perimental testing of the
A-bomb at Alamogordo,
N.M., in preparation for
the bombing of Nagasaki
and Hiroshima, Japan.
Mary Jean worked at
Alice Williams Insurance
Agency for a number of
years before becoming a
case manager at the HRS
Department to later be-
come a supervisor here in
Madison. In her career of
23 yedrs, she helped many
families and charitable
causes. For 20 years, Mary
worked moonlighting as a
pari-mutuels cashier.
Many of her later years,
she worked part-time in al-
terations with dry clean-
ers in Madison. She re-
tired to take up sewing,
family, bridge, crossword
puzzles and bingo as her
pursuits,
A longtime resident of
Madison, she lived on
Seminole Ave. (later Semi-
nole St.) for 58 years. In
2008, she moved to
Fraleigh Dr. in Livingston
Spring Acres. She moved
her residence to-Lake Park
of Madison Nursing Home.
in September of last year.
She leaves behind -a
legacy of unconditional
love and caring, a passion
for living to all who knew
her, and a family to carry
on her example.





January 7 & 8
NFCC is doing a pro-
gram "Resolve to Quit in
'09." This program is
free. There are six ses-
sions. There Will be NRT
(patches and gum) to help
you stop smoking. The
program will be held in
Madison at NFCC at 12
noon each day. Call Pre-
ston Mathews for more
information at (850) 973-
1710 or 728-5479.
January 11
Trinity will be in con-
cert at Unity Baptist
Church, at 11 a.m. Admis-
sion is free. A love offer-
ing will be received dur-
ing the concert.
January 16
Crabb Revival will be
in concert at Northside
Church of God in Perry,
at 7 p.m. For more infor-
mation, please call (850)
464-0114 or visit
www.northfloridaconcerts
.com.


Tyrra Meserve
Reporter
Greene Publishing, Inc.


INGREDIENTS

- 6 hard boiled eggs
* 1/4 cup Mayonnaise
* 2 tbs Mustard
* Relish to taste (optional)
* Splash of lemon Juice
* Paprika for garnish



DIRECTIONS


Peel boiled eggs and split lengthwise in half.
Remove yolks to a small bowl and mash with
a fork. Add Mayonnaise, mustard, lemon
juice, and relish (optional). Mix together
thoroughly.
Spoon mixture into egg "bowls" and dust
with paprika as a finishing touch. Enjoy!

Devilish Eggs can be lightly covered with
plastic wrap and kept in the refrigerator up to
one day before serving.



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6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 7, 2009


AROUND MADISON COUNTY




Madison Lodge Installs Officers



And Recog nizes 60-Year Member


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, December 27, 2008
Madison Lodge No. 11 F.&A.M. held its Installation of Officers ceremony on Dec. 27. Right Worshipful Roy A. Hibbs was elected as worshipful master, continuing a 164-year
tradition in Madison. Pictured left to right on the front row: Right Worshipful Richard Terry, Brother Vincent Palhoff, Brother Gerald Classon, Right Worshipful Roy A. Hibbs,
Right Worshipful Gerald McHugh, Most Worshipful Ralph Miller and Brother Opie Peavy. Back row, left to right: Worshipful John Sirman, Right Worshipful Jim Stanley, Brother
Farncis Kinney and Illustrious Tommy Greene.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Madison Lodge No. 11 E&A.M. conducted its Installation
of Officers ceremony Saturday Dec. 27, to coincide with St.
Johns Day which is the first day new officers are eligible to be
sworn into office. In addition to recognizing officers, Brother
Vincent Palhoff, whose membership is with Harmony Lodge
No. 38 in Hillsboro, N.H. although he has been regularly at-
tending Madison Lodge for years, was honored for 60 years as
a worthy brother.
The evening opened with a wonderful dinner provided by
Right Worshipful Roy A. Hibbs and his lovely wife, All, who,
with the help of severalladies of the Order of the Eastern Star
No. 109, including Worthy Matron Karen FerDon, served
dozens of plates until everyone was as full as their smiles were
vide. Brothers and guests were then excused to the lodge'
xeetng roonifofinstallatXobns ai4c re .cgnitio '..
-Right Worshipful Roy A. Hibbs was sworn in as Worship-


ful Master, stepping into a rich 164-year history that Worship-
ful John Sirman, currently Worshipful Master of Greenville
Lodge No. 28, referred to as "living history given Madison's
unique heritage as one of only five remaining pioneer lodges
in the state." Right Worshipful Jim Stanley currently entering
his 30th year as Lodge Secretary, then stepped to the podium
to administer the oaths of office.
Right Worshipful Hibbs has previously served the district
as District Deputy Grand Master, receiving the highest praise
from theState Grand Master, including the prestigious title of
Grand Representative. All were excited by the qualities and
commitments he brings to his office, not to mention the affec-
tion of his two lovely daughters and granddaughter that trav-
eled from Miami to be in attendance.
The other officers sworn in were: Opie Peavy Senior War-
den; Francis Kinney, Jnior Warden;; and Illustrious Tommy
Greene, JuniorDeaco.- Dueto travel and family conflicts, ad-
ditional officer installations were held over until January
Following installation
_proceedings, Brother Vincent
Palhoff was presented his 60-


year certificate-a very rare and respected honor-by one of
his hometown lodge brothers from New Hampshire, who trav-
eled to Madison for the ceremony Right Worshipful Gerald
McHugh, Secretary to the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge
of New Hampshire, speaking on the Grand Master's behalf,
recognized Brother Palhoff for the notable milestone. Brother
Gerald Classon, also of Harmony Lodge No. 38 in Hillsboro,
N.H., joined Right Worshipful McHugh and all in attendance
in giving the worthy brother an ovation for the amazing
achievement. Brother Palhoff's family including his first lady
Latrell, son and three grandchildren, also expressed joy and
pride for the momentous occasion.
Madison Lodge No. 11 E&A.M. meets twice monthly and
is very pleased to have men like Right Worshipful Hibbs and
Brother Palhoff, in addition to the other fine officers and
brothersof the lodge, serving a community they cherish. Last-
ly, all brothers,expressed their appreciation to Most Worship-
ful Ralph Miller, Past Grand Master of the State of Florida
Grand Lodge, for his much-appreciated attendance.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, December 27, 2008
Brother Vincent Palhoff received his 60-year certificate and pin on Dec. 27 at Madi-
son Lodge No. 11. Brothers, family and friends filled the lodge with encouragement and
appreciation for reaching such a momentous milestone. Pictured standing front left to
right: LaTrelle Palhoff, Vincent Palhoff, Uri Palhoff and Masumi Palhoff; back row: Eric
Palhoff and Julian Palhoff



SHELBY'S RESTAURANT

"Home Cookin"
Hours: Monday Sunday 6:00 am 3:00 pm
After New Years; Opening Nightly
Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Supper
Banquet Facilities & Catering
Monday Sunday
Business Meetings .(Luncheons & Dinners) *
Wedding Receptions Anniversary Parties Birthday Parties *
Bridal Showers Baby Showers All Special Occasions *
(Bartending Services Available)
140 NE Yellow Pine Avenue Madison, FL 32340
(850) 973-2414 Shelby Richards, Owner






Wednesday, January 7, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Church Holds Groundbreaking For Facility Expansion
rI


From humble beginnings in
the early 1900's to a ground-
breaking ceremony on Feb. 10,
1975, for the existing brick struc-
ture, the local Branch of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter-day Saints has seen sus-
tained growth in spirit and in
numbers. This local congrega-


*tion has outgrown the current
building and church leaders
from Tallahassee and Salt Lake
City have authorized a signifi-
cant expansion.
"We are excited to announce
the addition of a chapel to the
west end of our meeting house
located on the hill at the inter-


section of US Hw
Lane," said Bra
Shaun Robinso:
community is
invited to the
Jan. 10 ground-
breaking cere-
mony that will
include brief


ry 90 and Pickle
inch President
n. The entire


talks, special music and turning
of the earth with "golden" shov-
els. The ceremony will begin at 5
p.m. on that Saturday.
The sharing of the Gospel of
Jesus Christ most importantly
creates positive growth in the
lives of those who choose to fol-
low Gospel principles. The Sav-


ior's plan of happiness is avail-
able to all. Please join them on
Sunday mornings at 9 a.m. for
study, teaching and worship for
all ages. For more information
about the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints,
speak to a member or call the
missionaries at (850) 673-1544.


Tile Arbor Daj FodNdatioN To Qiye
Fve Free crapeMrt, L lTees
Florida residents will receive five free crapemyrtle trees for becoming a member
of the Arbor Day Foundation in January 2009.
The free trees are part of the nonprofit's Trees for America campaign.
"Crapemyrtles were selected for this campaign because of their elegant color and
form, making them an attractive addition to the home landscape in Florida," said
John Rosenow, chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. "These small flowering
trees boast perfect, six-petaled flowers of pink and red, with leaves that change from
summer green to autumn red, orange and yellow."
The trees will be shipped postpaid at the right time for planting between Feb. I
and April 30 with enclosed planting instructions. The six- to 12-inch trees are guar-
anteed to grow, or they will be replaced free of charge.
Members also receive a subscription to the Foundation's colorful bimonthly publi-
cation, Arbor Day, and The
Tree Book, which includes i
information about tree -Richter Pecan Company-
planting and care. 106 Jeffcoat Industrial Dr Dothan, AL 36303
To receive your free R
trees, subscription and Frank Richter
free book, send a $10 mem- "Let usuy your Nuts
bership contribution to Let us buy your Nuts
FIVE CRAPEMYRTLES, Don't give your pecans away!
Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Crack and Blowing for the public
Arbor Avenue, Nebraska
City, 2 68410, by Jan. 31, Office: 334-792-3718 Cell 229-869-1008
2009.


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8A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 7, 2009



HISTORYY


By Alfa Hunt
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Few Floridians are aware that turpentine was once
the second largest industry in the state and vas once
'referred to as a "brutal feudal system" by Gene Bur-
nett in his Florida's Past volumes.
"Florida's turpentine industry was 'repulsively
medieval'-where men were enslaved by debts to the
company, store," noted historian Stetson Kennedy
when studying the turpentine industry in the 1940's.
The business of the turpentine mills iii Florida
was first discovered by the famous English privateer,
Sir John Hawkins. He
first found the substance
when he came to Florida
in 1565 and immediately -
returned to England to
tell of the new resource he
had discovered.
However, England
first started harvesting
turpentine in Virginia in
the 17th century The pine
forests were cut down and
their sap harvested.
Over the next two cen-
turies, the English carved
a. swath through the
forests, reaching all the A close up of :he Carter
way to the Carolinas. By cooling tub and the spirit
the end of the 19th centu- left).
ry, the pines in Georgia
had been cut down. With the pine forest behind them
obliterated, the mills made their way to Florida.
By the turn of the century, turpentine camps were
found in clusters across northern Florida. They
pushed deep and towards the south along the Old Span-
ish Trial, stretching from Crestview to Lako City By
1903, there were 11 turpentine stills licensed in the
Madison County area.
Turpentine workers were nearly all black, .al-
though at the beginning of the 20th century, many
workers were Mexicans, Germans, Irish, Jews and
Poles, who were lured into this industry. Very often,
these immigrant workers would be sold to other stills
as a means to pay debts brought on by the company
coinmissary.
|- Most of the turpentine workers were born into the
business as their fathers followed the industry through
its movement in the southeast states. These descen-
dants of previous turpentine still workers were called
"teppentime folks."
For half a century, the business wielded immea-
surably high profits, but at the expense of its workers.


In the turpentine camps, there was no law-the camp
boss was the only law. The only time that outside law-
men set foot in the turpentine stills was when a work-
er. tried running away and help was needed to track
down the runaway.
There weren't any churches, schools or hospitals,
and the only store was the company store to which
many workers owed money. Whenever children did
have a school to attend, they were forced to drop out
early so they could go to work in the stills.
The day was filled with hard labor, and the night
was full of ruckuses. The men would end their day at a


7-7 o -- -_---- -- -
Turpentine Still including the The Carter Turpentine Sti
shed (white shed on the far as "The Turpentine City," wh
up of a turpentine still.


local camp juke joint. They would find release with
wild dancing, rotgut moonshine, fist and razor fights,
and wanton acts.
A visitor was once warned by black townspeople,
"Don't you ever go with no teppentime folks. They are
savages without a God."
The average worker might make a $1 to $1.75 per
day during the 1900's. By the early 1940's the wage was
pretty much the same. During the early stages .of the
turpentine stills, many operators leased convicts from
the state at $150 per year to supplement the labor.
The men were harshly overworked, overexposed
and often died from scant, poor food; beatings;
snakebites; malaria; gunshot wounds; and injuries in-
flicted by whips andbloodhounds.
These practices we-e eased by Governor Napoleon
Broward in his campaign against the "trusts and com-
bines" he claimed ran the turpentine industry. These
were usually large out-of-state corporations. They'd
employ agents to work with individual camp operators
to finance and market the pitch and its resin byprod-
uct. The profits which were produced were enormous,


Mills


but remarkably, the state didn't benefit from them.
One operator who worked in West Florida noted:
"It seems incredible that these millions of acres of
pine should have been cut, transferred through the
channels of commerce to other climes, and so few peo-
ple have been enriched by the process."
The crop yielded was usually measured in units
consisting of 5,000 trees on 250 acres of land. On aver-
age, each camp would harvest at least 10 crops. Each
camp was-self-contained. A large copper kettle used to
distill the turpentine and separate the resin sat in the
middle of the camp.
Living quarters for
the camp foremen, store
owners, woods rider and
the tree crop overseer
were separated front the
shanties and simple cab-
ins of the workers. The
weather-decayed shacks
would have a huge black
cauldron in the yards and
a nearby horrid-smelling
outhouse. Water for the
camp came from a single
camp pump.
When the Social Secu-
rity Act came into effect,
ll in Portal, Ga., also known the camp operators were
ich shows the common set enraged and government
officials were often ha-
rassed with arrests for
trespassing. This soon stopped, but only until the
Supreme Court ruled that turpentine workers were in
agriculture and, therefore, were excluded from the pro-
tection of the Act.
A study from the University of Florida in the 1930's
focused on the harshness of the "teppentime" world. It
reported that turpentine work was "too severe and the
pay too small for white workers." It went on to say, "a
difficult problem" was posed forthe operators Who had
piles of "unpaid accounts" at the company stores and
then left for another camp.
The study concluded that it was necessary for an
"impartial economic dictator" be set up to watch over
these "shiftless" people.
But, for most people born into the turpentine
world,-the way-,of, thinking-was summed up in a simple
Mexican phrase, "Sal Si Puedes," which means, "get
out if you can."
One old worker was once asked why he went into
the work, to which he replied, "You is born in the tep-
pentime. Ain't nothing you go into. Something you get
out of."


14,^7194


The


Turpentine






Madison County Carrier 9A


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10A Madison County Carrier


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wedding dress can make
a huge statement. From the conser-
vative high neck to a sweetheart
plunge, there are so many contrary
lines and shapes from which to
choose.
Similar to that of the wedding
dress style, certain forms look bet-
ter on specific body types. Know-
ing which body type she is will
help a bride pinpoint the perfect
look, so. that they look better than
amazing on their wedding day
Knowing which neckline best
compliment the bride's features is
essential. The eyes are automati-
cally drawn to the bride's torso;


adds length to the neck and torso,
making it appear longer than usu-
al.
Jewel: This neckline is for the
more conservative bride. The top of
the neckline rests at the base of the
bride's throat, similar to that of a t-
shirt. A currently popular choice
for this type are wedding dresses
with a jeweled neckline made of
lace. The result is both moderate
and sexy This look is great for,
women with a small chest.


Keyhole: Th
less coiimmon in pa
dings; however, it
tiful look for the c


other as-
of the
il ensem-


Illusion: The illusion is simply
the combination of any of the nec(-
lines combined with a lace or .sheer
covering, similar to that of the Sab-
rina neckline, only less constrict-
ing.
Queen Anne: This neckline
has a sweetheart plunge and a high
back. Because it conceals a good
deal of upper torso area, it tends to
look best on brides who have a
more conspicuous collarbone and
larger arms and/or bust area.
Scoop: The scoop is a more ca-
sual neckline than the others due to
it's fluid and re-
laxed look. With Destinatior
a low, curved
L neckline in the In TxedO Sa
front and back, it
looks good onn


Wednesday, January 7, 2009


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Wednesday, January 7, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11A



MONEY & FINANCE


Middle


Clai Hfatd To


Define


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Last week, Vice Presi-
dent-elect Joe Biden
launched his assignment
to head the White House
Task Force on Working
Families, which is an ini-
tiative targeted at "raising
the living standards of
middle class, working fam-
ilies in America." A
Time/CNN partnership
publication responded im-
mediately, "But who exact-
ly is he going to be fighting
for? Who is middle class
these days?"
Congress apparently
tried to answer this same
question last year as part
of various project evalua-
tions and came up with
the yearly household in-
come range of $19,000 to
$91,000, although the low
end of that range is de-


fined as poverty in most
areas.
As MSNBC explains,
"The researchers started
by looking at income lev-
els. Based on 2005 Census
Bureau reports, some 40
percent of the nearly 115
million households in the
U.S. earned less than
$36,000 a year. That repre-
sented just 12 percent of
all income. The 40 percent
on the next rung up the
economic ladder took in
between $36,000. and
$91,705, or about 37.6 per-
cent of all income. The top
20 percent, who made
$91,705 or more, collected
half of all income."
Interestingly,: those
numbers don't adequately
reflect the state of mind of
those who consider them-
selves middle class. Sur-
veys have shown that,


while people consider
$40,000 a year to be the low
end of what it takes to buy
a middle-class life, some
people who make as much
as $200,000 a year still con-
sider themselves middle
class, the researchers said.
In the end, there was real-
ly no consensus for the de-
finition of "middle class;"
neither was there an offi-
cial government defini-
tion.
"What constitutes the
middle class is relative,
subjective and not easily
defined," the survey con-
cluded.
Is it possible, then,
that "middle class" is as
much a state of mind as it
is an economic condition?
Politicians often use the
phrases "middle class"
and "middle income" in-
terchangeably, although


"middle income" can be
defined by simply finding
the middle of America's
wage scale. Whereas "mid-
dle class" may be defined
differently among various
parts of the country, defi-
nitely being tied to buying
power. A middle-class
home in Naples certainly
costs more than the same
home in Madison, for in-
stance.
An economist at Cali-
fornia State University,
Fullerton, said the true
"middle class" American
who earns between $35,200
and $52,800 couldn't actu-
ally afford those same
things that previously de-
fined a middle-class
lifestyle.
The National Opinion
Research Center (NORC)
at the University of Chica-
go has asked people to


Bubbles Burst On Both Ends Of The Market.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The rise and fall of oil
prices, and the associated
rollercoaster of gas prices,
has left many Americans
scratching their heads in
disbelief and holding
their breath in anticipa-
tion. Why? Because it ap-
pears the bubble may be
bursting again, this time
'on the bottom end of oil
prices. Fortunately, most
experts agree that the fi-
nal resting point of oil
would translate into gas at
$2 a gallon, which might
have seemed quite high
two years, ago, but now
might actually be a wel-
come resting point.
When those with an in-
terest in a particular topic,
especially a relatively.
unique topic, come togeth-


er to discuss viewpoints,
more and more are turn-
ing to Internet blogs. One
of the more popular blog
sites for discussing the oil
industry is The Oil Drum,
located at www.theoil-
drum.com.
The site has recently
posted access to vote in an
oil price survey: the "2009
Price Poll." It has also re-
posted the results of its
2008 poll, which included
approximately 1,000 par-
ticipants. In the poll con-
ducted last year with 2008
predictions, keeping in
mind that oil was at $97 a
barrel at the time, few
guesstimated it would end
below $50 a barrel. The
greatest number of re-
spondents cast their vote
for the $110-130 price
range, with many believ-


ing prices could rise as
high as $150 a barrel or
more by year end.
The writers on the site
are mostly private special-
ists who follow the oil in-
dustry and energy in gen-
eral. Their insights are
typically.backed with ra-
tional research and pre-
sented somewhat academi-
cally As one noted, "2009
will mark a sharp reduc-
tion in oil projects and in-
vestments, scrapping of
marginal production, and
lack of capital for new in-
vestments due to higher
pric; decks, fqr banks. But,
atleast for now, consump-
tion decline rates will ex-
ceed production decline,
barring more OPEC cuts."
The question that re-
mains, then, is whether
the world emerges from


the credit crisis "with a
full or half head of
steam," and whether the
demand for oil worldwide
will follow America, or the
other way around. Again,
the author notes, "Oil
price and supply, at least
for 2009, will take their
cues first from the econo-
my."
In the 2009 poll, $50-75
a barrel is currently the
most popular range. Re-
gardless of these yearly
outcomes, there is strong
evidence that the immedi-
ate oil markets have over-
corrected and ,that- the
same wild rage that drove
prices artificially higher
may be doing the same in
reverse.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


Trillion Dollar Survey Complete


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The majority of
Americans, when asked
if they see the stock mar-
ket as some sort of gam-
ble, responded/, that they
do. In fact, few pretend to
have a handle on it, even
the really big rich with
the biggest stakes (bil-
lions and trillions). This
is mostly because simply
too many opposing, com-
petitive groups (business-
es, individuals and gov-
ernments) have an inter-
est in it. In other words,
despite the opinion of
many conspiracy theo-
ries, no one group con-
trols the whole market (at
least, not yet), which
keeps the market general-
ly open.
That said, let's return
to the idea of gambling.
Using the gambling anal-


ogy, there are a wide vari-
ety of gambling games,
from slot machines on
one end, where it's all
about chance and luck
(many still consider luck
to be a personality trait);
to poker on the other end,
where the player becomes
a major component in the
game and the house isn't
automatically set to win,
like in slots.
Using that compari-
son, a case could be made
that most Americans are
just playing the slots, and
only the big rich (individ-
uals, businesses and gov-
ernments) are playing
poker (not to mention
that they own the casi-
nos).
The reason for this
elaborate illustration is
to put the role of so-called
market experts into per-
spective. These market


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specialists inclhide both
the players who invest
heavily in the market
(usually in segments) and
the reporters that follow
them, many of who are
also investors, like the
professionals who work
for the Wall Street Jour-
nal and CNBC. Again, no
one is saying these ana-
lysts and big investors
are gurus, simply that
they represent the poker
players in our gambling
analogy.
In the most recent
CNBC Trillion Dollar
Survey, "69 percent of the
49 respondents said the
Standard & Poor [(S&P)]
500 could gain more than
10 percent in 2009. In that
group, 26 percent said the
S&P could even be up
more than 20 percent.
Just six percent saw neg-
ative returns, and all of
those said the S&P could
be down 10 percent or
more."
The survey further
noted, "The third quarter
of 2009 should be the next
quarter to show positive
growth for the U.S. econo-
my, according to 51 per-
cent of respondents. An-
other 22 percent said they
expect positive growth in
the fourth quarter, while
18 percent see it earlier,
in the second quarter. Six
percent do not expect pos-
itive GDP [(gross domes-
tic product)] until 2010."
Before a celebration
begins though, consider
last year. The actual S&P
500 was down 38.5 percent
for 2008. The drop came
in the last few months,


beaten down by the finan-
cial crises and an econo-
my already reeling from
foreclosures and huge oil
prices. Expectations from
last year's survey, howev-
er, were still fairly posi-
tive. Respondents to the
survey mostly expected
stocks to be higher by the
end of 2008. Five percent
expected an unchanged
market, eight percent ex-
pected the S&P to be low-
er, and 25 percent expect-
ed the S&P to be higher
by 10 percent or more.
So, does this mean
that there's nothing to be
learned from the survey?
Most insiders would say
there is still much to be
gained from it because it
shows the attitudes of the
.players currently .at the
table. Of course, as hands
are played and folded,
and new cards are shuf-
fled, the play will neces-
sarily be adjusted.
Locally, 30 'individu-
als, business owners and
government leadership
were asked the same sur-
vey questions, with an al-
lowance for additional
comments. Interestingly,
the numbers were little
different from the survey
There was, however, a
strong common response
among the additional
comments, that being,
"Nobody knows!"
So, what's in store for
the rest of us? Regard-
less, it seems best to stay
informed and build a pok-
er face.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


identify their social class
as part of a number of
surveys, beginning as far
back as 1972. The cumula-
tive results from this sur-
vey allow comparisons in
self-reported definitions,
which, in- turn, can be
used to illustrate the sub-
jective aspects of defining
middle class as noted
above.
The cumulative NORC
survey data indicate that
3.3 percent of the popula-
tion consider themselves
to be upper class. That
would put the dividing
line between middle and
upper class just under
$200,000 in 2005. The
NORC survey indicated
that 5.3 percent of the pop-
ulation considered them-
selves to be lower class,
and 45.8 percent classified
themselves as working
class. That would put the
dividing line between
working class and middle
class at a little, over
$45,000, again assuming a
correspondence between
the survey data and the in-
come distribution.
What about Madison


County? A survey con-
ducted by Madison Media
Group Inc. revealed that
attitudes and income are
definitely bound together
in this region as well, al-
though the level between
classes was set quite dif-
ferently. Using averages
for households of two chil-
dren and both parents,
$30,000 was generally con-
sidered the dividing line
between middle and work-
ing class. (Here, too, only a
few labeled themselves as
"lower class," which is no
longer a politically correct
term.)
On the other end of
the spectrum, $80,000 was
generally considered the
dividing line between mid-
dle and upper class, al-
though many mentioned
that net worth was per-
haps a more appropriate
measure. One could have
land and assets valued in
the millions, for instance,
while living economically
off retirement and other
savings, and actually be
considered even more a
part of upper class by lo-
cal society


Make Your New Year's
Financial Resolutions
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones

If you're like many people, you've made some
New Year's resolutions. Perhaps you've vowed to go
the gym more often, or learn a new language or
reconnect with long-lost friends.' All these are worthy
goals, of course, but at the same time, you don't want
to neglect one of the most important,areas of your life
-your finances. So this year, whynot make some
financial resolutions?

Here are a few to consider:

Stay calm. As you're well aware, 2008 was not
exactly a stellar year for the stock market. What will
2009 bring? No one can say for sure, but it seems like-
ly that we are in for some volatility in the months
ahead as we slog our way through the recession. As
an investor, your best move isto staycalm and remain
focused on your long-term goals. Review your finan-
cial strategy to make sure it's still appropriate for your
risk tolerance, family situation and time horizon.
Increase your 401(k) contributions. Even
though you might not have enjoyed looking at your
401(k) statements during 2008, it's still a good idea to
boost your contributions for 2009. Why? For one thing,
you typically invest pre-tax dollars in your 401 (k), so
the more you put in, the lower your annual taxable
income. And your earnings grow on a tax-deferred
basis, which means your money can grow faster than
it would if placed in an, account on which you paid
taxes every year. Furthermore, you can adjust your
investment mix to reflect changes in your risk toler-
ance and your. proximity to retirement.
Build an emergency fund. It's a good idea to
build an emergency fund containing six to 12 months'
worth of living expenses, held in a liquid account. If
you face an unexpected expense such as a major
medical bill or a costly,car repair you don't want to
be forced into cashing out any stocks, especially if
their price happens to be down.
Diversify, diversify, diversify. In 2008, we wit-
nessed something that's unusual, though not unheard
of: a bad year for stocks and bonds. In the past, it has
more often been the case that when stocks are up,
bonds are down, and vice versa. That's why diversifi-
cation makes so much sense: By spreading your dol-
lars among an array of stocks, bonds, government
securities, certificates of deposit and other -invest-
ments, you can help reduce the impact of a downturn
that primarily affects just one type of asset. Of course,
diversification, by itself, cannot guarantee a profit or
protect against a loss, but if you aren't diversified at
all, you are inviting significant risk into your investment
portfolio.
Stick with quality. During turbulent times, quality
investments are your best bet for "weathering the
storm." If you're buying stocks, look for those compa-
nies that have long track records of profitability, strong
management teams, competitive products and solid
business plans. If you're considering bonds, find the
ones that have received the highest ratings from the
independent rating agencies.
Finally, be patient, disciplined and forward-looking.
The investment world has taken some knocks lately,
but good investment opportunities are still out there.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


Edward Jones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
Www.edwardjones.com
s^T-VmZ tomliian amf'rfe-ii ?jr..shee ^









12A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, January 7, 2009



HEALTH




Pivotal National Trial Uses Newest Interventional


Radiology Treatment To Bust Blood Clots In Legs

New Treatment May Revolutionize Care For Patients With Deep Vein Thrombosis;

$ 10 Million National Institutes Of Health Attract Study

To Determine If Drug-Device Technique Can Prevent Post-Thrombotic Syndrome


ATTRACT-the first
major national trial of a
catheter-based treatment
for deep vein thrombo-
sis-will evaluate the use
of clot-dissolving drugs in
combination with clot re-
moval devices to prevent
post-thrombotic syndrome
in patients with DVT (the
formation of a blood clot
in a leg vein).
PTS, a common irre-
versible complication of
DVT, causes permanent
damage to the veins, re-
sulting in debilitating
chronic leg pain, swelling,
fatigue and/or skin ulcers.
About 25-50 percent of
DVT patients develop PTS
when treated with blood
thinners alone.
While early treatment
with blood thinners is im-
portant to prevent a life-
threatening pulmonary
embolism, blood thinners

'~~~ wTfiw


alone do not dissolve the
existing clot, which re-
mains in the leg. Prelimi-
nary studies have shown
that interventional clot-
busting treatments can-
unlike standard DVT ther-
apy-remove clots and
have strong potential to
prevent PTS.
The outcomes of this
pivotal multicenter trial-
to'be funded at more than
$10 million by the Nation-
al Institutes of Health's
National Heart, Lung and
Blood Institute (NHLBI)-
are likely to change the
way DVT is treated in the
U.S.
"The ATTRACT trial
could fundamentally shift
the 50-year-old DVT treat-
ment paradigm to one that
includes interventional
clot removal as an essen-
tial element of standard
DVT care," said interven-


tional radiologist Suresh
Vedantham, M.D., who
will lead the trial. "By
funding this study, the
NHLBI has clearly recog-
nized the strong potential
of interventional radiolo-
gy clot removal treat-
ments for DVT to improve
public health," added the
associate profes-
sor at the Washing-
ton University Dee
School of Medi- of 1
cine's Mallinck-
rodt Institute of
Radiology in St.
Louis, Mo.
ATTRACT
(Acute Venous
Thrombosis:
Thrombus Re-
moval With Ad-
junctive Catheter-
Directed Throm-
bolysis) is a multi-
center, random-
ized trial "that will
definitively deter-
mine if the newest clot-
busting treatment (phar-
macomechanical catheter-
directed thrombolysis or
PCDT) prevents post-
thrombotic syndrome in
patients with DVT," said
Vedantham.
PCDT combines the
use of a clot-dissolving
drug with a catheter-
mounted miniature clot
removal device, allowing
an interventional radiolo-
gist to break up the clot
and remove it from the
vein, restoring blood flow.
"PTS is a serious com-
plication of DVT that is
under recognized and po-
tentially preventable if we
are able to dissolve the
clots early, before perma-
nent damage to the vein
occurs," Vedantham not-
ed. "Established PTS is a
lifelong, irreversible con-
dition for which there are
no consistently effective
treatments. Its prevention


is extremely important;
however, physicians have
historically neglected the
prevention of PTS," said
Vedantham. "The ground-
breaking combination of
clot-busting drugs with in-
novative device technolo-
gy-pioneered by inter-
ventional radiologists-


Normal
Blood Flow


ep Veins
the Leg


now enables clot removal
in a safer and more effi-
cient manner, often in a
single procedure session.
These advances will great-
ly increase the use of in-
terventional DVT treat-
ments," added Vedantham.
"This research is criti-
cal. The Society of Inter-
ventional.Radiology Foun-
dation initiated a DVT re-
search consensus panel
four years ago, bringing to-
gether clinicians and sci-
entists from all disciplines
and from all settings-
academia, private prac-
tice, government and in-
dustry-and determining
the need for the ATTRACT
trial," said Michael Darcy,
M.D., chair of the board of
directors for the Society of
Interventional Radiology
(SIR) Foundation, a scien-
tific foundation dedicated
to fostering research and
education in intervention-
al radiology The SIR Foun-


dation has been a critical
partner in developing the
ATTRACT trial, helping to
coordinate the site selec-
tion process and partner-
ing with the ATTRACT re-
search team to conduct the
trial, said Vedantham.
DVT is the formation
of a blood clot, known as a
Deep Vein Embi
Thrombosis















thrombus, in a deep leg
vein. This can be a very se-
rious condition that often
causes permanent damage
to the leg, known as post-
thrombotic syndrome.
Early treatment with
blood ,thinners is impor-
tant to prevent a life-
threatening pulmonary
embolism, but blood thin-,
ners do not dissolve the ex-
isting clot, which remains
in the leg.
While many patients'
clots will slowly dissolve
over time, often the vein
wall and vein valves be-
come irreversibly dam-
aged in the process. "PTS
develops as a direct result
of having the blood clot
stay in the vein. The blood
clot continues to block the
vein and permanently
damages its one-way
valves, resulting in the
pooling of blood in the leg,
chronic leg pain, swelling
and fatigue and sometimes


skin ulcers. It's logical
that immediate clot re-
moval will prevent PTS,"
said Vedantham.
The ATTRACT trial-
the first NIH-funded mul-
ticenter, randomized trial
of any interventional DVT
therapy-will begin later
this year. The trial will as-
sess the presence
01us and severity of
PTS, quality of
life, relief of pain
and swelling, safe-
ty and costs. At
least 28 U.S. clini-
cal centers will en-
roll 692 patients
and monitor their
health for two
years, said Vedan-
tham, who is chair
of the DVT Re-
search Committee
of SIR's Venous Fo-
rum and vice chair
of the Venous Dis-
ease Coalition. The
Society of Interventional
Radiology is a member of
the Venous Disease Coali-
tion.
SIR Foundation is a
scientific foundation dedi-
cated to fostering research
and education in interven-
tional radiology for the
purposes of advancing sci-
entific knowledge, in-
creasing the number of
skilled investigators in in-
terventional radiology
and developing innovative
therapies that lead to im-
proved patient care and
quality of life.
Interventional radiolo-
gists are vascular experts
who invented angioplasty
and the catheter-delivered
stent, which were first
used in the legs to treat pe-
ripheral arterial disease.
They provide vascular dig-
ease management and spe-
cialize in minimally inva-
sive treatments. Visit
www.SIRfoundation.org.


FINDING .l


hysici_ an


1 UNINSURED??

We have a sliding-fee program for
those who qualify at
Tri-County Family Health Care
Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician
You may save $ on.your prescriptions
from us, when filled at Jackson's Drugs

Please call 850-948-2840
for more information

TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.








Wednesday, January 7, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 13A



HEALTH




6(s4 Oow-TF4-c3md6. cuy44d&~wti~f c$S~


On Oct. 8, 2008, the
Food and Drug Adminis-
tration (FDA) released a
statement that supports
recent voluntary actions
by many drug manufac-
turers regarding the use of
nonprescription, over-the-
counter (OTC) cough and
cold products in children.
The voluntary actions
announced by the Con-
sumer Healthcare Prod-
ucts Association (CHPA)
are intended to help pre-


Curves of Madison is
rolling out the red carpet
to members of the award-
winning Healthways Sil-
verSneakers Fitness Pro-
gram, the nation's leading
exercise program de-.
signed for older adults. As
of Jan. 1, SilverSneakers


vent. and reduce the mis-
use of these products in
children and to better in-.
form consumers about
their safe and effective
use. CHPA represents
most of the manufactur-
ers of these products.
Members of CHPA
have volunteered to modi-
fy the: product labels of
OTC cough and cold medi-
cines to state "do not use"
in children under 4 years
of age. (Many of the prod-


members are eligible to
join Curves of Madison at
no cost.
"We are so pleased to
welcome local Silver-
Sneakers members to'
Curves of Madison," said
club owner Judi Wyche.
'As you age, your risks for


ucts currently state "do
not use" in children under
2 years of age.) Additional-
ly, the manufacturers are
introducing new child-re-
sistant packaging and new
measuring devices for use
with the products.
CHPA's voluntary ac-
tions will not affect the
availability of the medi-
cines, but will result in a
transition period where
the instructions for using
some OTC cough and cold


Curves Of Madison Rolls


debilitating disease in-
crease, and being over-
weight or obese signifi-*
cantly adds to that risk. At
Curves of Madison, we
have programs that help
women of all ages do the
three most significant
things they can do to de-


Photo Submitted
Healthways SilverSneakers Fitness Program member Ann Paquette demonstrates
the glute machine at Curves of Madison. All SilverSneakers members are able to join
Curves of Madison for free.
V '1


workout that really works.

At Curves, our 30-minute circuit works every major muscle group
and you can burn up to, 500 calories. All with a trainer to teach
and motivate.


FREE
Weight Loss &
Health Awareness Clin-
icsis providing therapists to ad-
minister weight loss and stop
smoking, group hypnotic
therapy.
For many people, this
therapy reduces 2 to 3 clothing
sizes and/or stops smoking.
Funding for this project
comes from public donations.
Anyone who wants treatment
will receive professional hyp-
notherapy free from charge.


This notice paid for with public donations


to the public!
k Stop Smoking Hypnotherapy
An appointment is not nec-
essary. Sign in and immediately Mon. Jan 12, 7:30pm
receive trmnentL Yogi Bear Jellystone Park
Health Awareness Clin- 1051 Old St. Augustine Rd
Health Awareness Clin-
ics is a non-profit organiza- MADISON, FL
tion. They rely on donations
to make treatment available to Tues. Jan. 13, 7:30pm
those in need. A modest Live Oak Garden Club
those in need. A modest 1300 11th St.S.W
$5.00 donation when signing LIVE OAK, FL
in is appreciated.
Only one 2 hour session is
needed for desirable results. HealthAwarenessClinics.or
Sitn in 30 min. early 231-288-5941


y









g


medicines in children will
be- different from others.
Some product instructions
will state "do not use" in
children under 4 years of
age, while others will in-
struct not to use in chil-
dren under 2 years of age.
FDA does not typically
request that OTC products
with previous labeling be
removed from the shelves
during a voluntary label
change such as this one.
The agency recommends

Out Red


crease their risks-man-
age their weight, exercise
regularly and eat health-
fully"
Ann Paquette is one of
Curves' Silversneaker
members. Paquette loves
the loving, positive and
supportive atmosphere
she finds at Curves.
"Everyone is so friendly,
here," she beams. "I am so
thankful for Curves. I en-
joy meeting new people
and exercising with other
women. It is like being
part of a family I highly
recommend Curves to all
the ladies in our commu-
nity who would like to be-
come healthier. Curves is
perfect for fulfilling the
need to exercise regularly.
It takes just 30 minutes
three times a week to see
amazing benefits. I feel so
much stronger, and my
stamina is just amazing. I
love this program."
Curves works every
major muscle group with a
complete 30-minute work-
out that combines
strength training and sus-
tained cardiovascular ac-
tivity through safe and ef-
fective hydraulic resis-
tance: Curves also works
to help women lose weight,
gain muscle strength and
aerobic capacity, and raise
metabolism with its
groundbreaking, scientifi-
cally proven method that
ends the need for perpetu-
al dieting.
Curves founders Gary
and Diane Heavin are con-
sidered the innovators of
the express fitness phe-
nomenon that has made
exercise available to
around 4 million women
globally, many of whom
are in the gym for the first
time. With nearly 10,000 lo-
cations worldwide, Curves
is the world's largest fit-
ness franchise. Visit
www.curves.com for more
information.
The SilverSneakers
Fitness Program is a prod-
uct of Healthways Inc.
Healthways is the leading
provider of specialized,
comprehensive Health and
Care Support solutions to
help millions of people
maintain or improve their
health and, as a result, re-
duce overall healthcare
costs. For more informa-
tion regarding the Health-
ways SilverSneakers Fit-
ness Program, visit
www.silversneakers.com or
call 1-800-295-4993.
There are 6,500 Curves
locations and more than
2.5 million women in the
U.S. who are eligible for
the SilverSneakers pro-
gram.
For more information
about Curves of Madison,
please contact Judi Wyche
at 973-4700.


following the dosage in-
structions and warnings
on the label that accompa-
nies the medication if you
have or buy a product that
does not have the volun-
tarily modified labeling.
Recent FDA Actions
FDA has held two pub-
lic meetings over the past
year on the safe use of
nonprescription OTC
cough and cold medicines
in children. The most re-
cent meeting on Oct. 2,
2008, focused on labeling of
these products.
FDA issued a nation-
wide Public Health Advi-
sory in January 2008 rec-


ommending that these
products not be used in
children under the age of
2 because of the risk of se-
rious and potentially life-
threatening side effects.
FDA continues to
reach out to other public
health agencies, consumer
and patient groups, drug
manufacturers, CHPA,
and the scientific commu-
nity As it obtains more up-
to-date information and
scientific data about the
safety and effectiveness of
these products in.children,
FDA can take the appro-
priate regulatory steps
moving forward.


OTC Tips for Parents and Caregivers
* Do not give children medications labeled only for adults.
* Talk to your health care professional, such as your doctor or
pharmacist, if you have any questions about using cough or
cold medicines in children.
* Choose OTC cough and cold medicines with child-resistant
safety caps, when available. After each use, make sure to
close the cap tightly and store the medicines out of the sight
and reach of children. ,
* Check the "active ingredients" section of the "Drug Facts" la-
bel of the medicines that you choose. This section will help
you understand what symptoms the active ingredients in the
medicine are intended to treat. Cough and cold medicines of-
ten have more than one active ingredient, such as an antihis-
tamine, a decongestant, a cough suppressant, an expecto-
rant or a pain reliever and, fever reducer.
* Be very careful if you are giving more.than one medicine to a
child. Make sure the medicines do not have the same type of
active ingredients. For example, do not give a child more than
one medicine that has a decongestant. If you use two medi-
cines that have the same or similar active ingredients, your
child could be harmed by getting too much of an ingredient.
* Carefully follow the directions for how to use the medicine in
the "Drug Facts" part of the label. These directions tell you
how much medicine to give and how often you can give it. If
you have question about how to use the medicine, ask your
pharmacist or other health care professional. Overuse or
misuse of these products can lead to serious and potentially
life-threatening-side effects, such asrapid heartbeat, drowsi-
ness, breathing problems and seizures.
* Only use measuring devices that come with the medicine ori
those specially made for measuring drugs. Do not use',
household spoons to measure medicines for children be-
cause household spoons come in different sizes and are not
meant for measuring Medicines.
* Understand that using OTC cough and cold medicines does not
cure-the cold or cough. These medicines only treat your child's
symptoms, such as runny nose, congestion, fever and aches.
-They do not shorten the length of time your child is sick.


Question: Can't I
rinse so I don't have to
rinse just as good?,


just use that mouth
use floss? Isn't the


Answer: This is the time of year for New
Years resolutions. The best dental resolution
is to add daily flossing to your routine. The
growing body of evidence tells us that
flossing not only makes your teeth -healthier it
may make you healthier overall and add
years to your life.
According to Michael Roizen, MD, author of
The Real Age Makeover, daily flossing, which
prevents gum disease, makes the average
person 3.4 years younger. "Men under 50
who have advanced periodontal disease are
2.6 times more likely to die prematurely and
three times more likely to die from heart
disease than those that have healthy gums."
So especially if you have a family history of
heart trouble you should be using floss and
have your mouth examined to determine if
you have gum disease.

Don't make the mistake of only flossing the
front teeth. Remember, you only need to
floss the teeth you want to keep.

Roderick K Shaw III, DMD
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmail.com
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of
Dentistry


Carpet To Silversneakers Members

Local fitness club welcomes Healthways

SilverSneakers members at no cost







14A Madison County Carrier


www. reeneoDublishtine.com


Wednesday, January 7, 2009


Greenville Pointe

Apartments !

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC
accessible apts. Rental assistance
may be available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-3056.
TDD/TTY 711.192 NW
Greenville Pointe Trail,
Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity


C^ outhem Villas of

O a 0dison apartments

Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR HC &
non-HC accessible apts. Call
850-973-8582, TDD/TTy 711.
315 SW Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. IBR ($409.)
2BR ($435.) Subsidy available
at times. HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd, Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider
and Employer


CHERRY LAK
Newly remodeled 3 B]
Cherry Lake Home. Th
Cypress home has nem
with stainless steel ap
new wood floors and
rooms. Has a garage ai
cottage on this 8/10 ol
lot. $144,800. 850-9
Bring offers



V Vf


CE
R 2 Bath
uis 1800 s/f


FOR SALE / OWNER
FINANCING
ALL LAND BELOW IS HIGH
AND DRY

5 acres Lee, North of Hwy 6,
Cayenne Rd., rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995
$5,000 down, $325/mo

10 acres Beulah Meadows Rd,
DWMH and houses allowed,
$49,500,, $5,000 down
$459/mo

10 acres Old Blue Springs Rd.
access, DWMH and houses al-
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down,
$459/mo

25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)

Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
RTN


w kitchen HOME ONLY LOANS
pliances, No mortgage on your land. Put
new bath Home on your land,
nd a small family land, state land or rental
an ace lot. Singlewides start at $350.00
)29-49.91
month and
12/10-1/9 Doublewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
CINDY 386-365-5370


Registered Nurse/Case
SManager
Full-time RN position for Jefferson
Big Bend County. Current Florida License
Hospice required, plus 2-3 years med-
yoh ..tow .hospi e, i .ensedsc 1983 surgery experience preferred.
Licensed Practical Nurse PRN
PRN nurse needed for Jefferson/Madison/Taylor. Must
have current Florida license.
Great benefit package!
Interested candidates can apply in person at 801 SW Smith
Street, Madison, FL 32340 or fax resume to: 850 325-6290
or email resume to elba@bigbendhospice.org
EOE/DFWP/ADA
Smoke Free Workplace


HOME BUYERS.. GUARAN-
TEED FINANCING THRU
B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044
WE PAY CASH..... FOR YOUR
USED MOBILE HOMES 1980
OR NEWER. LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129
FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY AND
LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE ZONED
COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT


FIRST TIME HOME BUYER
$7,500.00 CASH IN YOUR
POCKET CALL DAVID FOR
DETAILS 386-719-0044
MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00 CALL 386-288-4560

LOW CREDIT SCORES???
I MAY BE ABLE TO HELP
YOU BUY A HOME.
386-288-4560

NEW 4 BEDROOM 2 BATH
READY TO MOVE IN. CALL
386-288-4560


Madison Heights Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed for
low income families
150 SW Burngardner Dr.
Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833 ext. 485
House for Rent in Greenville, FL
(located near elementary school).
All Electric, Newly remodeled 3
bedrooms, 1 bath $600/mo. 1st &
security deposit. Housing Choice
Vouchers Accepted Call
850-973-7349 or 617-4 37-1905
....,. ... I, .... ..... :,, ccRT N
HOME FOR RENT
Restored 3 BR Home, CH & Air.
Oak floors; large storage,
1335 Sq Ft Yard Maint. included.
Adult family only, no pets, $800
rent and deposit. Credit check.
432 NE Horry Ave. Madison.
Call George 973-8583, 557-0994

DOWNTOWN APARTMENT
FOR RENT, NEWLY
RENOVATED 1BR, 1 BATH
$450.00 MO.
567-1523

12/19-RTN

Private, quite, furnished, one BR
Mobile home for one person.
Direct TV, near town, $395.00
plus Electricity
85Q.-973-4030
rtn cc

For Rent:
4 Bedroom 2 Bath house with a
built in office, beautifully remod-
eled tile & wood floors with car-
pet in 4 bedrooms. Fireplace,
large shaded yard, large front
porch, all electric. Lee School
disti-ict. Off HWY 6 near Blue
Springs, 1 year lease, References
required. $700 a month.
$700 Security Deposit
423-538-120.6 or 423-845-0590
RTN

4 BR Doublewide Mobile Home
in Lee. $550.00 month, plus
deposit. 973-2353
rtn
2 BR 1 bath Singlewide Mobile
Home in Cherry Lake Area.
$350.00 month, plus deposit
973-2353
rtn
2 BR, 1 Bath House
313 S.W. Jackson Ave.
$475. plus Securtiy deposit
973-3917
1/7-1/9
Haywood Realty
352-369-0900
FOR SALE
30 Acres with septic and (2) 4"
wlIls Fenced and Cross Fenced
also with Pond. Approx 25 acres
in posture with bahaya grass
and a beautiful 5 acre homsite
with canopy entrance to
property. Excellent location just
5 miles north of Madison on
Rocky Ford Road. Asking
$8,000.00 per acre. Call
Associate Pamela Hood
850-673-6409
10/8-RTN


Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage
Corner lots.
Fronts both Harvey Greene Dr.
and Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line,
8 inch water main,
access to city utilities,
fire hydrant, and service from
two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or.long.term lease.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141





Downtown Office/ Retail space
for rent. 700 to 1,400 Sql ft.
567-1523
10/22-RTN

FOR RENT
Office Building across street
from Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex./
(Old Enterprise Recorder
Office); 111 SE Shelby St.
Madison
Newly renovated back to the
1920's era Call 973-4141




BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004.
IF NO ANSWER, PLEASE
LEAVE NAME, TELEPHONE
NUMBER AND INFORMATION
ABOUT THE MILL.



FOR SALE: 1987 Ford Bronco.
Super hot engine! 58k original
miles. Auto trans. Differentials
don't leak. Only rolled over once
but never "mud bogged". Upper
body has no glass but engine and
running gear awesome! Now
painted camo $500. 850-464-1165



I build decks, sheds, exterior
carpentry work
Call 850-242-9342
ask for Bob




BUSY MEDICAL OFFICE
LPN/EMT/CNA
FULL TIME POSITION
CALL BEVERLY AT
973-4590
FAX RESUME TO 973-4929
1/7-1/9


ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00
P&I per mo, Doublewide your
land $422.00 P&I per mo. Sin-
glewide & $30,000.00 for land
$520.00 P&I per mo. or Dou-
blewide with $30,000.00 for land
$602.00 P&I per mo. Our land
your land or buy land. I special-
ize in credit challenged cus-
tomers. Applications over the
phone, credit decision next busi-
ness day. Let me help make your
new home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
Cindy 386-365-5370
BEST CASH DEALS ON
MOBILE HOMES. NO ONE
BEATS MY PRICES
386-719-0044
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/2
BATH EXCELLENT SHAPE
NEED CHAS, PRICED TO
SELL CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
MODULAR HOME FOR SALE
IN TOWN SAVE $20,000.00
TURN KEY DEAL OWNER
SAYS MAKE AN OFFER IT
MUST GO CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
BRAND SPANKING NEW 2009
5 BEDROOM 3 BATH 2004 Sq
Ft $594.31 PER MO. SELLER
PAYS $3,500 TOWARD
CLOSING COST CALL MIKE
386-623-4218
PRICE REDUCED! SPACIOUS
MFG HOME WITH 4 BED-
ROOMS, 3 BATH, BONUS
ROOM WITH LOTS OF WIN-
'DOWS. DISCONTINUED
FLOORPLAN. FOR MORE
INFO CALL SARAH
386-288-0964
BECOME A HOMEOWNER
FOR THE SAME MONTHLY
PAYMENTS YOU ARE
THROWING AWAY ON RENT.
CALL SARAH FOR MORE '
INFO 386-288-0964
NEED MORE SPACE FOR A
GROWING FAMILY? 2001, 5
BEDROOM, 4 BATH TRADE-
IN. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
FOR MORE INFO CALL
SARAH 386-288-0964



FOR SALE
4 SEATER HOT TUB
BLUE MARBLE DESIGN
$500. CASH ONLY
ABSOLUTE FIRM
CALL 850-973-4141






Step #1:

Get Your GED
FREE Prep Classes
Day or Night
Flexible Schedule



973-9440
NORTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE


. HINT#11


Packing material



for moving











Wednesday, January 7, 2009 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 15A





LEGALS


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

CASE NO. 2008CA0003140001XX
OLD BLUE SPRINGS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability
Company,

Plaintiff,
vs.

IGNACIO PAINE and LAZARA E. GARCIA-TUNON; et

al,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: IGNACIO PAINE, Defendant, unknown tenants; and other unknown parties in
possession, including the unknown spouse of any person in possession of the property,
and if a named Defendant is deceased, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that Defendant,
and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is
unknown, claiming under any of the named or described Defendants.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described
property in Madison County, Florida, to-wit:

Lot 10 of Block A of River Trace Subdivision. A subdivision according to the plat there-
of filed at Plat Book 2, Pages 28 through 3 0 of the Public Records of Madison County,
Florida.

Subject to any outstanding mineral rights of record.

Together with all the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereto belonging or
in anywise appertaining.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on Plaintiffs attorney and counsel of record, ROSE M. DECKER, JR., Es-
quire of The Decker Law Firm, PA., 320 White Avenue, Post Office Drawer 1288, Live
Oak, Florida 32064, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Ac-
tion, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, Honorable TIM SANDERS, whose
address is Madison County Courthouse, Post Office Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341, ei-
ther before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If you fail to an-
swer, defend or otherwise plead to this action to foreclose a mortgage, a Default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This Notice of Action is
.executed and published pursuant to the provisions of 49.08, et seq., Florida Statutes.

DATE: December 23,2008.


HONORABLE TIM SANDERS
Clerk of the Court
Madison County, Florida

Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk


12/31/08 and 01/07/09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
IM RE: ESTATE OF" PROBATE DIVISION
JAMES LAWRENCE GRAY JR.,
Deceased.
File Number 2008-124-CP
Division
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(One PR)
The administration of deceased, File Number 2008-124-CPis pending in the Cir-
cuit Court, for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is:
Post Office Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341.
The name and address of the Personal Representative and the Personal Represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT;
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the
date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
'COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons'having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL
CLAIMS, DEMANDS AMD OBJECTIONS MOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. The date of the first Publication of this notice is December 31, 2008.

12/31/08 and 01/07/09


DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

Proposed Base Flood Elevation Determinations for the Town of Lee and the
Unincorporated Areas of Madison County, Florida

The Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management
Agency has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Study (FIS) and Flood Insurance Rate
Map (FIRM) reflecting new or modified Base (1% annual chance) Flood Elevations
(BFEs) within the Town of Lee and the Unincorporated Areas of Madison County. Tech-
nical information or comments are solicited on the proposed and proposed modified
BFEs shown op the preliminary FIS and FIRM for the aforementioned communities.
These BFEs and modified BFEs are the basis for the floodplain management mea-
sures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of having in ef-
fect in order to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National.Flood In-
surance Program. However, before the BFEs or modified BFEs are effective for flood-
plain management purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed
elevations. For information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, as well
'as a detailed listing of the proposed and proposed modified BFEs and the addresses
where copies of the FIRM are available for review, please visit our website at
Ihttp://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Assistance Center
toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627).

01/07/09 and 01/14/09



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,

IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA,


IVY FINANCIAL CORPORATION,
a Florida Corporation,

Plaintiff,

vs.

NORMAN BALDIE; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT
NO. 2; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY. THROUGH,,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION


CASE NO:08-624-CA


To: All Above Named Unknown Defendants, including Unknown Tenant .it
No. 1 and Unknown Tenant No. 2,
Addresses Unknown

YOU, ALL ABOVE NAMED UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS, INCLUDING
UNKNOWN TENANT NO, 1 AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, ARE NOTIFIED
that aii action seeking foreclosure and other relief on the following properties in Madi-
son
County, Florida:

3 and Lot 74, NORTON CREEK SUBDIVISION, according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 31 through 33 inclusive, of the
Public Records of Madison County, Florida.,

has been filed against you, and each of you, are required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Scot B. Copeland, the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 174
East Base Street, Madison, Florida 32340 on or before February 7, 2009, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.

Dated this 5 day of January, 2009.

TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

01/07/09 and 01/14/09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FORUK MADIUiON C UUN 1T,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION


IN RE: ESTATE OF

ALBERTA HAYNES JOHNSON
Deceased.

File No. 2008-127-CP
Division FR-A

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Alberta Haynes Johnson, deceased, whose date of
death was November 29, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P.O. Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341.
The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representa-
tives' attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to le served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE W SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate roust file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of this notice is January 7, 2009.

01/07/09 and 01/14/09

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

IM RE: ESTATE OF
PROBATE DIVISION
JAMES LAWRENCE GRAY JR.,
Deceased.
File Number 2008-124-CP
Division
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(One PR)
The administration of deceased, File Number 2008-124-CP,is pending in the Cir-
'cult Court, for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is:
Post Office Box 237, Madison, Florida.32341.
The name and address of the Personal Representative and the Personal Represen-
tative's*attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT;
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the
date of the first publication of this notice must file their, claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. .
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL
CLAIMS, DEMANDS AMD OBJECTIONS MOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. The date of the first Publication of this notice is December 31,2008.

01107/09 '. . ..... .


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY. FLORIDA


IVY FINANCIAL CORPORATION,
a Florida Corporation.


CASE NO: 08-623-CA


Plaintiff,



ROSE DORSAINVIL; UNKNOWN . '.
TENANT-NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT
NO. 2; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

To: All Above Named Unknown Defendants, including Unknown Tenant
No. I and Unknown Tenant No. 2,
Addresses Unknown

YOU, ALL ABOVE NAMED UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS, INCLUDING
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1 AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, ARE NOTIFIED
that an action seeking foreclosure and other relief on the following property in Madison
County, Florida:
Lot 28, NORTON CREEK SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 31 through 33 inclusive, of the Public
Records of Madison County, Florida. has been filed against you, and each of you, are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Scot B. Copeland, the
plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 174 East Base Street, Madison, Florida 32340 on or
before February 7, 2009, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before
service on the plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.

Dated this. 5 day of January, 2009.

TIM SANDERS
As Clerk Of The Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk


01/07/09 and 01/14/09

sia mwm m mmmmmMmii aaB ^nMHmm mm emar manan^^


IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAM HINTON SALE


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 2008-CP-128
Deceased.


NOTICE OF ApMINISTRATION

The administration of the estate of SAM HINTON SALE, deceased, File Number
2008-CP-128, is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida 32340.
The name and address of the personal representative is set forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the
validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue or jurisdic-
tion of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE,
LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months
after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.

The date of the first publication of this Notice is the 7th day of January, 2009.


JAMES HINTON SALE
Personal Representative


THOMAS E. STONE
Attorney for Personal Representative
P.O. Box 292

Madison, Florida 32341
Telephone: 850-973-6560
Attorney at Law-Fla. Bar No. 212490


01/07/09 and 01/14/09
neaw~ass@ssmammuasmwa^mi^^^aamammmmmmaarmsuawmmawamm


IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

THOMAS J. BEGGS, IV

CASE NO: 08-621-CA

Plaintiff,

vs.

BEVERLEY GEORGE-JORDAN; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH. UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED,


NOTICE OF ACTION

To: All Above Named Unknown Defendants, including Unknown Tenant
No. I and Unknown Tenant No. 2.
Addresses Unknown

YOU, ALL ABOVE NAMED UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS, INCLUDING
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1 AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, ARE NOTIFIED
that an action seeking foreclosure and other relief on the following property in Madison
County, Florida, as shown in the legal descriptions attached hereto as Composite Exhib-
it
"A" has been filed against you, and each of you. are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Scot B. Copeland,.the plaintiffs attorney, whose address
is 174 East Base Street, Madison, Florida 32340 on or before February 7, 2009, and file
the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.

Dated this 5 day of January, 2009.

TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

Composite Exhibit A


DESCRIPTION:


Oak Hills 19


Part of: 15-2n-10-5965


A portion of section 15, Township 2 north, Range 10 East, being more particularly de-
scribed as follows:
Commence at a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of said section 15;
thence south 00"09'21" West along the east line of said Section 15 a distance of 1321.10
feet to a concrete monument marking the northeast corner of the south half (s /2) of the
Northeast Quarter (NE /) of said section 15; thence continue south 00-09'21" West
along said east line and along the east line of the North half (N 1/2) of the southeast Quar-
ter (SE 1) of said section 15 a distance of 2642.19 feet to a concrete monument marldng
the southeast corner of said N of SE V4; thence north 89-56'14" West along the south
line of said N /i of SE V1 a distance of 1194.15 feet to the southeast corner and POINT
OF BEGINNING of the following described parcel; thence continue north 89-56'14"
West along said south line a distance of 397.24 feet; thence north 00-15'42" East a dis-
tance of 1320.41 feet to the centerline of a 60 foot easement; thence south 89-44'18" East
along said centerline a distance of 397.24 feet; thence south 00-15'42" West a distance of
1319.03 fiet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
,Containing 12.03 acres, more or less.
TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO a 60 foot easement for ingress and egress as
recorded in O.R. Book 673, page 140 of the public records of Madison County, Florida.
Said lands situate, lying and being in Madison County, Florida.
Subject to ARTICLES OF THE ASSOCIATION OF THE OAK HILLS PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION RESTRICTIONS AND PROTECTIVE COVENANTS for
OAK HILLS as more particularly described in OR Book 705 page 96 through 706 and
OR Book 705 page 94 of the public records of Madison County, Florida.
Also subject to that easement for utilities granted to TriCounty Electric Corporation and
recorded in OR Book 708 Page 199 to 203 of the public records of Madison County,
Florida.
ALSO SUBJECT TO existing county graded road rights-of-way.
ALSO SUBJECT TO a 10 foot wide easement for utilities along the east and west line of
the above described parcel.
Said lands situate, lying and being in Madison County, Florida.
Said property is not the homestead of the Grantor(s) under the laws and constitution of
the State. of Florida .in:that neither Grantor(s) briany members of the household of
Grantor(s) reside thereon .

Filed for Record in
MADISON
TIM SANDERS
09-30-2004 at 2:31 p.m.
MORTGAGE 230.25
OR Volume 730 Page 292-293


DESCRIPTION: LEE FARMS C ID NUMBER: 31-1N-6227-OOC-000
A portion of Section 31; Township 1 North, Range 11 East, being more particularly de-
scribed as follows:

Commence at a rebar marking the southwest corner of said section 31; thence south 89-
55'28" East along the south line of said section 31 a distance of 1325.23 feet to a concrete
monument; thence south 89-55'47" East a distance of 530.77 feet to the southwest cor-
ner and POINT OF BEGINNING of the following described parcel; thence continue
NORTH 00-17'20" East a distance of 265.30 feet; thence south 89-59'21" East a distance
of 886.03 feet to the east line of the south Half (s ) of the Southwest quarter (SW /) of
said section 31; thence south 00-26'25" West along said east line a distance of 265.31 feet;
thence North 89-59'21" West a distance of 85.33 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 5-39 acres, more or less. Building exception: 03-08-b
SUBJECT TO existing county road rights-of-way along the easterly line of the above-de-
scribed parcel.
ALSO SUBJECT TO those easements for utilities as more particularly described in the
official records for Madison County Florida OR book 690 Pages 215 through 219.
AND ALSO SUBJECT TO those restrictions and protective covenants as more particu-
larly described in OR Book 685 pages 194 through 197.

Said lands situate, lying and being in Madison County, Florida.
Said property is not the homestead of the Grantor(s) under the laws and constitution of
the State of Florida in that neither Grantor(s) or any members of the household of
Grantor(s) reside thereon.

01/07/09 and 01/14/09


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Wednesday, January 7, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


The Business Card Directory


Full Service Internet Provider Computer Repair
Wide Area Networking
(850) 973-8855
883 Hwy. 90 West Madison, FL
between Pizza Hut & Brenda's Styles


.Live Oak

Pest Control Inc.
17856 Hwy 129 S. McAlpin, FL 32062
Roy r,(386) 623887 Sales Resentatie 1 1


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16A Madison County Carrier




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