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Madison County carrier
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00139
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Portion of title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla
Creation Date: December 3, 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID: UF00067855:00139

Full Text




INSIDE TODA


Central School

Celebrates

National

Reading Week
SeePage6A


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un versity OT Foriida Library
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Gai-fneIvilfe FL '32"C5,11 1


Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


Bring Your Bargains To The


Fort Madison Storage Yard Sale


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing. Inc.
This Saturday Decem-
ber 6, starting at 8 a.m..
,Fort Madison Storage will
be sponsoring a yard sale
and everyone is invited, in-
cluding sellers. In fact,
sellers will be allowed to
set up their own tables at
no charge, joining those


bargain hunters that are
already scheduled to at-
tend.
In these tight times
with everyone looking to
stretch a dollar, this will be
a great opportunity to buy
what you need and sell
what you don't.
Fort Madison. Storage
is located just north of


State Road 53 South just be-
fore Harvey Greene Drive,
across the street from
Greene Publishing. There
is plenty of space and great
parking. For further infor-
mation, call Latrelle Pal-
hoff at (850) 973-4141.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at mnichael a re-
enepublishing.com.


"Company has no plans for additional layot.fs or plant closings, saia tray hAtinson.
Director of Corporate Communications for Pilgrim's Pride.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publisling.,Inc.
According to reports
.published Monday, Decem-
ber 1, Pilgrhim's Pride, the
nation's largest poultry
producer, filed for Chapter
11 bankruptcy-court pro-
tection.
Industry experts point
out that the company was
simply overwhelmed by
the combination of high
feed prices, lower 'prices,
for chicken, and weakened
demand both domestically
and abroad.
Pilgrim's Pride's filing_
wasn't a surprise, but
there was hope last week
that it could be avoided.
There has been a lot of


anxiety since thd company
announced it would post a
significant loss in its fiscal
fourth quarter. .
The company said it
would operate as usual
while it restructures,
which was welcomed news
by the 1300 workers at the
Suwannee County facili-
ties, although it may con-
sider cutting production
due to market conditions.
Ray Atkinson, director of
corporate communica-
tions for Pilgrim's Pride,
said the company has no
plans for additional layoffs
or plant closings.
"We are not going out
of business, and we expect
it to be business as usual,"


Atkinson acknowledged in
a press email Monday. :"By-
filing for Chapter 11, we
will be able" to gain imme-
diate liquidity in order to
accelerate planned imn-
provements in operations
and merchandising while
continuing to run our op-
erations in the ordinary
course and focusing on im -
proving the cost structure
of our business."
The economics facing
the -industry have been
brutal. Corn prices, for in-
stance, were more than
triple their five-year aver-
age in June. Meanwhile,
wholesale chicken prices
Please See Pilgrim's
Pride, page 2A


Jordan Carroll raises his arms in victory as the Cowboys defeat Pensacola
Catholic 35-28 on Thanksgiving weekend. The Cowboys will play Bolles Friday night,
December 5, at 7:30 p.m. at Boot Hill. For full game story, see page 10A.
Go, Cowboys!


Woman

Arrested

For Filing

False Report
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A woman was arrested
for filing a false police re-
port and perjury on.Tues-
day, November 25.
According to a Madi-
son Police Department re-
port, Sgt. Nathan Curtis
witnessed Tarshell Marie
Davis;. 31, of Madison, ad-
mit in court in the judge's
chamber's that two years
earlier, she gave a false re-
port to William Greene,
who was then a sergeant
with the MPD.
On September 15, 2006,
Davis filed a report against
a man, whom she accused
.of battery
Davis admitted in the
judge's chambers on No-
vember 25 that she gave
the false report because
she was mad at the man.
and wanted to get him in
trouble. ,.


Madison Trooper


Seizes Dodge Charger


By JacoD Bemory
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Sgt. Stewart Smith, a
Florida Highway Patrol of-
ficer from Madison, ar-
rested, a Lakeland man on
Thanksgiving day, and
seized the man's 2007
Dodge Charger SRT-8.
According to a Florida
Highway Patrol report,
Sgt. Stewart Smith. of"
Madison, was working
traffic on Interstate 10
when he clocked the car
doing 92 at the 229-mile
post. Smith made a U-turn
to follow the car.
"After I made the U-
turn, I didn't see him any-
more,"' Smith told this re-
porter. "There have only
been four or five *times
during my career with the
highway patrol than when


1 maKe a u-turn me car
disappears."
As the driver of the
car, John Hampton, active-
ly fled and eluded Smith,
Smith followed with no
sight of him for four or
five miles.
"That's very unusual,"
Smith stated, "to not see a
,vehicle you are attempting
to catch up with for that
distance."
Smith said that traffic
was moderate on 1-10 that
day.
Smith made it to the
interstate exit in Monticel-
lo and was about to head
back east when he saw
Hanipton in the parking
lot at Arby's. 'He went into
the store and approached
Please' See Madison
Trooper, Page 2A


SCAM ALERT!!!


Holiday Season Cyber
Scammers Target Victims
The FBI is reminding
people this holiday season
that cyber criminals con-
tinue to aggressively seek
ways to steal money and
personal information.,
Scammers are using sever-
al techniques to fool poten-
tial -victims including.
sending unsolicited e-
mails that contain" attach-
ments such as electronic
greeting cards containing
malware (malicious. soft-
ware), setting up spoofing
websites that look like le-,
gitimate commercial sites,
and unleashing phishing
and vishing attacks where
individuals receive e-mails
asking for personal data.
"These cyber scam-
mers will do whatever
they can to steal your mon-
ey and personal informa-


tion this holiday season
and are trying many dif-
ferent ways to commit
these crimes. The best way
to protect yourself is to re-
port these scams to law en-
forcement or the Internet
Crime Complaint Center,
IC3," said Shawn Henry,
Assistant Director, FBI Cy-.
ber Division, Washington,
D.C.
In ,the greeting card
scam, the cards, which are
also referred to as e-cards
or postcards, are being
sent via spam. Like many
other Internet fraud
schemes, the criminals use
social engineering tactics
to entice the victim, claim-
ing the card is from a fam-
ily member or friend. Al-
though there have been
variations in the spam
Please see Scam Alert,
Page 2A


Wed 66/42 Thu 71/50 Fri 3/44
12/3 F 12/4 67 0 a _ 612S
Mainly sunny. High 66F. Winds SE Occasional showers possible. Few showers. Highs in the low 60
at 5 lo 10 mph. Highs in the low 70s and lows In Few shower. mighs e ow s
thelow50s. and lows in the mid 40s.


t 64/41 "'
1216
Showers. Highs in the mid 60s and
lows in the low 40s.


F-








2A * Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 3, 2008



VIEWPOINTS/FROM PAGE ONE


Scam Alert

cont from Page 1A


message and attached malware, generally the spam di-
rects the recipient to click the link provided in the e-
mail to view the e-card. Upon clicking the link, the re-
cipient is unknowingly taken to a malicious webpage.
Spoofing scams are, when criminals create a false or
shadow copy of a real website or e-mail in a way that
misleads the recipient. All network traffic between the
victim's browser and the shadow page are sent through
the spoofer's machine e. This allows the spoofer to ac-
quire personal information, such as passwords, credit
card numbers, and account numbers.
Even though the e-mail looks like the real thing,
complete with authentic logos and working web links,
it's a fak e. The website where you're told to enter your
account information is also fak e. In some instances, re-
ally slick spoofers direct you to the genuine website,
then pop up a window over the site that captures your
personal information. The information entered does not
go to the legitimate site, but rather to the spoofer's ac-
count. The information you entered will most likely be
sold to criminals, who'll use it to ruin your credit and
drain your account.
In phishing and vishing attacks, individuals report
receiving .e-mails or text messages indicating a problem
with their account. They are directed to follow the link
provided in the message to update their account or cor-
rect the problem. The link actually directs the individu-
als to a fraudulent website, that looks legitimate where
their personal information, such as account number
and PIN, is compromised.
Other reported scams have included victims receiv-
ing an e-mail message asking them to complete an on-
line survey. At the end of the survey, they are asked for
their personal account information to allow funds to be
credited to the account in appreciation for completing
the survey Providing this information will allow crimi-
nals to compromise the account.
Here are some tips you can use to avoid becoming a
victim of cyber fraud:
* Do not respond to unsolicited Spamm) e-mail.
* Do not click on links contained within an unso-
licited e-mail.
* Be cautious of e-mail claiming to contain pictures
in attached files, as the files may contain viruses. Only
open attachments from known senders.
* Avoid filling out forms in e-mail messages that ask
for personal information.
* Always compare the link in the e-mail to the link
that you are actually directed to.
* Log on to the official website, instead of "linking"
to it from an unsolicited e-mail. "
* Contact the actual business that supposedly sent
the e-mail to verify if the e-mail is genuin e.
To receive the latest information about cyber scams
please go to the FBI website and sign up for e-mail alerts
by clicking on one of the red envelopes. If you have re-
ceived a scam, e-mail, please notify the IC3 by filing a
complaint at www.ic3.gov. For more information on e-
scams, please visit the FBI's New E-Scams,and Warn-
ings webpage.


Stan Mes-
sick is a not-so-
far away neigh-
bor visiting fam-
ily in Madison.
When his
brother in law,
Curt Kniffen,
had back
surgery recent-
ly and his sister,
Mary Ann,
needed some
help, Messick
came up from
Summerland
Keys in the
Florida Keys to lend a hand around the cottages
that the couple owns.
Planning to stay a couple of more weeks at
least, Messick says Curt is doing much better
since his operation. Soon, however, he will be re-
turning to his home in the Keys where he is em-
ployed as an equipment operator.
"Besides," Messick added about his trip.
"Sometimes it's nice to just get away for awhile."


Pilgrim's Pride


cont from Page 2A


were down 16.2 percent over the same period.
There are a few positives among the current bad
news, however. One is that corn prices have fallen 55
percent, and another is that producers, except for
Tyson, have cut production.
Chapter 11 allows a company to remain in control of
its operations while attempting to reorganize, which
can take months or years. The Pittsburg, Texas-based
company filed for Chapter 11 in the U.S. Bankruptcy
Court for the Northern District of Texas and has been
granted a near-term extension by its creditors.
Pilgrim's Pride asked the bankruptcy court for
"permission to continue paying employee wages and
salaries, to provide employee benefits without inter-
ruption, and to continue its various customer pro-
grams," according to a company press release. And ac-
cording to their website, the company is also arranging
a $450 million loan to help pay costs of daily operations
as well as employee wages and other obligations.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@(reenepublishing.com


Madison Trooper

cont from Page 2A

Hampton, who,he placed under arrest.
Smith searched Hampton's vehicle and found open
alcohol containers inside.
Smith seized the Dodge Charger.
Hampton was charged with fleeing and eluding and
cited for an open container.
Smith said that since fleeing and eluding is a felony,
the car can be seized. The paperwork is currently being
processed for the forfeiture.













DECEMBER 6,2008

Starts at 8am
Located at 1552 S. SR 53

Fort Madison

Self-Storage

For info. call 973-4141 or 9734004
Bring Your Table & Goods To Sell!


Join us and experience this once in a lifetime
Historical Event
Inaugural Swearing in Ceremony,
Acceptance Address, Inaugural Parade
for
-President Elect Barack H. Obama
Leave January 19, 2009 at 12:00 noon, early
arrival into Washington D.C. on Inauguration Day at
9:00 am. Depart Washington, DC on January 20, 2009
between' 5:00 & 6:00 pm and arrive in Rocky Mount,
NC at 10:00 pm. Depart Rocky Mount, NC, and
January 21, 2009 at 10:00 am and arrive back in'
Monticello, Florida, at 8:00 pm
Total cost includes: Roundtrip on deluxe motor coach
from Monticello, Florida to Washington, DC;
Keepsake "2009 Barack H. Obama Commemorative
Metrorail One Day Pass" to event and one night hotel
stay at Days Inn Golden East, Rocky Mount, NC.
Please note that all rooms are double beds..
(1 adult single room = $375.00; 2 adults = $365.00;
2 adults w/2 children - adult -$365.00, child -
$275.00.) All prices are per person.
(Estimated attendance: 4 million)


Clifford Cummings
850-973-4740, 850-464-3076


Richard Glenn
850-443-8917, 850-997-9686
850-694-1179


QUESTION OF THE WEEK
Will you be attending the Florida State vs
Florida game in Tallahassee?



Log on to
www.greenepublishing.com -'
- Question of the Week
- Online Pigskin Picks
- Madison County News
and much more!


Yes No
Log on to greenepublishmg.com to vote on this week's question:

"Do you decorate your house for Christmas?"
Voting ends December 8, 2008.








Wednesday, December 3, 2008 Madison County Carrier * 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee Worship Center

To Host Gospel Sing

And Yard Sale
Lee Worship Center will host a gospel sing Saturday,
December 6, at the church, located on Magnolia Drive in
Lee. That day, a yard sale will be held from 9 a.m. until 3
p.m. There is even a tour bus available for sale. Proceeds
will go towards a new church steeple.
Charles Lasseter is scheduled to undergo gall blad-
der surgery on Wednesday Please remember him in
your prayers.
Thelma Thompson and Ernestine Kinsey arei seek-
ing people to turn in information for a special memories
book for the 20th anniversary of Lee Day. For informa-
tion on how to submit photos and information on your
family, please call Thelma at (850) 971-0011 or Ernestine
Kinsey at (850) 971-5890.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week
and a beautiful forever! May God bless each and every
one of you!


Northland Company Corporation vs. Jimmie's Fire-
stone - other civil
Lakisha Solomon and Department of Revenue vs.
'Kendrick Richardson - support
Dominic Akins and Department of Revenue vs.
Cherry McCray - support
Calvin Davis, Jr. and Department of Revenue vs.
Kaneice Davis - support
Rayeisha Haynes and Department of Revenue vs.
Marlos Alexander - support
Fadra Glee'and Department of Revenue vs. Darius
Allen - support
Donna Robinson and Department of Revenue vs.
Bryan Johnson - support


S/ !
















a yearly " i
subscription :e- -

will save you over newsstand prices.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
One Year In County Subscription -$30
One Year Out of County Subscription -$38


Stray Vectors


Over the
years, I have ob-
served that a lot National
of things are
"hazardous to, Security
our health."
I've also ob- Joe Boyles
served that a lot Guest Columnist
of those things
have very posi- .
tive benefits to
our daily lives.
Accordingly, I have co- ,uded that
life is hazardous to healtht!
My father mai.e an important
comment to me shortly before he died
in 1991. Raised as a farmer and
schooled as an agricultural econo-
mist, he said, "I am a conservationist
but I reject environmentalism.
There's a big difference." I agree.
There was some recent news
about the 1989 Exxon-Valdez accident
in Alaska where the reporter said
that it was the "largest oil spill in US
history." I challenge that. In the sev-
en months from January through
July 1942, Nazi U-boats sank nearly
700 ships in the western Atlantic off
the eastern seaboard and Florida
peninsula - 3.6 million tons of ship-
ping. The majority of these were oil
tankers transporting Gulf Coast pe-
troleum. I.can guarantee you that the
oil spillage from these sinkings
dwarfed the amount spilled by the
Exxon-Valdez.
Now that he has admitted an af-
fair with a campaign worker while
his wife was suffering from cancer, is
John Edwards' political career over?
I'm not so sure. It seems that Democ-
rats have a short memory when it
comes to personal failings of their
leaders, After all, they forgave Ted
Kennedy being responsible for the
death of a young woman.
Would someone please explain to
me the definition of a "windfall prof-
its tax?" If you make too much mon-
ey (who defines this?) in an invest-
ment,:then someone gets to take away
your profits and give them to some-
one else. Does that make any sense to.
you? Didn't Jimmy Carter try this 30
years ago? How did it work then?
The key to success against terror-
ism is intelligence. Watch what the
new Obama Administration does
with the intelligence agencies. Will
he cut them like his two Democrat
predecessors (Carter and- Clinton)
did or will he support them?
Politicians have begun to run out
of names for new ways to tax people,
so they have to invent taxes that no
one can trace. I know that an income
tax taxes income, but what does an
intangible tax tax? I suppose that it
taxes intangibles, whatever they are.
Now that the price of oil and
gasoline are falling, will the pressure
to build a comprehensive energy pol-
icy diminish? I hope not. I fear that


moment too
soon. A lot of people in the North-
east and Midwest depend on fuel oil
for home heating during the bitter
winters. To the elderly, the cost of
fuel oil could be a matter of life and
death.
-Football is all about blocking and.
tackling. All of those skill positions
are fine and they get all the head-'
lines, but the game is usually won or
lost in the trenches. Sometimes, I
will just focus my attention on the.
line of scrimmage and catch the rest
of the action in my peripheral vision
to really understand what is going on
in the game. .
Private sector. health insurance
cost, has doubled since 1996. If we.
want to insure more Americans,
which would be a good thing, then we
need to adopt policies that will de-
crease the cost of insurance like few-
er mandates and more competition.
After 36 years in the Senate, I fig-
ured the only way Joe Biden was
leaving would be teet first, but not so.
Actually, I think Biden's nomination
for the vice presidency was a pretty
good choice for Senator Obama,
shoring up his lack of foreign policy
experience much like Bush's selec-
tion of Dick Cheney in 2000. I seri-
ously doubt that we will see Biden get
trashed right out 'of the box by the
opposition like they did to Cheney.
One of the biggest problems with
government-run health care is ra-
tioning where services are limited
and patients with low priority are de-
nied treatment. We can study the ef-
fects of this problem in numerous
countries around the world like Eng-
land and Canada, which have a long
history with national health insur-,
ance.
. The biggest limiting factor with
wind turbine energy, which currently
provides about one percent of our na-
tion's electricity, is the transmission
grid. The problem isn't creating
electricity from wind; it is moving
that electricity to market. There is-a
lot of wind across the Central
Plains, but not many customers.
I have no sympathy for aut6 acci-
dent victims that weren't wearing a
seat belt. Back in my flying days, I
had to make no less than 15 connec-
tions to "hook up" to my trusty
Phantom. By comparison, a single
click of a 3-point harness is a piece
of cake.


Did you Know...

Before the year 1000, the word "she" did not exist in the English language. The sin-
gular female reference was the word "heo," which also was the plural of all genders.
The word "she" appeared only in the 12th century, about 400 years after English be-
gan to take form. "She" probably derived from the Old English feminine "seo," the
Viking word for feminine reference.


ChOt of (od's Thm Ounders: Nprs
P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Website:
www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
Sports
news@greenepublishing.conm
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
Classifieds / Leaals
debra@greenepublishing.com

PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene
I EDITOR
ljcob Bembry
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Heather Bowen
STAFF WRITERS
Michael Curtis andTyrra Meserve
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
Stephen Buchna and James Suiter
TvPESET TER/SSUBSCRIPTIONS
Bryant Thigpen
ADVERTISING
SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Man Ellen Greene.
Doro)thy McLKnner,
Jeanette Dunn,
and Sheppird Salter
CLASSIFIED %ND LEGAL ADS
Debra Lemis
Deadline or cljstifiL is Monday
at 3 p m
Deadline for Legal AJ'duement is
MNi'ndaj t 5 prn.
There will be . 3'" charge for Affidavis.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
In County $0 * Out-of-.Counry Si3
(Sute & local a.ecs included
Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 - 800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
.POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the
right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the man-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off: Greene
Publishing, Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


pppl


the next price
spike will top
$5 a gallor
Under T tose
P c uimstances,
$4/gallon will
S look cheap!
The dra-
matic fall in
energy prices
didn't come a








4A * Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 3, 2008



LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


EM INNOCENT
0RTOF-LAW

Man Arrested For

Marijuana Possession
A Madison man was arrested for possession of mar-
ijuana on Sunday evening, November 30.
According to a Madison Police Department report,
Patrolman Eric Gilbert was working radar when he
stopped a 1994 Mercury,. driven by Ronlyn Monlyn, 31.
Gilbert wrote Monlyn a warning citation for speed-
ing. While writing it, he smelled marijuana in the vehi-
cle and told Monlyn that he was going to search it.
While Gilbert searched the vehicle, Sheriff's Deputy
Mike Maurice searched Monlyn.
Gilbert found marijuana in a newspaper.,


Miami Man Arrested In

Scheme To Defraud Medicaid

Out Of Over $12,000
Attorney General Bill McCollum announced the own-
er of a Miami durable medical equipment company has
been taken into custody in a scheme to defraud the Flori-
da Medicaid program. Oscar Betancourt was arrested ear-
ly this morning by the Attorney General's Medicaid
Fraud Control Unit.
Durable medical equipment is medical equipment
that can withstand repeated use, is primarily and custom-
arily used to serve a medical purpose and is appropriate
for use in the patient's home. Investigators interviewed
11 recipients who stated they did not receive the expensive
prosthetic devices.which were billed to the Medicaid pro-
gram by MGG Services.
Betancourt is charged with one count of Medicaid
fraud and one count of third-degree grand theft. If con-
victed, he could face up to five years in prison and fines up
to $5,000. The case will be prosecuted by the State Attor-
ney's Office for the 11th Judicial Circuit. A co-defendant is
still being sought by authorities.


Orlando Woman Gets 20 Years For
Racketeering, Grand Theft And Forgery
Attorney General Bill McCollum announced that an
Orlando woman was sentenced to 20 years in prison for
multiple charges of racketeering, grand theft and forgery
Lucie Mae Thomas pleaded guilty to the criminal charges
related to her role as the ring leader of an organized theft
ring that defrauded several Central Florida banks and
credit unions. She and seven codefendants were prosecut-
ed by the Attorney General's Office of Statewide Prosecu-
tion.
Thomas, 42, and her codefendants would set up ac-
counts using frauduleftt checks and would then make
cash withdrawals at various branches of the banks and
credit unions. Cooperating codefendants indicated they
were making up to $5,000 per day. An investigation con-
ducted by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement
and the Office of Statewide Prosecution revealed losses in
excess of $100,000. Thomas was originally arrested in 2005
and was set for trial last year, but failed to appear. A na-
tionwide search resulted in her arrest in January in a
casino in Biloxi, Mississippi. Thomas pleaded guilty in
August to racketeering, conspiracy to commit racketeer-
ing, 15 counts of grand theft and 15 counts of forgery.


CyberCrime Unit Makes lOO Arrest In The Middle Of The Night
~ Northwest Florida Office Deploys After Receiving Tip From Law Enforcement In Missouri -


Attorney General Bill McCollum announced that his
CyberCrime Unit has made its 100th arrest, taking a Mil-
ton man into custody shortly before midnight last night.
William Kenneth Adkins, a firefighter at Whiting Field
Naval Air Station in Milton, was booked into the Santa
Rosa County Jail-last night and will be charged with pro-
moting the sexual performance of a child'and possession
of child pornography. The arrest was coordinated with
and assisted by the Santa Rosa County Sheriff's Office.
"The quick deployment of the Northwest Florida Cy-
berCrime Office and the close coordination with local law
enforcement .underscores the vital importance of having
CyberCrime offices throughout the state, ready at a mo-
ment's notice," said Attorney General McCollum. "The
CyberCrime Unit marked an important milestone with its
100th arrest and did so in a manner that exemplifies its
commitment to our children."
Yesterday, the CyberCrime Unit was contacted by law
enforcement with the Maryland Heights Police Depart-


ment in Missouri. An undercover officer had been chat-
ting online with Adkins, 40, who believed he was talking
to a 13-year old girl. Over the course of several months,
Adkins repeatedly solicited the "child" for sex and sent
her at least one video containing child pornography. Yes-
terday, he made statements to the undercover officer indi-
cating a Florida child was at risk of sexual abuse, prompt-
ing the contact to the CyberCrime Unit and the immedi-
ate deployment.
A search warrant was executed at Adkins' Milton res-
idence where law enforcement officers seized two com-
puters and other equipment, which will undergo addi-
tional forensic analysis. Law enforcement did not find ev-
idence of the Florida child Adkins had mentioned, but
the investigation will continue to determine whether Ad-
kins victimized any children. Anyone who has been vic-
timized by Adkins should immediately contact the Cyber-
Crime Unit at 850-623-1112.
The Northwest Florida CyberCrime Office was the


pIm


fifth office to open under the Attorney General's
statewide expansion of the unit. The office is- located
within the Santa Rosa Kids House, a nonprofit child advo-
cacy center housing multiple agencies and organizations
dedicated to assisting victims of child abuse, and their
families through the legal and healing process. This par-
ticular office is unique in that it combines the resources
of the Attorney General's experts in the investigation and
prosecution of online child predators and pornographers
with the resources of the Florida Department of Children
and Families, the Guardian Ad Litem program, the Santa
Rosa County Sheriff's Office, State's Attorney's Office,
the Santa Rosa County School Board, NAS Whiting Field
and the Favor House.


.Create a Year-end Financial
Checklist
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones
Now that we're in the holiday season, you proba-
bly have much to do. Still, you may find it worth-
while to take on one more task: drawing up a year-
end financial checklist.
What should go on your list? Consider the following:
* Sell your losers. From late 2007 through much
of 2008, the stock market has gone through some
rough times. Consequently, you may now own
some stocks that are worth less than what you
originally paid for them. While this fact may not
thrill you, there is a bright side: By selling some of
your losers, you can offset capital gains you may
have realized elsewhere in your portfolio. If you
didn't sell any winning stocks this year - and thus
had no capital gains - you can use your losses
to reduce up to $3,000 of ordinary income for
2008. And if your losses exceeded $3,000, you
can carry them forward indefinitely and use them
to offset gains or ordinary income in the future.
* Observe "wash sale" rules. One drawback to
selling your losers is that you may have wanted to
keep these stocks in your portfolio, despite their
decline in value. Can you buy them back? You can
- but you need to follow the "wash sale" rules. If
you want to claim your loss as a deduction, you
can't buy the same stock -during the "wash sale"
period - the day of the sale, the 30 days before
the sale and the 30 days after the sale. (See your
tax advisor for more information on wash sale
rules.)
* Put more money into your 401(k). Your 401 (k)
is a great retirement-savings vehicle - for several.
reasons. First, you typically, contribute pre-tax dol-
lars, so the more you put in, the lower your taxable
income. Second, your earnings can grow on a tax-
deferred basis. And third, you may have a dozen
or more investment choices, so you can build a
portfolio that reflects your risk tolerance, time hori-
zon and retirement goals. So, if you haven't
exceeded the contribution limit (which, in 2008, is
$15,500, or $20,500 if you're 50 or older), ask your
employer to adjust your remaining paychecks to
boost your contribution. Also, if you receive a year-
end bonus, see if you can put some or all of it into
your 401 (k).
* Add to your IRA. You actually have until April
15, 2009 to fully fund your traditional or Roth IRA
for 2008, but if you can avoid waiting until the last
minute, you might not have to come up with a big
lump-sum payment. For the 2008 tax year, you can
put up to $5,000 into your IRA, or $6,000 if you're
50 or older.
* Make charitable contributions. When you con-
tribute to a charitable organization - one that has
received 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status - your
donations are generally tax- deductible, provided
you itemize your tax return. Plus, if you decide to
donate a stock or other appreciated asset, you can
avoid capital gains taxes when the asset is sold.
If you can check most of these items off your year-
end "to do" list, you'll close out 2008 on a high note
- and position yourself for success in 2009 and beyond.


Brad Bashaw
hvlostllelta Reloprommsitativ


Edward Jones


114 SW R.m.,- .Vfcuir
P.O. Box 61
M :K h,,i ll - I . 1- iI I I
III[ ', >. 'r1-- , -s 11.i I',1 \ ,I'\ -.',1!r
Ilhn z, , tr>'.n,'lt-I hull I n,w", Sti u7''-N?.4

I'l A IIk 0 10% II M k








Wednesday, December 3, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier * 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


0,NUNIlY


AL .,AI -


December 5-6
Dec. 5: Arrival/pic-
tures with Santa at 5 p.m.,
Christmas vendors, late
night shopping downtown
Madison until 9 p.m.
Dec. 6: Christmas ven-
dors, along with Santa
from 10 a.m.-9 p.m.,
Christmas tour of homes
from 5 p.m.-9 p.m. by can-
dlelight in the historic dis-
trict, along with a horse
and carriage ride. Tickets
for horse and carriage
ride will be $20. There will
be Christmas caroling and
entertainment.
' ',b


December 6
Heirline will be in con-
cert at Sirmans Baptist
Church on Saturday, Dec.
- 6, at 7 p.m. Admission is
free. A love offering will be
received during the con-
cert.
December 6
New Bethel PB. Church
of Madison will be having a
musical program Saturday,
Dec. 6, at 6:30 p.m. They are
asking all choirs, groups
and soloists to go and ren-
der tivo selections. For
more information, please
call (850) 673-7630.


Every Monday In
December
iommv's Club Is an


opportunity for Mother's
and Mothers-to- be to
share, discuss and explore
concerns regarding child-
birth, baby care and life
choices after birth. All are
welcome and it is free. We
will meet at Madison Pub-
lic Library every Monday
in December from 10 am til
12 noon. Kathy Harvey, a
Certified Doula and Child-
birth Educator, will host.
For more information call
850-929-2951 or 850-464-0487.


In Lo


... --, a . "
A beautiful soul! She died in the arms of her Lord. She
will never suffer no more. She went to sleep in pain, but
v woke in the most beautiful place. Behold the streets of pure
gold. Nothing can compare to this place called Heaven. She
sees her Savior their. Oh, to look upon His face, what plea-
J W sure it is you see. No more tears of pain, only the warmth j
and love of having Him near to thee. She touched many in
this world and brought His love wherever she went. Now she
is receiving her rewards for all she did and what she meant.
She will be missed by all, no need to be said, but I know I will
see her again. There are no goodbyes for those who are in . -
Christ. We will all meet again in the place called Heaven. So p .
_ for now there is separation, but one day very soon, we will -
close our eyes to this world and open them to eternity some-
where. God in His mercy gives us the opportunity to choose.
We can choose to follow the world and spend eternity in Hell.
or we can choose to follow Christ and spend eternity with -
Him. I know where Ms. Mary is now, and I hope all who read
S.-this will choose as she did. May God bless!
SJ._, - Stephanie Reyna .


4


I


r


Celebrity Recipe
submitted by
Debbie Bass,
Coordinator of
NFCC's Displaced
. Homemakers
Program


December 10
The 55 Plus Club will
hold its Christmas Cele-
bration Meeting at the
United Methodist Commu-
nity Center, Hwy. 145, five
miles north of Madison.
All are invited. For addi-
tional information, please
contact Linda Gaston at
929-4938.
December 12
Fourth Annual Christ-
mas Gospel Sitig featuring
Benny Daniels and the Di-
amonds will be held at
Yogi Bear's. Jellystone
Park at 7 p.m. Please bring
non-perishable food items
to help the needy in our
area. For more informa-
tion, please call (850) 519-
1613.
December 13
The AARP Driver
Safety Program will be of-
fered on Dec. 13. This class
will be held at the Madison
Extension building 'from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. There is a
$10 fee for books and cer-
tificates. Any driver over
55 with a certificate of
completion must be given
a discount by his or her in-
surance provider. For
more information, please
call (850) 973-2422 to re-
serve a seat.
December 13
Greenville Country
Christmas Gingerbread
House Decorating Contest
will be held Saturday, Dec.
13, at the gazebo in Haffye
Hayes Park 9:30 a.m.-12:15
p.m. For further informa-
tion, please call Farmers
and Merchants Bank at
(850) 948-2626.
January 3
LifeSong, southern
gospel's newest trio, will
be in concert at San Pedro
Church on Saturday, Jan.
3, at 7 p.m. Admission is
free, however a love offer-
ing will be received during
the concert.

I I I.



AssocialtDegrees
Get anA.A. or Associate Degree
AdministraiveAssslant
Explore a career in Business
Alied Health
Be a Patent Care Technician
PCT app!ication.deadline Dec. 5
Correcions/Law Enf.
Begin a career in Public Safety
Drafting
Architectural & Mechanical Tracks
Early Childhood Ed
Start a career in Child Care
EMT/Paramnedic
Emergency Medical Services

Classes Begin Jan. 7
WWW.NFCC.EDU
fit;C
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6A * Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 3, 2008



AROUND MADISON COUNTY



Central School Celebrates National Young Readers Week


ureene ru i isiing, Imu. r~niuu uy cEimealiu U1re e1, IlUVemrui .u, Iuuu
Readers who participated in the National Young Readers week included, front
row, left to right: Cheryl James, Damon Fico, Lindsey Fico, Shirley Joseph, Frances
Ginn and Edwin Lundy. Back row, left to -right: Steve McHargue, Dewaine Knight,
Carol Gibson, April Johnson, Dale Rickards, Jodie Price, Gwen Hubbard, Doris
Bishop, and Sam Stalnaker.


uieII ruubi aiinig, IIIu. -nuiu uy ernciaIlu 1 11en , INuve bue lu , Juutj
Susan Richardson's kindergarten class enjoyed National Young Reader's Week.
Back row, left to right: Jalean Adderly, Caleb Ginn, Zarion Preaster, Riley Brennan,
Johntavis Gassier, Azariah Oliver, Jasmine Neal. Middle row, left to right: Sam
Stanley, Landri Aust, Dakayla Armstead, Kennedy Fogle and Samuel Nash. Front
row, left to right: Ny'kerria Williams, Zoey Brennan, Braydon Rye, Margaret (Meg)
Colvin, and Abbey Sanderson.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
National Young: Reader's Week took place during the
week of lov. 10 at Madison County Schools.
The schools planned wonderful activities for the stu-
dents, including having community leaders read at the
schools.
The community leaders who became the community
readers at Madison County Central School included:
Crystal Haire, Capital City Bank, who read Edward the
Emu in Lawanda Jennings' class.
Terry Johnson, from the Central School, read It's Mine
to Amy Webb's class.
Jerome Wyche, Madison County Solid' Waste Director,
read It Takes A Village to Darlene BlAnd's class.
Teresa Williams, Madison County Recycling Center,
read Edward the Emu to Autumn Burnette's class.
Kristy Killingsworth, Madison Vet Center, read Edward
the Emu to Heather Douglas's class.
Almera Blount, School volunteer, read Caps for Sale to
Liz Mitchell's class.
Ben Killingsworth, Madison County High School prin-
cipal, read Caps for Sale to Gwen Johnson's class.
Ray Griffin, Capital City Bank, read Dear Juno to Nellie
Thompson's class. - .,, ,' , ,-- ' ' -
.pete Bucher,.Madison, CQun Sheriff,_red.j Takes,.,
village to Sharon Warren's class.
Freddie Graham, from the Central School, read The Gin-
gerbread Man to Ceola Graham's class.;
Maurice Alexander, Madison County Central School Re-
source Officer, read Make Way for Ducklings to Shannon
Curtis's class; '
Tracey Wilson read The Gingerbread Man to Susan
Richardson's class. , :
Amy Barfield; from the Central School, read A Pocket for
Corduroy to, Emma Franklin's class.
Diann Douglas, Madison County Extension Agent, read
Annie & the Wild Animals to Latisha Williams' class.
Teri Bowen, Central School, read Little Polar Bear & the
Brave Little Haire to Amy Fletcher's class.
Frances Ginn, Madison County Tax Collector, read A
Little Bit of Winter to Leslie Greenlee's class.
Doris Bishop, retired school teacher read Little Polar
Bear & the Brave Little Haire to Bridgette Jenkins' class.
Bart Alford, Madison County School Board member,
read Aunt Flossie's Hats (and Crab Cakes Later) to Audrey
Davis's class.
Melissa Stewart, FLVS, read Gregory, the Terrible Eater
to Mellissa Sampson's class.
Lori Newman, Madison County School Board office,
read Make Way for Ducklings to Marion Stephens' class.
Kenny Hall, Madison County School Board member,
read Sheila Rae, the Brave to Pamela Anderson's class.
Dr. Melanie Hill, Madiosn Eye Center, read Popcorn
Dragon to Yolanda Haynes' class.
Melanie Terrill, Johnson & Johnson, read Sheila Rae,
the Brave to Tyesha Fogle's class.
Joni Hughey Wachovia Bank, read BigAl to Karen Law-
son's'class.


r PERSONAL INJl

WttrNInTETIIT ft


Beth Brinson, Madison County Extension Office, read
New Shoes for Sylvia to Polly Day's class.'
Susie Williamson, Madison County School Board Mem-
ber, read Big Al to Katrina Aikens' class.
Renee Groover, Stacie & Co., read The Principal's New
Clothes to Vickie O'Quinn's class.
April Johnson, Central School, read Ruby the Copycat to
Jan Eubanks'class.
Jodie Price, Madison County School Board office, read
Six-Dinner Sid to Shaeika Pride's class.
Frances Arnold, Central'School, read Possum's Hprvest
Moon to Lisa Pennington's class.
Lindsey Fico, AFLAC, read Amos & Boris to Tawanna
Christian's class.
Emerald Greene, Greene Publishing, Inc., read Mike
Mulligan and His Steam Shovel to Carroll Ryals' class. '
Cheryl James, Madison County School Board office,
read An Extraordinary Egg to Carol Griffin's class.
Heather Johnson, 4-H Director, read.Alexander and the
Wind-Up Mouse to Christy Adams' class.
Archie Strickland, Fire Inspector, read Tikki Tikki Tem-
bo to Kay Evans' class.
Tiffany Richardson, Madison County School Board of-
fice, read The Hatseller and His Monkeys to Liz' Shaw's class.
Bonnie Webb, Madison County Health Department,
read Beware of, the Bears! to Bill Mittman's class.
Dani Mays, Bank of America, reqd The Wolf's Chicken
Stew, to Stacy Frakes' class.
Ben Stewart, Madison County sheriff-elect, read
Amelia's Road to Debbie Tuckey's class.
Dwight Vickers, Madison Fire and Rescue, read Ibis: A
True Whale Story to Jeff Villeux's class.
Dale Rickards, Madison County School Board. office,
read Bringing Her Own to Gwen James' class.
Michelle Leblanc, Johnson and Johnson, read Stellalu-
na to Audrey James' class.
, Dorsey Williams, Apalachee Mental Health, read A Bad
Case of Stripes to Ray Robinson's class.
* Charles Evans, Winn-Dixie pharmacist, read Picnic at
Mudsock Meadow to Penny Kuntz's class.
Jada\Williams read Stellaluna at Tommie Bodenstein's
class.
* Nancy Hall, Central School, read Strega Nona at Celeste
Fleming's class.
Shirley Joseph, Madison County School Board, read
Chato's Kitchen to Elvira Miller's class.
DeWaine Knight, Madison County School Board, read
Everybody Cooks Rice to Rick lott's class.
Marie Smith, Madison County Property Appraiser's of-
fice, read The Patchwork Quiltto Clayton McWilliams' class.
Kathy Rogers, wife of dentist Clint Rogers, read Eat
Your Vegetables -from Rats on the Roof to Lorena Urban's
class.
Davis Barclay Central School principal, read Grandpa's
Teeth to Teresa Osborne's class.
Lou Miller, School Superintendent, read Kim Graham's
class the story Angle Child, Dragon Child.
' Marcia Webb, Madison County Community Bank, read
Just Plain Fancy to Susanne Griffin's class.
Joyce Bethea, Madison
" County Community Bank,
Y & read The Princess and the Piz-
Ji & za to Derita Pinkard's class.
Leigh McNutt, Madison
SAT IH ' County School Board staff,


read The Great Kapok Tree to Emily Matthews' class.
Latricia Davis read Koko's Kitchen to Doris Murdock's
class.
Brett Frakes, Department of Juvenile Justice, read The
Three Questions to Jim Waller's class:
Gwen Hubbard, Madison County School Board staff,
read The Rough-Face Girl to Wanda Bailey's class.
Carol Gibson, Madison County-High School Reading
Coach, read The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig to
Valorie Thomas' class.
Liz' Hodge, Excel School principal, read Montezuma's
Revenge to Wendy Harper's class.
Delbert Redditt, Faith Baptist Church.pastor, read Wolf!
to Willene Herring's class.
Mikahl Kornegay Florida State University graduate as-
sistant coach, read How Many Stars in the Sky? to Ruth An-
derson's class.
VeEtta Hagan, Madison County School Board member,
read Stephanie's Ponytail to Debbie Christ's class.
i B.J. Curtis, school volunteer, read The Scarecrow's Hat
to Lilly Moore's class.
Ivan Johnson, Madison County School Board Trans-
portation, read Harry the Dirty Dog to Melinda Richie's
class.
Jan McHargue, Madison' County School Board staff,
read How Many Stars in the Sky? to Ami Stone's class.
Gladney Cherry, Madison County School Board staff,
read The Cow Who Wouldn't Come Down to Ryan Kelly's
class.
George Webb, Tri-Cpunty Electric, read Stephanie's
Ponytail to Ansley Rogers' class.
Paula Ginn is the curriculum coordinator at the Central
School. Mariann Hutto, Paula Kauffman and Sybil Day are
the reading coaches.


Classes Start Jan. 7
Schedule available online at WWW.NFCC.EDU


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I








Wednesday, December 3, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier * 7A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


41-f Club Launches In Lee


The Senior Health


Expo Moves On To


Greenville


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, November 17, 2008
The Lee Community welcomes its new 4-H Club. Peg McCarthy is the Organizational Leader, bringing a rich
4-H heritage with her to the club. Pictured left to right, front: Maddie Gurley, Hannah Cooper and Briana Michael;
second row, left to right: Shelby Cooper, Rachel Curtis, Chase Gurley, Ciana Vaz, Jacob Curtis, Anna Davis and Mar-
vin Davis; back row left to right: Vikki Wertz, Conner Waller, Peg McCarthy and Scotty Wertz.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Nov. 17, at 6 p.m., the newly formed Lee 4-H
Club held its first meeting at Lee City Hall. Under
coordinator, Peg McCarthy,'the club is targeting chil-
dren, ages eight and up. 4-H has a rich tradition in
Madison County, although a Lee community club
hasn't been active for some time.
Heather Johnson, 4-H Agent for Madison County,
shared her knowledge and direction to, open the
meeting. Johnson made a big impact last summer in
Lee with her vital contribution to the Building
Blocks Summer Camp that was so successfully con-
ducted. In that instance, Johnson provided creative
curriculum and oversight for ten weeks of construc-
tive fun for dozens of children. In this instance, she
simply wanted to make sure everybody understood
the scope of the club and offer her assistance as
McCarthy, too, brings an established heritage to


Question: I want to bleach my
Will the bleach whiten my fillings?


front teeth.


Answer: Nooope! Bleach will not change
the color of fillings. Having that said, I frequently
tell patients to go for it anyway. You will be happy
with the bleaching. Good news is fillings that
have been placed-years ago may have matched
the color of the tooth before the tooth darkened..
Whitening the tooth will frequently lighten the
tooth color back to the shade the tooth was when
the filling was placed. Additionally, many modern
filling materials have a bit of a chameleon effect
which helps them match the tooth color after
bleaching.

Older fillings are another story. They may have
darkened significantly. Older fillings had the
problem of discoloring and, darkening when
exposed to ultraviolet radiation. These fillings
might stick out like a sore thumb after bleaching
due to the darkness. But remember, fillings don't
last forever. Tooth colored fillings should, be
replaced every 7 -15 years. If your filling is
severely darkened, and over 15 years old, you
are due to have it replaced anyway. So try the
bleaching, I have yet to find a patient that
complained about prettier and whiter teeth!




D9etn - - *-b ecig -p
^^^^^^^~it(850) 250-5964^^^


these activities, building on experience that began
thirty years ago in New Hampshire before her fami-
ly moved to Florida. Her husband, Gil, will be par-
ticipating as well.
"In the first meeting, we were able to meet every-
body and take suggestions for activities. Basically, it
gave us an opportunity to get to know the children
and determine the early focus of the club. The ac-
tivities that got a lot of support included Crafts, Gar-
dening and Rocketry, which always creates a lot of
excitement," McCarthy explained.
The 4-H emblem, which is the well-recognized
green four-leaf clover with a White "H" on each leaf,
captures the spirit of 4-H clubs everywhere: HEAD:
think, plan, reason; HEART: be kind, true, sympa-
thetic; HANDS: to be useful, helpful, skillful; and
HEALTH: tc enjoy life, efficiency in work and play.
The community is always invited to attend any
meeting, and, of course, bring the kids. The Club's
Organizational Leader, Peg McCarthy can be
reached at (850) 971-5442 for questions and comments
on club membership.
In the end, organizers are looking for the Lee
Club to thoroughly represent the 4-H motto, "To
Make the Best Better."
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.

Whatever You Need,
Greene Publishing, Inc.


1695


GREENE, S
Publishing, Inc.
S. SR 53 * Madison 973-4141


Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo by Tyrra B Meserve, November 21, 2008
Kenneth Methvin, the Muffin Man sings while se-
niors learn about their health and changes that may af-
fect it.
By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Once again supplying seniors with information
and knowledge on the health care industry, options
and inventions, the Senior Adult Health Expo made
its way to the Greenville Senior Center on Friday, No-
vember 21. Booths were set up, professionals of the
Health Care world were on hand and seniors were able
to peruse the wide range of services available today.
Rosa Richardson, Executive Director for the Se-
nior Citizens Council of Madison County, welcomed
the group, starting out the health expo in Greenville.
Seniors from all over Madison County gathered to re-
ceive information on health care options for seniors
that are currently available.
With door prizes, snacks and musical entertain-
ment, this expo was as fun as it was enlightening for
the seniors who attended. Kenneth Methvin, the Muf-
fin Man, sang as seniors browsed options and chatted
with experts on some of the new options available to
the modern 55 plus population. Seniors even received
a presentation from the Sheriff's Department on safe-
ty.
Other vendors included representatives from
AARC, Area Agency on Aging for North- Florida-
SHINE, Area Agency on Aging for North Florida-
FTRI, Byrnwood Nursing Home, Capital City Bank,
Cray Coppins American Reverse Mortgage, Epilepsy
Association of the Big Bend, HealthSouth Rehabilita-
tion Hospital, Herbalife, Jackson's Drug Store, Lake
Park of Madison, Madison County. Extension Office,
Madison County Fire Department, Madison County
Memorial Hospital, Madison County Sheriff's Office,
Magellan Health Services, SE Eye Specialists/The
Hour Glass, Senior Citizens Council of Madison
County, Inc. and Tri-County Family Health.
Thanks to all vendors Who came down, set up, and
were willing to share the information that is there to
help.
Keeping abreast of changes in the health care in-
dustry and new information on health issues, the Se-
nior Health Expo in chock full of helpful facts and is
worth a visit, wherever they may turn up.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be reached at
tyrra@greenepublishing.com


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8A * Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 3, 2008



BRIDAL GUIDE





Diamonds Are Forever



(So Choose Wisely)


Planning a wedding
comes with its share of
tough decisions. Where
should the ceremony be
held? What color and style
should the bridesmaid
dresses be? Roses or tulips?
But before all of that
begins, one of the first big
decisions is the engage-
ment ring. A short stroll
through any local jewelry
store will dazzle the wisest
young sir. Color, style, and
size are just some of the
choices that must be
weighed.
To help with the deci-
sion-making process, the
following is information
on (arguably) the most im-
portant part of the en-
gagement ring: the dia-
mond.
Despite the, enormity
of the diamond industry-
global sales topped $30 bil-
lion in 2006--many cus-
tomers are nonetheless
daunted by the task of
buying a gem. Before you
start shopping, familiarize
yourself with the four ba-
sic components that deter-
mine a diamond's value:
color, clarity, carat and cut.
Color-
Diamonds are graded
by how close to colorless
they are. (Most have tinges,
of yellow, perhaps even in-
discernible to the naked
eye.) The absence of color
generally increases, the
value of stone, except in.
the cases of so-called fan-"
cy diamonds, rare stones
prized for their deep hues.
Red and pink diamonds
are among the rarest- and
most expensive on the
planet.


Clarity
A diamond's clarity is
an assessment of its sur-
face blemishes and imper-
fections, called inclusions.
The fewer inclusions, the
greater the stone's worth.
Clarity grading is done at
10 times magnification
and the highest grade (FI)
is awardsed only to flaw-
less stones with ,no dis-


Round Oval


cernable marlks. A dia-
mond's value falls roughly
10 percent with each drop
in a stone's clarity grade.
Carat
Carat is a unit of
weight used to describe di-
amonds and other gems.
Because of the rarity of
large diamonds, price in-
creases - exponentially
with weight. Although the
term is often used to de-
scribe size, the relation-
ship between how large a
diamond looks and its ac-
tual weight can be deceiv-
:ing. A diamond with a.
shallow cut- may appear
larger but be worth less
than a proportionally cut
stone with a higher carat.
Cut
Regarded as the most
important of the four C's, a'


S oO'obin and Bill Hart
of Madison, and Carol
Shirley Hodge of Lake


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uity, request the nonc
your presence at the
riage of their children
Jennifer Nicole Hart a


or of
mar-
nd
and


diamond's cut dictates its
shape and brilliance (the
amount of light a diamond
reflects). The wrong cut
can instantly slash a dia-
mond's value, making the
art of diamond cutting a
prized skill in the industry.
The GIA (Gemological
Institute of, America)
identifies three cuts. Bril-
liant cut diamonds have


Marquise


numerous facets that are
positioned to radiate light
outwards. Step cut dia-
monds have sloped, four-
sided facets that give a
more open appearance,
but can make inclusions
more obvious. Mixed cuts
incorporate faceting ele-
ments of both, and are of-
ten found with colored
gemstones.
The classic diamond
is, to most people, a round
gem of sparkling white
brilliance with a kaleido-
scope of dazzling facets to
entice the eye.
Yes and no. Diamonds
are natural crystals of
varying size and shape
formed in the earth over
millions of years. The tra-
ditional round brilliant di-
amond, though the most


popular diamond shape of
all, is hardly the whole sto-
ry
By the diamond cut-
ter's art these. crystals are
carved into gems of spec-
tacular and whimsical
beauty A cutter's skill will
produce a diamond of the
greatest size with the
fewest flaws and the most
brilliance.


Pear


The round brilliant
cut has set the standard
for all other diamond
shapes, and' accounts for
more than 75 percent of di-
amonds sold today Its 58-
facet cut, divided among
its crown (top), girdle
(widest part) and pavilion
(base), is calibrated
through a precise formula
to achieve the maximum
in fire and brilliance.
The oval cut is an
even, perfectly symmetri-
cal design popular among
women with small hands
or short fingers. Its-elon-
gated shape gives a flatter-
ing illusion of length to
the hand.
The marquise cut, an
elongated shape with
pointed ends inspired by
the fetching smile of the


Shane Lee Halstead.
The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Janet Zygarlowski and the
late Clement (Ski) Zygarlowski and Billy and Jean Hart of Madison.
The groom-to-be is the grandson of the late Ruth and Floyd Edgerly.
Jennifer is currently employed at Shands Live Oak in Live Oak.
Shane is currently employed at Quest Aviation, Inc., in Lake City.
The ceremony will take place Dec. 6, 2008, at 4:30 in the afternoon
at the First Baptist Church 1898 Sanctuary, Madison. The reception
will follow at the Madison County Country Club in Madison. No
local invitations are being sent. All family and friends are invited
to attend.


Marquise de Pompadour,
was commissioned by the
Sun King, France's Louis
XIV, who wanted a dia-
mond to match it. It is gor-
geous when used as a soli-
taire or when enhanced by
smaller diamonds.
The pear shaped cut is
a hybrid cut, combining
the best of the oval and the
marquise. It is shaped


most like a sparkling
teardrop. It also belongs to
that category of diamond
whose design most com-
plements a hand with
small or average-length
fingers. It is particularly
beautiful for pendants or
earrings.
The heart-shaped dia-
mond cut is the ultimate
symbol of romance. It is
essentially a pear-shaped
diamond with a cleft at the
top. The skill of the cutter
determines the beauty of
the cut. Look for a stone
with an even shape and a
well-defined outline.;
The emerald cut is a
rectangular shape with
cut corners. It is known as
a step cut because its con-
centric broad, flat planes
resemble stair steps. Since
inclusions and inferior
color are more pro-
nounced in this particular
cut, take pains to select a
stone of superior clarity
and color.
The princess cut is a
square or rectangular cut
With numerous sparkling
facets. It is a relatively
new cut and often finds its
way into solitaire engage-
ment rings. Flattering to a
hand with long fingers, it
is often embellished with
triangular stones at 'its
sides. Because of its de-
sign, this cut requires
more weight to be directed


Destination Wedding?
In Tuxedo Sales & Rentals!





INCORPORATM


toward the diamond's
depth in order to maxi-
mize brilliance. Depth per-
centages of 70% to 78%
are not uncommon.
The trilliant diamond
cut is a spectacular wedge
of brittle fire. First devel-
oped in Amsterdam, the
exact design can vary de-
pending on a particular di-
amond's natural charac-
teristics and the cutter's
personal preferences. It
may be a traditional trian-
gular shape with pointed
corners or a more rounded
triangular shape with. 25
facets on the crown, 19
facets on the pavilion, and
a polished girdle. It is defi-
nitely for the adventurous.
The radiant cut is a
square or rectangular cut
that combines the ele-
gance of the emerald
shape with the brilliance
of the round, and its 70
facets maximize the effect
of its color refraction. Be-
cause of its design, this
cut requires more weight
to be directed toward the
diamond's depth in order
to maximize brilliance.
Depth percentages of 70%
to 78% are not uncommon.
The cushion cut dia-
mond is an antique style of
cut that looks like a cross
between an Old Mine Cut
(a deep cut with large
facets that was common in
the late 19th and.the early
20th centuries) and a mod-
prn oval cut.
The shape of things to
come in diamonds has al-
ready produced other fan-
ciful and innovative styles
such as the flower, clover-
leaf, triangle and kite. Nor
does it stop there. Some
cuts are variations on
standard shapes, others
spin off the natural crys-
tal formation of the stone,
and still others take the
idea of shape to revolu-
.tionary new heights. Indi-
viduality and taste deter-
mine the fashion, and the
magic of the gem cutter
transforms each stone
into a unique work of art.
Whichever you choose,
make sure it matches the
personality of the woman
who will wear it. And,
above all, give the ring
with love.


We can help!


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Diamod 'dar5 1e wJewe/ry
S" 'S ruiny you since 1923


3321 N. Valdosta Rd.
Valdosta, Georgia 31602
229-242-8546 ' Member American Gem Society


to a . a. G, s


The above six diamond cuts are some of the most popular on the market today. Alone, or accompanied by oth-
er stones, diamonds enhance the beauty of any woman and are a symbol of a love everlasting.


Heart Emerald


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Wednesday, December 3, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier * 9A

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10A * Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 3, 2008


SPORTS


Cowboy s To Play Bolles At Boot Hi


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County
Cowboys have advanced to
the third round of the
Florida 2-A State Champi-
onships, with a 35-28 win
over Pensacola Catholic.
Both offense and defense
got a workout in this one,
but the "Boys from Boot
Hill" again demonstrated
that champions are. often
made in the fourth quar-
ter.
Their next stop is a
home game against the
Bolles Bulldogs from Jack-
sonville.
Offensive Coordinator ,
Michael Coe worked the
backfield well, keeping the
Crusaders looking for di-
vine intervention to slow
down the Cowboy running
game that has mystified
opponents all year. "The
players responded well
when they needed to. Each
of them stepped up, but it
was definitely a hard-
fought battle," Coe noted.
The defense faced one
of its. hardest challenges
all year. Defensive Coordi-
nator Rod Williams previ-
ously mentioned that the
Cowboys often face teams
that are bigger, so, as need-
ed, he employs a lot of
movement and tremen-
dous speed off the snap to
make up the difference.
This was certainly evident
all nightagainst the Cru-
saders, proving that a
well-disciplined defense:


Friday Night


Photo Courtesy of Lisa Flournoy


The Cowboy defense digs in against the Crusaders during Round 2 of the Florida 2-A State Championships.


with a big heart is the
strategy of champions.
Jacobbi McDaniel was
named Defensive Player of
the Week, joining Quanta


"the Missile" Barfield and
the rest of the Gridiron
Gate, proving that it's eas-
ier to smuggle a gun
through the airport than it


is to sneak a pigskin past
the Cowboys.
Corey Akins was
named Offensive Player of
the Week. Running in the
-same backfield as Chris
Thompson, Akins' perfor-
mance may not receive as
many accolades as it de-
serves. However, to those
who are close to the team,
and surely to any re-
cruiter with an interest,
Akins distinguished him-
self again, this time to the


misfortune of the Cru-
saders.
Madison County is the
last public school remain-.
ing in the playoffs. Their
Friday opponent, The
Bolles School, is a private
K-12 school. The other
semi-final match-up is
Tampa Catholic versus
Gulliver Preparatory Gul-
liver Prep is located in
Pinehurst, a suburb of Mi-
ami.
Head Coach Frankie


Carroll and the entire
Cowboy coaching staff
want to send out huge
thanks to all the fans who
traveled to Pensacola to
support the team, and
gratefully .urge, everyone.
to bring'that spirit home
this Friday against Bolles.
LET'S LIFT THE
ROOF OFF BOOT HILL!
GO, COWBOYS!
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


'- ' - * . ' *' .' ,I . -.
.' s. , . ^" *r :' * ii. . .- . *^ "i
'1*" ?. ' - " "
"k" , ,', -' ' ' '. � ' ' :'" " ' " '


Photo Courtesy of Lisa Flournoy
Corey Akins heads outside and up field against the Crusaders in the second round
of the "Road to the Repeat."




PlaSyers of the W8ee0
i-cmm ^ 1--flW7EflkI


Photo Courtesy of Lisa Flournoy
Quarterback Kelvin Singletary has proved himself a rushing threat all season, in-
cluding the closing touchdown against Pensacola Catholic to advance in the 2-A State
playoffs.


r - - - - - - - - - - - - - m


I


CONGRATULATIONS TO

Last Week's Winners!


1st Mark Gress

2nd Kelsev Mercer

3rd Gre Gram


-*Eu



I
I
I

I
I






I









Wednesday, December 3, 2008


www.greenepublishing.com



SPORTS


Madison County Carrier * 11A.


ACA Middle School Boys


Defeat Steinhatchee 41-22


By Fran Hunt
Special from the Monticello News
The Aucilla Christian Academy mid-
dle school boys basketball team won their
season opener, defeating Steinhatchee,
Tuesday, Nov. 25, 41-22.
ACA and Steinhatchee tied the first
quarter score at 4-4; Aucilla clobbered
Steinhatchee during the second quarter,


18-4; the young Warriors downed Stein-
hatchee in the third, 14-8; and Steinhatch-
ee inched past Aucilla 6-5 during the
fourth.
Scoring for Aucilla were Jared Turn-
er, 11 points; Tres Copeland, 4; Jay Fin-
layson, 4; Bradley Holm, 4 points; Bran-
don Holm, 3 points; Jay Dickey, 2 points;
and Jared Jackson, 2 points.


BASKETBALL GAME CANCELLED


By Eddie Richie
Madison County High School Varsity &
JV Boys Basketball Coach
The basketball game between Madi-
son and Brooks Counties that was sched-
uled for Friday, Dec. 5, has been post-
poned.
Brooks County has a scheduling con-


flict for that evening. They are hosting a
playoff game and can't host both games
on the same night.
I will let everyone know when our
game has been rescheduled.
On a separate note, we have a game
scheduled for today: boys vs. Lincoln at
NFCC, 6 and 7:30.


'7 - '


MCHS Boys Basketball Update


By Eddie Richie
Madison County High School Varsity &
JV Boys Basketball Coach
The Madison County High School
varsity boys played very well for their
first regular season game on Nov. 25.
The defense was strong through-
out. They played smart and together
through foul trouble.
We still have a lot of work to do. We
missed 32 points worth of lay-ups in
the game.
You all can do the math to see what
our potential is.
Statistics from the varsity game:
Madison � 76
Mayo 61
Leaders:
DeAngelo Tucker: 29 points. 7 as-
sists, 5 rebounds, 8 steals
Solomon Griffin: 14 points, 6 re-
bounds, 2 assists. 2 blockA
Jacoby Robinson: 12 points, 2 as-
sists, 4 rebounds, 5 steals
O.P Lowe: llpoints, 9 rebounds, 3
steals

The JV boys also started off the
year with a bang, playing well on Nov.
25.
The first quarter score was 30-10.
Freshman Bryon Williams did very


well in his debut. Chris Brown and
Stephan Watts were great floor leaders
that returned from last year's JV, along
with first year sophomore, Laterrian
McDaniel. Freshman Charles Brown
played inspired ball.
I was very proud of how they
played very aggressively and hustled
throughout the entire game.
Statistics from the JVgame:
Madison 69
Mayo 33
Leader.:
Bryon Williams: 21 points
Stephan Watts: 14 points
Charles Brown: 10 points
Chris Brown: 10 points
Rashad Guyton: 5 points
Laterrian McDaniel: 5 points
Keith Thomas: 4 points


Dec. 3
Dec. 5
Dec. 9
Dec. 11
Dec. 12
Dec. 16
Dec. 18
Dec. 20


Upcoming Boys Games:
Home vs. Lincoln
CANCELLED
At Godby High
At Lafayette Co. High
Home vs. Jefferson Co.
Home vs: Baker Co.
At Taylor Co. High
Home vs. Suwannee Co.


Dec. 29-31 First Coast Classic
Jan. 6 At Florida High


JV&V

JV&V
JV&V
JV&V
JV&V
JV&V
JV&V
v
JV&V
JV &V


Recession Official


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The current recession
began in December 2007,
says the National Bureau
of Economic Research,
meaning, this month, it is
entering its twelfth
month.
The good news is that
the worst two post-war re-
cessions, which began in
November 1973 and July
1981, only lasted 16
months and were followed
by significant rebounds.
This would translate into
a positive shift by Sum-
mer 2009.
The broader U.S. mar-
ket tends to rally sharply
from recession lows, gain-
ing 32.4 percent on aver-
age a year later, although
a number of Wall Street
experts assert it will be
months before stocks de-
liver a sustainable rally
The employment mar-
ket had already con-
firmed the recessionary
climate. The U.S. unem-
ployment rate rose to a 14-
year high of 6.5 percent in
October as another
240,000 jobs were cut,
proof the economy is al-
most certainly in a reces-
sion. The new number, re-
leased Friday. Nov. 7, by
the Labor Department.
showed the job market de-
teriorating at an alarm-
ingly rapid pace. Unem-
ployment has now sur-
passed the high seen.after
the last recession in. 2001,
when the jobless rate
peaked at 6.3 percent in
June 2003.
October's decline
marked the 10th-straight
month of payroll reduc-
tions, and government re-
visions showed that job
losses in August and Sep-
tember turned out to be
much deeper. Employers
cut 127,000 positions in
August, compared with
73,000 previously report-
ed, and 284,000 jobs were
cut in September, com-
pared with the 159,000
jobs first reported.
So far this year, a stag-
gering 1.2 million jobs
have disappeared, with


over half of that decrease
occurring in the past
three months.
The employment mar-
ket is niuch weaker than
economists expected.
They were forecasting the
unemployment rate to
climb to 6.3 percent in Oc-
tober and for payrolls to
fall by around 200.000.
"The U.S. recession is
deepening," said Michael
Gregory, economist at
BMO Capital Markets
Economics. The final
quarter of this year is get-
ting off to a "particularly
ugly" start, he said.
Job losses were wide-
spread, reflecting the
mounting impact from a
trio of crises: housing,
credit and financial. Fac-
tories cut 90,000 jobs, the
most since July 2003.
Construction companies
got rid of 49,000 jobs,
with heavy losses in
home building. Retailers
cut payrolls by 38,000.
Professional and busi-
ness services reduced
employment by 45,000. Fi-
nancial services cut
24.000 jobs. with heavy
losses in mortgage bank-
ing and at securities
firms. Lastly, leisure and
hospitality cut 16.000 po-
sitions.
All those losses more
than swamped small
gains elsewhere, coming
mostly in government, as
well as in education and
health care. All the econo-
my's woes; a housing col-
lapse, mounting foreclo-
sures, hard-to-get credit,
and financial market up-
heaval; will confront
President-elect Barack
Obama when he assumes
office early next year.
And the employment
situation is likely to get
worse, experts say Many
expect the jobless rate to
climb to 8 percent or pos-
sibly higher next year. In
the 1980-82 recession, the
unemployment rate rose
as high as 10.8 percent be-
fore inching down.
The grim numbers
spurred calls from De-
mocrats on Capitol Hill to


enact another round of
economic stimulus of
around $100 billion, pos-
sibly including provi-
sions to create jobs
through big public works
projects.
"Today's employment
numbers are a stark re-
minder of how critical it
is we keep focused on uti-
lizing the tools we now
have to return our coun-
try to the strong job cre-
ation we had in recent
years," a White House
spokesman noted. "'We
know that the main prob-
lems are tight credit and
housing markets, and we
have the tools to solve
them."
Workers with jobs
saw only modest wage
gains. Average hourly
earnings rose to $18.21 in
October, a 0.2 percent in-
crease from the previous
month. Over the past
year, wages have grown
3.5 percent, but paychecks
aren't stretching that far
because high food, energy
and other prices have pro-
pelled overall inflation at
a faster pace.
To prevent the coun-
try from sinking into a
deeper arid more painful
recession, the Federal Re-
serve continues to ratchet
down interest rates,
standing now at one per-
cent. Overall, the econo-
my contracted at a 0.3 per-
cent pace in the July-Sep-
tember quarter. It was the
worst showing since the
2001 recession, and re-
flected a massive pullback
by consumers.
As U S. consumers
watch jobs disappear,
they reconsider some
buying, which the post-
Thanksgiving retail
numbers confirmed.
Among other factors,
that's why analysts pre-
dict the economy is still
shrinking in the current
October-December quar-
ter and will contract fur-
ther in the first quarter
of next year.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Gas Falls Below 32 As Oil Dips Below 350


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Last week, oil prices
dropped to levels not seen
in more than three years,
and retail gasoline prices
are now below $2 across
nearly half of the country
Benchmark crude fell
as low as $48.50 a barrel on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange, levels last seen
on May 18, 2005, when oil
hit $46.80 a barrel. Mean-
while. prices at the pump
continue to fall, with 23
states averaging less than
$2 a gallon.
Light, sweet crude for
December delivery fell 7
percent, or $4 per barrel,
to settle at $49.62. Oil
prices have fallen 66 per-
cent since reaching a
record $147.27 a barrel in
mid-July.
Oil analyst Stephen
Schork wonders if even
the low-low price of $50
will hold.
"Maybe $50 is too con-
servative given the putrid,
putrid look at the econo-
my." he said. "If we're not
out of these doldrums
nine months from now.
we're looking at $30 oil."
Schork said he expects
buyers to put some of
their current purchases
into storage and that in-
ventories will continue to
build.
The Energy Depart-
ment's Energy Informa-
tion Administration also
reported Thursday that
natural gas storage levels
far exceeded expectations.
driving prices sharply,
downward. Natural gas in-
ventories held in under-
ground storage in the low-
er 48 states rose by 16 bil-
lion cubic feet to about 3.45
trillion cubic feet for the
week ended Nov. 14.
Analysts had expected
little to no change in re-
serve levels, according to a
survey by Platts, the ener-
gy information arm of Mc-
Graw-Hill Cos.
Going into Thanksgiv-
ing, gas prices fell 2.7 cents
to $2.02 a gallon, according
to auto club AAA, the Oil
Price Information Service
and Wright Express. The


As American motorists continue to reduce the num-
ber of miles they drive each year, the price of gasoline


dips into affordable levels.
average price for gasoline
is on pace to fall below $2
nationally, and is current-
ly available at both inter-
changes in Madison Coun-
ty below $2 a gallon.
The decline comes as
motorists continue to dri-
ve less. The Federal High-
way Administration re-
ported Wednesday that
Americans drove 10.7 bil-
lion fewer miles in Sep-
tember than a year ago.
That number, a 4.4 percent
'drop, is an 11th-straight
monthly decline. Ameri-
cans have now driven 90-
billion fewer miles over
those 11 months than they
did the year before.
Rural interstate travel
fell 8 percent in September
and urban interstate trav-
el declined by 3.9 percent.


Also, Goldman Sachs,
which earlier this year
predicted oil would reach
$200 a barrel, said Wednes-
day that it was discontinu-
ing its oil trading recom-
mendations. Goldman said
Wednesday in its weekly
energy report that while
continued weak demand
and constrained credit
would keep prices under
pressure, it hoped that
high volatility would pro-
vide a better exit point for
trading.
Goldman said it is
moving to a near term
price scenario of $50 a bar-
rel, .but keeps a price tar-
get of $107 by yearend
2009.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@greene
publishing.com.


S1st Continental Mortgage
Finding solutions for your needs ----
97% Purchases * FHA Loans * Mobile homes
Debt consolidation * Good/Bad Credit
Call Today: 386-590-1856








12A* Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday December 3, 2008


I I .Advent Christian Village


e( t enville Pointe

Apartments


1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC
accessible apts. Rental assistance
may be available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-3056.
TDD/TTY 711.192 NW
Greenville Pointe Trail,
Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity

C9outherem Vllas of

C adison C(partments

Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR HC &
non-HC accessible apts. Call
850-973-8582, TDD/TTY 711.
315 SW Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
andDisabled. 1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.) Subsidy available
at times. HUD vouchers accept-
edCall 850-973-3786 -
TITYAcs 711.
404 SWSumatra Rd, Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider
and Employer





Madison Heights Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed for
low income families
150 SW Burngardner Dr.
Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833 ext. 485
Equal Housing Opportunity
I rt
House for Rent in Greenville, FL
(located near elementary school).
All Electric, Newly remodeled 3
bedrooms, 1 bath $600/mo. 1st &
security deposit. Housing Choice
Vouchers Accepted Call
850-973-7349 or 617-4 37-1905
RTN
HOME FOR RENT
Restored 3 BR Home, CH & Air.
Oak floors, large storage,
1335 Sq Ft Yard Maint. included.
Adult family only, no pets, $800
rentand deposit. Credit check.
432 NE Horry Ave. Madison.
Call George 973-8583, 557-0994
10/17- RTN

For Rent in Lee, FL
M.H. 3 B/R 2 Bath
2 B/R 1 Bath
4 B/R 2 Bath
850-973-4606
850-673-9564
11/28-12/19
Furnished, quiet one BR house
395.00 mo plus Security Deposit
Plus 100.00 Electric
973-4030
rtn cc




SATURDAY, DEC 6
STARTING @ 7:00 AM
AT
BIBLE DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
HOSTED BY:
NFCC LPN CLASS
PLEASE COME JOIN US!
WE APPRECIATE YOUR
SUPPORT!
12/3,12/5



BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004.
IF NO ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFORMATION ABOUT
THE MILL.
RTN





Downtown Office/Retail space
for rent. 700 to 1,400 Sql ft.
567-1523
10/22-RTN


FOR RENT
Office Building across street
from Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder
Office); 111 SE Shelby St.
Madison


UOR SALE / UOWNER1,
FINANCING
ALL LAND BELOW IS HIGH
AND DRY

5 acres Lee, North of Hwy 6,
Cayenne Rd., rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995
$5,000 down, $325/mo

10 acres Beulah Meadows Rd,
DWMH and houses allowed,
$49,500,, $5,000 down $459/mo

10 acres Old Blue Springs Rd.
access, DWMH and houses al-
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down,
$459/mo

14.8 acres Madison, North of
Hwy 6, Cactus Rd., restrictions
$73,950 ($5,000 / Ac)
25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)

Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
RTN

1/2 ACRE IN THE COUNTRY,
MADISON COUNTY $5,000
869-0916
RTN/TO


rner:
acres.
2005.
d with
k-up.
led

dison


House for sale by ow
2BR 1 Bath on 2.021
Newly remodeled in
Additional storage she
washer & dryer hoo
Appliances indud
$65,000 Firm
2 miles North of Ma
city limits
850-509-7084 or
850-973-6979

Vacant Land
Parcel #5 Rolling
Plantation, Madiso
13.57 Acres Vacant
Price $89,000 orma]
Call (850) 402-8
Realtors Welcoi
12




Commercial/Indust
Property
with state highway fri
23 acres, Corner l
Fronts both Harvey Gr
and Highway 53 So
Natural gas line
8 inch water mai
.access to city utility
fire hydrant, and servi
two power company
Property has easy acc
1-10, via SR 53 & S
Will build to suit ter
Call Tommy Gree
850-973-4141


Dunn's
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340
ANYTHING LEFT OVER 30
DAYS WILL BE SOLD
rtn



For Sale 1989 Chev. Caprice
Classic $1,950. 00
Call 850-929-4794 or
850-673-1148
12/3-12/12 pd



Lay A Way for Christmas
Scooters and 4 wheelers
JUST SCOOTERS
221 N. Greenville
850-242-9342 or 850-948-2788
Ask for Bob
RTN




I build decks, sheds, exterior
carpentry work
Call 850-242-9342
ask for Bob
RTN

SEWS?



S , 973


HOME BUYERS.. GUARAN-
TEED FINANCING THRU
B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044
WE PAY CASH..... FOR
YOUR USED MOBILE
HOMES 1980 OR NEWER.
LYNN SWEAT
FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY AND
LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE ZONED
COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-
5129

FIRST TIME HOME BUYER
$7,500.00 CASH IN YOUR
POCKET CALL DAVID FOR
DETAILS 386-719-0044



LOW CREDIT SCORES???
I MAY BE ABLE TO HELP
YOU BUY A HOME.
386-288-4560

NEW 4 BEDROOM 2 BATH
READY TO MOVE IN. CALL
386-288-4560
HOME ONLY LOANS
No mortgage on your land.
Put Home on your land,
family land, state land or,
rental lot. Singlewides
start at $350.00 month and
Doublewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
CINDY 386-365-5370


ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00
12/3-1/2 P&I per mo, Doublewide your
land $422.00 P&I per mo. Sin-
glewide & $30,000.00 for land
Hills $520.00 P&I per mo. or Dou-
n, FL blewide with $30,000.00 for land
t Land $602.00 P&I per mo. Our land
ke offer your land or buy land. I special-
015 ize in credit challenged cus-
me tomers. Applications over the
/3-12/26 phone, credit decision next busi-
ness day. Let me help make your
new home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
trial Cindy 386-365-5370
BEST CASH DEALS ON
ontage MOBILE HOMES. NO ONE
ots. BEATS MY PRICES
reene Dr. 386-719-0044


SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/2
, BATH EXCELLENT SHAPE
NEED CHAS, PRICED TO
SELL CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
MODULAR HOME FOR SALE
IN TOWN SAVE $20,000.00
TURN KEY DEAL OWNER
SAYS MAKE AN OFFER IT
MUST GO CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
BRAND SPANKING NEW 2009
5 BEDROOM 3 BATH 2004 Sql
FT $594.31 PER MO. SELLER
PAYS $3,500 TOWARD
CLOSING COST CALL MIKE
386-623-4218
PRICE REDUCED! SPACIOUS
MFG HOME WITH 4 BED-
ROOMS, 3 BATH, BONUS
ROOM WITH LOTS OF WIN-
DOWS. DISCONTINUED
FLOORPLAN. FOR MORE
INFO CALL SARAH
386-288-0964
BECOME A HOMEOWNER
FOR THE SAME MONTHLY
PAYMENTS YOU ARE
THROWING AWAY ON RENT.
CALL SARAH FOR MORE
INFO 386-288-0964
NEED MORE SPACE FOR A
GROWING FAMILY? 2001, 5
BEDROOM, 4 BATH TRADE-
IN. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
FOR MORE INFO CALL
SARAH 386-288-0964

FOR SALE ON 1/2 ACRE 3
BEDROOM/2 BATH WITH
ALL IMPROVEMENTS POSSI-
* BLE OWNER FINANCING.
CALL WILL OR AARON FOR
DETAILS 850-253-8001

FOR SALE 3 BEDROOM/2
BATH ON .75 ACRE ALREADY
SET-UP $2500.00 DOWN AND
ONLY $649.00/MONTH CALL
WILL OR AARON 850-253-
8001

FOR SALE 4 BEDROOM/2
BATH ON 1 ACRE READY
NOW FOR ONLY
$699.00/MONTH. CALL
TODAY 850-253-8001

FOR SALE 1999 28X64 3 BED-
ROOM/ 2 BATH $25,000.00
CALL WILL OR AARON FOR
DETAILS 850-253-8001
10/29-RTN


L-


r. naerandteMation







Subscni#etodaytog



Hthews you need f hm



thepeople you know.



iB uh''o"m mmimmmn-
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Step #1:
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973-9440
NORTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE


IJo


II


Phone Number:_____


Please fill out and mail this back with I
a check or money order made out to
Greene Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341 I
850-973-414 II o
S n ii l m n


Current JOBS Line Advertisement call 386-658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Work in a Community; Feel like one of the Family!

Director of Dietary Services
Coordinate all aspects of dietary service in institutional setting, 3
meals daily, limited special events; prior supervisory or management
experience in food service industry strongly required. CDM
required. Relevant specialized training a plus.
LPN
FT/ PT/ long-term care setting. Unrestricted Florida license
required; GPNs welcome.
Housekeeping / Operations Specialist
PT indoors / outdoors in lodge setting, general custodial / lawn
upkeep; valid Florida DL required; swimming pool maintenance
certificate a plus; weekend shifts may be required.
CNA
FL/ PT/ long-term care setting.
Florida certification required.
Food Service Staff
PT/FT in various settings including summer seasonal, institutional,
and cafeteria. Prior experience in institutional of cafeteria food
service a plus but not required.

FT positions include health, dental, life, disability, supplemental
insurance; 403b retirement account; paid time off, access to onsite
daycare and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. or fax
resume / credentials to 386-658-5160. EOE / Drug-Free Workplace /
Criminal background checks required.
11/26-12/5

The City of Madison Police Department is accepting applications for
Police Officer. Applicants must meet all of the following
requirements to be considered for employment:

* Applicants must be at least 19 years old.
* Must hold a current law enforcement officer certification by the
Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission at
time of employment.
* Must have a valid Florida Drivers License with no poor driving
record.
* Applicants must be of good moral character as demonstrated by
background, polygraph and psychological examinations.
* Applicants must pass both an oral, written and physical
examinations to be considered for employment.
* Applicants must pass a physical abilities test.

Applications and selection criteria may be picked up at the Madison
Police Department, 310 W. Rutledge Street, Madison Florida 32340
or by calling (850) 973-5077, or at the police department website at
www.madisonfl.govoffice2.com. Applications may be found at the
police department webpage. Applications received will be kept in
active status for a period of six months, at which time applications
are placed considered inactive. It is each applicant's responsibility to
keep their application up to date and active to be considered for
employment, as openings occur. The police department accepts and
receives applications on a continuous basis and chooses qualified
employees based on active applications currently on file. The City of
Madison is an equal opportunity employer who recognizes veteran's
preference, and is a drug free work place.
12/3-12/12


ruth.
n,
ies,
ce from
aies.
cess to
R 14.
nant.
ene
RTN


Newly renovated back to the
1920's era Call 973-4141
RTN]


ANTsy


to sell those


old items you


have just


lying around


the house?


Sell Them In



The Classifieds



850-9734141









Wednesday, December 3, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier * 13A



LEGALS


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Randell H. Rowe, Jr., deceased, whose date of
death was October 31, 2008, and whose social security number is 263-54-6676, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is P. 0. Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341-0237. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is November 26, 2008.
11/26/0812/3/8

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON, COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARILYN KIAUPA
FILE NUMBER: 2008-78-CP
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS .
The administrators'of the estate of Marilyn M. Kiaupa, whose date of death was
December 14, 2007, is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is Madison County Courthouse, Post Office Box 237,
Madison, FL 32341-0237. The names and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estates must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDANT'S DATE OF-
DEATH IS BARRED.
12/03/08-12110/08

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING
The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will
hold a special meeting, December 18, 2008 in the Regency Room of the Ramada Inn
North, 2900 North Monroe St., Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting will begin at 1:00 pn.m.
E.S.T. The meeting will be open to the public.



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASEN0. 2008-112-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF .
DORIS B. RAINES
aik/a Doris Browning Raines
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DORIS B. RAINES, deceased, whose date of
death was October 9, 2008; is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Flori-
da, Probate Division; File Number 2008-112-CP; the names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who
have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OFA COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or
demands against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRE).
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIMS FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS December 3,2008.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant to F. S. 713585(6), Elsie Title Services, LLC w/pwer of attorney will sell the
listed autos to highest bidder subject to any liens; Net proceeds deposited with clerk of
court per 713585; owner/Ilen holders right to a hearing per F. S. 713.585(6); to post
bond per F. S. 559.917; owner may redeem vehicle for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
w/reserve; inspect 1 wk prior @ lienor facility; cash or cashier's check: 25% buyer
prem; anyone interested ph (941) 486-0800. sale date 1/5/2009 @ 9:00 am @ 6025 S SR
53, Madison 32340-9428. storage @ $1650 per day inc. tax;'
JFSr M16 lien amt $1,600.00 1999 Ford F550 Tr, Whi, 1FDAF56F4XEC49079
lienor: Jimmie's Firestone, 6025 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340-9428 Reg # MV11891,
(850) 973-8546.
12/03/08





ANF
ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA
Clasi.iled | Display | Metro Daily



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1-866-742-1373


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Adoption
Pregnant? Consider-
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Lisa. (800) 900-2980, pin 00.
FL Bar# 0150789.

Announcements

Run your ad'
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Florida newspapers reach-
ing over 4 MILLION read-
ers for $475. Call this
newspaper or (866)742-1373
for more details or visit:
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fieds.com.

Auctions.

AUCTIONS! Saturday
December .6th 10:00 A.M.
211 Acres� Highway 142,
Selmer, Tennessee. 1:00
P.M. 85 Acres� Harris
Road, Crump, Tennessee..
FREE BROCHURE:
(877)914-7653. Garner Auc-
tions, Inc. Ken Garner TN
FIRM 4293.
www.garnerauctionsinc. c
om.

Auto
Donations

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grams; Breast Cancer Info
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Business

Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY
ROUTE Do you .earn $800
in a day? 30 Local Ma-
chines and Candy $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033.
CALL US: We will not be
undersold!


Be Empowered! Real-
ize Financial Fulfillment
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SSix-figure Potential. Re-
turning 2 min-phone calls.


Not MLM. Eull Training &
Support. References- Avail-
able. Serious Call (800)940-
6301, www.cashresultsto-
day.com

Create your own pros-
perity and personal free-
dom with your own finan-
cial bailout plan. Go to:
www.financialfreedom200
8.net or call (888)848-4777.

Cars for Sale'

Police Impounds! 95 Hon-
da Civic $700! 94 Acura In-
tegra $700! 93 Honda Ac-
cord $650! for listings call
(800)366-9813 Ext 9275.

Employment

Services

Post Office Now Hir-
ing! Avg Pay $20/hr or
$57K/yr Including Federal
Benefits and OT. Placed by
adSource not affiliated
w/USPS who hires. Call
(866)713-4492.

Learn to Operate a
Crane or Bull Dozer
Heavy Equipment Train-
ing. National Certifica-
tion. Financial & Place-
ment Assistance. Georgia
School of Construction.
www.Heavy5.com Use
code "FLCNH" or call
(866)218-2763.

Health

Feeling Anxious
About The Future? Buy
and read Dianetics by L.
Ron Hubbard. Price:
$20.00. Order Now. Free
S h i p p i n g .
wwwDianeticsTampa.org
or Call (813)872-0722.

Help Wanted

No Truck Driver Expe-
rience-No Problem. Wil-
Trans Trucking Will
Teach You How to Drive:
Company Sponsored CDL
Training. Be OTR in
Three Weeks. (888)3681
1205. Must be 23.

DRIVERS: CALL TO-
DAY! Sign-On Bonus 35-
41cpm Earn over $1000
weekly Excellent Benefits
Need CDL-A & 3 mos re-


cent OTR (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

/ Driver- PTL Needs
Company Drivers- CDL-A
earn up to 40 cpm. 1/2cpm
increase every 60K miles.
Average 2,800 miles/week.
www.ptl-inc.com Call
(877)740-6262.

Driver-BYNUM
TRANSPORT- needs qual-
ified drivers for Central
Florida- Local & National
OTR positions. Food grade
tanker, no hazmat, no
pumps, great benefits,
competitive pay & new
'equipment. (866)GO-
BYNUM. Need 2 years ex-
perience.

Homes For
Rent

3BR/2BA Foreclosure!
$11,000! Only $199/Mo! 5%
down 15 years @ 8% apr.
Buy, 4/BR $259/Mo! For
listings (800)366-9783 Ext
5798.

Never Rent Again!
Buy, 4Br 2Ba $15,400! Only
$199/Mo! 3 Br $11,000! 5%
down 15years 8%. HUD
Homes Available! for list-
ings (800)386-9783 ext 5796.

Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Computers,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance.
Computer available. Fi-
nancial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121,
www.CenturaOnline.com


AIRLINES ARE HIR-
ING - Train for high pay-
ing Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA ap-
proved program. Finan-
cial aid if qualified - Job
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance (8,88)349-
5387.

NOW AVAILABLE!
2008 POST OFFICE JOBS.
$18-$20/HR. NO EXPERI-
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FED BENEFITS, VACA-
TIONS. CALL (800)910-
9941 TODAY! REF #FL08.


Real Estate

NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS-Handyman
special bordering U.S.ES.
paved dr., well, septic, sin-
glewide with shop near
Lake Nantahala, borders
paved road. Only $49,000"
http://valleytownrealtyco
m (800)632-2212 valley-
townrealty@verizon.net.

VIRGINIA MOUN-
TAINS 2 acres on moun-
tain top near New River
State Park, great fishing,
view, private. $29,500 must
sell, call owner (866)789-
8535.

TENNESSEE LAND
RUSH! 1+acre to 2acre
homesites, wood, views.
Starting at $59,900. Tenn
River & Nick-a-Jack view
tracts now available! Re-
tirement guide rates this
area #2 in U.S. places to re-
tire. Low cost of living, no
impact fee. (330)699-2741 or
(866)550-5263, Ask About
Mini Vacation!

MID TENN MTNS By
Owner, 5 acres, perfect
mountaintop cabin-site
w/woods. Small stream in
back of property. A must
see! $26,900. Owner Financ-
ing (931)445-3611.

South Carolina low
country Hunt-
ing/Recreation Tracts for
sale. Close to 1-95 in Bam-
berg CO. Peace-
ful/secluded and loaded
with deer, turkey, hogs and
timber value too. 42ac-85ac-
120ac-235ac-500ac-730ac- all
on the Little Salkahatchie
river. Roads, game plots,
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Woman Writes Historic
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December 6th - 10 AM - Saturday
Near Tennessee River - Perry County
1,500 Acres - Selling In 8 Tracts - 100 Acres & UPI
CUnioted Creek - Springs - Pasture - Electricity
..-----X. Frontage on paved road - 6 miles to Hwy 13
Hudglns Auctions
10% Buyers Premium Great Hunting I Recreation Land!


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION


IN RE: ESTATE OF
Randell H. Rowe, Jr.
Deceased.


file No. 2008-119-CP
Division


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AdVertising IN etworKs ot riorlaa
a company of the Florida Press Association
FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM
We make every effort to submit only those ads deemed credible. Howeuei; if there are any ads listed that are against
lour general policy, run them at your own disC7-etion. For questions, Heather Cleary (850) 521-1175.








14A * Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, December 3, 2008



REGIONAL





Cki/UW^& Voww^ kOatfwtPeg


Come -ra


Pines Blues & BBQ Festival promises to
be the best show in the area. Thousands
will turn out for. a day filled with great
BBQ, blues music, the Gibson Guitar
Tour Bus, competitions, food, crafts and
much more. The weekend of Dec. 12-13,
the Tourism Development Council and
the Perry-Taylor County Chamber of
Commerce will bring electrifying and
acoustic blues music for the most enthu-


Sponsored by Timberland Ford,
Smith & Smith Attorney ,Office, Ad-
vanced Refrigeration and Goodman's
BBQ, the event will feature top national
and regional blues artists, Larry McCray,
the Rocky Athas Group, Damon Fowler,
Johnnie Marshall, King Cotton, 6th
Street R&B, Used Blues and Rick
Knowles.
The festival will also feature the offi-


201 West Main St.
Perry, Fl. 32347
(850) 838-2929


DECMBR 2-1, 00

FoetCpia ttePr Pry l

Presnte by TiberandFor

Bakyr BQ opeito


n i or shine the South s


bum. %
Damon Fowler, born and raised right
here in Florida, first picked up the guitar
at the age of 12. After being shown a few
chords, it was apparent that he was a nat-
ural. Soon, Damon was playing small
clubs in and around the Tampa Bay area.
Years later, and thousands of shows be-
hind him, Fowler is one of the most
unique and seasoned acts on the national
circuit.
Johnnie Marshall, born and raised in
Wigham, GA, has a touch of that early
Robert Cray styling in his songwriting,
guitar work and vocals. His songs are
captivating to watch and pleasing to hear.
'"A show that includes Johnnie Marshall
is a must-see," remarked the Perry-Tay-
lor Chamber of Commerce.
"We are pleased to have such a high-
ranking group of talented musicians at
this event. It's a must-see for any music
fan."
For the beginner musician, Gibson
guitar sessions will be held throughout
the day, and the Gibson Guitar Tour Bus
will be present for free tours.
The event will 'also feature a live re-
mote broadcast from GULF104FM, out of
Tallahassee, with prizes and giveaways.
The Chamber encourages everyone


cial Triple Crown BBQ Championship
event, where finalists from Alabama,
Florida and Georgia compete for the
Triple Crown prize. In addition to the an-
nual Triple Crown event, there will be a
Backyard BBQ Competition and the Old
Whiskey River Sauce Contest. The win-
ner of the Old Whiskey River Sauce Con-
test will win a guitar signed by Willie
Nelson and the winners of the Backyard
BBQ Competition Will win over $1,500 in
cash prizes and bragging rights. Also,
during the People's Choice portion of the
event, event goers will have the opportu-
nity to be the judge. Thirty of the top
competitors inthe Southeast-the best of
the best-will present their creations for
young and old to enjoy
If, that wasn't enough, some of the
most renowned blues artists from all over
the United States will be featured. For
starters, the legendary Larry McCray
will be present with his fine tuned guitar
playing. Larry was originally from
Arkansas, but later left home at the age of
12 with his older sister Clara, to Saginaw,
MI. It was there that a guitar was placed
in his hands and the seed was planted.
Clara and her friends sparked Larry's de-
sire to pursue the instrument., They fi-
nally gave him a secondhand guitar and
let him play with them on the
weekends. He has since never
looked back.
Later, Larry united with his
brothers Carl and Steve, where
they started their own band
with their own unique sound.
Performing on and off as the
McCray. Brothers, they soon
caught the attention of a De-
troit record producer. "Ambi-
tion" .marked Larry McCray's
first national hit release in 1990.
After many hits and many
road tours, Larry McCray has
set a place for himself in the
blues world, and he continues to
establish his own legacy
through his passion, dedication
,and love of the music.
Our Texan of the line up,
Rocky Athas, started playing
guitar at school and performing
at neighborhood gigs with good
friend Stevie Ray Vaughan. By
Age 23, Rocky Athas was hoh-
ored as one of the ten best gui-
tarists in Texas, as an inductee*
to Buddy Magazine's Texas Tor-
nadoes. (Stevie Ray Vaughan re-
ceived his induction two years Dam
later.) Rocky holds this honor picked
with such noted guitarists as ZZ
Top's Billy Gibbons, Eric Johnson, Bugs
Henderson, Johnny Winter and Jimmy
Vaughan. Rocky wasn't only recognized
by Texas musicians, the Eriglish rock
band Thin Lizzy wrote the. song "Cocky
Rocky" after hearing Rocky play one
night at Mother Blues, a local Dallas club.
Queen guitarist Brian May was also on
hand for those performances and was so
floored by Rocky's finger tapping style,
he incorporated it on the next Queen al-


./


Hey' all you grill masters: We're
having a throw down, and you're in-
vited!
Over $1,500 in, cash prizes will
be won by backyard BBQ enthusi-
asts at the Southern Pines Blues &
BBQ Festival, Dec. 12-13, at the For-
est Capital State Park, in Perry.
No BBQ event is complete with-
out the Backyard BBQ Competition,
where grill masters from all over
compete for the Backyard Title, as
well as cash prizes.


BBQ enthusiasts from all over
Florida, Georgia, Alabama and as far
as Texas will be here competing for
the title.
This is a sanctioned Florida BBQ
Association event, and will abide by
FBA rules for the contest.
For an application and a copy of
the rules, or for more information,
contact the Perry-Taylor County
Chamber and the Southern Pines
Blues & BBQ office at (850) 584-
5366.


Your Satisfaction
Is Guaranteed.
2399 S. Byron Butler Pkwy.
(US 19 S.)
Perry, Florida 32347

1-800-HAMPTON
or call hotel direct
(850) 223-3000


Robbie's Se'afood
Fresh Seafood * Smoked Sausage * Freshwater Fish
Smoked Bacon * Steamed Shrimp & Crabs
Robbie Jenkins, o0vner * 128 S. Washington St. * Perry, FL 32347* 850-584-5064


Weiss True Value
S� & Just Ask Rental
STAlrT RIG TART HEE. 209W. Green St, Perry, FL 32347
STAfRT RIGHT. START HERE- . 0^^54-51
850-www.trueva5845515
www.truevalue.com .


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-1


Photo Courtesy www.damonfowler.com
ion Fowler, born and raised in Florida, first
up the guitar at the age of 12.

to come out and join them for a great
weekend in Perry at the Forest Capital
State Park, Dec. 12-13 for the best in
blues: BBQ and so much more. Tickets
are only $10.00 per person for a weekend
pass.
Coolers are not allowed in the concert
area. Camping is available. For more in-
formation, call the Chamber at (850) 584-
5366 or go to www.southernpinesblues
.com.