Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00132
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla
Publication Date: October 15, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00132
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text



INSIDE TODi


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V04. 45 NO. 11 Madison County's Award-Winning Newspaper


FDOT Seizes $813,224



In US Currency


Colonel David Dees, Di-
rector of the Florida Depart-
nment of Transportation's
(FDOT) Motor Carrier Com-
pliance Office and Mark R.
Trouville, Special Agent in
Charge of the Drug Enforce-
ment Administration (DEA)
Miami Field Division, an-
nounce the seizure of
$813,224.00 in US currency


On Thursday, September
18, the money was discov-
ered during a commercial
vehicle safety inspection of
a tractor-trailer at the
weigh-in-motion station on
1-10 in Madison County by a
FDOT Officer assigned to
the DEA Tallahassee Task
Force.
Pursuant to a search of


the tractor-trailer, three.
boxes were discovered in
the passenger side storage
box under the sleeper com-
partment. A Madison Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office narcotics'
detector dog positively
alerted to the odor of illegal
drugs on the currency.
Madison County Sher-
iff's Deputy Jason Whitfield


assisted with the seizure
and arrest.
This investigation re-
mains ongoing by the DEA
Tallahassee Task Force,
comprised of Florida De-
partment of Transporta-
tion, Office of Agricultural
Law Enforcement, Florida
Highway Patrol and Talla-
hassee Police Department.


POUCE SEIZE GUN, CAR. CASI

Man Arrested For,

Drug Trafficking)04O4
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Madison man was arrested for
drug trafficking on Saturday, October By Jacob Uem t wIc'i1sponsor t
11. Do Inc ar.e" october*


Kenny Johnson

Announces His

Candidacy For

Sheriff Of

Madison County
I l Kenny C. John-
son, would like to an-
nounce my candida-
cy for Sheriff of
Madison County I
thank God and I.
thank you, the citi-
zens of Madison
County, for allowing.
m to become your
sheriff candidate.'
I nm the son of
the late Viagil and Kenny C. Johnson
Otha; Mae johnson
of Pinetta, Florida. My family consists
of my wife .Cythia Johnson and three
children, Toy Camisha and Kendall
Johnson, all of Madison County
Cynthia, my "wife, is employed by
the madison Colunty Memorial Hospi-
tal.
Toy, my daughter, graduated from
Madison County High School in 2004
and wnill be graduating from FAMU in
the spring of 2009. While attending
FAMU, Toy has maintained a 3.08 grade
point average.
Camisha, my second oldest daugh-
ter, is dual-enrolled at Madison County
High School, as well as North Florida
Community College. Camisha is on the
A Honor Roll and is a member of the
staff uniform office on the Madison
County High School Band.
Kendall, my son, is a student at
Madison County Central School and is
also on the honor roll.
My family resides in Pinetta, Flori-
da and are members of Greater Com-
munity Baptist Church of Madison,
Florida.
.IMy schooling consisted of Pinetta
Junior High epSchool, Madison County
High School and North Florida Junior
College of Madison, Florida. In 1987, I
took the Correctional course and
passed it, becoming certified in correc-
tion. In 1988, I gained employment with
the Madison County Sheriff's Depart-
ment. In 1989, 1 then went back to school
and got my certification in law enforce-
ment and maintained.a very high G.P.A.
I was employed at the Madison County
Jail for five years and then in 1993, 1 was
promoted to sergeant/shift supervisor
and maintained that position for bal-
ance of my 16 years.
While employed at the Madison
County- Sheriff's Office, I always re-
minded.myself that I am a public ser-
vant to the citizen of Malison County. I
always believed in being honest and giv-
ing an honest day's work for a honest
days pay When dealing with the citi-
zens of this county, I have always tried
to be fair, honest and treat everyone in a
dignified manner like I would like to be
treated.
If I am elected as your next sheriff,
I'll give you a sheriff that you can count
on and one that you won't need an ap-
pointment to talk with. My goal is to
hold town hall meetings throughout
Madison County to listen to your con-
cerns and the problems in your commu-
nity By holding these town hall meet-
ings, as a sheriff, I can gather data from
you, the members of the community
Please see JOHNSON, Page 4A


According to a Madison Police De-
partment report, Straughter was pa-
trolling on Base Street, Patrolman Eric
Gilbert stopped a 1997 Crown Victoria
for a traffic violation.
As Gilbert approached the vehicle,
he smelled marijuana. He asked the dri-
ver, Roger Straughter, for his driver's li-
cense.
Gilbert issued a Straughter a cita-
tion for the expired tag. He then asked
Straughter if he had any marijuana in
his car or on his person.
Straughter said that he did not and
that Gilbert could take a look.
Gilbert asked Straughter to step out
Please see STRAUGHTER, Page 4A


Lee Developing

Natural Gas

Infrastructure
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Realizing the strategic need to have
a complete utilities network be part of
the commercial and industrial infra-
structure that supports the develop-
ment of the 1-10 interchange in Lee, as
well as current and future residential
development, on October 8, the Lee
Town Council heard presentations
from engineering firms and grant ad-
ministrators who specialize in Commu-
nity Development Block Grants for Eco-
nomic Development.
Four engineering firms and three
grant administrators took turns trying
to convince the council they were best
suited for the project, which in this in-
stance was focused on introducing a
natural gas station and distribution
system to the area. One of the immedi-
ate applications of the project is pro-
viding gas to a specialty bakery that is
proposed for two of the fifty acres now
under control of the Madison County
Development Council as part of their
commercial and industrial complex lo-
cated near the interchange.
Please see NATURAL GAS, Page 4A


Last Chance Political Rally


Showcases Candidates


By Michael Curtis
Greehe Publishing, Inc.
Four Freedoms Park
played host to local, state
and federal candidates on'
October 10. It was a last
chance effort to gain votes
for the upcoming general
election on November 4.
Moderated by Chamber Di-
rector Ted Ensminger, who
is rapidly gaining traction
with organizational activi-
ties throughout the county,
candidates followed a tra-
ditional debate format of
personal introduction.
This was followed by a
question and answer ex-
change that allowed listen-
ers to briefly contrast can-
didates seeking the same
office. 0
Madison firefighters
provided drinks and hot-
dogs to the small but lively
crowd who comprised the
political devotees that have
supported their favorites
during this voting season.
And although there were (I
few new faces, the gather- B
ing of family, 'friends and d
Please see RALLY, Page 4A 1


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 10, 2008
Democratic Executive Commtlftee Chair Jim Catron
eft) and Republican Executive Committee Chair Wendy
ranham (right) Join Chamber Director Ted Ensminger
during the Last Chance Political Rally held on October
0 in Four Freedoms Park.


ane


for

Supervisor
1?1 *^^ -


1, LbeCTIvnmo .54 jres 'H ieailt 14A
kound Madison County 5-8A Money & Finance 9A
3tidal Guide 12A Obituaries 5A
lassifieds/Legals 20-21A Path of Faith C Section
community Calendar 5A School/Sports 17-18A


Wed 89160 tI
10115
Mainly sunny. Warm. High 89F.
Winds ENE at 5 to 10mph.


Thu 89161 Fri 87163 at 8056
10116 U 10117 10118 056 ZJIS
Plenty of sun. Highs in the upper Times of sun and clouds. Highs in Partly cloudy. Highs in the low 80s
80s and lows in the low 60s. the upper 80s and lows in the low and lows in the mid 50s.
160s.


f 4>








2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 15, 2008




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS





Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


Madison County Memorial Hospital Says, "We Are Here For You!"


Greetings to our Madison County Family!
Our Madison County Memorial Hospital had a very
busy month of September! On September 4, 2008, Rib-
bon -Cutting and Grand Opening ceremonies were held
at the newly refurbished Four Freedoms Health Ser-
vices Building. Dr. Daniel Perkins and Gena Plain be-
gan seeing patients in their new offices on August 18,
2008. The much-needed space allows Dr. Perkins and
Gena to better serve the great people of Madison Coun-
ty. They are located at 235 SW Dade Street in the heart of
beautiful, historic downtown Madison.
On October 12, Madison County Memorial Hospital
participated in the Senior Health Expo at the First Bap-
tist Church in downtown Madison. There were a huge
number of vendors attending this well- planned event.
Much information was presented to our senior popula-
tion ranging from health programs, insurance plans,
banking opportunities-just about everything that-would
pertain to enriching the lives of our valued seniors.
This awesome expo helped them to become aware of
the many programs and services that are available to
them-right in our own wonderful community During
this event, Madison County Memorial Hospital focused
on our excellent Physical Therapy Department and on
our outstanding Swing Bed program!.
Madison County Memorial Hospital offers a Swing
Bed Program to patients who are discharged from a hos-
pital- but more time is needed to get completely well.
With this program a patient can transfer into the hospi-
tal's swing-bed restorative care program. Depending on
various factors, a patient can stay up to 100 additional
days working toward physical improvements goals in-
cluding physical therapy. Medicare as well as many oth-
er insurance plans pay for this value service. The pro-
gram has seen a triple increase in patient volume since
last September.
September 15th found several of us playing in a Golf
tournament at the Madison County Country Club. This
event was sponsored by the Greater Madison County
Chamber of Commerce and Tourism. We had a great
time supporting this organization which continues to
make exciting advances under the great leadership of
their inspiring and energetic Director, Ted Ensminger!

Cherry Lake Fire Department

Thanks Greene Publishing, Inc.
1Dear Editot, J
Our department would like to express our apprecia-
tion for your assitancce towards the success of our an-
nual'fundraising event.
Thank you for providing numerous announcements
regarding our event this ensured the event's success.
Thank you for your continued support!

Cherry.Lake Fire and Rescue

UMwSWS Statement of Ownarship, ManagmenaMnt, and Circulatdon
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MCMH CEO, David Abercrombie, CFO Jim. Davis, Dana
Ferguson, Chief of Nursing, and I made up the MCMH
four-some representing MCMH for this great fun-filled,
community event that is held annually at the Madison
County Country Club.
On September 26, our community came together to
honor our local Hometown Hero, Dr. William Johnson
Bibb. Dr. Bibb is well known for his unsurpassed dedi-
cation to the medical profession and to each one of his
many patients.
The Florida Hospital Association has honored Dr.
Bibb as one of ten doctors chosen as a Hospital Hero. He
was selected from nominations, which were submitted
from cities and counties throughout 'our state. One of
these ten will be named "The Florida Hospital Hero" at
an elegant Dinner/ Gala, which will be held at the
renowned Peabody Hotel in Orlando on October 16,2008.
Madison Country has already officially named him our
local "Hometown Hero!" Many local civic clubs, govern-
ment entities, and his Church, First United Methodist,
all presented to him with resolutions-each beautifully
framed and each naming him as "A Hometown Hero!"
SMadison County Chamber Of Commerce and Tourism
Director, Ted Ensminger, joined our Madison City May-
or, Myra Valentine, to emcee the large. event honoring
Dr. Bibb on this occasion.
Mrs. Jackie Johnson gave the keynote speech for
this grand celebration! She, entertained everyone with
great stories from the past; she also read a beautiful
poem that she had written especially to honor him on
this day Along with touching speeches and entertain-
ing stories, a huge banner was designed and donated by
Jackie Johnson and family; it stretched across the south
end of the Gazebo in bold red,-white, and blue lettering
with the message of the day: "Dr. Bibb-Our Hometown
Hero!" There were many elaborate patriotic decora-
tions in the Four Freedoms Park done by special friends
Jenny Andrews and Jackie Johnson. There was also a
delightful lunch served in our beautiful park. Mr.
Aubrey Jones catered the delicious and beautifully dis-
played food. This celebration will definitely be remem-
bered for years to come. Many friends, along with a
large number of family members, gathered from near
and far to honor Dr. Bibb for his many years of service
to a very grateful community!
Madison Mayor Myra Valentine wrote the outstand-
ing letter that nominated him for the Florida Hospital


Association's Florida Hospital Hero award. Her letter
appears below:
Dr. Johnson Bibb, Hometown Hospital Hero
Webster defines "hero" as one whose courageous
life and deeds make him remembered and honored. I
look at Johnson Bibb as more of the Clark Kent "Su-
perman" type of person. He has quietly gone about his
business of caring for his patients and neighbors in
Madison County for well over 40 years.
Turning the clock back to his arrival in town; as a
young doctor, just out of the Navy, all eyes were upon
him. He arrived with a work ethic of serving others and
an appreciation for his country and family He placed
"the icing on the cake" by asking Judy McComas to be
his bride and share in the joys and trials of his life as a
small town, country doctor. What a team!
Johnson Bibb has stood firm in his profession as the
only physician in the town at various times in his ca-
reer. Tirelessly Serving, keeping his patients in the local
hospital, when possible, and continuing office calls and
house calls to those who needed him. He sacrificed
missing many of his children's special events because
of his commitment.
As a neighbor and family friend, I have watched Dr.
Bibb at our Nursing Homes. His day of visitation al-
ways brings comfort to the elderly patients, a caring
touch that medication cannot replace.
Johnson and Judy have established a "once a week
date. They get out of town for dinner and a movie on
Saturday afternoon. If Dr. Bibb has a patient in the hos-
pital in that city, they always stop by the hospital to
check on them before or after the "date." You see, it is a
lifestyle with them, not a job.
How blessed we are in Madison to have Johnson
Bibb as a resident Doctor as Madison County Memorial
Hospital. He has set a standard in his life as well as in
his profession...
Our community is very grateful to Dr. Johnson Bibb
and to his very supportive wife, Judy, a favorite of all
who know her. Family and faith contribute to his suc-
cesses. We extend love and appreciation to them, and we
thank you Madison Mayor Myra Valentine for express-
ing it all so well in your superb, winning letter!

Vicki Howerton
Community Relations Coordinator
Madison County Memorial Hospital


Question Of The Week

"Have you made your decision on who you, will vote for as President?"




3%'
Still deciding




Noo







s ---- --- - - - - - .
YesL. .



Log on to greenepublishing.com to vote on next week's question:
"Who do you'think has the best vice presidential candidate?"
Voting for this question ends October 20, at 9 a.m.









Wednesday, October 15, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee Elementary To Hold

Fall Festival This Friday

The Lee Elementary School Fall Festival will be held
Friday, October 17, from 5-7:30. p.m. There will be newer
games this year, as well as the annual cake auction. Go
out and support Lee Elementary School.
William Sircy, youth pastor at Brewer Lake Baptist
Church in Lafayette County and a Madison County resi-
dent, will bring the morning message at Lee United
Methodist Church's homecoming on Sunday, October 19.
Services will begin with the early service at 9 a.m.,
following by church memories at 10 a.m. and the 11 a.m.
morning worship service. Dinner on the church
grounds will follow that service.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week
and a beautiful forever! May God bless each and every
one of you!








Betty Jean Miller vs. David Miller dissolution of
marriage
TB&N Mortgage Corporation vs. T.C. Thompson -
mortgage foreclosure
Citizens State Bank vs. Linda Muhr mortgage fore-
closure
Denise Knelly and DOR vs. Tracy McDonald sup-
port
Jacinta Brown and DOR vs. Jason McDaniel sup-
port
Wendy Roger and DOR vs. James Roger support
Gandice Walker and DOR vs. Tommy Woods -
UFISA
Sha6rf'Straughtetr 'd# DOR vs.' James Williams -
rsupport--
Stephanie Stephens and tOR vs. Joshua Blanton -
other domestic
Kendall Isdell and DOR vs. Danny Batten support


*Why are some people ignorant enough to think
that lying, cheating, deceiving, having no morals and
trying to control a town by exploiting the word Chris-
tianity, all for personal gain, makes them worthy of
following and praying with? I think that CALL has
brought out the wolves in church clothing.

*I hope that now that Clemson has fired Tommy
Bowden that Ann Bowden will finally let Bobby beat
Clemson.

*The Cowboys need some real competition but
Lowndes County is afraid to play them.

S*Women can hide the fact that they haven't
shaved by covering up their legs and armpits. Men
would have to cover their faces.
SedyorStingest
Jacb 41".re ubishng c S t Scoplin
comlien o*jst gouhSo lug
bou5lfein enra.


Hear

One

Day, m

Gone

Tomorrow


When you listen to the rodo. do you
remember everything? When you re
driving own the rood, it's hard to
get a phone number. With classifleds,


-nvestin a
-lasing
mBtj~~essage

wK~ith tiMhe


If people forget the message, they
con look again-and the phone
number's already on paper. .



Publishing, lnc. !


Probably the
most important
issue to voters in Nation l
this fall's gener-
al election is the S ity
economy The
credit crisis and Joe Boyles
subsequent Guest Cohlunanist
plunge in the
stock market has -
everyone on edge.
For some reason,
this situation has proved highly advan-
tageous to the Democrats and their
presidential candidate Barack Obama.
While many voters have a tendency to
look backward, those who look forward
will base their decision on which candi-
date's policies will most' benefit the
economy over the next four years.
In a recent Wall Street Journal arti-
cle, economists Phil Gramm and Mike,
Solon suggested that with federalism,
we can judge a candidate's economic
proposals by looking at a state whose
policies most closely approximate each
proposal. By using an index created by
the American Legislative Exchange
Council (ALEC), we can evaluate each
state by its ability to attract investment
capital the economic engine for new
business. This is the central issue in
the current credit crisis how do we at-
tract investment capital?
Based on ALEC's competitiveness
index, the states which have added the
most new jobs and population to sup-
port that growth from 1996-2006 are
Texas, Florida and Arizona. On the oth-
er end of the list those states that are
the least competitive for new business
and consequently are stagnating are
Illinois, Ohio, and Michigan. I think it
is interesting that the Republican nomi-
nee is from a state (Arizona) at the top
of the list while the Democrat nominee
is from a state (Illinois) at the bottom of
the list. Might their economic philoso-
phies reflect this fundamental differ-
ence?
The authors explain that the differ-
ence between these states is a matter of
governance, tax policies, and regulatory
practices. "Business conditions were
better in the successful states than in
the lagging ones. Capital and labor
gravitated to where the burdens were
smaller and the opportunities greater."
That's what the data shows public
policies such as taxes and regulation af-
fect the formation of new business.
This isn't surprising.
What are the effects of. these poli-
cies? During the study period, the
states at the top of the list added 3.7 mil-
lion new jobs while the three states on
the bottom lost 400 thousand.
An important difference between
these six states is union influence. The
three "rust belt" states have "closed
shop" rules whereby every worker in a
unionized business is required to be a
member of the union. By contrast, the
three "sunshine" states have "right-to-
work" rules covered under the Taft-
Hartley Act. This means that union


membership is
not required in
order to work.
The plain fact of
the matter is
that it is more
expensive (both
for the worker
and the busi-
ness) to operate
in a union envi-


ronment.
To see this effect in practice, consid-
er the automotive industry; Fifty years
ago, Detroit dominated this important
business sector which was responsible
for one-seventh of all the jobs in Ameri-
ca no more. All of the new, modern
automotive plants are being built "in
southeastern, right-to-work states.
There are other factors involved such as
weather and taxes, but unions are a
dominate factor.
Another big factor here is taxes.
Money is earned in the private sector.
Taxes pull money out of the private sec-
tor for the benefit of the public sector.
The idea is that the public sector will re-
distribute the money as they see fit, but
it is a very inefficient process.-About 30
cents on the dollar sent to the Federal
Treasury is siphoned off to support the
bureaucracy that's why Washington
keeps growing and growing.
Some might argue, as Senator Ma-
jority Reid idid recently, that public
money creates jobs, but are they mean-
ingful jobs? There is.a strong case to be
made that private sector jobs are far
more meaningful in terms of efficiency,
productivity, and customer satisfaction
than public sector jobs.
The Obama tax plan claims that 95
percent of tax filers .will see a tax. cut.
McCain has not asked Barack to explain
that since 35 percent of tax filers pay no
income tax, how 95 percent will get a tax
cut. Perhaps this is the Democrat ver-
sion of "new math." But the larger
question is how can you stimulate the
economy when you plan to take more
-money out of the economy in the form
of higher taxes?
Let's not forget regulatory practices.
The private sector wants to deregulate
while the public sector wants to over
regulate. There is a happy medium in
between. I would argue in the name of
economic freedom and robust growth
that we should err on the side of dereg-
ulation keeping in mind that abuse will
require tightening the regulatory
screws, but that does not seem to be the
mood of the country right now.
In the recent vice presidential de-
bate, you heard Senator Biden repeat
the old populist saw of running down
companies, that move off-shore. The
reason that business moves out of state
or off-shore is to find a freer business
climate that will allow them to reduce
the cost of operation. Did you hear that
Michigan? If you want to stop the flight
and attract new business, then reduce
the cost for them to operate in your
state. It's just that simple.


Did You Know...

A crocodile cannot
stick its tongue out.


to 0ida Press.AsAsioi,0



Award Winning Newsaper



CnrFloud ers:miiag~w



P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
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PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene plins ey
EDITOR
Jacob Bernmbry
PRODUcION MANAGER
Lisa Greene
STAFF WRITERS
Michael Curdis and Tynrra Mserv*,
GRAPRic DESiGNERS
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TYESETTER/SUBSCRIPTIOW
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ADVERTISING
SALES EPRESENTATIVES
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Dorothy McKinney,
and Jeanette Dunna
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL As
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Deadline for c hiified is Monday
at:00 pm.
Deadline for Legal Advenisemant is
Monday at 5pm.
There will be a '3 hme for Affidavits
CIRCULATION DEPARTMWr.
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
Subscription Rates:
In County $30 Out-of-Coimty $3.
(State & local taxes included)


Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published, weekly by
Gdeene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the
Right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the man-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date. they are dropped off. Greene
Publishing, Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


Election Economics


I









4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 15, 2008




LOCAL CRIME & FROM PAGE ONE

-- 1


Man Busted For Pot Possession
On October 9, Cpl. Michael Maurice of the Madison
County Office K9 Team was working traffic on.I-10 when
he stopped a vehicle at the 247-mile marker westbound
for an equipment violation.
According to Maurice's report, while waiting on the
driver, Gabriel Emile De Cube, 19, of Orlando, to pro-
duce the required documents, Cpl. Maurice observed
drug paraphernalia in plain view.
Cpl Maurice asked De Cuba to exit the vehicle and
explained that he was a K9 officer and what his K9 was
trained to do. De Cuba told-Cpl. Maurice there was no
need to get his K9 and stated there was an ounce of mar-
ijuana in the vehicle.
De Cuba was placed in custody and Cpl Maurice con-
ducted a probable cause search of the vehicle. During
the search Cpl. Maurice located one ounce of home-
grown marijuana bud and several more items of drug
paraphernalia.
De Cuba was transported to the county jail and
booked on felony possession of marijuana and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia charges.
Sgt. Randy Jansch assisted Cpl. Maurice on the stop.


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cont from page 1A Fr


and it will tell me just when and where we need to con-
centrate more in certain areas to solve the problems in
the community
I will also try and get a contract with Prison Trans-
port. This contract with Prison Transport will allow us
to temporarily house their inmates at a daily rate and
this money will go back into the county's budget. If I am
elected as your next sheriff, I will persue and get any fed-
eral and state grants available, another saving to our
county As a unit, we will also cut out on any unneces-
sary spending which our citizens will save on taxes. Our
citizens of Madison County deserve a safe and clean
community and this is my plan for Madison County if I
am elected by you, the citizens of Madison County
I want to thank you for reading this message and ask
for your vote on November 4th for a new beginning in
Madison County May God bless you and your family
Paid Pol. Adv., Pd. for and approved by Kenny John-
son, Independent, for Madison County Sheriff


II


cont from page 1A


committed followers listened attentively
Jim Catron and Wendy Branham, Madison County
Democratic and Republican Executive Committee
Chairs respectively, coordinated the event with Ens-
minger that included spokespersons for presidential
candidates. Drawing previewed questions from a Madi-
son County High School Cowboys' football helmet, can-
didates were given a minute to reply, with opposing can-
didates given a minute as well.
Obviously, there wasn't agreement on all points,
which included a summary and stance on the proposed
amendments by several concerned citizens in atten-
dance. At the end of the day, however, there was one is-
sue on which everyone agreed. In these uncertain
times, regardless of candidate preference, all hope for a
better tomorrow, especially for those young and future
generations who can't yet speak for themselves.
Michael Curtis can be reached at michael-
@greenepublishing.com.


cont from page 1A


of his vehicle and to the front of the patrol vehicle.
Following a search by Gilbert, Sheriff's Sgt. David
Harper and his K-9 and Sheriff's Cpl. Kevin Anderson,
$2,180 in cash, marijuana and a firearm were found.
The police also seized Straughter's car.
Straughter was charged with marijuana trafficking
and possession of a firearm in the commission of a
felony

Natural GaS cont from page 1A


Firms from Tallahas-
see to Jacksonville made
presentations that were
scored by. council mem-
bers according to estab-
lished ranking criteria,
awarding points based on
the following categories:

1. Proposed Approach
to Meeting Local Needs -
25 points
2. Management and
staffing, experience. Ca-
pacity and availability -15
points
3. Successful similar
Florida Small Cities CDBG
Program experience with
Small Cities and Counties
- 30 points
4. Familiarity or abili-
ty to quickly become fa-
miliar with local condi-
tions and needs. 25 points
5. Fee Administration
Only 5 points

Council members were


PERSONAL INJURY & '

WRONGFUL DEATH



Jon D. Caminez
Board,cCertified Civil Trial Attorney

Ian Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III



CAMINEZ, BROWN & HARDEE, P.A.

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


given an opportunity to
ask questions during the
presentations, scoring
each upon completion.
Once completed, score
sheets were passed to
Deputy Clerk Janice
Miller who tallied the re-
sults for final selection.
Mittauer & Associates
in Jacksonville, who is
also working with the
town oh a wastewater pro-
ject, was selected for engi-
neering and Jim Parrish,
who has built a stellar rep-
utation in previous grant
projects with Lee, Madison
and the county, was select-
ed as grant administrator,
having each received the
highest scoring.
In closing business,
Madison Service Company
was awarded the bid for
additional building mate-
'rials, electrical construc-
tion and roofing materials
for the Ernestine Kinsey
Hall addition to the City
Hall complex.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@-
greenepublishing.com.














(d0 aji s
( 00dpr


Go Beyond Employer's
Life and Disability Policies
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones

If you work for an employer who offers a benefits pack-
age that includes life insurance and disability income insur-
ance, consider yourself fortunate. But you can't necessari-
ly .consider yourself fully protected. And if you don't have
appropriate life and,disability insurance, your long-term
financial goals could be at risk.
Life Insurance: How Much Is Enough?
The, amount of life insurance you'll require will change
throughout your life. When you're starting out in your career,
and you're single and living in an apartment, you probably
need a lot less insurance than you might a few years later,
when you have a spouse, children and a mortgage.
Because your life insurance needs will evolve over time,
you can't really use a "formula" to determine how much
insurance you should own. The only way to determine your
true needs is to take stock of your individual situation. How
big is your mortgage? How much will it cost to send your
kids to college? How much income is your spouse likely to
bring in over time?
By answering these anid other key questions, you should be
able to get a good sense of how much life insurance you'd
need at any point in time. From there, it's just a matter of
seeing how much insurance your employer is offering and
then purchasing enough coverage on your own to' make up
the shortfall, if one exists. And you'll find other benefits to
owning your own policy: It may be more cost effective, and
you'll keep the coverage even if you change jobs.
If you purchase a term life policy, .you'll find it quite afford-
able to receive a substantial amount of coverage.
Eventually, to help yourself meet goals beyond just protec-
tion, you might want to consider some type of permanent
insurance, such as whole life or universal life, which con-
tains an investment component in addition to the death
benefit..
Disability Insurance: Go Long
An illness or accident will keep one in five workers out of
work for a least a year during their working careers, accord-,
ing to the U.S. Census Bureau. And Social Security
Disability Insurance (SSDI) might not help, because, in any
given year, most claims are denied. In fact, in 2007 only
about 38 percent of the 2.2 million people who applied for
SSDI benefits actually received them, according to the
Social Security Administration.
So, while you are healthy and working, ask some questions
about your employer's disability insurance plan. What does
it cover and for how long? Many employers provide short-
term disability plans because they are relatively inexpen-
sive, but as we've seen, many disabilities last a year or
longer. Find out if your employer offers anylong-term dis-
ability coverage, which can provide benefits until you reach
age 65. If so, think about purchasing as much as you can.
If you can't get enough coverage at work, consider a policy.
from an outside provider. Basically, you need enough of a
monthly disability insurance benefit to replace your net
take-home pay, so that your current lifestyle does not
change. Disability insurance policies vary widely in cover-
age and premium, so shop around before purchasing one.
Take full advantage of your employer's life and disability
insurance plans. But if this coverage isn't enough, get what
you need on your own.You'll be making a smart investment.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


Edwardjones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


Madison County


CRIME BEAT

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GIVEN GUILTY IN A COURT OF LAW


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Wednesday, October 15, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Rev. Hazel


Frank H.


Woodard Donaldson


Rev. Hazel Woodard,
age 88, died on Friday, Oc-
tober 10, 2008 in Jack-
sonville.
Fu-
A neral
Seo.ri-a
vices
were


Octo-
ber 13,
at 11
a.m. at Beggs Funeral
Home in Madison. Burial
followed in Macedonia
Cemetery in Lee.
The family received
friends at Beggs Chapel on
Monday from 10-11 a.m.
Rev. Woodard was born
on October 15, 1919 in Lee,
and is the son of the late
Charlie Woodard and
Mamie Richardson Wood-
ard. He was. a lifelong resi-
dent of Madison. He was a
member of the First Bap-
tist Church in Madison
and the Middle Florida
Baptist Association. He
was a retired teacher, hav-
ing worked for many years
for the Madison County
School System, He was a
loving father and grandfa-
ther.
He is survived by his
wife, Marjorie Webb
Woodard of Jacksonville;
two daughters, Sheryle An-
nette Stout and husband
Steve Stout, and Brenda
Woodard Jones and hus-
band Steve Jones; four
grandchildren, Kevin
Stout, Jason Stout,
Stephen Jones and
Matthew Jones; and two
great-grandchildren, Hay-
den Stout and Skylor
Mathis. He is also survived
by many other relatives
and friends.


Frank H. Donaldson,
age 49, died Sunday, Octo-
ber 12, 2008 in Madison.
Funeral services will
be Wednesday, October 15,
at 11 a.m., at Beggs Funer-
al Home in Madison with
burial at Corinth Ceme-
tery
Visitation will be Tues-
day, October 14, frqm 6-8
p.m., at Beggs Funeral
Home.
Mr. Donaldson was
born May 1, 1959, and is the
son of Fred and Juanita
Donaldson. He lived most
of his life in Lee, except for
a short time in Washing-
ton State. He worked in
maintenance at Goldkist
in Lee and Live Oak and
was a member of Lee First
Baptist Church.
He is survived by two
daughters, Angel Leah
Donaldson of Lee, and
Sara Lynda Donaldson of
Madison; two brothers,
Jonathan Donaldson of
Lee, and Richard Donald-
son of Perry
He was preceded in
death by his parents, Fred
and Juanita Donaldson;
and one brother, Freddie
Donaldson.


,I", Community Calendar


I o0ta 0zs


October 15-22
Bible Deliverance
Church will be having its
annual Harvest Conven-
tion, through Wednesday,
October 22, starting at 7
p.m. nightly There will be a
different speaker each
night with special music by
local talent. For more infor-
mation, please call (850)
251-7416.
October 17
Lee Elementary School
will be holding its Fall Fes-
tival on Friday, October 17,
from 5-7:30 p.m. For more
information, please call
(850) 973-4461.
October 17
There will be a senior
adult health expo on Fri-
day, October 17, from 10
a.m.-1 p.m., at the Lee City
Hall. Free food, free info
and door prizes will be
available to the public. This
is the perfect event for all
seniors and caregivers. For
more information, please
call (850) 973 4241.
October 18
The descendants of
James C. Barrs and Martha
E. Land and their son Isaac
N. Barrs and Mary Eliza-
beth Boyet, are invited to a
reunion on Saturday, Octo-
ber 18, at the Day Commu-
nity Center in Day at 12
p.m. for fellowship4 A
potluck lunch will be
served at 1 p.m.
October 17-19
The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection's Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park will celebrate the 20th
anniversary of the Suwan-
nee River Quilt Show and
Sale on October 17-19. More
than 200 quilts of all sizes
and shapes will be on dis-
play during this three-day
show. Admission to the
Quilt Show is $3.00 per per-
son. For more information
or to learn how to enter a
quilt into the Suwannee
River Quilt Show, please
call Kelly Green at (386) 397-
4478 < or visit
www.Florida StateParks-
.org/stephenfoster
October 18


Join us for Pet Contests
and other fun activities on
Saturday, October 18, in the
Suwannee County Colise-
um at the Live Oak Fair-
grounds. Registration be-
gins at 10 a.m., and contests
begin at 11 a.m.
There are 31 fun con-
tests for dogs and cats; just
$1 each. Win ribbons and
be eligible for "Best in
Show" trophies. Even if
you don't have a pet to
bring, come and enjoy the
show. .
There'll be refresh-
ments and bake sale items
reasonably priced, super
raffles, and shelter dogs
and cats available for adop-
tion.
Need more info? Call
1-866-236-7812 toll free or
850-971-9904 local.
October 19
The Madison County
Historical Society will
meet this Sunday October
19, at 2:30 p.m., at the Madi-
son Veterinary Clinic.
Dr. John Lewis anid
Mrs. Edith Davis will give
the history of Veterinary
Medicine in Madison
County
Member dues are $5.00
for the year.
October 24
Mike and Kelly Bowl-
ing and LifeSong will be in
concert at Yogi Bear's Jelly-
stone Park in Madison on
Friday October 24, at 7 p.m.
A $7 donation is requested
at the door plus a free-will
offering will be received.
For more information,
please call (850) 464-0114 or


(904) 472-7865, or visit
www.northflorida-con-
certs.com.
October 25
The Second Annual
"Come To The Water" at
the Stephen Foster Park on
October 25, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. For more information,
please visit
www.stephenfostercso.org
or call (386) 397-1920.
October 26
On Sunday evening,
October 26, 'the Bibletones
of Gulfport, Miss:, will be
in concert at Sirmans Bap-
tist Church in Greenville at
6 p.m. Admission is free,
however a love offering will
be received during the con-
cert.
October 26
Pine Grove Baptist
Church will be hosting
their 152nd Homecoming
with Mickey Starling as
.guest speaker.'Lunch will
follow immediately follow-
ing morning worship. For,
more information, please
call (850) 973-2676.
November 1
The Pinetta Volunteer
Fire Department will be
hosting a Political Rally
and Chicken N' Rice Sup-
per with Cake Auction at
the Pinetta Fire Depart-
ment On November 1, start-
ing at 6:30 p.m. For more in-
formation, please call (850)
929-4633 or (850) 929-7574.
November 2
Lee First Baptist
Church will be celebrating
Homecoming on Sunday,
November 2. Rev. Dennis
Draper will be the guest


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speaker. Lunch will follow
morning worship.
November 6-9
Madison County's
biggest gospel music event
will take place Thursday-
Sunday, November 6-9, at
Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park
in Madison. Scheduled to
appear is the Bradys, Nao-
mi And The Segos, Jeff
Treece Band, The Old
Paths, The Gibbs Family,
The Reflectsons, Stephen
Jones, Southern Joy, Re-
deemed Trio, Pure Heart
anid VictorySong. Sunday
morning chapel service
features the Reflectsons
and guest speaker Dale
Thigpen. Tickets are $10 at
door or advance pass for all
three nights for $25 (special
ends before Thursday
night's concert). For more
information, please visit
www.north-floridacon-
certs.com or call (850) 464-
0114.
November 9
The Gibbs Family of
Titusville will be in concert
at Sirmans Baptist Church
on Sunday evening, No-
vember 9, at 6 p.m. Admis-
sion is free, but a love offer.
. ing will be received during
the concert.
November 14-16
The MCHS class of 1998
is planning its 10-year re-
union on November 14-16.
For more information on
this event, please email the
reunion committee at maco-
hi98@yahoo.comi. If you
have information on any of
the class mates, please con-
tact the committee.








6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 15, 2008



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


RECIPE
Halloween &
Drinks:








A big bowl of punch is the perfect prop for gory
and ghastly Halloween trickery There are lots of
Ways to make your-party punch extra eerie!
Make a slime ring from green punch.
Freeze green punch in a gelatin mold along with
plastic bugs, spiders and eyeballs. And place a few
small glow sticks underneath the punch bowl: when
the lights are turned down, the brew will radiate in a
mysterious and unearthly fashion.
Float life-size zombie hands made from ice.
Buy a couple of latex or rubber gloves. Wash
them thoroughly with dish soap and turn them inside
out. Carefully pour in water. Fasten tightly at the
wrist with a rubber band.
The shape will turn out best if you hang the
gloves, fingers down, from your freezer shelf. Plan to
freeze your uncanny hands for at least one full day.
When it's party time, run warm water over the
gloves very briefly--just long enough to loosen the
gloves from the ice--and carefully peel them off the
frozen hands. The ice fingers break off easily, but
that's okay--the disembodied digits just add to the
"zombie" effect.
Turn your punchbowl into a steamy, smoky
witch's cauldron.
Nothing makes a party spookier than an ominous
witch's brew. First, visit your local supermarket's
fresh fish counter and ask if they carry dry ice; if
they don't, they may be able to tell you where you can
purchase some.
Mix up a punch of your favorite fruit juices in a
large bowl and place it inside an even larger bowl, pot
or cauldron. Throw on your best witch or warlock
costume and add (using tongs or extra-heavy-duty
gloves) chunks of dry ice to the bigger container. This
allows you to create that delightful creeping mist
without putting dry ice directly into the punch,
which can be extremely dangerous. When you're
ready to create some magic, simply pour some hot
water over the dry ice. Continue to add hot water and
dry ice as needed.
Note: Never ingest dry ice!Be very careful when us-
ing dry ice. Always keep it out of reach of children and
never touch it with bare skin; use tongs or extra-heavy-
duty gloves.















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Madison's Newest Restaurant



Has Its Door Ajar


By TyrraB B
Meserve
Greene
Publishing, -
Inc.
A new
restau-
rant's door
is ajar in
Madison. g
Situated 5
on the cor-
ner of
Base Street
and MLK, ..ue mn ann
;,;1^;;!- ^ ^.a isage
the Wild IT
Plum will
be opening
its doors
all the way
to offer a
fine dining
atmos- *<
phere,
scheduled
for Novem-
ber. Each
week, they
will be
serving
brunch on
Sunday
luncheon
Tuesday
through
Friday
and dinner
dining
Tuesday
through Sat-
urday Madison has a new restaurai
evenings. November.
Converting
a beautiful brick home into a lovely restaurant, \
Plum allows guests to entertain family and frien(
with plenty of cozy room to dine together, whileE
giving couples looking for an intimate setting a p
to feel privately served. By leaving the interior si
ture of the house intact, there are also rooms ide
business meetings as well as a room perfect for p
or holiday functions.
Reluctant to categorize the food to be served,
allow that there will be something for everybody
traditional Southern favorites to classic internal
cuisine, the idea is to offer a stable farm to table.


Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo by Tyrra B Meserve, September 8, 2008
it, whose door is ajar until its grand opening in


with each
season's
bounty
bringing new
and different
ingredients
into the
restaurant in
order to cre-
ate special
menu items.
The empha-
sis, simply,
fresh ingre-
dients, well
prepared,
with quality
service.
Owners
Kevin O'Mal-
ly and his
wife, Marina,
new resi-
dents from
Tampa, hope
to create and
contribute
something
interesting
and vibrant
to the Madi-
son's com-
munity in a
way that
they know
best, through
hospitality.
In making
Madison
their home,
they would like


nothing more
than to see the
county flourish, while stillRretining its, cPharmingd c4l
aura.
Hoping that they will be welcomed into the commu-
nity, the Wild Plum is making a fine dining start by
serving the best to the people they wish to get to know
best. It is sure to be a fine addition to Madison's fair
city's fare.
Folks with good attitudes and cordial demeanors
are welcome to apply for all positions by calling 813-
774-2112 or 850-973-6405.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be reached at
tyrra@greenepublishing.com.


I~Ben *5 A ~1tI955 Pus1


Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo by
Tyrra B Meserve, October 8, 2008
Elizabeth -Hollings-
worth, Older Act Coordina-
tor at the Madison County
Senior Center, shares up-
coming events with the 55
Plus Club.


Your

Vote
i your

Early voting begins October 20 in I


President and Vice President
Barack Obama
Joe Biden
LEGISLATIVE
State Senator District 3
Precincts 3,4, 9, 10.4, and 10.A


Suzanne L. R. Franks
Madison County Sheriff
Opie A. Peavy
COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1
Precinct 1


Justin Hamrick


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Great. happenings were being dis-
cussed at October 8, 55 Plus Club meeting.
Enlightening the group as to some new
activities at the Madison County Senior,'
Center was Elizabeth Hollingsworth, Old-
er American Act Coordinator. Getting se-
niors up and involved, there are so many
things to do, there's hardly any time.
From computer classes to light exer-
cise, crafts to companionship, the Madi-
son County Senior Center is the place to
be for seniors looking for some fun.
Whether it's to meet new friends,
learn a little something, or to help out in
the community when able, there is a vol-
unteer activity program to fit all and
Hollingsworth is adding more.
"Anything people are interested in,
we're willing to try," Hollingsworth said.


"We are here to help people stay home and
out of nursing homes as long as possible.
There is a lot of stuff to do, many services
and programs, and we're adding on as we
go. These are just some of the highlights."
Armedwith her community calendar
schedule for the center, Hollingsworth
read down the list of upcoming events.
Some, like the exercise programs, last
only a half hour, while others are a bit
more involved, lasting a whole hour. Dif-
ferent activities take place at different
times and on different days, so anyone
looking for some action need only grab a
calendar and schedule their favorite.
As always, the senior center is look-
ing for volunteers to help lead these
groups. Anyone interested may, contact
Hollingsworth directly at the center, 850-
973-4241. One is never too old to have some
serious fun with friends.


DEM


Jay McGovem


DEM


LEGISLATIVE
State Representative District 10
All precincts


DEM


DEM


Leonard L. Bembry


Madison County Supervisor of Elections


Jada Woods Williams


DEM


DEM


COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5
Precincts 3, 11


DEM


Roy Ellis


DEM


Paid Political Advertisement. Paid for and approved by the Madison County Democratic Executive Committee,
Jim Catron, Chair. Royce Allmond, Treasurer.


Room 113, Elections Office, Courthouse Annex, Madison.
Your vote for these candidates will be appreciated
Representative in Congress District 4


I center I:


I E


I








Wednesday, October 15, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A



AROUND ADISON COUNTY




Planting Memorials For Passed Members


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
"Dear Lord,
'Please bless this tree
that has been dedicated to
Alice Sims. Let it grow and
.show the strength and love
that Alice had for everyone.
She was a very special lady
and she is truly missed. Let
this tree be a home to birds,
give shade when needed
and the same beauty as the
lady it is dedicated, to.
Thank you for her family
that has honored her today
by being present and as this
tree grows, be a shining
light in remembrance of
Alice.
'Please bless all of us at
his time and be with us as
we go our separate ways.
Amen."
The meeting held on
October 9, was a combined
remembrance between
ladies of both the Wbman's
and the Garden Clubs.
Each, members of both
clubs, Ruth Hutto and Al-
ice Sims, had trees planted
on Lake Francis by friends
who miss them greatly, in
the interest of the commu-
nity in which they were


Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo by Tyrra B Meserve, October 9, 2008
Fellow club members and family gather to honor the memory of Ruth Hutto and Alice Sims, two outstanding women of the community who
have passed, with the dedication of planted live oaks.


deeply involved. Live oaks endure, like the memories
.were planted to grow and of beauty in the hearts of


Continue Caution For Employment Scams


By Michael Curtis .
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Thanks to the watchful eye of Lee res-
ident Art Keeler, another clever employ-
ment scam has been discovered and
brought to the attention of this paper.
All rip-offs will at some point ask the
person being scammed to .provide a com-
bination of either money, banking or vital
identification information. This scam
stated that a company named Norton Re-
cruitment is "looking for US citizens will-
ing to become our collaborators.and work
with us towards structuring our world-
wide investment program. Your partici-
pation does not require any investment."
It then goes on to say "We are looking for
people that own a checking bank account
with Bank of America in the United
States of America and that are willing to
collaborate with our company in order to
place strategic investments in the name of
our company and by doing so also in-
crease their income. Other banks are also
accepted, so if you don't have a Bank of
America checking account, e-mail us the
name of your bank and we'll reply and
tell you if it's compatible with our invest-
ment program."
Of course, the goal is to get, and cer-
tainly not give, the recruit's private re-
sources. What makes this scam even
more dangerous is that it didn't just come
in an anonymous email, which is mostly
the case; it was posted as though it was a
Career Builder job ad. Career Builder is
one of only three or four nationwide em-
ployment posting services. Still the de-
fense is the same. Never give banking in-
formation to anyone until he or she has
been fully checked out.
These parasites are hitting people
more and more often now that the econo-


my is suffering and people are desperate-
ly looking for opportunities to make extia
money As a quick aside, don't throw out
the baby with the bath water. This re-
porter just reviewed a story about dozens
of new Internet millionaires who devel-
oped a good product or service to sell on
the Internet because once the business
gets going it can reach millions of buyers.
The rip-offs use the Internet the same way
though, sending out millions of false invi-
tations, knowing they can make good
money if only a few respond.
Here are a few more dead give-
aways that an offer is a scam:
(1) The email address goes to an AOL,
Yahoo, Gmail or other online service in-
stead of a company website. Large com-
panies that are well established have
there own email.
(2) Avoid companies with no recep-
tion staff or that only have voicemail.
(3) Find out the physical address of
the company and call that state's Better
Business Bureau or the city's local Cham-
ber of Commerce.
(4) If a company is overseas, especial-
ly if the offer claims to be from a foreign
governmental agency, simply avoid it. A
real overseas company will not be con-
tacting total strangers living in Madison
County to help them process their easy
money That almost seems too obvious to
even point put, doesn't it?
(5) Any offer that includes a big mon-
ey prize for only a small fee on the recipi-
ent's behalf will only take the fee and pro-
vide no large prize unless one labels a
huge headache as a prize.
Again, please be cautious and tell at
least two friends before acting on any new
opportunity, especially if it sounds too
good to be true and has to be done today


those who knew and loved
them.
The also dearly re-
membered Woman's Club
member and crusader for
Madison County, Willie
Clare Copeland, was the
founder of the tradition
that the clubs have readily
embraced, and since the
first tree took root in 1983,
there have now been 150
trees planted in Madison.
"Ruth was a fun, dy-
namic, and positive
woman," Dolly Ballard,
Garden Club President
shared of her friend. "We
were all blessed with
knowing her."




- OP
MI


A beautifully endear-
ing way to watch memo-
ries grow in the name of
loved ones-who have jour-
neyed on, trees will contin-
ue to serve as reminders
for future generations,
showing a growing com-
munity the beauty that lay.
within the ladies' souls.
Family members of both
Hutto and Sims were invit-
ed to attend the dedication
ceremony and it was ap-
parent how touched loved
ones were by the special
service. Hutto's daughter,
Bonne Haddock was
moved to tears as, after
journeying from Youngs-


town, Florida, she and
Sim's sister, sister in law,
nephew, his wife and son
took part in the ceremony.
"It is written in Gene-
sis, Chapter Two, that we
should leave a place better
than we found it," Ethel
Barefoot reminded listen-
ers.
It is in the honor of
these two ladies, gardeners
and dedicated women, that
the members of their
clubs, friends and family,
wish to leave behind beau-
ty that grows, trees that
shelter, and a fondness that
endures. , '-,


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8A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 15, 2008



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


i..


-. -
- :.., *., .


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 12, 2008
The 50th Florida Gramling Reunion was held at Shiloh Southern Methodist Church, which was founded by the Florida Gramling family patriarch and matriarch, John and
Elizabeth Gramling, on December 24,1845.


-Shilo Methodist Hosts 50th Florida OGramling Reunion


Question: What is the stock market going to do? Is
it going to go up or down and how is this going to affect
my dental health?

Answer: Wow! I am a little out of my league on this
one, but here goes. I can tell you with confidence that
the stock market will go down and that it will go up.
The trouble is I do not know when or which will happen
first. I don't know the stock market.

Teeth do not know the stock market either. Dental
diseases march along irrespective of the stock market.
So my suggestion, is tQtalke pare of your teeth and do
not let the stock market ups anriddown alter your dental
health. If you feel like you want to save or conserve
money, I have a few tips for you. I can save you money
and improve your dental health at the same time.
There are long established ways to reduce the cost of
dental visits by improving your dental health. First, go
ahead with regular cleaning. It is cheaper to practice
preventive dentistry. Catching issues when they are
small is much cheaper than delay. $100 for a filling is
cheaper and better than $3000 for an extraction and
bridge. Second, floss every day. This really brings
down dental costs. You do not have to floss all of your
teeth, just the ones you want to keep. Third, buy a new
toothbrush that works well. You are not stopping any
disease with that old worn out toothbrush. Fourth, use
Fluoride mouthwash everyday.

See your dentist regularly. Do not let your smile go into
recession. /

Roderick K Shaw I1I, DMD
Let us feature your questions. Contact uis at
(850) 250-5964 or rkshawyii'embarqmail.comni
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of
Dentistiry


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 12, 2008
The memory of John and Elizabeth Gramling live on
in family who gathered for the 50th Florida Gramling Re-
union held at Shiloh Southern Methodist Church in Madi-
iS6n County. Their mortal bodies were laid to rest in the
xjf ly cemetery adjacent to Shiloh Southern Methodist
Church.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
When Reverend John
Gramling and wife Eliza-
beth settled in Madison
County prior to Florida
becoming a state, later
founding the Shiloh
Southern Methodist
Church min 1845, he certain-
ly would have counted it a
wondrous blessing to have
such fine family gathering
to celebrate that spiritual
heritage 163 years later.
On October 12, the church
again played host, this
milestone marking the
50th Florida Gramling Re-
union.
Reverend Tom Ray,
Kelley, who noted that
Shiloh held great meaning
in his own spiritual jour-
ney as the church of his
baptism, returned to pro-


vide a moving message
that combined a rousing
reminder of the good news
of the gospel with a per-
fect peppering of humor
that gave everyone a sense
of thanksgiving for family
both past and present.
Huge kudos also went out
to the Brooks family for
their efforts in making the
old church shine, as
though the decades passed
unnoticed, marked only by
the headstones in the
church's nearby cemetery
The most memorable
exhibit, however, was the
remarkable rendering of
the Gramling family tree
created by Tina Zipperer
Golden, whose offer to help
an aunt trace a family di-
ary turned into a labor of
love that could nothing
less than astonishing. .


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Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis., October 12, 2008
Florida Gramling family matriarch Mary Lila Johnson
stands in front of the remarkable rendering of the Gram-
ling family tree with son Kin and daughter-in-law Jackie.


Covering a wall of con-
nected poster boards, Gold-
en constructed a genealog-
ical masterpiece that liter-
ally traced every member
by both blood and mar-
riage. Representing ten
years of painstaking re-
search and hundreds of
hours of construction, few
families anywhere have
experienced such an awe-
some spectacle.
Madison County
Judge Wetzel Blair, who
was recently in the news
following the rare treat of
swearing in daughter
Elise as an attorney, wel-
comed family and visitors,
his mother, Sadie Blair,
(85) being among the el-
dest and most beloved
members of the clan. In
fact, Sadie Blair, along
with the Florida grand
matriarch, Mary Lilla
Johnson (95), were again
the oldest family members
attending the reunion,
where Johnson's daugh-
ter-in-law, Jackie Johnson,
was re-elected as Reunion
President.
Following Kelley's ser-
mon, which was preceded
by a children's sermon
from Mary Bess Wilson,
-the older daughter of


Jackie and Kin Johnson,
the reunion was opened
for family business. The
Johnson's younger daugh-
ter, Elizabeth Waring, read
the minutes of the 2007
gathering, impressing lis-
teners with her exception-
al level of detail.
Messages from matri-
archs Mary Lilla Johnson
and Sadie Blair followed,
literally leaving listeners
applauding. The treasur-
er's report had to be post-
poned though, as Billie
Jean Fuqua was unable to
attend due to recent
surgery A few minutes
later during the offering,
the family voted to send a
bouquet of flowers to let
her know that she was
sorely missed and to get
well soon.
The spirit of the
Gramling reunion still
echoes throughout the his-
toric church, accented by a
chorus that, like the
Gramling family, contin-
ues to stand the test of
time.
"No spot is so dear to
my childhood, as the little
brown church in the vale."
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@-
greenepublishing.com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By IVMichael Curtis, October 12, 2008
Jackie Johnson continues as President of the Florida
Gramling Family Reunion.


-


--


4.0~w -









Wednesday, October 15, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 9A



ONEY & FINANCE




Chinese May Become The New Banking Language


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
As the U.S. government's second-largest creditor af-
ter Japan, China will certainly have a role in the unpre-
dictable drama that is unfolding in the banking and
credit market crisis that started in the U.S. and is quick-
ly spreading worldwide. Inter Press Service, in a report
published in the Asia Times (Hong Kong), reports, "The
Wall Street fire-sale has prompted economic pundits in
China and elsewhere to call on Beijing to snap up stakes
in United States financial institutions and further Chi-
na's influence on global financial power."
Chen Jie, an economics professor at Shanghai Fu-
dan University, commented, "China cannot easily afford
to pass up such an opportunity We have been anxious-
ly trying to find investment opportunities for our finan-
cial capital, but before the crisis, there existed a myriad
of visible and invisible barriers for Chinese investment
overseas, particularly in the United States."
These barriers to Chinese investment appear to be .
disappearing daily Reuters news service added to the
speculation when they reported that the head of the
China Banking Regulatory Commission recently said,
"China might consider injecting liquidity,into the Unit-
ed States to help it save the market," although a
spokesman for that government agency did not confirm
the comments.
Meanwhile, speculation still grows, and since U.S.
bonds make up the lion's share of China's $1.81 trillion
foreign-exchange reserves, the world's biggest stockpile,


staying on the sidelines seems out of the question. In
China, a financial-news newspaper associated with Peo-
ple's Daily quoted Liu Yuhui, an economist at the Chi-
nese Academy of Social Sciences, as saying, "the Chi-
-'


2.
I ,


...... 111W

-- q. ... . . .-

nese government was on the horns of a dilemma."
SLiu was further quoted as saying, "If China does not
participate in the U.S. bailout plan, arid that causes the
financial crises to strike deeper into the U.S. economy,
then the damage to China will certainly be very great. If
the Chinese government actively participates in the U.S.
bailout plan, however, that will mean the Chinese gov-


ernment assumes some of the bailout risk. Then if the
bailout plan doesn't go as expected, China may be
dragged in even deeper."
So for now, China's foreign ministry has emphasized
that China's main priority in the face of the current un-
certainty is to ensure that it keeps growing without a
slowdown. In other words, whatever China does must
first be good for China. A spokesman for the foreign
ministry added, "China feels strongly that faced with
this kind of crisis, it will be difficult to solve it by rely-
ing on just one country's strength. We need the global
community to join hands to deal with it together. This
is China's clear position and commitment to the global
community."
Lastly, Bloomberg financial news reiterated that
Japan and China are the two largest foreign creditors of
the U.S. Japan holds $593 billion of U.S. Treasury bills,
followed by China with $519 billion. The financial-news
service quoted the chief financial economist at Bank of
Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ Ltd. in New York, who remarked,
"China owns us, lock, stock and barrel, so it's more im-
portant than ever .that the U.S. monetary authorities co-
ordinate their monetary policies with China."
Everyone remembers growing up with all the elec-
tronics, toys and household goods that were labeled
"Made in China." If Americans aren't careful, that
same tag may soon be on the bottom of our bank ac-
counts as well.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


October Has A Tradition Of Stock Market Crashes


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
As the U.S. govern-
ment's second-largest
creditor after Japan, Chi-
na will certainly have a
role in the unpredictable
drama that is unfolding in
the banking and credit
market crisis that started
in the U.S. and is quickly
spreading worldwide. In-
ter Press Service, in a re-
port published in the Asia
Times (Hong Kong), re-
pdrts, "The Wall Street


fire-sale has prompted
economic pundits' in Chi-
na and elsewhere to call
,on Beijing to snap up
stakes in United States fi-
nancial institutions and
further China's influence
on global financial pow-
er."
Chen Jie, an econom-
ics professor at Shanghai
Fudan University, com-
mented, "China cannot
easily afford to pass up
such an opportunity. We
have been anxiously try-


ing to find investment op-
portunities for our finan-
cial capital, but before the
crisis, there existed a myr-
iad of visible and invisi-
ble barriers for Chinese
investment overseas, par-
ticularly in the United
States."
These barriers to Chi-
nese investment appear to
be disappearing daily.
Reuters news service
added to the speculation
when. they reported that
the head of the China


Banking Regulatory Com-
mission recently said,
"China might consider in-
jecting liquidity into the
United States to help it
.save the market," al-
though a spokesman for
that government agency
did not confirm the com-
ments.
Meanwhile, specula-
tion still grows, and since
U.S. bonds make up the
lion's share of China's
$1.81 trillion foreign-ex-
change reserves, the
world's biggest stockpile,
staying on the sidelines
seems out of the question.
In China, a financial-news
newspaper associated
with People's Daily quot-
ed Liu Yuhui, an.,econo-
mist at the Chinese Acade-
my of Social Sciences, as
saying, "'the Chinese gov-
ernment was on the horns
of a dilemma."
Liu was further quot-
ed as saying, "If China
does not participate in the
U.S. bailout plan, and that
causes the financial crises
to strike deeper into the
U.S. economy, then the
damage to China w ill cer-
tainly be very great. If
the Chinese government
actively participates in
the U.S. bailout plan, how-
ever, that will mean the
Chinese government as-
sumes some of the bailout
risk. Then if the bailout
plan doesn't go as expect-
ed, China may be dragged
in even deeper."
So for now, China's
foreign ministry has em-
phasized that China's
main priority in the face
of the current uncertain-
ty is to ensure that it
keeps growing without a
slowdown. In other
words, whatever China
does must first be good for
China.
A spokesman for the
foreign ministry added,
"China feels strongly that
faced with this kind of cri-
sis, it will be difficult to
solve it by relying on just
one country's strength.
We need the global com-
munity to join hands to
deal with it together. This
is China's clear position
and commitment to the
global community" -
Lastly, Bloomberg fi-
nancial news reiterated
that Japan and China are
the two largest foreign
creditors of the U.S.
Japan holds $593 billion of
U.S. Treasury bills, fol-
lowed by China with $519


billion. The financial- China."
news service quoted the Everyone remembers
chief financial economist growing up with all the
at Bank of Tokyo-Mit- electronics, toys and
subishi UFJ Ltd. in New household goods that were
York, who remarked, labeled "Made in China."
"China owns us, lock, If Americans aren't
stock and barrel, so it's careful, that same tag may
more important than ever soon be on the bottom of
that the U.S. monetary aU- our bank accounts as well.
thorities coordinate their Michael Curtis can be
monetary policies with reached at michae-

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Ruthellen Caldwell
Financial Specialist
City President
Wachovia Bank, N.A,
Madison Financial Center
200 W. Base Street, FL0408
Madison, FL 32340
850-973-8714
fax 850-973-8723
ruthellen.caldwell@wachovia.com


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Community Banks:
Safe, Secure and Solid
These ara challenging times.There istunnoll and uncertaintyaboutour
nation's economy. And In challenging times, consumers need to stick with
the tried and true and the Institutions that have served them mhl.
One thing is certain. Community banks ate still safe, secure and stable
financial institutions focused on doing what is best for our customers and
communities.
A community bank customer's insured deposits are safe In a community
bank. No one has ever lost a pnnyof deposits insured by the FDIC. If you
are concernedaboutthesafetyofyourmoney, talkto us to get the
straight facts.
Madison Co(m(y ComtunilyBank S, Secie, and Solid
BAVSRFINANCIAL Inc., Coral Gables, Florida
lspleered to aMwI rils fle-sasr "SUPERIOR"r rarso





Madison Coanty Commauisy Bank
Madkison Florida
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nlwsm It aw ithisha irft Md bulel Aofim

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AetW SskAtreW cseh" 00
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jai E....sat u saM ...M.n.flma ^
VFses, 3P-9t5340 Fat 00-973-IYI S
M eIIL Mm S tM8a144ee. IL 3U4







10A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, October 15 2008


m ... .4...


K


Davidl^
Chief E
We ha
great t6
It is 4w
tow.w
Have a ie
Madison Coing


I B


Bosses are the people responsible for
giving us fortitude and making our life
easier. despite the huge load of work. It
happens that although we cherish a cor-
dial approbation for them, but lack the
opportunity to display it. This is what
led to the naming of a National Boss
Day. which provides employees a chance
of exhibiting their appreciation towards
their bosses. The day marked for the cel-
ebration is 16th of October every year.
Now-a-days. Boss Day serves as an
opportunity of improving the employee-
senior relationship and appreciating the
boss for handling the pressure he has to
face day in and day out, to ruIm an orga-
nization effectively
History, & Origin of
National Boss Day
The entire credit of creating
awareness among all
the employees for a
day dedicated to
their boss
goes to
Patricia
Bays


)


Haroski. It was her efforts for having a
day dedicated to bosses that led to the
creation of National Boss Day, on
October 16. She was an employee at State
Farm Insurance Company in Deerfield,
Ill and worked under her father. In 1958,
she registered the holiday with the
Chamber of Commerce of the United
States, in respect of her boss-father.
Patricia Bays Haroski. instead of
working under her own father, was con-
siderate enough to scrutinize the adver-
sity and hurdles that her boss-father had
to go through to run the company She
thought 16th October, the birthday of
Patricia Bays Haroski's father, as the
perfect day for the employees to official-
ly acknowledge and honor their Bosses
and superiors countrywide. Ms.
1Haroski's purpose was to authorize a day
to authenticate thankfulness for her boss
as well as other bosses. She thought of it
as a day dedicated to the bosses, who
make the workplace much more conge--
nial for the workers.
It was four years later that the initia-
tive taken by Patricia Bays Haroski's
was honored by the Governor of Illinois,
Otto Kerner. He welcomed the proposal
of observing Boss Day and officially
declared 16th October as National Boss
Day, in 1962. Following that day the idea
became popular across the countries
very soon and many countries started to
celebrate this day with full gusto.
Employees across the work gladly
accepted the concept of dedicating a day
to their bosses and conveying their
respect through its celebration.


Thank You!
I reaLUj appreciateJoU,
Youwr hdpfr f, #aWnc waOs,
4nd howdourjenwrvus hea
Your utnse-fishness dspl j

I thankeouforjour khidinew
i wilt not soonfrra3&
SYou're, one ofthew nicestpeapi
r have ever nt
Joanna Fu<
Madison Nursing & Rehab0-
Would Like To Wish
JoAnn Gne
Administra
"HAPPY BOS
You are an expe
health field. Your
energy and w.
We truly appreciate that you are
here supporting us.
The Staff And Resident
of Madison Nursing & R6


Hap
Boss
To A Wond
Fro
The S
AlMadison
Madison E,


p


(I


Brad Meister

We Appreciate You!

Thanks For Being A Great Boss
All The Farmers Furniurc Staff


* K,.


FM HAPPY BOSS' DAY KIM i

TAKE YOUR SHOES OFF,
PuT YOUR FEET UP,
RELAX, You DESERVE IT!

Kim cc/A GiU de


... .......
Day,

mlo.-TWRR H 7"MI

W Mb
StAftJ Faculty
........ .


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^?ecuiiie Officer
accomplished
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uly a privilege
wrkfoith vou!
nderful Boss' Day.
Meen- .n.njl Hoip.d SrIft


'-




N1^


tentary
&Staff
ie Our
ncipal,
k
Hlan


#Dvi, V


wuch,
tor
'DAY"
dtin the
vre full of
rmth.



H-
b~ib


py
Day
iful Boss
Ar
itaft

k Center


Top 10 Things That Make A Great Boss
1. Shows appreciation of subordinates' efforts -- verbally.
written, and monetarily!

2. Has realistic expectations that are clearly expressed.

3. Is friendly and kind but keeps a professional distance.

4. Doesn't pile on the work simply because he/she doesn't
feel like doing it.

5. Shares credit for a job well done, but also accepts blame
when appropriate.

6. Is understanding about the occasional personal prob-
lem.

7. Good at setting priorities and sticking to them.

8. Willing to listen to subordinates' ideas of new ways to
do things.

9. Has a good sense of humor. Doesn't mind occasional
joking around in the office and isn't too serious about
everything.


10. Remembers
to be one of the


Dr. Meljime Hill


what it's like
little people.


IL'


Madison County
Central School
Facdulty & Staff
Truly Appreciate
Our Principal,

Sam

Stainaker


Boss' Day Trivia

During the 1950's the word "boss" enjoyed a
colloguial usage to mean "great," first-rate or
topnotch.

In the jargon used at the barnyard, a cow or
calf is called "boss."

In medical jargon, a protuberance, rounded
swelling or humpback is known as "boss."

There's a town in Missouri named "Boss"
with a population of 609.

"Boss" is also the name of a popular soft
drink in Japan!

"Boss" is considered to be ranked 3,714 in the
list of the most common last names in the
United States.


There are 6.7 million
alone. This makes five
workforce.


managers in the US
percent of the entire


Greenville
Elementary School
Welcomes Their New
Principal,
Clifford E. Cooks

Happy Boss'

Day!


-' -I


lizahbedi

from,
The Faculty & Staff
at Madison County
Excel Alternative School


THANKS FOR
BEING
A GREAT BOSS!
THE FACULTY 6 STAFF
AT PINETTA ELEMENTARY
Beii Moore SCHOOL APPRECIATES YOU!


I


WW~uR


Mesl


1i


Madison County Carrier 11A


Wednesday, October 15, 2008


.-*^









12A* Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 15, 2008



BRIDAL GUIDE


How To Make Out of Town Guests Feel At Home On Your Wedding Day


Your best friend from
college now lives six
states away, and the
cousin you grew up with
is on the opposite coast
from you. They may be
thousands of miles away,
but your out-of-town
guests still play an impor-
tant role in making your
wedding day everything
you dreamed it, could be.
"Americans are more
mobile and in-touch than
at any time in our histo-
ry," says Barry Glick of
NAVTEQ's, Traffic.com.
"Cell phones and e-mail
enable us to maintain
close relationships with
loved ones who live thou-
sands of miles away, but
on your wedding day,
you'll want to have them


by your side."
With some careful pre-
wedding planning and a
little help from local fami-
ly and friends, you can
help ensure out-of-town-
ers will make the trip -
and enjoy the journey
Here are some tips:.
To make distant
loved ones feel like a part
of the pre-wedding excite-
ment, consider sending an
e-newsletter in the
months leading up to the
big day You can do this on
a monthly basis or weekly,
whatever fits into your
schedule. Fill the newslet-
ter with\ information
about your- planning
progress ("We booked the
reception hall."), updates
on RSVPs ("Don't forget -


VWe 1te



Wecddhg cokes


k,. W 2v
^>. g ^^ .. b.^So. ; .."3?? f."-*" & "? c.^4


RSVPs are due back in
just two weeks."), and
amusing anecdotes about
life as a bride-to-be ("I
* gained two pounds tasting
wedding cakes last week!).
Create your own
wedding Web page where
you can include useful
photos that will help out-
of-town guests recognize
important landmarks
when they visit. Post im-
ages of the outside of
your wedding location
and reception site, so that
when guests arrive they'll
recognize the spot and
know they're in the right
place.
If guests are taking a
long road-trip to attend,
help them out by mapping


their route for them be-
fore they depart. They
may have navigations sys-
tems in their cars or they
may rely on Internet-
based map resources.
Once they are in your
area, Traffic.com is a
great site to help them
plan the best route to your
specific wedding venue.
The website provides real-
time information on *de-
lays, traffic jams and de-
tours, as well. Guests can
update the information
you provide by logging on
to www.Traffic.com them-
selves, or calling (866) MY-
TRAFC (866-698-7232).
For guests who have
cars equipped with a navi-
gation system, a map up-


date purchased through
www.navigation.com pro-
vides many benefits:
Confidence in know-
ing the best route to the
wedding.
Satisfaction in find-
ing .the quickest way
around a detour.
Comfort in finding
the closest hotel, restau-
rant or ATM. Freedom
from not having to pull
6ver and ask for direc-
tions.
Recruit in-town fam-
ily and friends to act as
personal assistants for
out-of-town guests, help-
ing with travel arrange-
ments, hotelceservations,
emergencies and other
trouble-shooting. Intro-


duce the visiting loved
ones with your near-home
volunteers by e-mail or
phone.
Negotiate a good ho-
tel room rate for out-of-
town guests. If you're hav-
ihg your reception in a ho-
tel, the property will usu-
ally offer a discounted
rate for your guests. If
your reception is in a hall
that's not affiliated with a
particular property, re-
search hotels within a rea-
sonable driving distance
and approach them asking
for a group rate discount.
For large groups, some ho-
tels may even agree to pro-
vide your guests with
shuttle service to your re-
ception site.


Wedding Statistics For Lingerie, Attendant Gifts & Apparel


Bridal Guide maga-
zine's "Bridal Trend
Watch" gives us some in-
teresting statistics that
should be fun for you to
look over. About Lingerie.

Ninety-seven percent of
the survey takers said that
they will purchase new
lingerie to wear under
their bridal gown. Three
percent said they wouldn't
be wearing anything. Sev-
enty-six percent indicated
that they would shop for
lingerie like what is avail-
able at Victoria's Secret.
While 29% said they would
choose styles like those in
Frederick's of Hollywood.


Two percent said they
would be buying their lin-
gerie from the Gap.

About Jewelry ..
Seventy-nine percent
Of brides plan to buy new
jewelry for their wedding
day and/or for their hon-
eymoon. The average ex-
penditure is anticipated to
be $176 and come to a total
of $304 million in sales.

Gifts for Attendants . .
Most brides (96%) per-
cent are planning to buy
gifts for their attendants
and most will buy jewelry
(63%, silver jewelry or ac-
cessories, 31% jewelry


boxes, 14% pearls, 13%
gold jewelry). On average,
brides plan to spend $65 on
each attendant. An aver-
age wedding party has
eight attendants, which
comes to a total expendi-
ture of $520.


Destination-Weekend-
Wedding
Wear...
Eighty-three percent
of brides will wear either
a formal or semiformal
gown. Seventy-three per-
cent of grooms will wear a
tuxedo or suit.


GJRARDIN

D/amopncds re Jewe/lry
S bi. 'Servitg yousince 1923


3321 N. Valdosta Rd.
Valdosta, Georgia 31602
229-242-8546 Member American Gem Society


1-11S~.81t1 C~leauler S
Y ur C ustomrr IJryv C.lc'cartC-rs'
W'e Sipeciialze J~ibi .*
the Cle-a-ning .&
H-Eeirl-oouDninmg
of ]Biridlall ovns ( zwn
3S~ ~ 'Ttt^ f s^VC ^h

Monay fprilay 7 30a i a m n 0O p in Salurdayv : 3Dm n W n
S 229-263-41493
101 Webster St. Quitman. GA


Monticello's Full Service Bakery
Tupelo's
V C, Custom Wedding Cakes
Fresh Baked Breads
Cookies & Pies
220 West Washinton St. Birthday & Wedding Cakes
Monticello, FL 32344
Free Wireless Internet Access -
850-997-2127 y
Tuesday Saturday 7am 2pm


Getting Married?
,i-Is T ulic (, Candles, Guest 13ooks
S& Pens, Cake Senr ers, Cake Toppers,
S ) ccorUons. Custom Liade Bouquets


Br' ;: -,.1 'I'>;, ^n
-. ,


Now Open in Our NEW Location
838 SW 247 (Branford Hi, Lake City 386-754-0000


WAL-MA
Hwy. 129 North Live
386-330-2599 7Baker)
3 86 30_ 88 Stor
'0
86-330-2488 Store


12


*-,








Wednesday, October 15, 2008 www.greenepublishilig.com Madison County Carrier 13A


2008 HICKORY GROVE FOUNDER'S DAY


Hickory Grove Founer's




Day Set For Saturday


Church.
This year's celebration
will feature food, activities
and singing.
The food will include:
*Biscuits, sausage and
ham from Cousin Mary,


24


115 SW Bunker Street madison, ft 32340 Hour
Phone 973-4088 Fax 973-9896 Towing
24 Hr 973-8328 (Jr. Hodge, Towing Ifgr.) Service
owner. Bill Stewart


Hickr Groue's fudr' Day
iii '


~4~jI. ~


Multipurpose meeting room available for
Weddings Receptions Reunions
*Tutorial Hall for children and Adults
Meetings Meet U Greets Parties
For more information contact Otis or Essie Norton
at(850)50&W9 rud Supporter
or the center ppa ** er
at (850) 948-9932 cf ickory drd-vee's
1376 SWGIrandS founder ay
Greenvm*, FL 32331


NORTH AMERICA


Proud to be art of

Hickory $ove

Founders Day!


*Butter churning
*Slingshot making '
*Apple bobbing
*Civil War campsites
*Train rides Phrough
the woods
*Re-caning chairs
*Basket weaving
*Quilting
demonstration
*Country store
*Vegetable market
Performing on the Hick-
ory Grove Singing Stage will
be the McCormick Family
the Master's, Teddy Mc-
Mullen (an Elvis imperson-
ator who spent most of his
summers on the Hickory


- -


Lou's Kitchen. All of it will
. be cooked on wood burning
stoves.
*Funnel cakes
*Hot and salty boiled
peanuts
*Collard greens and hoe-
cake cornbread
*Bobby Joe Buchanan's
World Famous Venison Chili
*Big John's grilled pep-
pers, onions and sausage
dogs
*Corm-on-the-cob cooked
right in the shuck and
dunked in butter!
*Cracklins from the hog-
killing cooked by the Hack-
les, who do them just right
*Steven William's Secret


Recipe Barbecue Pork
*Homemade ice cream
*Aunt Callie's home-
made cakes of all varieties
*Chicken pileau with all
the fixings, cooked in old
black washpots
*Pork skins
*Hot dogs for the kids
The activities
will include:
*Cane-grinding and
syrup making the way it
used to be.
*The art of sausage mak-
ing. Watch people actually
making and smoking coun-
try sausage.
*Mule plowing
demonstrations


Official Program Dedication
This year marks the 18th Annual Founder's Day Cele-
bration a Hickory Grove. They started dedcating the
program during the second annual event.
2008 Julian and Virginia Andrews
2007 Nell and Delvina McLeod
2006 Belton and Mary Lou Buchanan
2005 Frank and Sallie Williams
2004 Randall Buchanan
2003 Ralph Hunt Williams.
2002 William Edwin and Mae Blair


FAR
BUREA
-NURNC


Serving Madison,
Jefferson &
Taylor Counties


Glen King Freddy Pitts Jimmy King
Agent Agency Manager Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071



MtIA 4auai oauide-d .bai


Grove farm of his uncle, Ju-
lian Andrews), the Light-
house Singers and Karen
and Cheri Williams. The
Hickory Grove Church Choir
will also. sing at Founder's
Day
This year's Founder's
Day booklet is dedicated to
the memories of Julian and
Virginia Andrews.
The day will end with a
fire and brimstone message
from John Dodson, the pas-
tor of Hickory Grove
MethodistChurch.
The fun will start at 9
am. Go on out and have a lot
of fun!


Walter S. Copeland, CPA
Copeland & Schnitker, PL
Certified Public Accountants
133 NE Horry Avenue
Madison, FL 32340
Office: (850)-973-8980 Fax: (850) 973-8900
Email: walter@wckscpa.com






Have A Great 2008
Hickory Grove
Founders' Day!

Leigh B. Barfield
Madison County
Property Appraiser
229 SW Pinckmey St, Room 201
Madison, FL 32340
850-973-6133
Fax 850-973-8928
www.MadisonPA.com


MORLEY'S


MEATCUTING


(586) 96-525
(386) 96305215


McAlpin, FL


434295-F


Opie Peavy and
Family proudly
support
Hickory Grove
Founders Day.
"Holding true to what Elect
Madison County values,
Ab nos pOpie Peavy
Truth, Honesty and Ople Peavy
Intergrity" ,for Sheriff
Home: (850) 929-2364 Cell: (850) 464-0903
E-mail: opiepeavy@shareinet.net www.oplepeavyforsherlff.com
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Opte Peavy, Democrat, for
Madison County Sheuiff.


,de O~ e yce 7 /bud6'l\ .

10 GeeL f)j\/ '
Vt1,&'^^ (Jy< (j6&V6-t&<%1i

People You Know. A Bank You Can Trust.

Madison County
S Comm-unity Banik
a p 301 East Base St. Madison, Florida 32340
850-973-2400 Fax 850-973-8161 ,
SBanking Lobby...Mon.-Thurs. 9am-4pm *Fri. 9am-6pm
mi m Hours: Drive-Thm ......Mon.-Fri. 9ani-6pm Sat. 9ani-12pm


Ben Stewart
is Proud to be a part
of the history
of Madison County.
Elect

Ben Stewart
Sheriff of
Madison County
Paid Political Advertisement For and Approved by Ben Stewart
ForSherff of Madison County


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The eighteenth annual
Hickory Grove Founder's
Day Celebration will be held
Saturday October 18, at Hick-
ory Grove United Methodist


Friendship Through Service

Stewaitsi~omotue


cgreenville cadiHon
-ultipAirpos center 1956.
"One Stop Shop for all
your entertainment needs"








14A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 15, 2008



HEALTH & NUTRITION


Settiqq At Emwtptq Pactc At TIhe


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.

"I got flowers today."
"Igot flowers today. It wasn't my birthday or any
special day. We had our first argument last night and he
said a lot of cruel things that really hurt me.
I know he is sorry and didn't mean the things he said be-
Scause he sent me flowers today.
"Igot flowers today. It wasn't our anniversary or
any other special day. Last night he threw me into a wall
and started to choke me. It seemed like a nightmare. I
couldn't believe it was real. I know he must be sorry be-
cause he sent me flowers today.
"I got flowers today. It wasn't Mother's Day or any
other special day. Last night he beat me up again. If I
leave him, what will I do? How will I take care of my
kids? What about money? I'm afraid of him and scared
to leave, but I know he must be sorry because he sent me
flowers today.
"I got flowers today. Today was a very special day. It
was the day of my funeral. Last night he finally killed
me. If only I had gathered enough courage and strength
to leave him, I would not have gotten flowers today."
By Paulette Kelly

In the year 2000, intimate partner homicides ac-
counted for 33.5 percent of the murders of women. That
same year, 1,247 women were killed by an intimate part-
ner. In 2008, the most rapid growth in domestic relation
caseloads being received are domestic violence filings,
and those numbers are still climbing. The Day of Unity,
celebrated the first Monday in October, kicks off a
month long campaign that hopes to connect battered
women's advocates across the nation wieh the victims of
abuse. One month in the year, October is Domestic Vio-
lence Awareness Month, mourning those who have died
because of domestic violence, celebrating those who
have survived and works to connect those trying to end
the violence nationwide.


Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo by Tyrra B Meserve, October 9, 2008
An empty place at the table shows the emptiness that
domestic violence leaves behind in the heart of a nation.
Sheila Combs, counselor and advocate for women
and children, is never tiring in her effort to end domes-
. tic violence. At the start of Domestic Violence Month,
she reaches out, door to door, business to business, to in-
crease awareness of domestic violence and working to
get community support. Posting flyers and handing out
pamphlets is just the start, as Combs has also begun to
employ visual aides to show the emptiness that abuse
leaves in its wake.
"Each person murdered because of domestic vio-
lence," Combs somberly states, "leaves an empty place
at the table, an empty place in the family"
Setting up empty places in public view, Combs hopes
that this will help the community see how all are affect-


ed by violence that takes place behind closed doors.
"This month, we are celebrating those who made it,"
Combs continues, "and we want to remember those who
didn't."
Seeing first hand, on a daily basis the devastation
that domestic violence leaves in its wake, Combs ex-
tends herself throughout Madison and the Tri-County
area to share the message that these women are not
alone.
"We need a shelter here in Madison," Combs stated.
"As it is right now, the closest shelter we have is still a
bit too far. A lot of these women go unreported for fear
if they go to the shelter they will have to uproot their
children, take them out of school, reregister and relo-
oate them where they will be without their friends,
teachers and support group. These women are staying
in the situation for the sake of their children."
Many times terrified and isolated, victims of do-
mestic violence feel isolated and without viable options
to rectify their situations. It is the mission of Combs
and advocates like her that seek to show the victims a
way out. Handing out buttons, purple ribbons, and fly-
ers around the community, Combs is striving to open to
public's eyes to what has long been a closeted subject.
Eager to join the crusade, local businesses such as
Bank of America, Elmer's Genealogy Library, *Winn
Dixie, O'Neal's Family Dollar and Pineland Missionary
Church as well as individuals like the court house em-
ployees are displaying empty place servings and wear-
ing signs that show support. From an empty plate at the
table that shouldn't be, to a purple ribbon that reminds
of the ones who have lost the battle, domestic violence
is a crime that affects all, from the smallest child that
cries in the corner as he watches his mommy getting
beat to the largest fist that lands the final blow on what
was the face of love.
To reach someone who can help, please call 850-973-
4144 or 800-500-1119.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be reached at
tyrra@greenepublishing.com


Obesity Is A Curable Epidemic


Lake Park Of MadisoI
A skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility
serving the long term care and rehabilitation
needs of Madison and the surrounding area
S259 SW Captain Brown Rd. IMadison. F
(850) 973-8277


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc. .
Obesity has become a global epi-
demic affecting the lives and health of
tens of millions of people, according
-Ao the World Health Organization.
Over half the adult population is now
overweight or obese and the numbers
in Madison County are among the
highest in the state, double state aver-
age.


Of particular concern is child-
hood obesity The escalating studies
conducted among children suggest
that the obesity rate has doubled in re-
cent years, reaching levels of over 20
S percent in many locations and the re-
sulting human and social costs are
S enormous.
SIn purely financial terms, the
health costs of obesity and its many
S related diseases, including diabetes,
S hypertension and heart conditions,
L now measures well into the billions.
But statistics alone cannot convey the
effects of obesity on quality of life and
_- the emotional impact of. premature
deaths associated with obesity


In the United States, an estimated
$15 billion is spent on treating various
diabetic complications alone with
more than $30 billion going to obesity
driven heart disease.
The annual cost of obesity-related
blood pressure treatment, breast can-
cer and colon cancer is approaching
another $10 billion annually In addi-
tion to this, Americans spend $33 bil-
lion on weight reduction products and
services, including diet foods, prod-
ucts, and programs. Making these
numbers even more staggering is that
a generation ago obesity was a rela-
tively unknown problem.
Beneath all the statistics, another
pattern stands out. Billions of dollars
are spent on medical treatments but
very little is spent on examining the
social causes, or on providing infor-
mation that explains the social con-
text of obesity The contradictions are
overwhelming. Never before has soci-
ety had greater scientific and techni-
cal capacity to provide nutritious food
and expand the methods of healthy ex-
ercise.


Medical and social research also
points to the fact that weight and obe-
sity problems are largely social, not
just individual. There is no denying
that the food industry is still stepping
up the deception and deserving of
much of the blame as has previously
been associated with executives in the
tobacco industry
It's like their saying, "Since we
can't grow more people to eat. our
products, let's grow the size of each
person to eat more product."
Humans have become modern day
herds for the food industry It would be
funny if it weren't such a crime to the
Lord's temple. In the final count, if
the available resources were har-
nessed rationally it would be possible
to greatlyreduce, if not eliminate the
obesity epidemic. Standing in the way
however, are vast corporate interests
and advertising. Indisputably howev-
er, obesity is a curable epidemic.
Users need only take a stand; the fruit
and vegetable stand that is.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Family.Health Care
You may save $
4 on your prescriptions
as a patient of
STri-County Family
Health Care and our
partnership with
Jackson's Drugs

Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician

Open Thursday Evenings Until 7 PM
Please call 850-948-2840
for more information

Tri-County Family Health Care
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.




Valdosta Medical Clinic
James A. Sinnott, M.D.
;y Edward J. Fricker, -VM.D.
Specialist In All Gastrointestinal Disorders
Dr. sno (229) 245-7345 or 1-800-587-0777
3207 Country Club Drive Valdosta GA


FINDING




Physician. A


TOTAL
HOMIECAR
SOLUTIN

Home Oxygen Nebulizer Medication
Diabetic Shoes & Supplies Home Medical Equipment
24 Hour Service
353 NE Marion St Phone: 850-973-4125
Madison, FL Fax: 850-973-8922


-Nursn V iHOme


I


Takft e






www.greenepublishing.com


A


Bell Mobile Home
Transport & Setup


Relevel Tie-Downs
Permits


Call For
Free Estimates


*SvreSysftms
Full Service Internet Provider Computer Repair
Wide Area Networking
(850) 973-8855
883 Hwy. 90 West Madison, FL
between Pizza Hut & Brenda's Styles


Burnette
Plumbing & Well Service


Drilling & Repairs


Plumbing Repairs Fixtures-Faucets
Sewcr & IValcr Coiinnectionns Valter Heater Repairs
Wells Drilled Pumps Replaced
Tanks Replaced All Repairs


Carlton Burnette
Master Plumber
150-973-1404


125 SW Shelbv Ave.
Madison. FL 32340


BUILDERSS SUPPLY
SPECIALUZIN IN QUALITY PRODUCTS, SALES AND SERVICE

1 Rick Lewis
Contractor Sales Representative
North Florida Area
1301 Madison Hwy.
P.O. Box 37 -Valdosta, GA 31603
Also specializing in Installed Sales:
Fireplace inserts Gas Logs Marble
surrounds Marntels -Shower doors *Mirrors -Garage
doors-Ventilated shelving -Custom shelving -Door & window
installation and replacement *Interior rim

Mobile: (850) 672-0397 SBS Office (229) 242-4750
Fax: (850) 584-3934 SBS Fax: (229) 242-6113
.' .- *e' 51
*- --- --- -0 **


Ewing Construction
ROOFING
New Homes / Additions Sun Rooms Screen Rooms
Carports Decks/ Metal Roofs ,Shingle Roofs
State Certified Building Contractor and Roofing Contractor
.CBC 7257818 / MCCC132a133
BEN EWING 850-971-5043 FLeeSsre


Cantey
Lawn Services & Stump Grinding
ComSplee a w nC eS tump GrinSdinS


Blake Cantey
Owner/Operator
- J 1 z


Bus. (850) 973-4785
Mobile (850) 673-7052
1262N Stat Rd 53


A LI


4..


Pest Control Inc.


17856 Hwy 129 S. McAlpin, FL 32062
Roy Crain, Jr. (386) 362-37* Sales Representative 180771-3887


Tire & Muffler'0 *
Center i1, ;mwHal
106L E. ULIS 90 Madision,. FL
Ilt'ii.- Cl.., i F.uarmr
850-973-3026

Need A
Graphic Designer?


* Billboard Design
* Posters
* Flyers


NEED ART, I CAN DO IT
Call Lisa at 850-242-8230


FLORIDA COOKING'
| WILD STYLE
a available at
Greene Publishing, Inc.,


located at
1695 South SR 53
in Madison, FL.


Li


V(


i~~v


Wednesday, October 15, 2008


Madison County Carrier 15A


vl. 7.


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16A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com
*~ 1 '. " sA U.


Wednesday, October 15, 2008


LUXIJURY LIMOUSINE Pioneer Day Is
OF NORTH FLORIDA, INC.
FF "When it's time for a break from the ordinary"
SAlways A Treat
Ut~ ~ A~ll 'fFf OO V O VCO dfl=


EKLA RPY RALRK OWNER
[ D. (386) 752-7754) i. 352F
22036 451h- Dr86 935 2
Lake Ciry FL ;"024 -all 186 -g e 0 1'K

Granny & Pa??y!

TrAdition
The Granny and Pappy tradition began with the
first Mayo Mule and Wagon Pioneer Days Festival
which later became known as Pioneer Day The tradi-
tion includes the selection of a couple, born in,
Lafayette County who are 75 years of age or older and
reside in Lafayette County to lead the parade and rep-
resent the pioneers of the county Because of the birth,
age and residence requirements it is not always possi-
ble to find qualified, willing couples to serve in this ca-
pacity. On more than one occasion, a man and a woman
were selected to serve as Granny and Pappy who were
not married to each other.


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Lands & Timber

Nursery, LLC
BARE-ROOT SEEDLINGS SEEDLING
PROMOTION PACKETS
CONTAINERIZED TREES 1-20 GALLON


Marvin Buchanan & Matt Buchanan
Owners
Tony Barrington General Manager/Sales
Jane Brock Office Manager/Sales
Julie Mortlock Accounting/Personnel
Joe Keen Operations Manager
3087 N. County Road 53, Mayo, Florida 32066.
Phone: (386) 294-1211- Fax: (386) 294-3416
Email: cflatntfrsery.comr
Pioneer Day Art Show
The Art Show has been an important event in Pio-
neer Day since the beginning. The leadership and in-
spiration for the show was provided by Annette Croft,
an employee of the Lafayette County State Bank. The
show has been hosted by the Lafayette County State
Bank each year. In 2003, Mrs. Croft was remembered at
the Art Show with a beautiful poster, picture and write
up about Mrs. Croft's life. Her daughter Belinda Cox
and her husband attended the Art Show and Pioneer
Day in recognition of Mrs. Croft's work in the Art
Show from 1979 to 2002. With the passing of Annette
Croft in the summer of 2003, the Mayo Woman's Club
accepted the responsibility for coordinating the Pio-
neer Day Art Show. The 2003 Art Show was dedicated
in honor and memory of Annette Croft. The Best of
Show award was named the Annette Croft Award and
was sponsored by the Lafayette County State Bank


Joe


FUNERAL HOME

Congratulations

on a Great 29th

Pioneer Day

Celebration!
Steve Green & Tommy Murrow
440 S. Monroe, Mayo, FL
(386) 294-2658
Locally Owned and Operated


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Pukishina, Inc.
The Lafayette County Chamber of Commerce
sponsored Pioneer Day o 6 on 'Friday, October 10,
and Saturday, October 11, in Mayo.
On 'Friday, the park opened to the public at 3
p.m. A talent show was held beginning at 6 p.m.
The Pioneer Day Art Show was also held, sponsored
by the Mayo Womai Club. Displays were in the lob-
by of the Lafayette State Banh.
Saturday, the park opened to the public beginning
at 1 a.m.
The parade was held at 10 am., winding its way
from the 'First Assembly of God through, downtown
Mayo.
Musical entertainment began at. 11 a.m. with the
Willow Street 'Band, followed by Gabe Simpson, Robby
Kirby, Tracy Perry and Virginia 'Fletcher
Dorothy Massey and willie- Jones were chosen as
the P,0068 Pioneer Day Granny and Pappy.
The traditional passing of the Kerchief and bonnet
was held at the Clerk of the Court's office in Mayo on
September X3, as Judge Darren Jackson presided over
the historical moment.
Massey and Jones smiled as last year's Granny and
, Pappy, Minnie and uc atch, put the bonnet and
herchief on them.
Massey, who was employed by the Lafayette
County School District for 33 years, is the daughter
of the late Dunih and Ida Williams. She was married
to the late William Massey, Jr for 413 years. The cou-
ple had five children and were blessed with six grand-
children and one great-grandchild.
Jones has been a farmer all of his life. -e is a
member of the Little Galilee Church in Mayo. He and
his family were blessed with nine children, 50 grand-
children, and d6 great-grandchildren.
Three girls were crowned in their age groups dur-
in the 14th Annual Little Miss Pioneer Day Pageant
held on September 90 at Veterans Memorial Park in
Mayo.
Bailey Lawson was crowned the winner in the 4-6-
year-old age group. Tanya Buchanan won the 7-1 age
group and Taylor Racdey won the 10-19 age group.
'Fifty-five girls competed for the prestiious honors.
The Pioneer Day Festivities are held each year dur-
ing early October Thousands of people travel to be a
part of the annual event.


Bring coupon in I
for
Free 20 oz. Drink
with purchase of I
any meal
S IOpen 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
204 W. Main Street, Mayo, FL I
386-294-3643

how Pioneer Day

QAme To 8e
When Jim and Claire France moved to Lafayette
County in 1971, they were immediately impressed with
the rich heritage and customs of the county Claire saw
so many things in our everyday life that most took for
granted.
In 1979, the Rotary Club and the Chamber of Com-
merce were working together trying to find an interest-
ing way to bring attention to Mayo and Lafayette Coun-
ty Claire suggested a celebration to commemorate life
in Lafayette County as it was when pioneers came to
the area more than 100 years ago.


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Sat. 9 a. n-4 p.
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Ifow ayo


Got Its Name


There are several theories as to how Mayo got its
*name. One theory is that J.C. Ramsey, the first postmas-
ter, named the new post office after someone in his fam-
ily named May and added the "o."


P. Burns


Byrd's Power

Equipment

T.W. Byrd's Sons Logging
B's Starters & Alternators
Byrd's Power Equipment


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Tough Name.Tough Equipment.M
Sale &
Slerv ce 11860 E. US 27 Branford, Fl 32008
AllMaes (386) 935-1544
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---








Wednesday, October 15, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 17A*



SCHOOL & EDUCATION



Birthing Babies In The Classroom


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A heated debate continues to wage
across the country concerning teen
pregnancy While some educators be-
lieve comprehensive sex education
would reduce teen pregnancy in the na-
tion, others believe that education en-
courages earli-
er sexual activi-
ty
As the dis-
cussions con-
tinue, policies
change and
teen mothers
still find them-
selves in the
cross fire. Pre-
viously unable
to return to nor-
mal classes
when pregnant, many adolescent moth-
ers found themselves transferred to con-
tinuation schools and excel programs.
With the same obstacles facing of-
age-mothers-to-be, unwed teen mothers
are also burdened with additional cross-
es to bear in the form of continued edu-
cation, increased health risks and so-
cioeconomic impacts. The question then
becomes, what to do when a child is giv-
ing birth in study hall.
A young mother went into labor on
the morning of October 7, at Madison
County High School. It was only about
two years ago that this would have been
an impossibility, as she would have been
immediately transferred to the Excel
school.
"We were finding," said Madison
High School Principal, Ben

t.sas^ia Ifu.fHBR^ J
.iii P^ *8



S^~~~I fai^11


Killingsworth, "that these students were
not attending the Excel Program. They
felt as though, in many cases, they were
being labeled 'bad kids,' so they'd just
stop going and then they fell between the
cracks."
It is estimated that over 40 percent of
adolescents will become pregnant before
reaching the age
of 18 and one of
three of those
mothers will
drop out of
school. In reality,
80 percent of fe-
o g males who be-
come pregnant
before the age of
eighteen never
finish high
school and 40
percent of those
who give birth by age fifteen do not com-
plete the eighth grade.
"I don't like the reason behind it, of
course," Killingsworth went on to say,
"However, we had to bring them back.
They need to be able to continue their
education and this was the only way we
could ensure that. There are programs
that can help and teachers that will be
there to support them. They need to be
in school."
Though the teen pregnancy debate
will not be solved overnight, it is in the
best interest of the child that many of
these policies are changing.
Said Killingsworth, "We have to
think of both the young mother and the
unborn child."
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be
reached.at tyrra@greenepublishing.com


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Tyrra B Meserve, September 26, 2008
Club member Mina Bloodworth explains to the students the benefits of greens,
with the help of visual aids.

The Veggies Are Rolling At Greenville Elementary


By Tyrra B Meserve -
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A creative way of get-
ting students pumped
about both gardening and
health, The Madison Gar-
den club has once again
found a way involve youth
with horticulture via
rolling veggie gardens.
Planting kale, cabbage,
beets, radishes, mustards
and other greens,
Greenville Elementary
third and fourth graders
bedded their first
seedlings that they will


tend until harvest time
rolls back around.
Garden Club President
Dolly Ballard came rolling
into the Greenville Ele-
mentary parking lot with
serious flower power, as
she and fellow Garden
Club members unloaded
soil, seedlings and pots to
transfer into wheelbar-
rows meant for planting.
Filled with healthy vita-
mins, students will learn
what they are planting and
what nutrients are sup-
plied by those greeneries.
"Folic acid helps make
healthy babies," one stu-
dent announced while
learning about the greens
to be planted.
"Exactly, and you can
find folic acid in green
leafy vegetables," Mina
Bloodworth, former Gar-
den Club President

AWFV1!fr7


showed the students on an
educational chart.
Working with stu-
dents, the Garden club
ladies also get a chance to
do again this year what
they had so much fun do-
ing in the years before, get-
ting youth actively in-
volved in the planting
process while spending
quality time with a grow-
ing generation. Explain-
ing what the vegetables
were and how they benefit
a healthy diet, the ladies
supervised as students
tucked their baby
seedlings into cozy wheel-
barrow beds, where they
will be lovingly tended un-
til time to poke their green
little heads up towards the
rolling skies.
Staff writer Tyrra B
Meserve can be reached at
tyrra@greenepublishing.com


TYlIlw Pias&

Restaurant
1713 East H y 91)0* Madison, Fl 32340 '
Hours Monday Sunday 6 am. 2:30 p.m.
"Home Cookin"
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Famous for Great food & Great Service!
Extensive Wine Selection with over 35 offered by glass
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1874 Clubhouse Dr.
Valdosta, GA
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Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Tyrra B Meserve, September 26, 2008
Former Garden Club President Mina Bloodworth ex-
plains gardening to third and fourth graders the benefits
of bone meal.








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'18A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 15, 2008,



SPORTS


Rachael Webb Impre




Outstanding Softb


By Fran Hunt
Specialfrom
The Monticello News
Rachael Webb, of Lee, had an im-
pressive season with the Tallahassee
Bullets, 12 and Under Fast-Pitch
Girl's Softball team.
The Bullets placed seventh out of
104 teams, representing 42 states in
the largest girls' fast pitch
World Series in the US, July
13-19, in Panama- City
Beach. This was the best ef-
fort ever put forward by any
team from Florida in the
past.
Webb played in 87
games in 14 tournaments
and the World Series.
During the Dixie
Chicks Classic, she played
in six games, had 13 at-bats,
scored five runs, had eight
hits, knocked in four RBI,
six singles, one double, one
triple,, and two walks. She
had a batting average of
.533, a slugger's percentage
of .733, she struck out 0 per-
cent of the time, and she
had an on-base percentage
of .588.
Webb played in six
games during the Chipola
Classic, she had 13 at-bats,
scored five runs, had six
hits, six singles, one strike-
out, and two walks. She had
a batting average of .462,
slugger's percentage of
.462, she struck out seven
percent of the time, and she
had an on-base percentage
of .533.
In the Tsunami Tsmash
Tournament, Webb played in five
games, she had ten at-bats, scored
two runs, had two hits, one RBI, two
singles, three strikeouts, one walk
and one sacrifice. She had a batting
average of .200, a slugger's percent-
age of .200, she struck out 25 percent
of the time, and she had an on-base
percentage of .273.
During the Lake City Tourna-
ment, Webb played in five games, she
had eight at-bats, scored six runs,
had five hits, five singles, and four
walks. She had a batting average of
.625, a slugger's percentage of .625,.
she struck out 0 percent of the time,
and she had an on-base percentage of
.750.
Webb played in five games dur-
ing the Bullets Winter Classic, had
eight at-bats, scored three runs, had
one hit, one single, and seven walks.
She had a batting average of .333, a
slugger's percentage of .333, struck
out 0 percent of the time, and had an
onbase percentage of .800
In the Merchants' Fall Classic,
Webb played in five games, had ten
at-bats, scored five runs, had three
hits, she drove in one RBI, two sin-
gles, one double, and one walk. She


had a batting average of .300, a slug-
ger's percentage of .400, she struck
out 0 percent of the time, and she
had an on-base percentage of .364.
During the Early Bird Classic,
Webb played in five games, had 13 at-
bats, and scored, nine runs, had five
hits, knocked in nine RBI, had five
singles, one strikeout, and two


S,Rachael Webb


walks. She had a batting average of
.385, a slugger's percentage of .385,
she struck out seven percent of the
time, and she had an on-base per-
centage of .467.
Webb played -in four games dur-
ing the RCSA April Anarchy Tour-
nament, she had seven 'at-bats,
scored two runs, had one hit, one
RBI, one triple, three walks, and one
sacrifice. She had a batting average
of .143, a slugger's percentage of
.429, she struck out 0 percent of the
time, and she had an onbase percent-
age of .400.
In the Spring Splash Tourna-
ment, Webb played in six game. She
had 14 at-bats, scored nine runs, had
nine hits; she drove in four RBI; had
nine singles, and one walk. She had
a batting average of .643, a slugger's
percentage of .643, she struck out 0
percent of the time, and she had an
on-base percentage of .667.
During the Palatka Grandslam
Tournament, Rachael played in five
games, had 13 at-bats, scored four
runs, had four hits, and had three
singles, one triple, two strikeouts,
and two walks. She had a batting av-
erage of .308, a slugger's percentage


sses With




'all Play

of .462, she struck out 13 percent of
the time, and she had an on-base per-
centage of .400.
Webb played in five games in the
Sliders Slugfest Tournament, she
had seven at-bats, scored five runs,
had two hits, both doubles, two
strikeouts, and three walks. She had
a batting average of .286, a slugger's
percentage of .571; she
struck out 20 percent of the
time, and she had an on-
base percentage of .500.
In the Merchant Madness
Tournament, Webb played
in six games, she had ten at-
bats, scored four runs, had
five hits, drove in three
RBI, four singles, one dou-
ble, and three walks. She
had a' batting average of
.500, a slugger's percentage
of .600, she struck out 0 per-
cent of the time, and she
had an on-base percentage
of .615.
During the Fastpitch in
Paradise Tournament, she
S played in six games, had
53 .eight at-bats, scored three
.. runs, had two hits, two sin-
gles, three strikeouts, four
walks, and one hit-by-pitch.
? She had a batting average of
.250, a slugger's percentage
of .250, she struck out 23
S percent of the time, and she
had an on-base percentage
of .538.
Webb played in eight.
games during the North
Florida State Tournament,
and she had 16 at-bats,
scored three runs, had
three hits, had one single,
one double, on triple, five strikeouts,
two walks, and one sacrifice. She
had a batting average of .188, a slug-
ger's percentage of .375, she struck
out 26 percent of the time, and she
had an on-base percentage of .278..
In the World Series, Webb played
in ten games, had 19 at-bats, scored
six runs, had eight hits, all singles,
two strikeouts, one walk, and one
hit-by-pitch. She had a batting aver-
age of .421, a slugger's percentage of
.421, struck out ten percent of the
time and had an on-base percentage
of .476.
Throughout the course of the en-
tire season, Webb played in a total of
87 games, she had 166 at-bats, scored
76 runs, had 64 hits, drove in 23 RBI,
had 54 singles, six doubles, four
triples, 19 strikeouts, 38 walks, two
hit-but-pitch, and three sacrifices.
She had a batting average of .386,
a slugger's percentage of .470, struck.
out nine percent of the time, and had
an on-base percentage of .505:
Rachael is the daughter of Allen
and Amy Webb. She will play her
third year of softball at Madison
Academy this spring.


Warriors


Make Good


Showing In


Lincoln


Invitational
By Fran Hunt
Special From The Monticello News
The Aucilla Christian Academy boys and girls cross
country teams made a good showing during the Lincoln
Invitational, Saturday, Sept. 20.
"A lot of them ran good times and some upped their
records," said Coach Dan Nennstiel. "There were a lot
of teams and a lot of schools participating. We are not
at the top three level yet, but we are a work in progress
with a long way to go before the end of the season. The
girls ran at about eight of 12 and the boys were next to
last, but their performance is up to what I expected of
them this early in the season."
Nennstiel reiterated that the beginning of the sea-
son and how the teams do was not the major concern,
but rather where they stand toward the end of the sea-
son. "It's not like football or baseball which depends on
how many you win to make it into the finals, but rather,
how you finish at the end of the season in the stand-
ings," said Nennstiel.
He added that two of the Lady Warriors, Anna Fin-
layson and Michaela Roccanti, did finish in the top 15 for
the second race of the season and each-was given recog-
nition and medals for their positive efforts.
Running for the Lady Warriprs, Roccanti finished
13th with 23:13, averaging 7:28 per mile; Finlayson fin-
ished 14th, with23:26, an average of 7;32 per mile; Eliza-
beth Riley finished 25th with 24:15, an average of 7:48
per mile; and Angela McCune finished 58th, an average
of 8:58 per mile.
Caroline Mueller finished 62nd witl 29:37, averaging
9:30 per mile; Chelsea Snodgrass placed 64th with 29:57,
an average of 9:37 per mile; and Hannah Haselden
placed 78th with 38:10, an average of 12:17 per mile.
Jay Finlayson finished 81st with 22:40, averaging
7:17 per mile; Russell Fraleigh placed 78th with 22:59, an
average of 7:23 per mile; and Ricky Finlayson finished
97th with 23:35, averaging 7:34 per mile.
Jay Dickey finished 112th with 25:50, averaging 8:18
per mile; Carson Nennstiel finished 117th with 26:45, an
average of 8:37 per mile; and Kent Jones finished 127th
with 29:14, an average of 9:22 per mile. '
Team managers who ran with the team for the love
of running included fourth grader Gatlin Nennstiel,
who placed 18th with 23:48, an average of 7:40 per mile;
fourth grader Donnie Kinsey, who was running just for
-the fun of it with a friend, placed 30th with 24:47, aver-
aging 7:58 per mile; and fifth grader Ian Haselden fin-
ished 46th with 26:45, an average of 8:36 per mile.
The Warriors competed in. the FSU Invitational Sat-
urday, Sept. 27 in Tallahassee. "It's not a fast course, but
it's a tough one," said Nennstiel. "The competition is
the toughest we'll have throughout the year
because they only feature the best of the best runners,
so it'll be really challenging. I just wanted the kids to
see how the big races are because the FSU Invitational is
the same course we run in Regional, if we make it that
far this year.
"Last time, we ran against about 80 teams, this week,
we competed against about 300 of the best teams," said
Nenimstiel. "I do-think that Anna (Finlayson), Michaela
(Roccanti), and Elizabeth (Riley) will do quite well."
Nennstiel concluded.
.."- -


Players of the Wi Plyl













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Wednesday, October 15, 2008 www.s~reenepub1ishing.com Madison County Carrier 1 9A


e^sPPNestle Waters
is Proud To Be A Port of'
The Madison Community and
Supports The Cowboys!


Madison


/ Bottling
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N ORTH AW ERICA


Groc ery
GOOD LUCK, COWBOYS!


Duke vs. Miami


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Boston College vs.
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Ohio State vs.
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Kansas vs. Oklahoma


Cl) atultions To
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2nd Laurie Gundlach
3rd Bill Turner


Contest Form
Name:
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* Winning Teams


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Vanderbilt vs.
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Madison vs.
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www.greenepublishing.com


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correct picks (and the closest to the game
score in the tie breaker) will win a Combo
Meal from Arby's. Dairy Queen, Wendy's, or
Subway, and their choice of a $20.00 check
from Greene Publishing, Inc. or 2 tickets to
Wild Adventures Theme Park. The Second
Place winner will receive 4 movie passes and
the Third Place winner will receive 2 movie
passes from Greene Publishing, Inc. All win-
ners will receive a free combo meal from
Arby's, Dairy Queen, Wendy's, or Subway.
- I
SOfficial Football Mania Rules
I One entry per person. All entries must be on an I
Official entry blank. No photocopies accepted. I
* Entries must be completely filled out, legible
and dropped off at Greene Publishing, Inc.,
I 1695 South SR 53, Madison, no later than 5 pm I
S on Friday or mailed to P.O. Drawer 772.
Madison, Florida 32341: postmarked by Friday.
Judge's decisions are final
I Winners will be announced each Wednesday in
the Madison County Carrier:
Employees of the newspaper and their family
Members are not eligible for the Football Mania I
contest.
Must be ten (10) years old, or older to play.
In the Texas vs. Nlissouri game, write
I down what you think the final score will be. I
This will be used to break a tie if needed.


I


I


I


Madison County Carrier 19A


Wednesday, October 15, 2008


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20A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, October 15, 2008


______T_ i l l 9 FR SA, I MOBE HUMANEHSOCETY C
WMVU- M AM W.' /^T=GET = .I


reenville ointe

(!Apartments !

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC
accessible apts. Rental assistance
may be available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-3056.
TDD/TTY 711.192 NW
Greenville Pointe Trail,
Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity
_______________rtn

oluthem villas of

M a 0dison a apartments


Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR HC &
non-HC accessible apts. Call
850-973-8582, TDD/TTY 711.
315 SW Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1BR ($409.)
.2BR ($435.) Subsidy available
at times. HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd, Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider
and Employer
rtn



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Madison Heights Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed for
lbw income families
150 SW Burngardner Dr.
Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 1-800-545-1833, ext. 485
Equal Housing Opportunity

3BR 2 Bath DW Mobile Home
No Pets. In Pinetta area on
Rocky Ford Rd. $600 month
plus Security Deposit.
References Required
Call 929-2649
9/17-10/10 pd

1 B/R Mobile Home in the
country $400. month
$400. Security Deposit
850-566-5455


House for Rent in Greenville,
Florida. All Electric, Newly
remodeled 3 bedrooms, 1 bath
$650/mo. 1st, last & security
deposit. Considering Housing
Choice Vouchers
Call 850-973-7349
RTN

HOME FOR RENT
Restored 3 BR Home, CH & Air.
Oak floors, large storage,
1335 sq ft Yard Maint. included.
Adult family only, no pets, $800
rent and deposit. Credit check.
4321NE Horry Ave. Madison.
Call George 973-8583, 557-0994
10/17- RTN

LIVE THE GOOD LIFE!!!!
HISTORICAL RENTAL
APARTMENT Newly renovated
2BR/1BATH. GREAT ROOM
WITH DISH HOOK UP.
LARGE KITCHEN,, stove,
refrigerator. Yard service,
Located near downtown and
college. $600.00 mo.
Call Immediately!
850-524-2093 or
850-673-9425

BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY
SETTING! '
3BR/WB/2CAR GARAGE.
WASHER DRYER HOOKUP,
W/STOVE, REFRIGERATOR,
DISHWASHER, LARGE
GREAT ROOM $550.00 +
DEPOSIT. CALL
IMMEDIATELY!
850-524-2093


10/8,10/17


Newly rennovated 2/1 apts. close
to college. $495 mo.
$965 to move in.
A.C.R.E.S. Realty
386-984-6447
51/01 10/17


3 BR, 1 bath for ren
Section 8 vouchers a
850-778-671.


Mobile Home for
Nice clean 2 BR 1 BA
Trl Prk Way next to
386-266-823


FOR SALE BY OWNER:
Madison, Yellow Pine
208 N.E. Rowena St. 3/1/1 Lot
size 80x190 Inground Pool, Pole
barn 24 X36 BRAND NEW:
Kitchen, pool liner, sand filter,
pump, hot water heater and roof.
$99,500.00
352-489-5239
10/15,10/17

FOR SALE BY OWNER
5 acres Lee, North of Hwy 6,
Cayenne Rd. rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995. $5,000
down $325/mo

4.7 acres Lee, county graded
road, $39,995, restrictions,
$5,000 down, $325/mo.

Madison, North of Hwy 6,
Cactus Rd., restrictions
14.8ac $99,995

25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee, high
and dry, $4,500/ac

Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
RTN

Real Estate For Sale

Newly Constructed:
2BR 2 Bath Townhouse
1200S/F Heated Area
$129,500


McWilliams K
850-973-861


Res. 3/4 Ac. in town -
$16,000 owner
347-267-835

House for sale by
2BR 1 Bath on 2.(
Newly remodeled
Additional storage s
washer & dryer h
Appliances inc
$65,000 Fin
2 miles North of I
city limits
850-509-7084
850-973-69'


Haywood Rea
352-369-09(
FOR SAL]
30 Acres with septic
wells Fenced and Cr


HOME BUYERS.. GUARAN-
TEED FINANCING THRU
B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
386-719-0044

WE PAY CASH..... FOR YOUR
USED MOBILE HOMES 1980
'OR NEWER. LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129


FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY AND
LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE ZONED
COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT

FIRST TIME HOME BUYER
$7,500.00 CASH IN YOUR
POCKET CALL DAVID FOR
DETAILS 386-719-0044

MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00 CALL 386-288-4560

LOW CREDIT SCORES???
I MAY BE ABLE TO HELP
YOU BUY A HOME.
386-288-4560

NEW 4 BEDROOM 2 BATH
READY TO MOVE IN. CALL
386-288-4560


ealty HOME ONLY LOANS
14 No mortgage on your land. Put
RTN Home on your land,
Crestwood family land, state land or rental
fin. lot. Singlewides start at $350.00
50 month and
10/15-10/24 Doublewides at $440.00.
owner EVERYTHING INCLUDED
owner: NO HIDDEN CHARGES
D2 acres. CINDY 386-365-5370
in 2005. ZERO DOWN
hed with- LAND HOME PACKAGES
Nook-up. Singlewide your land $340.00
luded P&I per mo, Doublewide your
m land $422.00 P&I per mo. Sin-
Madison glewide & $30,000.00 for land
$520.00 P&I per mo. or Dou-
4 or blewide with $30,000.00 for land
7 $602.00 P&I per mo. Our land
10/810/3 1 your land or buy land. I special-
10813 ize in credit challenged cus-
alty I tomers. Applications over the
00 phone, credit decision next busi-
ness day. Let me help make your
E new home dream come true.
and (2) 4" Trades welcome.
oss Fenced Cindy 386-365-5370


also with Pond. Approx 25 acres
in posture with bahaya grass
and a beautiful 5 acre homsite
with canopy entrance to
property. Excellent location just
5 miles north of Madison on
Rocky Ford Road. Asking
$8,000.00 per acre. Call
Associate Pamela Hood
850-673-6409
10/8-RTN


Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage
23 acres, Corner lots.
Fronts both Hhrvey Greene Dr.
and Highway 53 South.
Natural gas line,
8 inch water main,
access to city utilities,
fire hydrant, and service from
two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141
RTN




Wanted Acreage: w/home,
buildings & fencing. Seeking
lease purchase, owner financing.
Will be in Live Oak October 20-
30. Have 3 large breed dogs.
Call John & Betty Bird
941-875-2163
10/15-10/31





Pet Setter needed for medium
size dog. 8:30-3:30 Once a
month on Saturday & Sunday.
Will pay $30.00
Call Janet, 828-488-4891
mornings


10/15,10/17

* R^T^^^ ^


CARNIVOROUS PLANTS!
t $650.00 You'll have them eating out of
accepted. your hand, but watch your
4 fingers!
10/15,10/17 Buy Venus Fly Traps & Pitch-
------ er Plants now at Creatures
185 Gibson Featured Pet Shop
Harveyso Madison FL 850-973-3488
1 10/15,10/17


BEST CASH DEALS ON
MOBILE HOMES. NO ONE
BEATS MY PRICES
386-719-0044
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/ 2
BATH EXCELLENT SHAPE
NEED CHAS, PRICED TO
SELL CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218
MODULAR HOME FOR SALE
IN TOWN SAVE $20,000.00
TURN KEY DEAL OWNER
SAYS MAKE AN OFFER IT
MUST GO CALL MIKE AT
386-623-4218


BRAND SPANKING NEW 2009
5 BEDROOM 3 BATH 2004 SQ
. FT $594.31 PER MO. SELLER-
PAYS $3,500 TOWARD
CLOSING COST CALL MIKE
386-623-4218
PRICE REDUCED! SPACIOUS
MFG HOME WITH 4 BED-
ROOMS, 3 BATH, BONUS
ROOM WITH LOTS OF WIN-
DOWS. DISCONTINUED
FLOORPLAN. FOR MORE
INFO CALL SARAH
386-288-0964

BECOME A HOMEOWNER
FOR THE SAME MONTHLY
PAYMENTS YOU ARE
THROWING AWAY ON RENT.
CALL SARAH FOR MORE
INFO 386-288-0964


NEED MORE SPACE FOR A
GROWING FAMILY? 2001,5
BEDROOM, 4 BATH TRADE-
IN. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
FOR MORE INFO CALL
SARAH 386-288-0964






Dunn's
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts

850-973-4723

2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340

ANYTHING LEFT OVER 30
DAYS WILL BE SOLD
rtn


FREE FIREWOOD
929-9993


89' F-150 Green Pick-up,
Runs fine, power locks and
windows, new paint job
$1,800
727-415-4428
Ask for Hunter
rtn

ATV 2003 Kawasaki Prairie.
Very good condition. Low hours.
Automatic. Four wheel drive.
Comes with a seed spreader and
will take $5,500. Call David at
850-929-7555 or 850-251-7416


2003 KIA SORENTO
850-508-3391
Excellent Condition!
1 Owner, $10,000.00
70,500 miles; V6 3.5 Liter;
Automatic Transmission; 2WD
Air Conditioning
Power Seat
Power Steering Roof Rack
Power Windows
Alloy Wheels
Power Door Locks/keyless entry
Premium Sound
Front Side Air Bags
Dual Front Air Bags
Tilt Wheel Cruise Control
(4-Wheel) Leather Seats
6 Disk, in-dash CD Changer
Two Tone Paint
Wood Grain / Leather Steering
Wheel
4 Wheel Traction Lock
(for rain or snow)
RTN


Motivated Sell
2001 Toyota Camry
Has 96,000 miles on cai
recalled engine has 26,
call James
850-673-1314


er
$8,000


KRI TTK R UKiNEK

Suwannee Valley Humane Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340
TIwo miles south of Lee off C.R 255
From 10 Exui 262. Take C.R 2555 north '2 miles
We are a Limited Space Shelter (no kill). You must check with
us prior to bringing a drop-off animal to the shelter. Hours; Tues. to
Sat. 10:00 to 2:00, or by appointment. Visit our website and see the
animals that need a really good home at
www.geocities.com/suwanneehs or at our e-mail address suwan-
neevalley @ embarqmail.com.

Lost and Found Pets:
If you have lost a pet or found one, the humane society will help
you find your pet. Call us at (850) 971- 9904 or toll free at 1-866-
236-7812. Leave a message if we are closed, we will return your
call. Remember to always call your local animal controls or shelters
if you have found a lost or found pet.

THRIFT STORE:
You must come see our thrift stores, if you have not been here
before. We have three stores, a boutique, clothing and furniture. We
are always looking for donations for the stores. Please keep us in
mind if you have items in good condition you would like to donate
to us.

RECYCLING:
We have a recycling bin on our property newspapers, magazines,
and catalogs. The bin will take all kinds of paper. We also have a bin
in Live Oak at 305 Pinewood Drive, just west Of Johnson's Appli-
ance/Radio Shack. We also collect aluminum cans to recycle. Just
bring them to the shelter. All the money goes to help the homeless
animals.


"r, factory The Suwannee Valley Humane Society depends on adoptions for
,000 miles $65.00 which INCLUDES,- spay/neuter, de-worm, heart-

worm/feline leukemia tested and rabies shot (if old enough). Please
10/15-11/7. come and visit us, our animals would love to meet you.
REMEMBER; DO NOT LEAVE PETS IN VEHICLES FOR ANY
7W LENGTH OF TIME DUE TO THE HEAT AND HUMIDITY


Lay A Way for Christmas
Scooters and 4 wheelers
JUST SCOOTERS
221 N. Greenville
850-242-9342 or 850-948-2788
Ask for Bob
No irn frMasgRT



LEMONGRASS DAY SPA
aNow hiring for Massage
Therapist and Nail Tech.
Apply in person only
104 West North-Side Dr.
Valdosta, GA 31602
RTN






Managers & Assistant Managers
Seeking highly motivated em-
ployees for the Convenient Store
business for Madison area.

Offering competitive salary,
weekly pay, Vacation, paid
Holidays, Bonus & 401K Plan.

Call Kimn at 352-494-7551 for
more information.
10/8-10/17

Advertising Sales
Representative
(salesman) needed.
Must be a team player, able
to handle multiple tasks, and be
able to get along with an entire
office staff. Must have good per-
sonality and LOVE to talk on the
telephone.
Apply in person only at
GREENE PUBLISHING. INC'S
newspaper office, located at 1695
South SR 53, in Madison.
Please... if you're not sure
how an alarm clock works or you
average more than two dramatic
incidents in your life, per week,
or simply only work because you
are bored, or fill that you must
complain on a daily basis or fight
with co-workers, please do not
apply.


FEATURED ANIMALS FOR ADOPTION:
DOGS:
3428 May is an all American /Mix. She is brindle color and is
1 year 2 months old. She has short legs like a Bassett. She is a real
sweet heart.

3426 Lucas is a black Lab /Mix. He is 7V2 month old and is a
very friendly guy.

3332 Denny is a Retriever / Mix, he is 1 year 1 month old. He
is tan and is a very friendly guy.

3331 Damien is white and black, he is 11 months old. He is a
Lab/Mix and is a sweet heart of a dog.

3330 Shawn is a black Lab/Mix with white toes. He is 11
months old and he is a loveable dog.

CATS:
3442 Lucy is a Manx kitty, she is 5 years 7 months old. Shem
is a black cat and is very friendly.

3433 Bindi is a Calico, she is 7 months old. She is a very love-
able cat and is looking for a home.

3432 Bambi is a black and white cat. She is 7 months old and
is a sweet cat.

3419 Zena is years 5 months old. She is black and has had
every thing done for her, also has a microchip.

3409 Meshia is a Siamese /Mix, she is 2 years old. She is cream
and brown color.

LOST AND FOUND
If you have lost or found an animal, you would like to report.
Please feel free to call us and I will put your report in the paper free.

LOST:
"Meanie" a Boston Terrier, he is black with some white. He is
all black with white spot size of dime on back of his neck. He is 15
months old and has been neutered. Was lost on 9/4/2008 from The
Boys Ranch in Suwannee County, while visiting there. If you have
found him, please call Mamaris Mattox at (904) 868 7336.

Spaying And Neutering
Experts, say the most important thing people can do to help
their pets is to get them spayed or neutered. This means the animals
get an operation, to be sure they can't have kittens or puppies. They
are asleep during the operation,; so they aren't scared or in pain.
Spaying and neutering are so important because there are so
many animals needing care and not enough homes or shelters for
them.
One cat or dog can have many litters in its life. Its kittens or
puppies can have many litters, too. This can end up creating thou-
sands of new cats and dogs.
We would like to thank, everyone for visiting us at Lake City
Mall. We had a great time.

The Suwannee Valley Humane Society
Presents Its 2008 23rd Annual

PET SHOW

Saturday, October 18th

At the Suwannee County Coliseum

Registration starts at 10 am Contests starts at 11 am

If you have any questions, please call the shelter at
TOLL FREE 1-866-236-7812 local 971-9904
Or email: suwanneevalley@ embarqmail.com


Love's Travel Stops & Country Stores, Inc.
Is now hiring at our Lee, FL store!

Cashiers
S Team Members
All shifts available
Starting at $7.00 hr.
Benefils & bonuses available
Work flexible shifts
(weekends & holidays)

Pleaseapply at:
Love's Travel Stop#379
3204 SE County Road 255
Lee, FL 32059
(850)971-4115


-1


r--


--------~----









Wednesday, October 15, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 21A




LEGALS


Local Man Prevails In Scuffle

With Hoodlums
BEXAR COUNTY- Tom W., after using Thera-Gesice
011on a sore left shoulder, encountered two hoods break- -
ing into a car in a parking lot. He whacked one of them
upside the head and ran them off. When asked why he
took the risick. he painlessly replied: *
"None of your dang business!" l


Go painlessly with Thera-Gesic r arPIS


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83. PART IV
Under the Authority of the Self-Service Storage Facility Act, Section 83.805 the de-
scribed below has been seized for nonpayment of rent and other accrued expenses.
Property consists primarily of household 81 personal goods in units rented by: Candra
Blue, Derrick Staten and Bernice Davis. The property will be sold at auction to the
highest bidder as provided by the Self-Storage Facility Act, Section 83.806. The sale will
be held Saturday October 18,2008 at 9:00 A.M., at the Madison Mini Storage, 1098 E.
U.S. 90. in Madison, Florida. For further information call 973-6246.
0/15/08.10/17/08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE Na.: 2008-97-CP
PROBATE DIVISION
In Re: The Estate of
EUGENE T. GUESS,
Deceased,
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE EN-
TITLED ESTATE AND ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the administration of the estate of EU-
GENE T. GUESS, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court in and for Madison Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Madison County Courthouse,
Post Office Box 237, Madison, Florida 32340. The name and addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or demands against the estate are required, WITHIN
THREE CALENDAR MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE to file with the clerk of the above styled court a written statement
of any claim or demand they may have. Each claim must be in writing and must indi-
cate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the creditor or his agent or attor-
ney, and the amount claimed. If the claim is not yet due, the date when it will become
due shall be stated. If the claim is contingent or unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainly shall be stated. If the claim is secured, the security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient copies of the claim to the clerk to enable the clerk to
mail one (1) copy to each the representative.
All persons interested in the estate to whom a copy of this Notice of Administra-
tion has been mailed are required, WITHIN THREE CALENDAR MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE to file any objections
they may have that challenges the validity of the decedpnt's will, the qualifications of
the personal representative- or the venue or jurisdiction of the Court. r
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
S BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this Notice of Administration: October 15, 2008.
Cary A. Hardee, H RAMONA M. GUESS, Personal Representative
Post Office Drawer 450 2169 NE State Road 6
Madison, Florida 32341 Madison, Florida 32340
Telephone (850) 973-4007
Facsimile (850) 973-8495
Florida Bar Number 133856
Attorney for the Personal Representative
10/15/08. 10/22/08


The Madison County Board of County Commissioners is soliciting Requests For Pro-
posals (RFPs) for the contractual position of Emergency Medical Services Medical Di-
rector. The proponent should be a Florida licensed M.D. or D.O. and shall be board
Certified and active in a broad-based clinical medical specialty with demonstrated ex-
perience in prehospital care and hold an ACLS certificate or equivalent as determined '
in Chapter 64E-2.038, F.A.C. Prehospital care experience shall be documented by the
Provider. The medical director shall demonstrate and have available for review by the
department documentation of active participation in a regional or statewide physician
group involved in prehospital care and must meet all requirement of 64E-2.004, of the
Florida Administrative Code and comply with Madison County E.M.S. requirements.
Please direct all inquiries to Mr. Alien Cherry, County Coordinator at 850-973-3179.
Proposals should be received no later than 4:00 P.M. on October 27, 2008. Proposals
received after this date will be returned.
Proposals can be hand delivered or mailed to the following addresses:
Mr. Alien Cherry, County Coordinator
229 S.W. Pinckney St.
Suite 219
Madison, Florida 32340
Mr. Allen Cherry, County Coordinator
P.O. Box 539
Madison, Florida 32341
Madison County Board of County Commissioners reserve the right to reject 4
any and all proposals.
Madison County is an Equal Opportunity Employer
10/15/08, 10/17/08

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NO. 2008-95-CP


IN RE: ESTATE OF
SIM H. ANDREWS,
Deceased.
______________


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of SIM H. ANDREWS, deceased, whose date of
death was July 26,2008, is pending in (lie Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida,
Probate Division; File Number 200S-95-CP; the names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands
against the Decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREL (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons who have claims or de-
mands against the Decedent's estate, including unatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FOR TH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIMS FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS October 8,
2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
/s/ Clay A. Schnitker /s/Rimonny Dewitt Andrews
CLAY A. SCHNITKER RONNY DEWITT ANDREWS


Fla. Bar No.349143 I
Davis, Schnitker, Reeves & Browning, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 652
Madison, Florida 32341
(850) 9734186


1465 SW Moseley Hall Road
Madison, Florida 32340


October 8.2008 and October 15. 2008




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Have An Auction Without
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You'll find there's a buyer who's willing to
take or make your best offer for just about
anything you have to-sell when you advertise
in the Classifieds. It's the best place to get
the best price for whatever you have to sell.
Rather than save it forever or store it away,.
let someone get good use out of it while you
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F Adoption

Pregnant? Considering adoption? A married couple, large extended
family, seeks to adopt. Financially secure. Expenses paid. Call
KAREN & KEVIN. (ask for michelle/adam). (800)790-5260. FL
Bar# 0150789.

Announcements

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22A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 15, 2008




REGIONAL HAPPENINGS


Tops In Blue Performs At Wild Adventures;

Family Entertaining Family With DOja Blues


The U.S. Air Force's
Tops In Blue is offering a
night of family entertain-
ment at Wild Adventures,
Sunday October 19 at 4:00
p.m. The highly acclaimed
2008 edition of Tops In Blue
is entitled
"Deja Blue."
This
year, Tops In
Blue contin-
ues its long-
standing
tradition of
"family en-
tertaining
family"-by
showing us
what has
made Tops
In Blue a
Ina u? ,, '
"must-see"
event every
year for the
last 55
years.
You'll hear
hot Latin
sounds, All-
American
country mu- -
sic, and hits .
from the top -I
of the .se
charts.
You'll expe-
rience great


music from your favorite
movies and Broadway
shows. Combine that with
the dazzling lights, cos-
tumes and precision chore-
ography for which Tops In
Blue is known worldwide,


and you can look forward to
a show that's sure to please
everyone.
"Tops In Blue is the Air
Force's premier entertain-
ment showcase," said Tom
Edwards, show producer
and chief of
Air Force
Entertain-
ment. "The
new 2008
teamisaire-
flection of
the 'best of
the best' per-
formers
throughout
the Air
Force."
Sunday Oc-
tober 19 is
Military Ap-

Day at Wild
Adventures.
Admission is
free' for Muli-.
tary with
valid ID. The
Tops In Blue
Performance
is included
in the price
of general
admission
and all Wild.
Adventures
guests are invited. Regular
admission is $45 and Ju-
nior /Senior admission is
$40 and both include a Sec-
ond-Day Free.
For more information
on the performance at Wild
Adventures visit www.wild-
adventures.net or call 229-
219-7080. For more infor-
mation on Tops In Blue vis-
it iww.topsinblue.com.


Teddy Mac Karaoke, Elvis Dinner Theatre, and Magnolia Fest
Bring Fun And Music To The Spirit Of the Suwannee Music Park


This Thursday and
Friday night, Oct. 16-17,
you can visit the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park
for the atmosphere and
food and also get a chance
to show off your musical
talents during Karaoke
with Teddy Mac. Why, you
might even leave there
with a new-found desire
to make it big in the mu-
sic world, not to mention
the possibility you'll hear
an up and coming star
perform who you will just
love! That's right, Ted Mc-
Mullen, also known as
Teddy Mac, will host
karaoke on Thursday and
Friday nights this week in
the Music Hall at the Spir-
it of the Suwannee Music
Park. You can bring your
own CD with music or use
Teddy Mac's large assort-
ment of music. Karaoke is
lots of fun and those regu-
lars who come out pro-
claim it's a real hoot! Ad-
mission to the Music Hall
on Thursday and Friday
nights is free. Dinner and
beverages from the SOS
Caf6 and Restaurant will
be available at regular
prices.
S ELVIS DINNER
THEATRE FEATURES
VEGAS STYLE STAG-
ING OCT. 18 The big
night is finally here with
"Elvis" and the Elvis Din-
ner Theatre featuring Ted
McMullen as Elvis in
three stages of Elvis' life.
Vegas style backdrops,
lighting and costumes
step up the fun, the aura
of "Elvis" and the enjoy-
ment for this wonderful
evening of entertainment
and the opportunity to re-
member "The King of
Rock N Roll," Elvis Pres-
ley Ted McMullen has
been an Elvis imperson-
ator for many years and
performed before thou-
sands of adoring fans. He
regularly performs at the
SOSMP on the Music Hall
stage where his fans flock
to be part of this huge


event. Don't miss your
chance to be part of the
audience. Ladies, get your
girlfriends together and
plan to spend the entire
weekend with us so you
don't miss any of the ac-
tion during this great
weekend. When Elvis is
not on stage, you can shop
our Crafts Village, Coun-
try Store; take a canoe
trip down the famous
Suwannee River, tool
around the nearly 1,000-
. acre campground and
park, hike, go horseback
riding or... SHOP nearby!
If you plan to attend the
Saturday night Elvis Din-.
ner Theatre, call uis now
to reserve your tickets to
make sure you're not dis-
appointed. Dinner of
baked chicken and side
dishes along with a ticket
for the show is just $27 per
person.
KARAOKE
WITH TEDDY MAC
OCT. 16-17 This Thurs-
day and Friday night, Oct.
16-17, you can visit the
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park for the atmos-
phere and food and also
get a chance to show off
your musical talents dur-
ing Karaoke with Teddy
Mac. Why, you might even
leave there with a new-
found desire to make it
big in the music world,
not to mention the possi-
bility you'll hear an up
and coming star perform
who you will just love!
That's right, Ted Mc-
Mullen, also known as
Teddy Mac, will host
karaoke on Thursday and
Friday nights this week
in the Music Hall at the
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park. You can
bring your own CD with
music or use Teddy Mac"s
large assortment of mu-
sic. Karaoke is lots of fun
and those regulars who
come out proclaim it's a
real hoot! Admission to
the Music Hall on Thurs-
day and Friday nights is


free. Dinner and bever-
ages from the SOS Cafe
and Restaurant will be
available at regular
prices.
FOR TICKETS, PRICE
INFO AND MORE
Thursday and Friday
night, Oct. 16-17, admis-
sion to the Music Hall is
free. Food and beverages
will be available Thurs-
day and Friday nights at
regular prices from the
SOS Cafe and Restaurant
menu. Doors open at 6
p.m. Thursday and Friday
night shows begin at 7
p.m.
Tickets for the Elvis
Dinner Theatre on Satur-
day night, Oct. 18, are $27
per person for dinner and
the show. Tickets are
available in advance or
will be available at the
door until capacity is
reached, first come first
serve. Doors open Satur-
day night at 5:30 p.m. so
dinner can be served and
complete by 7 p.m. when
the show begins. The
show lasts about three
hours.


We've Moved
Your people have relocated, but
their dedication to getting you
every advantage remains the
same. Come by the new office
and put your people to work.
For other locations call
1-800-HRBLOCK
or visit hrblock.com


H&R BLOCK

H&ItR Block Madison
(next to SUBWAY)
378 E Base Street
Madison,FL 32340
850-973-3800
Mon & Thurs 1-6
0 2007 H&R Block Servces, Inc




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