Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00114
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: June 11, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00114
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text



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THE SPIRIT OF MADISON COUNTY


*1 greepbishing I.Madso Cont's wad-inningNesppe 5040I, 4


Woman

Killed,

Six

Injured
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A woman was killed
and six were seriously
injured in a traffic
crash on Interstate 10 at
the 236-mile marker,
west of Greenville, early
Friday morning, June 6.
According to a Flori-
da Highway Patrol re-
port, Yolanda V. Cruz,
29, of Camilla, Ga., was
traveling east on 1-10 in
the outside lane in a
1997 Ford Explorer. At
the same time, Mark
Allen Morrell, 46, of Vi-
dor, Texas, was in the
outside lane behind
Cruz. ,:-
Morrell's left front
bumper collided with
the left rear corner of
Cruz's vehicle. After the
impact, Cruz's SUV ro-
tated clockwise onto the
south shoulder of 1-10.
After leaving the
roadway, Cruz's vehicle
overturned several
times, ejecting all seven
of its occupants. Nope
of the occupants was
wearing a seatbelt.
The SUV camn to a
final rest in the ttee
See WOMAN KILLED,
Page 10A


Fire Destroys Mobile Home


By Jacob Bembry'
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A fire on Friday evening, June 6, de-
stroyed a mobile home in the
Ravenswood Trailer Park.
According to Fire Inspector Archie
Strickland, Madison Fire and Rescue re-
sponded to the fire at 179 Ravenswood,


B
G
n

II
t(
r(
yr.


Lot 8, at 7:20 p.m. and the first engine ar-
rived on the scene.
Strickland said that the fire was ac-
cidental and had started inside the trail-
er.
The home belonged to Willie Bell,
who was not home at the time the fire be-
gan.


I


Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Friday night, June 6. a lightning strike in the
San Pedro Bay ignited a fire that resulted in 377 lost
acres of forest and the smell of smoke through the
weekend. The lost acreage was determined using GPS
technology Dozens of smaller fires are still burning.
According to Elijah Terrell, Forest Area Supervisor,
Florida Division of Forestry, Perry District, Madison
County Station, numerous lightning strikes have
See BAYABLAZE, Page 10A


Sex


Offtender


Registers


Eddie Roy Turner
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Eddie Roy Turner
has registered as a sex
offender with the Madi-
son. County Sheriff's Of-
fice with a change of ad-
dress. .
Turner, who is under
supervision, registered
with the address of 3736
US E Highway 90, Madi-
son, 32340-5482.
Turner is a 5'10" tall
black male, who weighs
180 pounds. His qualify-
ing offense was A lewd
and lascivious act on a
child under 16 years of
,age.
Turner's aliases in-
clude Eddie R. Givens,
Eddie Roy Moore, Eddie
Roy Givens and Eddie
Givens.

Man; Child

Injured In

Wreck
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A man and a child
were injured.as their
1993 Subaru was hit by a
2003 Ford pickup at the
intersection of US.
Highway 90 and NE
Country Road on Friday,
June 6.
According to a Flori-
da Highway Patrol re- ,
port, Daniel R. Williams,
50, of Madison, was
traveling east on High-
way 90 at approximately
4:52 p.m. At the same
time, Bryan D. Whit-
field, 29, of 'Mdison,
was also eastbound, but
See WRECK, Page 10A


Greene Publisning, Inc. mnoto By IIcnael lurtis, June u, iuua
It's ART TIME at the Building Blocks Summer Camp!
Building Blocks Summer Camp
Opens To A Grateful Community
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Residents throughout the Lee community have
joined with Mayor Ernestine Kinsey and the Lee Town
Council to gratefully welcome the Building Blocks
Summer Camp. Located at the Lee Business Complex,
which is already home to two very successful opera-
tions, namely Dawn's Academy and FastPack, the
camp program is a collaborative effort between the
Town of Lee and 4-H.
Town Manager Cheryl Archambault, along with
Deputy Clerk Janice Miller, have been working on this
Town Council directive for over a year. This reporter
is extremely proud to have participated in the develop-
See SUMMER CAMP, Page 10A


TDC Welcomes New Faces Then Changes Funding Policy
ly Michael Curtis month's meeting. City of ferences between them- cause it is funded from format selected from vari-
freene Publishing, Inc. Madison Mayor Myra selves and the Board of county bed tax dollars as- ous stakeholders in the
The Tourism Develop- Valentine, Town of Lee County Commissioners sessed on overnight ac- business. Currently com-
nent Council (TDC) of Councilman Doug McNi- (BOCC) regarding the role commodations, including prised of city and county
ladison County got back col, as well as real estate and authority of the motels, campgrounds, and officials, professionals
o business on June 5 fol- developer and agent tourism council. the bed and breakfast. Its and entrepreneurs, the
owing the unexpected Stephen Pike resigned The Tourism Develop- membership is specified goal of the tourism com-
esignations of three abruptly, the latter two ment Council was formed to include officials and mittee is to develop strate-
lembers during last voicing irreconcilable dif- as required by law be- residents in a committee See TDC, Page 10A


2 Sections,. 30 Pages
Around Madison County
Bridal Guide
Classifieds/Legals
Community Calendar


Father's Day
5-7A Greeneville News
11A Health 1
16-17A Obituaries
5A Path of Faith B S


12A Wed /73 Tnu 90/73 Fri S917 .S 9S3/73
8-9A 6111 -'-73 6/12 90 3 6/13 9172 -' 6114 9373
4-15A Partly cloudy early. Scattered A few thunderstorms possible. A few thunderstorms possible. Isolated thunderstorms. Highs ti
5A thunderstorms developing later in Highs in the low 90s and lows in Highs in the low ,9s and lows in the low 90s and lows in the low
action I the day. the low 70s. the low 70s. 70s.


I


Ponet ounmittednby Pat Lignicap


Summer Is In The Air!


Konner
Jones,
Noah
Winstead
and
Stavon
McCrary
show
friends
how to
whip it,
and whip
it good.
Please
see page
5A for full
Coverage.


4
Se








2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 11, 2008



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS





Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


'The sign above the
door at the Madison Coun-
ty School Board


The sign at your local
grocery store or other re-
tail establishment

OUR EMPLOYEES
FAMILIES COME
FIRST PLEASE EX-
CUSE ANY DELAY OR
PROBLEMS THIS MAY
CAUSE FOR YOUR VIS-
IT. PLEASE COME
BACK ANYTIME, EX-
CEPT WHEN MY FAMI-


LY IS HERE BECAUSE
YOU WILL COME SEC-
OND.

How long would this
business be around the
county? I venture to say
not long?
Does Madison County
School Board represent
all the children in Madi-
son County? On Tuesday,
June 03, 2008 our elected
school board members
voted to give special treat-
ment to children of the
School district employees,
but that is no excuse for
allowing an employee's
family to come first. Just
think how you would feel
in the same situation.


How long would you wait?
What if this were the only
store in town in which to
shop, would you not try to
change such a blatant pol-
icy of nepotism.
At our Public school, a
child may request a trans-
fer to a new school, and
get that transfer if the
parent guardian or care-
giver assigned by the
court is a school district
employee. All the other
children must participate
in a lottery Imagine going
to any other business and
getting your service be-
hind the family of the em-
ployees of that business.
Our School board has
thrown the public trust to


The Madison County Health


Department is offering FREE


Mammograms through June 30th


to women ages 40-49 who do not


have health insurance and has


not had a mammogram in the


last year.






If anyone is interested

please, come by the

Health Department or

contact

Tekeema Graham .j

@ 973-5000 ext. 120




FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF'


HEALTfH


WHEN YOU
HERE YOUR
COMES FIRST
IN AND APPLY


9emn


WORK
CHILD
COME


Does Madison County School Board Represent

All The Children In Madison County?


the wind and elected to
serve the needs of a few
over the needs of the
many How are we, all the
other parents of children
who attend the public
schools in Madison Coun-
ty, supposed to believe
that our children matter
when the first introduc-
tion to a public school is
an assignment for our
child after all the employ-
ees? How many other
rules and assignments are
made because of employ-
ment at the District? A
public school needs to
have a fair and impartial
process to assign children
to schools in Madison.
Public trust is the ingredi-
ent that allows parents to
have faith that all chil-
dren will be treated fairly.
Yes, our parents should
support their children at
Madison County Schools,
but our schools and our
school board needs to lis-
ten to the parents, and
support the parents of
Madison County, ALL
THE PARENTS AND
ALL THE CHILDREN.
Our school board mem-
bers and indeed our
School Superintendant
are ELECTED to provide
an equal educational
chance for all the children
in Madison County, It is
sad to think that to pro-
vide equality to all chil-
dren, the district will need
to employ all their par-
ents.
Our teachers, and
school employees deserve
our respect and thanks for
the public service they
provide, but they do not
deserve to be first in line
at the public school for
placement, educational
benefit or other programs.
Real support for teachers
should come in salary in-
creases, lower class sizes,
and more collaboration
from parents. And above
all and done the least,
more public THANK
YOUs. This is the time to
support the children, ALL
THE CHILDREN, not
just those lucky enough to
have a parent employed by
the school district. Creat-
ing an atmosphere that is
based on the needs of all
children is the first step.
Remember that OUR
SCHOOL BOARD IS
ELECTED TO SERVE
ALL CHILDREN and if
we disagree we need to
make our voices heard at
the ballot box.
Involved Parent and
Community Supporter of
our Schools

TERESA
GALLEGOS


My "Daddy's Hands"

Happy Father's Day
With Father's Day coming up this weekend, I could-
n't pass up the opportunity to write about my Father,
Tommy Greene (affectionately still
known as Daddy, to me.)
When life, in general, is
studied, it is truly amazing
how much time and thought
God put in to what we all
needed and how our lives
would be structured best.
Mothers are given to
us for nurturing, and
gentleness, and love.
The one to kiss away our
tears, hug away our
fears, and to listen with a
kind, open heart to our
worries and troubles. It
was her side of the bed
that you would climb in to
in the middle of the night,
when awoken with a night-
mare.
Fathers, I feel, do/and can
have these.same traits, yet their role
in our lives are much different. Our Father was the one
we looked up to as "the man that can do EVERYTHING
and ANYTHING!" He was the provider, the hard work-
er, the one that could fix anything that was broken, the
playful one that would rustle and tussle in a wrestling
match, and let's never ever forget him as ... the disci-
plinarian.
From my Mother I learned the softer side of life.
She showed. ie h6ow a real mother. is supposed t6 wilb o
her children....and I can only hope that I am doing even
half as good of a job as she did. From her, I learned the
importance of a sweet heart, a caring spirit, and a giv-
ing attitude. She taught me how to fin4 a silver lining in
any situation, and she taught me the lesson of "making
memories" with my children and enjoy ing life, one day
at a time.
From my Father I learned the "oth r" side of life.
My brothers and I were taught, from a v ry young age,
'A man is only as good as his word," and here's noth-
ing worse than a thief or a liar." He taughtme to work
hard, respect others and their property, thatbove all I
should always be honest in all that I do, and th I CAN
do anything that I set my mind to. From him I :ew my
backbone, inherited his business mind and his lie's ag-
gression to always strive for better.
On my wall, in my Madison office, my Daddy hung a
picture frame with the quote "Never remain neutral, for
the loser will not respect you and the victor wili banish
you from his cave."
From both of our parents, my brothers and I wbre
always taught, "There is NOTHING more important
than FAMILY!!"
One of my favorite songs, of all times, is "Daddy's
Hands."
To me this song says EVERYTHING that I would
like for my Daddy to hear, not just because it's Father's
Day, but because I want him to know how-much I love
him and respect him, as a man and as my Father.

I remember Daddy's hands folded silently in prayer
And reaching' out to hold me, when I had a nightmare
You could read quite a story in the callous' and lines
Years of work and worry had left their mark behind

I remember Daddy's hands how they held my
Mama tight
And patted my back, for something done right
There are things that I'd forgotten that I loved,
about the man
But I'll always remember the love in Daddy's hands

Daddy's hands were soft and kind when I was cryin'
Daddy's hands were hard as steel when I'd done wrong
Daddy's hands weren't always gentle but I've come
to understand
There was always love in Daddy's hands.
I remember Daddy's hands working' 'til they bled
Sacrificed unselfishly just to keep us all fed
If I could do things over I'd live my life again
And never take for granted the love in Daddy's hands

Daddy's hands were soft and kind when I was cryin'
Daddy's hands were hard as steel when I'd done wrong
Daddy's hands weren't always gentle but I've come to un-
derstand
There was always love in Daddy's hands.

Happy Father's Day, Daddyl!!
ILove You!!!

Until then I'll see you around the town.


Question Of The Week




"Have you
received your
economy
stimulating
tax rebate
check?"

--------- --- .--.- -- --"
0 10 20 30 40 50 60
Log on to www.greenepublishlng.com to answer this weeks' question...
"How often do you wear your seatbelt?"
Voting for this question will end on June 16 at 9 a.m.


7:., a w~


QB 0( -









Wednesday,June 11, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Building Blocks


Summer Camp Begins
Midway Church of God's Kids Krusade, the Incredi-
ble Race, was very successful as dozens of children
came each evening. On Friday evening, drawings were
held for a Michael Waltrip barbecue grill and two tires,
which came off two different racecars at the Daytona
500. My sister, Abbie, drew the names of the winners.
T.J. Cline won one of the tires and Jamie Phillips won
the other. Abbie drew her own name for the grill! Prizes
were given all through the Kids Krusade. On Friday
evening, Bruce Flowers showed up and brought his race-
car. Everyone had a great time in the Lord.
I understand that Lee First Baptist Church also had
a great Vacation Bible School!
Condolences are extended to Thelma Thompson,
whose sister, Ruby, died last Thursday in Jacksonville.
Ruby was also my father's first cousin.
The Building Blocks Summer Camp program began
Monday with great fanfare as the children all began hav-
ing a great time!
Happy birthday wishes are extended to Precious
Cline and A.J. Doyle, June 10; Jed Phillips and Bethany
Phillips, June 11; Cody Cline, June 16 and Cary Phillips,
June 17.
Happy anniversary wishes are extended to Turner
and Mozella Phillips, who will celebrate their 40th an-
niversary on June 11; Allen and Brenda McCormick,
who will celebrate their 33rd anniversary on June 13;
and Elvoye and Betty Thomas, who will .celebrate their
52nd anniversary on June 16.
That's all the news for this week. Have a great week
and a beautiful forever! May God bless each and every
one of you!





Latoya D. Cuthbertson and DOR vs. Decroya W
Greer support
Tracey J. Stewart and DOR vs. Wilton Cooks -
UFISA
Vereneda J., Gallon-Hendry and DOR vs. Mario C.
Herring support
Weeks Farm Machinery, Inc. vs. Twin Oaks Rentals
- other civil /.
Shantee, Graham vs. Stadius Brown domestic in-
junction
Steven' Rissman vs. Guillermo Marquez-Sterling -
other civil
SBetgy Bass vs. Marvin P Bass dissolution of mar-
riage /




Our eyes are always the same

size from birth, but our nose

and ears never stop growing.



After Much Time

and Anticipation,

The Recipe Eook

You' e Fl s ce

lBeen -....

Waiting .f BE
H41
Ior Is w^ S ~'' ^S

Here
A aThe cost of this "one of a kind"
/ recipe book is just $28.
.Last! DON'T WAIT!
Get your copy at
Madison Sporting Goods
in Madison, Florida,
S Jackson's Drug Store
% i. in Greenville, Florida,
Guys & Gals Styling Salon
in Madison, Florida and
Greene Publishing, Inc.,
located at
1695 South SR 53
\in Madison, FL.


Why We Should Drill


Last week,
Senator Bill Nel-
son used a photo-
graph I had e-,
mailed him to
highlight the re-
cent explosion of
fuel and energy
prices that has
plagued so many
Americans. The
photo ,was taken


National

Security
Joe Boyles
Guest Columnist


on May 26th and showed the price for reg-
ular gasoline at the Shell station on the
corner of Duval and Base at $4.099/gal-
lon. In the few months, the price of
crude oil that makes up nearly three-
quarters of the price we pay at the pump
has soared by 44 percent.
While I disagreed with some of Sena-
tor Nelson's comments, there is no doubt
in my mind that he is acutely aware that
Floridians are sick and tired of the high
prices for fuel. What are we to do about
this quandary? Let's start by exploring
and using domestic sources of energy I
can think of four reasons why this makes
sense let's see if you agree.
First, over the long run as we in-
crease supply, we are assured that prices
will fall provided that new supplies ex-
ceed increased demand. If we do not in-
crease supplies, then we can be assured
that prices will rise as the world de-
mands more energy to fuel their
economies. Without aggressive action,
in short order, we may see prices climb so
high that we will wish that the price for a
gallon of regular "only" cost $4.
Second, we are sending a lot of dol-
lars overseas every month, principally to
buy foreign oil. About 60 percent of our
oil supply is imported, so billions of dol-
lars are being shipped offshore. The neg-
ative balance of payments is helping to
weaken the dollar making oil even more
expensive. If we produce more of our
own energy and import less, we will
strengthen the greenback and our na-
tion's economy
Third, the more energy we create at
home translates into more American
jobs. Rather than use American dollars
create foreign energy business, we would
be investing those dollars at home creat-
ing business in America.
Last, the more energy we produce at
home, the more self-sufficient we be-
come. This means we will be less reliant
on unstable or hostile regimes, such as
Nigeria, Iran and Venezuela. Our two
largest suppliers of energy abroad are
Canada and Mexico, both of which are


friendly trading
partners. If we
can replace less
S.,, i reliant suppliers
with domestic
sources of ener-
Sgy, then America
will become
more secure.
M o s t
S Americans
Should support
these arguments but the Democrats in
Congress are holding up progress.
Their arguments to the contrary are
couched in climatic fears of carbon-
based fuels and dwindling supplies. I re-
ject the man-made global warming argu-
ment but recognize the limits of carbon-
based fuels. Our supplies of carbon-
based fuels are limited to somewhere Be-"
tween 100-200 years and as supplies be-
gin to dry up, the will become more.
scarce and expensive. In that period of
time, we need to replace our fuels with
alternative sources of energy
For example, we shouldn't be per-
mitting new electric generators that are
fueled by oil and natural gas. New elec-
trical generating plants should be pow-
ered by new generation nuclear and
clean coal technologies. Nuclear power
generation is clean energy and our coal
is domestically produced. We should be
reserving oil for transportation and nat-
ural gas for home heating.
One of the things r find most trou-
bling in this current energy debate is
the inability of our Republican and De-
mocrat leaders to work together to fash-
ion a compromise energy policy that
would benefit the American people.
Both sides are beholden to the special
interests that supply them with money
for their reelection and they are satis-
fied with demagoguing each other and
allowing American consumers to twist
in the wind.
It is very frustrating! We should be
able to explore and drill for more domes-
tic sources of energy We should stream-
line the permitting process for new gen-
eration electrical power plants to re-
place older, inefficient plants and add
new capability for our growing energy
needs. We should invest in qost-effective
technologies which represent alterna-
tive sources of energy We should not be
dependent on unstable regimes that
wish us harm rather than good. And we
should be developing conservation poli-
cies that make sense to the average con-
sumer.


Your Community,

NOTICED.


School Distric Budgets
Local lax (lialnges
Piopealy ARcEiois'
Public Hearings
Adopl ions


Find out about public notices in this newspaper.
Or search online at:
www.floridapublicnotices.com


~"Zias


1Orida Press Assoc,



Award Winning Newspaper








P.O. Drawer 772
SMadison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Website:
www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
ge bpg e 4blishing.coly
news@greenepublishing.com
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
Classifieds/ Legals
debra@greenepublishing.com
PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene Kinsley
EDflro
Jacob Bembry
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Lisa Greene
STAFF WRITERS
Michael Cutis and Tyra Meserve
GRPkmc DESIGNERS
Stephen Bochina and Heather Bowen
TYPESETTER/SlUBSCRIPTION
Brant Thigpen
ADVERTISING
SALES EPRESENTATDVES
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy McKinney,
Jeanene Dunn and Dan Mathis
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Debra Lewis and Lisa Greene
Deadline for clsifiedh is
Monday at 3:00 pm.
Deadline for Legal Advertisement is
Monday at 5pm.
There will be a '3 charge for Affidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Sheree Miller and Bobbi Light
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
In County $30 Out-of-County $38
SStale & local rtxes included)


Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the
right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the man-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene
Publishing, Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.








4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 11, 2008



LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER

__"1I a-nH U U


Madison County

CRIME BEAT


ALL. SUSPECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED INNOCENT
UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY IN A COURT OF LAW

Man Arrested For Violation

Of Domestic Injunction
A man was arrested for violation of a domestic in-
junction on Friday, June 6.
According to a Madison Police Department report,
Sgt. William Greene, 'Ptl. Joey Smith and Ptl. Eric
Gilbert were dispatched to a residence on SW Pinckney
Street in reference to Stadius Lorenzo Brown, 20, being
at the residence near a side window, which violates a
temporary injunction for protection issued on June 4
and served to Brown on June 5.
Upon the officers' arrival, the victim and witness
pointed down First Avenue and stated Brown had just
fled on a bicycle after seeing police.
Brown was located two blocks from the residence
and placed under arrest.


Pining










1713 East Hwy 90 Madison, FI 32340 '
Hours Monday Sunday 6 am. 2:30 pm.
"Home Cookin"
Now ompn 850-973-2414
7 Days A Shelby Richards -Owner
A WOO'eek A


5i


7i i "Friendly People Serving
Hometown Flavor"
Breakfast Served
Monday-Saturday 6:30 am till 10:30 am
Daily Lunch Plate Special & Salad Bar
Open Friday 5:00 pm 8:00 pm Seafood Buffet
Plus: Hamburgers, Phillys, Hot Dogs, Fajitas & Other Menu
Items Monday Friday 10:30 am till 2:30 pm
Thursday Night Special Saturday Specials
Danny's "Soon to be World' Country Style Barbeque
Famous" Prime Rib Specials -
5:00 pm until 8:00 pm 10:30 am till 2:30 pm
Take Out & Catering Available
US 90 at SR 255 In Beautiful Downtown Lee
Owners Sue & Phillip Watson
850-971-0031


'Where the Locals Eatt




Featuring Prime Rib, Steaks & Grilled Seafood
USDA Choice Beef cutfresh daily on premises
Famous for Great food & Great Service!
Extensive Wine Selection with over 35 offered by glass
Premium Well iHappy tHour 4 pm 7pm Sports Bar
229-259-9333 *
Located uwithitn mile south of Holiday Inn at Exit #16
Take-out 2101 W. Hill Ave. CreditCards
Available Open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner Accepted
11:00Oam-i00pm Sunday Thursday 11:0am-11:00pm Friday-Saturday

Hours:
Sun. Thurs.
11 am-lO 10pm
Fri. Sat.
11 am-11 pm


anat It
'N(OI I


855 W. Base St. Madison, FL

(850) 973-3333

j|S~~jjB JS ~~jiIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII"7'" 'y'


Taylor County Man Arrested

And Distribution Of Child


Attorney General Bill MV
lum announced on Thursda
5, that a Taylor County mai
been taken into custody on
charges of child pornograp
session and distribution. W
Bernard Demps' possession
distribution of multiple im
child pornography was disc
through an investigation in
by the Attorney General's C
Crime Unit. Demps was arr
today by law enforcement o
with the CyberCrime Unit,
Taylor County Sheriff's Off

Central Flori


Attorney General Bill
McCollum announced that


Q "


I'P



Uar


IcCol- and the Perry Police Depart-
ly, June ment.
n has Investigators with the Cyber-
Crime Unit determined Demps,
hy pos- 46, possessed images of child
illiam pornography while conducting a
and routine investigation online into
ages of the distribution. A search war-
covered rant was executed at Demps' Per
itiated ry residence and one computer
Dyber- was seized, along with numerous
-ested floppy disks, CDs, VHS tapes and
officers two folders containing numerous
the printed images of child pornogra
'ice phy, many appearing to be no
da Woman Sentenced F

Mortgage Fraud Schi
a Central Florida woman months in prison
has been sentenced to 45 lowed by two yi


'i


I1*


"Sn-s


:,: Delightful
S .,iaaican Cuisine
. Amazing Desserts
850-971-2760
Dine-In or Orders To Go
Delivery Available Soon
6073 East US 90 Lee, FL 32059
About Five Minutes East of Madison
Located At Beulah Land Stores With
Elegant Consignments DP's Automotive
(850) 971-0009 (850) 9" 1-0071


p.m


1874 Clubhouse Dr.
Valdosta, GA
229-242-7700



Ole Times Country Buffet

So#l Sa/ad & F tBagWoh mBufe
Hand Cut Top Sirloin Steaks On Buffet Nightly!
Banquet Facilities Available

S(229) 253-1600
1193 N. St. Augustine Road, Valdosta, GA
Lake City Mall, Hwy 90, in Lake City, FL
MasterCard/Visa/American Express/Discover


U


For Possession


Pornography
more than 10 years of age. The
equipment removed from Demps'
house will undergo additional
forensic analysis to locate any
possible additional images.
Demps will be charged with
one count of possession of child
pornography, one count distribu-
Stion of child pornography and ad-
ditional charges could be added at
a later date. If convicted of all
S counts, Demps faces up to 10 years
in prison. He will be prosecuted
a- by attorneys with the CyberCrime
Unit.

or Participation In


on to be fol-
ears of pro-


bation for participating in
criminal mortgage fraud
schemes.
Geisha Morris and her
mother, Patricia Grant,
were previously found
guilty by an Orange Coun-
ty jury for their role in a
mortgage fraud ring that
operated throughout Cen-
tral and South Florida.
The case was prosecuted
by the Attorney General's
Office of Statewide Prose-
cution.
Morris, 25, worked
with Grant, 51; her father,
Bdgar Grant, 73; and a
fourth co-conspirator,
Novelette Hanse, 57, to fal-
sify numerous documents
which enabled them to ob-
tain over 3 million dollars
in mortgages loans.
Th co-defendrl antse


filed fraudulent W-2 forms,
bank statements, HUD-
forms, employment forms
and a number of 'other
documents to purchase ex-
pensive homes in Orange,
Broward, and Palm Beach
counties for friends and
other family members.
All four were arrested
in March 2005.
Hanse also pleaded
guilty today and: was sen-
tenced to three years of
probation. Patricia Grant
was sentenced to 18 years
in prison in early May;
Edgar Grant -pleaded
guilty in 2006 and was sen-
tenced to two years in jail.
The investigation was
a joint effort by the Office
of Statewide Prosecution,
the Office of Financial
Regulation and the Flori-
da Department of Law En-
fnrcemetnt


Attorney General Launches


"MOST WANTED".

Fugitive Website
Attorney General Bill McCollum has launched a
new website featuring most wanted fugitives being pur-
sued by the Attorney General's law enforcement offi-
cers. The website will highlight dangerous criminals on
a nationwide level and will have information provided
by the Attorney General's Medicaid Control Fraud 'ht,
Office of Statewide Prosecution and CyberCrime Unit:
"Sometimes-the most valuable information provided
to our law enforcement comes from concerned citizens
within our communities," said Attorney General Mc-
Collum. "With the help of this website and its viewers;
dangerous criminals with serious charges canbe locat-
ed and brought to justice quickly."
The website will feature suspects and convicted
criminals who are wanted on serious charges including
drug trafficking, cybercrime, organized criminal activi-
ty, racketeering, and failing.to appear for sentencing af-
ter conviction or plea agreement. Each fugitive listing
will include an informational summary of the individ-
ual's charges and potential threat as well as an option to
access a full-page profile with additional details such as
the fugitive's last: known whereabouts or: any known
aliases.
Information on reporting tips to local law enforce-
ment and local Crime Stoppers organizations will'be
available on the website. Viewers can also access the tip
line contact information by clicking on the 'View all'
link on the Crime Stoppers Tip Line page. Citizens are
advised to refrain from taking any action to apprehend
the individuals and to report all information about po-
tential whereabouts to law enforcement. More informa-
tion is available at the, website, located at:
http://myfloridalegal.com/mostwanted.







Get lead stories, I /J
classified, O
the Community
Calendar

so much more!

~II~ I L


p I


WOea Skeal~s
i8 Adce Cl~e


III


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Wednesday, June 11, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY





71 WWee Have Summer Fun!
^>^ ^_ ^L^ .LL.^^^^*-u m mer^^^^ ^.^L ^L ^.-.L ^.^^y^L ^L ^^^ LJ
I e n ^^^ <^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^


Mayomie Pearl
(ordan) Stokes


Mayomie Pearl (Jor-
dan) Stokes, age 76, passed
away on Sunday, May 4,
2008 at Haven Hospice of
Lake City She was born in
Madison County and
moved to Mayo in 1965. She
was a member of Grace
Baptist Church and was a
loving, devoted mother
and grandmother. She en-
joyed quilting and fishing.
Survivors include a
son, Jack Stokes of Lee,
two daughters; Sharon Fla-
nary of Ft. Meade, and
Peggy Erdlitz of Enter-
prise, Ala.; nine grandchil-
dren and nine great-grand-
children.
Funeral services were
held at Grace Baptist
Church on Wednesday,
May 7, 2008 at 11 a.m. with
Rev. Orvis Amerson offici-
ating. Interment followed
at the Midway Cemetery
Family received friends 1
hour prior to the service at
the church.
Joe P Burns Funeral
home in Mayo was in
charge of the arrange-
ments.

Pierce Walker

Hackle






Pierce Walker Hackle,
age 84, died Monday, June
9,2008 in Valdosta, Ga after
a brief illness.
Funeral services will
be Wednesday, June 11,
2008 at 11 a.m. at Beggs Fu-
neral Home, Madison
Chapel, Madison, with
burial to follow at Hickory
Grove Cemetery, Madison.
The family will receive
friends Tuesday, June 10,
from 6-8 p.m. at Beggs Fu-
neral Home, Madison
Chapel.
Donations may by
made to Hickory Grove
United Methodist Church,
P.O Box 303, Pinetta, Flori-
da 32350 in memory of
Pierce Hackle.
Pierce will be lovingly
remembered by his four
children: Roger and (Ann),
Dale and (Gail), Chuck and
(Mattie), and Debbie Hack-
le Williams and (Jeff),
eleven grandchildren and
ten great grandchildren.


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
'All we need is the truth in
our hand. Someone to call a
friend. Neverfear the darkness.
All we need is just the sun in the
sky, and the hope of a summer to
come with the meaning of love."
-Gertrude Jekyll

Summer is in the air and on
the minds of the teachers at
Laura's Wee Folks Day Care.
Setting up some fun, the tots
that attend Wee Folks are in for


a real blast as the weather heats
up and the ladies in charge cool
down with some innovative
ideas. From poolside splashing
to pie eating contests, the hot
dog days are sure to fly by with
breezy delight and giggles ga-
lore when the Laura's Wee
Folks ladies put their minds to-
gether for awesome summer
fun.
As the day warmed up on
Thursday, May 29, so did the
hearts of passer-bys who hap-
pened to see the fun taking
place at Laura's Wee Folks Day


Greene Publisning, Inc. Pnoto ny lyrra Meserve, may zu, Zuua
The teachers try to keep pace with hungry four-year-
old pie eaters.


Care. Children splashed from
kiddy pools as whip cream
flowed from nozzles pointed
over eager mouths. Even the
teachers joined in with antics of
their own, spaying children and
adults alike as everyone romped
in the summer sun.
From bags tosses, slip and
slides, pool parties and a pie-
eating contest, there was plenty
of fun to be shared. The boys
took the lead in pie snarfing,
but the girls were clearly the
winners when it came to
squeals after being hit with the


hose. No one held grudges
though, as it's hard to be taken
seriously when one's covered in
whipped cream.
Miss Laura and the teachers
at Wee Folks have definitely set
their sights on some cool sum-
mer fun this year and the ex-
citement of their tots can be
heard for miles. With so much
glee in the air, one might find it
difficult to repress thdir boister-
ous inner child.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve
can be reached at tyrra@greene-
publishing.com


,- .



Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Tyrra Meserve, May 29, 2008
Kara Buchtmann helps dry off Kina Cruce's two and three-year-old class. Pictured
front row, left to right: Alacia Smith, Joshua Watts, Desmond Hunter, Nadia Waller and
Besty Anna Craven. Middle row, left to right: Makayla Blanton, Abbi Hollingsworth,
Blaine Smith. Back row: Kara Buchtmann holding Anna Ebberson.


Cli.00g01fiNVNIT CA|


June 11
Sirmans .Baptist
Church is having a revival
running through Wednes-
day, June 11. The times
will be 6 p.m. on Sunday
and 7 p.m. Monday-
Wednesday Brother John
Edmisten will be the
Speaker. There will be spe-
cial singing each night.
June 11
The Local Planning
Team for Circuit 3, conver-
ing Columbia, Dixie,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madi-
son, Suwannee and Taylor
counties will meet on June
11, at 3 p.m. at the Suwan-
nee County Guardian Ad
Litem Office, located at 213
East Howard Street, Live
Oak. This meeting is a
continuation of the team's
work on the Governor's


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Tyrra Meserve, May 29, 2008
Breona Keene, left, and Kayle Walker, right, look on at
the boys who appear to be winning.


A Guide to Home Ownership en Espanol


Participants Will Learn How To:
* Understand and establish credit
* Qualify for a home mortgage
* Save and shop for a home
* Qualify for down-payment assistance


Upcoming Class:
Saturday, June 14th
9:00am 3:00pm


REALTOR*
Tallahassee
BOARD OF REALTORS"


Call (850) 894-6786 for More Information or to Register.

10. hmsil dTlaaseFoia3339wm71Re~r


initiative to promote
adoption, support adop-
tive families and prevent
child abuse, abandon-
ment and neglect. The
meeting is open to the
public and public input is
welcome. For additional
information, please con-
tact Melissa ,Walker at
352-955-5123
June 12
To assist parents in


Freddy Pitts
Agency Manager


the positive resolution of
grief, South Georgia Med-
ical Center's Compassion-
ate Friends Support
Group will meet at 7 p.m.;
Thursday, June 12, in
SGMC Basement Class-
room C. Grieving par-
ents, siblings and grand-
parents are invited to at-
tend. For more informa-
tion, call Stephen Norris
.at (229) 259-4510.


Serving Madison,

Jefferson, Taylor &

Lafayette Counties



Jimmy King
Agent


233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071


Doug Helms, Agent
105W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213



813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371



Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399


The TALLAHASSEE BOARD OF REALTORS' is pleased to offer a Step-by-Step
Homebuyer Education Course to assist Spanish-speaking, first-time home-
buyers learn the process to secure safe, decent, affordable housing.

All classes are held at the TALLAHASSEE BOARD OF REALTORS* Office located
at 1029 Thomasville Road (Across from '.\ t .,,, i ..i on Thomasville Road)








6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 11, 2008



AROUND MADISON COUNTY

I


Second Annual


Red, White & Blue


Heritage Day Festival


Set For June 28

By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Saturday, June 28, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., the Sec-
ond Annual Red, White and Blue Heritage Day Festival
will be launched from the Madison County Courthouse
lawn. Among activities scheduled for the event, candi-
dates from throughout the region seeking political of-
fice will have campaign booths and be speaking
throughout the day A political speech podium will
open at 10:30 a.m., giving each candidate ample time to'
discuss his or her views.
In addition to campaign activities in the Courthouse
square, the festival will run along Range Ave., with an-
tiques and collectibles, arts, crafts, lots of food vendors
and even a nostalgic horse & surrey tour of the historic
district. There will also be space available for civic
fundraisers at no charge. Please call (850) 973-9000 for
booth inquiries and event details.
Voters may submit questions for the candidates pri-
or to the event via mail or email. The questions will
then be made available for the candidates to address
during his or her podium time throughout the festival.
These questions for the candidates may be mailed to
Madison Antiques Market & Interiors @ 197 SW Range
Avenue, Madison, FL 32340 or e-mailed to rewhiteand-
blueheritageday@yahoo.com. All questions should be
submitted as soon as possible to ensure consideration.
Staff writer Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Tuten s UI Pick
Potatoes Squash Sweet Onions



C^2 CALL FIRST
Day 948-4816 Night 973-8286


"Small Town Hero" Essay Receives


Mother's Passionate Praise


SBy Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The following essay was recently recognized as part
of an essay contest conducted at Madison County High
School. Although many great entries were included,
several receiving high praise, the following was a moth-
er's passionate favorite and is offered for the pleasure of
others. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Mattair sponsored the con-
test. The story is presented without change and huge
kudos is extended to its author, Ashley Haynes

"My Small-Town Hero"

From LeBron James and Laila Ali to Will Smith and
Rosa Parks, these names are recognized as being signifi-
cant heroes and heroines of our society today. As time
progresses, we watch as these people break the unexpected
barriers of success. Unfortunately, my hero has never
won an Oscar or walked the red carpet. He has won a
gold medal, but he has never competed in the Olympics or
been the spark of a civil rights movement. He's a person
of many heroic qualities, born and raised in the small
town of Madison. He's taught me that dreams do come
true, but only through faith. My hero is no other than my
brother Jeremy Haynes.
First off I most admire my brother for his relation-
ship with GOD. Ever since we were young he always
taught me to keep GOD first. Every night, for at least an
hour, he would be tucked away with his Bible. I would
constantly hear him in the opposite room reading and
praying. He would always tell me that if I didn't do any-
thing else, I need to remember Philippians 4:13 ("I can do
all things through Christ, who strengthens me.") He sug-
gested that any time I find myself worried or stressed; I
can turn to this specific verse as a form of relief Jeremy
has showed me that it's best to take something negative
and turn it into something positive.
Since he was a little boy, he has always carried a pas-
sionfor baseball. When he was first introduced to a base-
ball, he never put it down. He had big dreams of playing
college baseball and making it into the big leagues as a
pitcher I remember one day he told me that someone said
to him, "The odds of making it into the big leagues are a
million to one." This statement could have made Jeremy





BTCT


quit, and give up all hopes of fulfilling his dreams as a
professional baseball player Instead, his endurance and
strength pushed him to continue on to the next level.
Today, Jeremy can say that he is that one because now
he lives HIS dream as a minor league pitcher For years,
I've lived in the shadow of my big brother When I think
of what he's done, Ifeel as though GOD couldn't have put
me in a better position. Jeremy is a person of character
faith and determination. He's a mentor, an athlete and a
child of GOD. He's touched the heart of many, and
showed that going hard on every pitch does pay off He's
not a celebrity, built on the fame and glory of the world.
He is, however and will always be "MY SMALL-TOWN
HERO".
Jeremy Haynes is now a Class "A" baseball player for
the Anaheim Angels organization in Rancho Cucamon-
ga, California.


Fish Day -
Now Is The Time For Stocking
*4-6" Channel Catfish $33 per 100
*6-8" Channel Catfish $53 per 100
*Bluegill (Coppernose & Hybrid) *Redear
*Largemouth Bass *Black Crappie (If Avail.)
*8-11" Grass Carp *Fathead Minnows
We will service you at:
Farmers Supply Co. in Valdosta, Ga.
Wed. June 18 From 8 am 9 am
To Pre-Order, Call:
Arkansas Pondstockers 1-800-843-4748
Walk Ups Welcome


I
1
-4


I'
Well Drilling Pump Repair Pool Supplies Pool Chemicals
Pruud To Be Serving )bou With 2 Locations



a'- (386) 590-0888 cell
24 Hour Service
A.ike Harris Owner


Roy Crain, Jr(38)362388*Salsepresetalive1 771


HUGH'S LAWN CARE
_1 A and TREE SERVICE, LLC
Hugh Sherrod T =c'
238 1NE Bid ya Pond ,e.4' Madit, forida
Busneas: 8504453321 Hoe: 850-9736601 mail: ughgslearthlinknet
Lawn MowIng WiSO
WE PlANT Edging &A"MnU
& MAINTAIN Weed Eating Welr
GAME FEED Tree Trimming es O
PLOTS Bush Hogging Roads SUSoNim


A F


= lf Ai-


AVUr\ EiecUl. 1 --
Licensed ER 13013747 & Insured
Residential and Commercial Electrical Contractor
Dewayne O'Quinn
Kelli Carroll O'Quinn
Owners Operators
Po Box 131
Greenville. FL 32331
J Phone (850) 948-9957
Licensed in Madison, Jefferson & Taylor Counties


F]


Termite and Pest Control
Certified Pest Control Operator
Termite & Pest Control Specialis I


850-673-7590


Jay L~te


th rive Oak



BUILDERSSUPPLY
s c ~uw :m ucrs, sS N s 17856 Hwy 129 S. McAlpin, FL 32062


Rick Lewis
Contractor Sales Representative
North Florida Area
1301 Madison Hwy.
P.O. Box 37 -Valdosta, GA 31603


Also specializing in lhstalled Sales:
*Fireplace inserts -Gas Logs 'Marble
surrounds 'Mantels 'Shower doors 'Mirrors 'Garage
doors 'Ventilated shelving 'Custom shelving 'Door & window
installation and replacement 'Interior trim


Mobile: (850) 672-0397
Fax (850) 584.3934


SBS Office (229) 242-4750
SBS Fa' (229) 242.6113


(..,.l, I ,H , l, ,1 (l,,,l0d Ihll h 'i
Shea's Well & Pump
Everett's
Well Drilling & Irrigation Wells
Rc i uIlnw .,l Iri Vl.'.1 11 V.l. Ic I. ,i ll 11. -1 .. V "
-" i e i..c.
**. in .. I I, I . .. ] ' I I.,r. l, \ i I ,. ( > r In "I. II .
Old Q111il lan.i M niall .,n1 Io.al Qullnman. (C,
(229) 263-4192
I 1 1 ... 11 i '. I ,i '


Design
SSod or Seed
Cold Hardy Palms
'.;" Light Debris Clean-Up
Tree Spade Transplanting
Ovel 35 Acics In Productlon
30 Years Serving Thlis Area
SPeacock's Landscaping
irensed &* Insured (850) 973-2848
Toll Free -800-9PEACOCK

Burnette
Plumbing &Well Service
RF'OO5445
Drilling & Repairs
Plumbing Repairs* Fixtures-Faucets
Sewer & Water Cnnections Water Heater Repairs
Wells Drilled *Pumps Replaced
Tanks Replaced All Repairs


Carlton Barnette
Met8-r Plumber
850-973-1404


Tire i Mffisre
Center /-1,a
lo1f E. XIS 9 0 a Mzuimcbr, FL

850-973-3026




SEK
I0


125 SW Shelby Ave.
Madison, F. l. 3-11


________________ U


2417 Claim Service:
1.866.275-7322
"Helping You
Is What We Do Best:'


Serving Madison, Jefferson,
Taylor & Lqfayette Counties
Auto, Life, Health, Home
Freddy PItts, Apnym*wgwr


SJimmy King, Agemt aGlen Klng, Agn
233W. Base St.' Madison (850) 973-4071
Freddy Pits
105 W. Anderson St, Montcello (850) 997-2213
Freddy Pills
813 S. Washington St.' Perry (850) 584-2371
Lance Braswell, A tf
Larayete Counly Mayo. FL (386) 294-1399


Need A
Graphic Designer?

Billboard Design
Posters
Flyers
NEED ART, I CAN DO IT!
Call Lisa at 850-242-8230


Ewing Construction
New Horna / Addton / Sun Room I/ Srow Roome
Carport I D)Ock / IMobie Home R ooowrU / Metl Rooft
s.MC.wfl.4 SWI4 0 C0W..W.R c
sec ixstr n ce ,dles l
BNE#WING 859)7*19043 00*^

SFLORIDA COOKING'
WILD STYLE
available at
Greene Publishing, Inc.,
located at
1695 South SR 53
in Madison, FL.


-- - ---- -- ------- --- --- ---............ --


II ~ r


*








Wednesday, June 11, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Alpha Kappa

Alpha Offers

Chit Chat

Camp For

Black Males

Ages 10-18
Nu Omega Omega
Chapter of Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority, Inc.,
Shirley T. Barfield, Presi-
dent will host a Camp Chit
Chat for Black Males 10-18
on Saturday, June 14, at the
Madison County Recre-
ation Center from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. This event is be-
ing done to meet National
Requirement on the Black
Family Focus.
This Camp Chit Chat
will address some of the
problems Young Black
Males need awareness on
such as: Health Issues,
Money Management,
School Drop Out, Teenage
Pregnancy, Gang violence,
and Manhood.
Presenters will be
Black Males who have
achieved in different areas
of life. Please consider
lending your support by
providing a monetary do-
nation for this event.
Funds collected will help
us provide lunch, camp
packs, and door prizes.
Your support will be great-
ly appreciated and your
name will be displayed on
a banner at the camp. This
camp will be educational
and Fun. Contact Deloris
Jones, 850-973-2823 or Glen-
da Branch, 950-673-9330.
Thank you for your
support.






Cet l ied sones, :-
clcssR eds,
theCommunr
(aendar

so mch more
.MOM=1'I


Employment Connections


Announces Staff


Employment Connections is ex-
cited to announce a staff promo-
tion and two new employees.
Cindy Heffernan, a resident of
Live Oak, was promoted to Pro-
gram Director Which oversees the
coordination of two federal work-
force programs administered by
Employment Connections' Work-
force Professionals. Heffernan has
8 years of case management expe-
rience and looks forward to lead-
ing her team of Career Consul-
tants.


Heffernan left a Career Coun-
selor vacancy, which was filled by
Amber McDonald of Madison. Mc-
Donald has a varied background,
including earning a Psychology
Degree from Moravian College and
four years in the Marine Corps.
Transitioning from her most re-
cent experience in construction,
McDonald. says, "I feel lucky to
have the education and experience
to be able to change careers, and
look forward to being able to assist
people to make a difference in


Changes

their morale and lives."
Judy Hentges joins the Employ-
ment Connections Team as an Ad-
ministrative Assistant. Hentges, of
Madison, also brings a variety of
experience to her new position,
from being self-employed while liv-
ing in Naples, to working for a lo-
cal church. Employment Connec-
tions welcomes-its new staff mem-
bers and looks forward to the con-
tributions they will make to the or-
ganization as they train to be
Workforce Professionals.


Florida Farm Bureau Thanks Lawmakers As


14 Of 15 Farm Bill Titles Become Law


Last week, the U.S.
House overrode President
Bush's veto of the farm
bill, voting 14 of the bill's
15 titles into law. The
house vote was 316 to 108
to override; the Senate
voted 18-13 to override.
The House and Senate
have determined that 14 of
the 15 titles are already
law, so there will be no
short-term extension of
the 2002 farm bill. The
House and Senate will act
in June to fix a clerical er-
ror that had caused the
President to veto a bill
that did not include the
trade title.
"We appreciate the
members of the Florida
delegation who stayed the
course and voted for the
farm bill and we are call-
ing upon our members to
express their apprecia-
tion," Florida Farm Bu-
reau President John L.
Hoblick said, adding that
the 2008 farm bill is more
supportive of Florida
agricultural producers
than previous farm bills.
Senators Bill Nelson
and Mel Martinez were


Subsrib
Toda


GUN & KHIFE SHOW


JUNE "
SAT 9-5 &L SUN. 1C-5 %
Valdosta
Lowndes Conference Center
(Norman Dr to I Meeting Place)
BUY-SELL-TRADE
Info: (563) 927-81 76
a-.-



WATERMELONS CANTALOUPES

SWEET ONIONS
S" ...,Watermelons
$2.00
Cantaloupes
S$1.50
,, Sweet Onions
3 for $1.00


Tanya's U-Pick

971-5362
Call First To Make An Appointment
Directions: Take Hwy. 53 South 3.5 miles past 1-10, to
Midway Church Road and take a left. Tanya's U Pick will be down
the first dirt road on the left (Gunpowder). Look for the signs.
Mon. Fri. 9 -. 1 & after 4 All Day Sat. and Sun. Afternoons


F orida Farm Bureau President
lJohn L. Hoblick said that the
2008 farm bill is more supportive
of Florida agricultural producers
than previous farm bills.


steadfast supporters of
the farm bill, and 12 mem-
bers of the Florida House
delegation voted "yea" on
the override vote, They
are Reps. Allen Boyd, Cor-
rine Brown, Ginny
Brown-Waite, Vern
Buchanan, Lincoln Diaz-
Balart, Mario Diaz-Balart,
Alcee Hastings, Ron
Klein, Tim Mahoney,
Kendrick Meek, Adam
Putnam and Debbie
Wasserman Schultz.
The bill includes a
new Specialty Crop Title
that provides more than
$1 billion for state block
grants; Florida will re-
ceive the second-largest
amount 'of grant benefits.
It increases food stamp


ZA II


and school nutrition pro-
grams and includes a
Fresh fruit and vegetable
program for schools that
will provide nutritious
Florida products to mil-
lions of school children.
Nutrition programs make
up about two-thirds of the
spending.
The conservation title
increases programs that
will help Florida produc-
ers protect and conserve
natural resources. The
bill also increases the sug-
ar loan rate by three-quar-
ters of a cent and will pro-,
vide for a sugar-to-ethanol
program.
The Florida Farm Bu-
reau Federation is the
state's largest general-in-


terest agricultural associ-
ation with about 140,000
member-families
statewide. Headquartered
in Gainesville, the Federa-
tion is an independent,
nonprofit agricultural or-
ganization. More informa-
tion about Florida Farm
Bureau is available on the
organization's Web site,
http://FloridaFarmBurea
u.org.


Sisters Perform

In Colgate

Country

Showdown
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Sisters Sheri Littleton
and Tania Williams, of
Madison competed in the
Colgate Country Show-
down on May 30. The
Showdown took place at
the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park in Live Oak.
Although neither sis-
ter placed in the contest,
both demonstrated amaz-
ing vocal control and abili-
ty as their voices filled the
warm spring air.
Littleton sang the
song, "No Place That Far"
by Sara Evans. She turned
in an amazing perfor-
mance on the song.
Equally amazing was
Williams' performance of
the Loretta Lynn standard,
"Coal Miner's Daughter."
Littleton and Williams
are two of the daughters of.
Gene and Geraldine Stokes
of Lee.
Sheri Littleton is mar-
ried to Randy Littleton.
They have one son, Cutler,
who is in the rock band,
Reckless Reality.
Tania Williams is the
mother of Logan Groover
and Luke Williams.
Videos of Littleton and
Williams can be viewed at
www.yackahoo.com.


ewsita wzaiII.
1713 East Hwy 90 Madison, Fl 32340
Hours Monday Sunday 6 am.- 2:30 pnm.
"Home Cookin"


Now
0P902
7 DIay
A WoelkIl


Equipment Auction
Tools-Equipment-Tractor-Loader
Motorcycle BMW-Cars-Boat &Misc
9 AM, Saturday, June 14th, 08


Shelby Richards -Owner

850-973-2414

L A ILA


4%,


5084 NE Colin Kelly Hwy, Madison, FL 32340

Directions:
BFrom'US 90 to Rt. 145 go North approximately 5 miles and watch for SIGNS!
Or Use Auction Logator on our Webslte www.gejohnsonauctioneers.com


-. Tools: 6 HP 80 Gal. Air Compressor, Transmission Jack, Nut & Bolt Bin, Airless Paint
Sprayer, Alt-Gen Tester, Tool Cabinet, Snap-on Roll Around Tool Cabinet, Sand Blaster,
Gas Cans, Bolt Cutters, Parts Bins, Motor Manuals, Battery Tester, Cag Jacks, Air Hose,
S Value Grinder, Drill Press, Cement Saw, Tuff Heater, AC Tester, Transmission Jack, and
more...
Equipment: Ford 4000 Tractor w/Box Blade, VME ZL802 Loader (6500 Hrs.), American Eagle MC w/30' Mast (1124
Hrs.), Yale Fork Lift, Blu Arc Portable Welder, Chipper, Ferris Walk Behind Mower, Floor Buffers, Gas Welder, 65-P
Air Compressor 80 Gal., Hoffman Spin Balancer, Pressure Washer w/Gas Motor,(2) Steam Jennies, Cement Mixer, (2) 4'
Fans, (3) Cutting Torches, Parts Washer, (4) Car Lifts, Engine Stand, Miller Mig Welder, Hot System Pressure Washer,
Hydraulic Press, Delta Air Compressor, Engine Lift, and more....
Trucks. Trailers, & Misc: Indy 500 Race Car, Mini Car, BMW Motorcycle w/side car (air conditioned)1991 Ford
Super Duty Bucket Truck, Jaguar Convertible XJS-V12, 26' Fiberglass Truck Body, Raven Boat-Motor & Trailer, 4x8 Flat
Bed Trailer, Green Golf Cart, Wheel Chair Lift, 50 Gallons of Paint, (50) Good assorted Motors, Key Machine, Maytag
Washer & Dryer, (15) New Windows, New Bucket Seats, (4) Steel Work Tables, Battery Charger, Lots of revolving
vehicles for parts and to be sold individually, and more...
* Lunch Stand Available! *
* Rain or Shine! *
* Join Our Email List from Our Websitet!
Personal Property Terms: 10% BP, VisaMC Available (3% I
i Admin Fee Charged), Cash, Personal & Business Checks
with Bank Letter of Credit Only, Cashiers Checks. All items
sold in As-Is Where -Is Condition. All items paid for
before removal.
i .......................................P ~ ..... ...........................- - -


"Plan to Spend The Day -
The Auction Way"


Loader


"Where Buyer and Seller Come Together" ,
G, Johnson Aucfloneergs
au1840/asb1337
10360 176th St. McAlpin, FL 32062
1-888-99-SOLD (7663) or 386330-2719
www gejohnsonauctioners.corn or e-mail bidlbid2@m sn.com


MR' i


All Announcements Made By Auctioneer From Auction Block Take Precedence Over All Advertisements


l


;I~r*rrrrri~
I~"~DII







8A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday,.June 11, 2008



GREENVILLE NEWS




Filling Prescriptions
-- .:~iL : r I ? 4. 6;P'. ~


With Comm
By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On a downtown street in Greenville sits a little
drug store that opens at 9 a.m. and transports people
back in time. The time is that of not so long ago when
pharmacists knew their customers by name and ail-
ment. A time when one could call the drug store and
expect to recognize the cheery voice that answered
with "Good morning, Jackson's Drug Store, how may
I help you." It was a time when one felt comfortable,
completely at ease trusting that the person who
stood behind the counter would not only fill their
prescription correctly, but also take the extra care to
explain any changes the patient may experience as
well. In today's times of change, it is good to know
that some have not changed at all. There is at least
one drug store that values the tested and true way of
treating their customers, like they are, family
Danny Jackson, owner, manager and pharmacist
at Jackson's Drug Store, knows his business. In fact,
open in Greenville since 1993. Jackson has gotten to
know the people in his conmnunity quite well. It is
his job to keep them that wa\:
"It's a family thing." Jackson responded( when
asked how he got into the pharmaceutical business


CONGRATULATIONS TO
CATHERINE CONNORS


The Town of
Greenville would like
to commend the
Public Works Department
for a job well done!


unity Care
Jackson's father and mother, Charles and Tracy
Jackson, own a drugstore in Monticello, where the
junior Jackson lived for years.
"Family" is exactly how Jackson and his staff
treat their customers, like they are family, so much
so that on behalf of MemberHealth, LLC, Jackson's
Drug Store was recognized for its excellence and re-
ceived the 2007 Patient Care Award. Evaluated in
multiple categories, pharmacies are honored by
MemberHealth, LLC. for demonstrating superior pa-
tient care by improving the use of cost-saving gener-
ic drugs, managing patient therapy and cost, engag-
ing patients in face to face reviews to promote safety
and compliance and cost effectiveness.
This is just one more feather in the cap of Jack-
son's Drugs, as they have also won the 1993, 1994, and
1995 Greeneville Country Christmas Business Deco-
ration Award for their participation. Obviously
proud to be part of their community, a step into Jack-
son's Drugs feels like a step back in time, where
neighbor's never missed a chance to stop and say
"Hello" and a pop by the local druggist meant anoth-
er visit with someone who cares.
Staff writer Tvrra B ,leserve can he reached at
lt'rrcar'girecnepublishing.com


* .fI,,l,


13848 Hwy. 90 West Green~v

A85O948 66


Jackson's Drug Store stands waiting to serve its
Greenville community.
iM B5WiiA


Seenville

Il; izr
S" lizer-


'-.


Cemicbal Con;

13293 W. Hwy 90., Greenville, FL32331

850-948-2968
Charles Refand Owner Earlene C. Roland Manager'
' i -


Greenville Elementary Student


Scores Six On FCAT Writing Test


Greenville Elementary School fourth
graders are proud to announce their
score of 3.8 on the writing portion of the
annual Florida Com-
prehensive Assess-
ment Test, better
known as FCAT. The
minimum score nec-
essary for students
S to be on grade level
is a level three.
On a scale of one
to six, the county's
average 2008 fourth
Catherine grade writing score
Connors was 3.4. The state
average was 3.8 and
Greenville Elementary School had an av-
erage of 3.8.
The average writing score at
Greenville Elementary School improved


from a 3.4 in 2007 to 3.8 in 2008. This was
the greatest one year improvement for
fourth grade in the county
Greenville Elementary School had
the only fourth grade student in the
county to make the highest possible
score of six. This bright young lady is
Catherine Connors, the daughter of
Sylvia O'Quinn of Greenville. Catherine
was also the overall-winner of the
Greenville Country Christmas art con-
test and proudly has her drawing dis-
played on the front cover of the Superin-
tendent's annual Christmas book.
The GES faculty is very proud of the
outstanding job'the students at
Greenville Elementary School did on the
writing test and hopes that the citizens
of Madison County continue to help
them encourage and motivate their stu-
dents to do their best.


Proud to be Growing

with our

Greenville Community
Full Service Banking, including Free Electronic Banking, Personal and Business Loans,
Insurance, Investment and Wealth Management Products and Mortgage Services


David Dnggers
Assstant Vice Preiident
Branch Manager


Randi Lynn Goff
Aszisltan Br3nch Manager


Farmers & Merchants Bank
850-948-2626 www.rnmbbank.com
RAc Monhcello / Tallahassee / Thomas.qille / Greenville


Anna Moo "Woos"



With Moosic


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Award-winning recording artist,
songwriter and entertainer of children
and adults alike, Anna Moo, wooed
Greenville with her beautiful Moosic
on a recent visit. Invited to help kick
off the Madison County Libraries fun-
filled summer line-up, Moo had her au-
dience of 60 people clapping and moov-
ing along from Madison to Greenville,
with the beat of a special drum. Tour-
ing each year and performing for thou-
sands of children at festivals, schools,
concert halls and libraries across the
nation, Moo is adored by many with
her "Moosic" that soothes the soul.
"I am so very blessed to write and
sing for children," Moo said. "There is
no greater reward than doing what you
love for a living and loving what you
do."
Well traveled, Anna Moo has been
the keynote presenter for Early Child-


hood Educator Conferences in 18
States, including Florida, as well as the
United Kingdom. She is also highly in
demand as a keynote speaker and
workshop presenter for national
teacher conferences.
The turn out for her latest
Greenville stop for "Moosic" lovers
shows that Moo's appeal is nowhere
near fading either, and the word is
spreading about Moo's popularity Her
albums include Anna Moo Crackers,
Making Moosic and a collaboration
with none other than Bo Diddly him-
self, entitled Moochas Gracias, under
the label of Good Moo's Productions.
Also awarded the Parent's Choice
Gold Award, Anna Moo seems to know
just what it takes to get 'em up and
moving in the morning. For some fabu-
lous fun, check out Anna Moo and her
"moosic" designed to make kids smile.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be
reached at tyrra@greenepublishing.com


U


Anna Moo


~E~an~Rcx~i~~--~ -- ,s.


I


\41








WednesdayJunc I 1, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 9A



GREENVILLE NEWS

C r C ________________________________________


GOL DENLEAF

EA W


864 NW US 221
Greenville, FL 32331

Phone: 850-948-7891
Cell: 850-973-7135
Fax: 850-948-2482
email:
joeballreams@ msn.com


PL4


Ro~ liad l11wiA I It

Js(t 1 H afl I
I I~.. I


Proud to Support

Our Youth Baseball

S League and Nlost of

S All Its Dedicated


H & R Grocery


oa~l'h\


1809 SW Main St. oreenulle, FL
850-948-3034


Hours:
Mon.-Fri.
7am-8:30pm
Sat. 8am-8:30pm


dnA 1


' -

| .' G ^ .

1384S HHwy. 90 West Greenville, Florida "

N.Ir. N 850-948-4466
I| i D II QI e | I I D~ r r I( I I I e D I e| |ei||e tee 0 I 1,o| i 9 1 1 a10 I 1 0 1 1 -fo l 4l "


Greenville


Baptist Church


Hosting VBS

By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Greenville Baptist Church is hosting Vacation Bible
School June 11 through 13 at the church.
Supper will be served at 6 p.m. each evening and the
fun will begin immediately afterwards. VBS will close at
8:45 each night.
Greenville Baptist Church, also known as "The
Church on the Hill," is located at 109 South Grand Street
in Greenville.


GftuNVAUE &EMENARY

Scw ool


Babies Get A Healthy Start In Greenville


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Tackling community problems from
a social aspect, Healthy Start in
Greenville is geared to help make sure
every baby born has the best chance
available at a healthy birth. Regardless
of race, religion, marital or financial
status, Healthy Start's coalition of
roughly 368 members is a community
collaboration dedicated to improving
birth outcomes. Facing problems stem-
ming from poverty, lack of support and
education, Healthy Start helps from the
beginning in two fold. By providing pre-
natal risk screens as well as other ser-
vice programs for expectant Tri-County
mothers-to-be, Healthy Start is working
to help their community two-fold.
"Every baby deserves a healthy


start" is the motto by which Healthy
Start runs. Getting involved at the earli-
est point of pregnancy possible, healthy
Start supplies mothers in a delicate con-
dition prenatal risk screens to deter-
mine the health of both mother and
child and whether there are any envi-
ronmental issues that may in the future
cause problems for the two. Mothers
screened help Healthy Start gather in-
formation that can make health care
better for all Floridian moms and babes.
After the initial screen, a member from
the Healthy Start program makes con-
tact with the family, explains the results
and addresses any questions that may
have arisen. From there, it is decided
what is needed and the program works
to find services available in the local
area to ensure the healthiest possible


pregnancy and birth.
Guiding mothers through the first
stages of prenatal visits, talks with doc-
tors and mid-wives, avoidance of sub-
stances that are harmful to the unborn
child and detection of early labor are
only the beginning for Healthy
Starters. After a child is born, Healthy
Start suggests a Healthy Start Infant
Risk Screen, and more help is on the
way.
Families who reside in the Tri-
County Healthy Start service area also
have the Healthy Families Program
available. A program that helps parents
learn to understand what their baby is
trying to tell them, Healthy Families
walks new parents and parents to be
through the healthcare system to help
keep mother and baby on track with


well visits and immunizations.
Completely free programs, both
Healthy Start and Healthy Families are
there to offer aid and support at the
most crucial point in a mother and
baby's life. Teaching new parents how
to develop their skills and increase
their sensitivity and responsiveness to-
ward their child's needs and cues,
Healthy programs are doing everything
they can to help Floridian babies get a
healthy start at birth for a healthy fu-
ture for all. For more information on
Healthy Start programs in the area,
contact the Healthy Start Coalition of
Jefferson, Madison, and Taylor Coun-
ties, Inc. at 850-948-3072. Every baby de-
serves a healthy start.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be
reached at tyrra@greenepublishing.com


Known -FLor'B lues' IRsreniWlle


By Tyrra B Meserve.
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Lying quietly off High-
way 90 is the little town of
Greenville. Passed by on
the route to somewhere
else, most miss this little
spot of green with its his-
tory of blues. Known pri-
marily for being the child-
hood home of legend Ray
Charles, there is more to


the tiny burg than meets
the passing glance. Histo-
ry has its roots throughout
the South and Greenville
is no different. When trav-
eling down the road to
somewhere, it might just
be worth the stop at a sign-
post up ahead that reads
"Welcome to Greenville."
In a town that boasts a
total square mileage of 1.3


Ronnie Moore
County
Commissioner
District 3

850-948-2043



0 6 D p


for all its land, according
to the United States Cen-
sus Bureau, one might
think there isn't much to
do. One would be wrong,
however, for in that small,
yet mighty, town of
Greenville there's quirky
history galore. Just ask
any of the approximately
837 residents that com-
prise the 331 households
and 220 families that con-
stitute Greenville's popu-
lation.
The park that sits just
off to the side of down-
town Greenville is a
tourist favorite and home
to one local legend. Presid-
ing in bronze over all so-
cial gathers that take place
is none other than Ray
Charles, himself. There in
all his glory, the rhythm
and blues legend proudly
pounds the piano that was
lovingly dedicated in his
honor, for all his child-
hood chums to remember
him by In Greenville, it is


common knowledge that
town Mayor Elesta Pritch-
ett and the talented Ray
Charles grew up friends.
If one were thinking
of hanging around to
catch some sights in
Greenville, one might
wish to drop in and take a
gander at the historic
Bishop-Andrews Hotel.
One of the last standing
"country hotels" along the
Old Spanish trail, the
Bishop-Andrews func-
tioned as a hotel until 1954
and was recently renovat-
ed and reopened as the
Grace Manor Bed and
Breakfast Inn. A step back
in time, with a register at
the historic hotel, guests
also receive a taste of true
southern hospitality at no
extra charge.
Another sign of inter-
est is Ike's Bait and Tackle
Deli. Beautiful artwork
causes passersbys to at
least stop, glance and won-
der, "Bait, tackle, or deli?"


With so many choices, it's
a wonder that decisions
are made at all. The riv-
er's just a hop skip and
jump away and Ike is
there to supply whatever one
may need to spend a care free
day relaxing on the bank.
Greenville is another ex-
ample of not judging books
by their covers. To one that


Supervisor




C


has no time or patience,
speeding down 90 and it
might be missed. For the con-
noisseur of life, take a rest
.and chuckle in the face of
stress in beautiful little'
Greenville.
Staff writer Tyrra B
Meserve can be reached at
tyrra@greenepublishing:-
com


,ds CWi lams

of Elections

(850) 973-6507

Proud Supporter
f the Greenville
Community


P XINE LAKE
SN i H o


U.S. Hwy 90 East
P.O. Box 445
Greenville, FL Phone
850-948-4601
32331ax850-948-1702
Fax: 850-948-1702


Proud To
Support The
Town I Live In!


I'mt n cl s



1 ,111{ ,I 1!


Healthy Start irfor
E1f{ rUAIL1 T V every mom who wants to
START have a healthy baby!
We Offer:
Child Birth Preparation Breastfeeding Support
Nutrition Education Help to quit smoking
Emotional & Family Support
Ask your doctor for a Healthy Start Screen
(850)973-5000 ext 118
"/ coalliion makingpositive changes in
.the lives of mothers & ,l-ci,/rh ,."


.;
I
~


I









10A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 11, 2008



FROM PAGE ONE
PA


cont from page 1A


SUMMER CAMP


4 cont from page 1A BAY ABLAZE


cont from page 1A


gies, from advertising to websites to event promotion,
designed for the basic goal of putting "heads in beds"
throughout the county.
The Tourism Development Council is officially a
recommending body only, so the County Commission-
ers'. decision to periodically choose a different course
may sound harmless on the surface. Unfortunately, the
message it sends when it alters TDC policy can, and re-
cently did, have a very negative impact because it leaves
tourism council members wondering why they have
committed time on a voluntary basis only to see its poli-
cies overturned by the same commissioners who
charged them with the oversight in the first place.
In this instance, the conflict centered oi the
Tourism Development Council's vote to set a limit of
$2,000 per promotional grant it is requested to fund. The
purpose of this promotional grant is to promote new
events by offsetting specified expenses. The limits were
then established to allow the funds to be spread more
broadly The term "seed money" was even mentioned in
association with the grant program as the goal, again,
was to promote predominantly new activities that at-
tracted new "heads in beds," versus ongoing support for
repeat or mature events.
Consequently, when Elmer Spear, owner of Elmer's
Genealogy Library, requested over $6,000 for an upcom-
ing conference he was organizing, the Tourism Develop-
ment Council approved it only for the limit of $2,000.
Spear took the situation and request to the Board of
County Commissioners who, again, has the final word
over these matters, although the TDC does have some
discretionary privileges given them by the Commission-
ers. In the end, Spear cited his reasons for the addition-
al funding and the board granted his request for the full
$6,000. It was noted that the funds fell into all the ac-
cepted categories and it was also pointed out that there
was over $50,000 in "reserve" funds left over from mon-
ey not used last year.
In the course of the exchange, it was noted that the
decision would override the tourism council and that
several members had already expressed their unwilling-
ness to continue if the TDC was merely a function of
county requirements forthe bed tax and not a legitimate
body of oversight whose efforts are taken seriously.
County Commissioner Ricky Henderson, currently the
liaison from the Board of County Commissioners to the
Tourism Development Council of which he is also Chair,
was particularly outspoken. In the final count though,
the tourism council was overruled.
As noted previously, three Tourism Development
Council members resigned exited and two others ex-
pressed concern for the future. The greatest twist and
irony of the whole affair, however, came during the June
5 meeting. To allow greater leverage and prevent con-
flict for future outlays, the Tourism Development Coun-
cil voted to remove the $2,000 limit.
In additional business, Chamber of Commerce Pres-
ident Ray Griffin provided an update for, and requested
future support of, the regular season football game
scheduled for Friday night, September 5 at 8 p.m. be-
tween Madison County High School and Independence
High School, a nationally ranked 5A program located in
Mint Hill, North Carolina. The Patriots, as they are
known, once.sported a 119-game winning streak until an
untimely loss last September.
Lastly, the tourism council approved a $3,200 outlay
from North Florida Concerts to assist with their upcom-
ing FALL FEST '08, a four day/three night event being
held at Yogi Bear's Jellystone Campground November 6-
9. CEO Bryant Thigpen organized the event, which in-
cludes popular groups like the Bradys and the Reflect-
sons, of whom Thigpen is a member.


WRECK


cont from page 1A


was slowing to make a left turn on Country Kitchen
Road.
Williams failed to see Whitfield ahead and struck the
rear of Whitfield's Subaru.
Bryan Whitfield received serious injuries in the
wreck and was taken to the local hospital. Shamad D.
Whitfield, 2, received minor injuries in the wreck.
Dan Williams, nor his son, Jarred D. Williams, 14, or
his father, Grover B. Williams, 80, of Jennings, were in-
jured in the accident.
Madison County Sheriff's Sgt. Freddie Register and
Madison Fire and Rescue responded to the crash scene.
Investigating FHP Trooper Tom Roderick was as-
sisted by FHP Trooper Chuck Swindle.










Market volatility raises many questions. Are we
heading into a recession? Will I be able to refinance
my mortgage? Will my retirement plans be impacted?
As an Ameriprise financial advisor, I can provide you
with solid strategies and tips to help you weather
today's market.
Find out why more people come to Ameriprise
for financial planning than any other company:
Call (850)973-8888 today.
Mark E. Branham, CFP", ChFC"
Financial Advisor
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL
SPLANNERM practitioner
121 SE Rutledge Street
PO Box 526
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-8888
Toll Free: (800) 477-8818
Fax: (850) 973-4406
mark.e.branham@ampf.com
Financial planning services and investments available
through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., Member,
FINRA and SIPC. *Based on the number of financial plans
annually disclosed in Form ADV, Part 1A, items available at
adviserinfo.sec.gov as of December 31, 2006.
2008 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.


TDC


WACHOVIA

Ruthellen Caldwell
Financial Specialist
City President
Wachovia Bank, N.A.
Madison Financial Center
200 W. Base Street, FL0408
Madison, FL 32340
850-973-8714
fax 8.50-973-8723
ruthellen.caldwell@wachovia.com

24 Hour Service: 800-WA(


CHOVIA (922-4684)


been hitting the area for weeks and a concentration of
these fires runs along Camp P Road. Current conditions
are unfortunately unchanged with Smokey Bear still
displaying a HIGH rating on his fire danger sign that
sits adjacent to the forestry station on State Road 53.
"There have been strikes all over the four-county re-
gion that we serve. Dixie County got hit with eight fires
just in the last few days. We are spread so thin with all
the fires still burning that we appreciate everyone being
patient with regards to broad burning especially Small
yard burns are okay but we won't be approving any pile
or site burns for a little while," Terrell explained.
Eight foresters and several private "cooperators"
fought the large Bays' burn over the weekend that in-
cluded as many as five, tractors. These private firefight-
ers work for private timber interests, including im-
mense commercial operations like Buckeye, in the area
and their equipment plus added manpower is vital to ag-
gressively combating these threats to their client's re-
sources. Among the foresters, all four counties in the re-
gion Madison, Lafayette, Taylor and Dixie were
represented.
Staff writer Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


ment of the project, serving on the program board with
Archambault and 4-H Agent Heather Johnson.
The camp opened on Monday, June 9 with over 30
kids, ages 6 to 12. That number is expected to grow to
the goal of 50 campers as vacationers return and word of
this very unique program gets out into a community
that has been hoping for this type of project for years.
Even with the successful launch, however, organiz-
ers would greatly appreciate both camper referrals and
especially continued donations. Several scholarship do-
nations between $50 and $500 have already been re-
ceived, including $1,000 from Progress Energy, although
more is hoped to meet the demands and obligations. The,
reason donations are so essential now is that the camp
must show maturity before any grants or public funding
is available, although Archambault is tirelessly pursu-
ing all options.
By mission, the program is designed to develop es-
sential life skills, or "building blocks," in a recreational
setting so as to help children to overcome the poverty
culture that is crippling our greater community As
such, there is a goal to include as many kids from those
challenging circumstances as possible. Of course, the
unfortunate irony is that those who need it the most can
afford it the least. And although the fee is only $50 per
week for the all-day, professionally supervised curricu-
lum, which includes a hot meal and healthy snack,
many children that wish to attend, again, simply can't
afford it.
Camp Director Melinda Richie, a graduate degree
instructor from Madison County Central School, along
with Activity Director Michael Quackenbush, is leading
a group of volunteers utilizing the ten-week 4-H based
curriculum that effectively addresses social and educa-
tional deficiencies in an entertaining setting. Many im-
mediately noted that it was quite impressive to witness.
For more information and to make donations, sim-
ply call Lee City Hall at (850) 971-5867. Organizers arid
the Town Council express their enormous appreciation
for all considerations.
Staff writer Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.













Homeowner's Equity


Plummets To Historic Drop

By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Homeowner's equity has dropped to a historic
low, as it fell to 46.2 percent in the first quarter of
2008. This is the lowest rate since World War II.
Home ownership has, in the last couple of gener-
ations, been seen as a way that individuals can build
personal wealth. For the last five quarters, however,
Americans have owned less than half the worth of
their homes. In some cases, debt has not risen, but
the value of the home has declined, so the debt-to-val-
ue ratio is unstable.
A homeowner's equity is the market value of a
property minus the mortgage debt and homeowners'
percentage of equity has declined steadily as home
values surged during the housing boom due to a jump
in cash-out refinancing, home equity loans and an in-
crease in 100 percent financing.
Experts report that they expect equity to decline
further as falling home prices erode the value of
Americans' largest asset, dragging more homeown-
ers "upside down" on their mortgages.
At the end of March, nearly 8.5 million home-
owners had negative or no equity in their homes, rep-
resenting more than 16 percent of all homeowners
with a mortgage, according to Moody's Economycom
Chief Economist Mark Zandi. Zandi estimates by
June 2009 that will increase to 12.2 million, or almost
one out of every four homeowners with a mortgage,
but one out of every three homeowners owns their
properties free and clear, with no mortgage at all.


cont from page 1A


lone on its top, facing northwest.
After the impact, Morrell came to a controlled stop
in the emergency lane of 1-10 eastbound, east of the
area of collision.
Cruz was dead at the scene. Her passengers, Anto-
nio Escalante, 34, Wendy Escalante, 8, Antonio M. Es-
calante, three months, Michelle Escalante, 4, Jackeline
Escalante, 1, and Magdiel Soto, 18, all were seriously in-
jured. They were all taken to Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital for treatment.
FHP Cpl. Terrance M. Chukes was the investigating
officer, as well as the homicide investigator.



.Know Objectives of Mutual
Funds Before Investing
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones
With thousands of mutual funds on the market, how can you
choose the ones that are right for your individual needs? For
starters, you need to know the objective of each mutual fund in
which you plan to invest. Let's take a look at the investment
objectives of some of the most popular types of mutual funds:
Growth funds These funds invest in the stocks of
growing companies, with the goal of providing investors, with
capital appreciation. In plain English, you invest in these funds
for the. potential to make your money grow. If you invest in
these funds, you will almost certainly experience the "ups and
downs" of the market, but if you hold your funds long enough,
and they are well managed, you may increase your invest-
ment's potential return.
Growth-and-income funds As its name suggests, a
growth-and-income fund is structured to provide the potential
for both growth in value and current income payments, in the
form of dividends. Generally speaking, these funds are less
risky than growth funds yet offer lower growth potential. But if
you are interested in adding an income stream to your portfo-
lio, these funds may be suitable for your long-term investment
goals. Dividends can be increased, decreased or totally elimi-
nated at any time without notice.
International funds -You can choose from several types
of international funds: global funds, which invest in both U.S.
and international stocks; international funds, which invest pri-
marily outside the U.S.; country specific funds, which focus on
one country or region; and emerging market funds, which con-
centrate on small, developing countries. These funds general-
ly invest for growth, but they involve special types of risk, such
as currency fluctuations and the prospect of investments being
affected by political or economic turmoil.
Bond funds When you invest in a bond fund, you are
seeking current income, in the form of interest payments, and
the chance to help stabilize a portfolio that might be heavily
weighted toward stocks. You can choose from municipal bond
funds, corporate bond funds, mortgage-backed securities
funds and U.S. government bond funds. Although bonds funds
generally contain less investment risk than stock funds, they
carry a different type of risk: purchasing power risk. In other
words, the interest payments you receive from your bond funds
may not always keep up with inflation. Keep in mind that bond
funds are subject to interest rate risk and fund values may
decline as interest rates rise.
Money market funds These funds invest in short-term
debt instruments and, are managed to maintain a stable net
asset value of $1 per share, however the value of fund can
fluctuate and it's possible to lose money. Many people invest in
money market funds if they want to "park" funds for a short
time before investing it elsewhere. You might also use a money
market fund as an "emergency fund" containing six to 12
months' worth of living expenses. While these types of mutual
funds have some obvious differences, they also share two
important traits in common. First, financial professionals
choose the investments, which is obviously a benefit to you.
Second, mutual funds, by owning many different types of secu-
rities, offer the advantage of diversification. (Diversification, by
itself, cannot guarantee a profit or protect against a loss in a
declining market).

A financial advisor can help you choose those mutual funds
that are appropriate for your needs. But it's still your responsi-
bility to know about the funds in which you invest so, before
writing a check, read a fund's prospectus which can be
obtained from your financial advisor. The prospectus contains
more complete information, including the funds investment
objectives, risks, charges and expenses that should be care-
fully considered.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


Edwardlones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


WOMAN KILLED









Wednesday, June 11, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11A



BRIDAL GUIDE


QCuality Cldeaners

'V" Speciial lz in '
,the Clleulniii.ig &

oa Biridiall G wo''w-is .
24.

ModaVy Friday 7 0 e.m. 8:00 p.m. Salurday 7:30-Noon ''
229-263-4149
101 Webster St. Quitman. GA,,

Couples' Wedding Planner:


For couples embarking
on a marital commitment,
becoming engaged and
planning their wedding is
a truly exhilarating time.
Surrounded by loving fam-
ilies and friends, the hap-
py pair is apt to be swept
up in a whirlwind of par-
ties and the myriad details
of the wedding celebration
and honeymoon trip. With
all of the excite-
ment and festivi-
ties, it is also im-
portant to be con-
cerned with prepa-
rations of a more
serious nature: -in-
surance and finan-
cial preparation.
While it may not be
at the top of the list,
it's certainly some-
thing that needs
consideration.
It is no secret
that many couples
are marrying later
in life. While the av-
erage age of mar-
riage four decades
ago was 20 for fe-
males and 22 for
males, it is now five
years older for
both. Today's cou-
ples are more edu-
cated, more estab-
lished, and there-
fore have more
complex financial
and insurance needs. They
are finding that insurance
and financial preparation
must go hand in hand with
starting a new life togeth-
er. Since the average
length of an engagement
is about eighteen months,
couples have ample time to
consider such important
dollar-and-cents details
concerning their fu-
ture..
Insurance profes-
sionals suggest that cou-
ples review the follow-
ing before-and-after
wedding checklist:
Pre-Wedding:
Insture the Engage-
ment Ring-Ask your
agent whether your cur-
rent renter's or homeown-
er's insurance policy, car-
ried by either or both par-
ties, covers the loss or
theft of the engagement
ring. If not, additional
coverage may be needed.


Review Coverage
for the Place you Live-
This is a good time for you
to review the combined
value of your possessions
to help you determine
whether the assessed val-
ue of your total property
is up-to-date. It is impor-
tant that your renter's or
homeowner's insurance
policy provide a sufficient


amount of protection for
the increase in your be-
longings when you com-
bine households.
Automobile Cover-
age-An engaged couple
can find out whether they
qualify for discounts as a
result of being married.
Many find that being cov-
ered under one policy is
less expensive. Check out
possible safe-driver dis-
counts as well as multi-
line discounts, which of-
ten apply when you have
more than one insurance
product with a company.
For instance,, you may
qualify for a discount by
insuring your cars and
residence with the same
company
Post-Wedding:
After the wedding fes-
tivities, ongoing financial
and insurance require-
ments will continue to
change. As a newlywed
couple you should talk to


9~~~fJ


an insurance agent or fi-
nancial professional about
your overall situation and
as circumstances change
in your life. Examples in-
clude:
Life Insurance
Needs-While it is diffi-
cult to think about even as
wedding bells are still jin-
gling in their heads, new-
lyweds would do well to
consider how to
provide for "each
other and any addi-
tional dependents
in the event of the
unexpected death
of either partner.
SSaving for Re-
tirement-Early
planning can help
make sure you will
have adequate re-
sources for your
golden years to-
gether, and possi-
bly even the retire-
ment of your
dreams. Spouses
should work jointly
and with a finan-
cial professional to .
establish retire-
ment savings tools
that fit their needs,
such as employer
sponsored 401(k)
plans, IRAs, and
annuities.
College
Savings-While it
may seem like eons before
you both have children,
it's important to' continue
saving when they arrive -
particularly for their edu-
cation. Once you have chil-
dren, consider setting up a
Qualified Tuition Pro-
gram, often referred to as
Section "529 plans" to be-
gin preparing for the cost
of higher education.
Arranging for adequate in-
surance and constructing
a financial road map as
couples plan to wed may
seem like a daunting task,
but it can help you to un-
derstand how to help pro-
tect yourself with insur-
ance and financial savings
tools and ensure they keep
up with your changing
lives. An established and
reputable company can
help identify and set prior-
ities for any newly en-
gaged, or newly married,
couple's insurance and fi-
nahcial needs. Partnering
with a financial profes-
sional can help you better
protect what you have as a
couple and prepare for the
future.


Destination Wedding? We can help
In Tuxedo Sales & Rentals!


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Mr. & Mrs. Art Keeler Jr.
Lee, FL
30 Years Anniversary






Love Always,

SProtect, Always

Trust, Always

Hope.

1 Cor 13:6


June 10, 1978 June 10, 2008


New Rules And Roles Defined For

Mothers Of The Bride And Groom


Things have changed
for the mothers of prospec-
tive brides and grooms. A
decade ago, weddings were
planned primarily by the
bride and her mother, with
the groom and his family
playing supporting roles.
Now, as more brides and
grooms plan and pay for
their own weddings with-
out parental help, and with
more couples inviting both
sets of parents to partici-
pate fully, the moms are
confused about their roles.
"Moms are, caught be-
tween old-world expecta-
tions and 21st-century real-
ities, and those old-world
expectations lead to resent-
ment," says Sharon Naylor,
author of The Mother of
the Bride Book (Citadel
Press, 2001) and Mother of
the Groom (Citadel Press,
2005). "When a mother is
surprised to find that she'll
play a smaller role, or no
role, or even worse -
share a planning role with
'his mother,' that can be a
recipe for disaster. Both
books provide new role def-
initions and updated mom
etiquette. When moms get
the answers they need, the
frustration levels go down,
and clashes are prevented."
Here are some of the au-
thor's top tips for mothers:
*Acknowledge that the
bride and groom are in
charge, even if you're pay-
ing for the wedding. Being
in charge of the platinum
card doesn't give you the
right to steamroll your
wishes onto the day
*If you find yourself
overly-invested in the wed-
ding, it could be a sign that
you want your own celebra-


tion. Consider renewing
your wedding vows. .
*Propose your wishes
as requests not demands
or manipulations.
*See into the future.
You're building the founda-
tion of your future rela-
tiiiship wii the bride and
groom now, so everything
you do determines the ac-
cess you'll .have to them
and to any future grand-
kids. Be pleasant and look
at the in-laws as an extend-
ed part of your family, not
competitors.
*Don't focus only on the
wedding; ask the bride
what's new in her work
and social life.
*Embrace your new
son- or daughter-in law.
Find wonderful ways to
welcome him/her into the
family, such as inviting the
couple to dinner or sending
them copies of family
recipes.
*Honor the couple's
boundaries. If they say you
can invite only ten friends
and colleagues, hand in a
list of ten, not twenty
When you show that you
respect their wishes,
they'll respect yours in the
future.
.Keep track of what's going
well, so that you'll enjoy
the process more, and so
that you' can comfort the,
bride when she loses her
perspective.
Naylor's must-read
book also caution against
making assumptions from
the start, as well as the best


ways to be of help in every
area of the wedding plans.
"What's most surprising to
today's mother and step-
mother is the intensity in-
volved," says Naylor.
"They often get stunned by
the heightened emotions -
-and the heightened expens-
es so what they thought
was going to be a fun
process becomes a highly-
charged atmosphere where
they feel they 'can't win."
The author feels it's all
about establishing a foun-
dation of communication,
trust, and reliability and
then maintaining them in
the middle of all those hun-
dreds of wedding planning
details.
All of this makes for
not-to-be-missed talk and
helpful advice on the Wed-
ding Podcast Networik's
'Here Comes the Moms'
(weddingpodcastnet-
work.com). According to
Naylor, the idea is to take
the fear and frustration out
of the mothers' new roles.
in wedding planning, and
return them to the excite-
ment of preparing for both
a joyous wedding and a fu-
ture shared with a new
son- or daughter-in-law,
plus a new extended family.
So what's the number
*one tip for mothers of the
bride and groom? Listen
,more than you
speak....both to the bride
and the groom. They're the
center' of the day, so their
wishes come before any-
thing else.


e. di Gg O vke

sp
op

I41
WAL-MAT', 0
Hwy.129 orth- Lie Oa, F
386-30-259 aker
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M M ry


Insurance And Financial


Preparedness Checklist


E* \EI)IINGS PICNICS
B-DAY PARTI I:,S
H AYRIDES

Misty Edge

Carriage Rides

.Phone: 352-514-7729
Insured







1 2A Madison County Carrier www.greeneoublishin~.co Wednesday, June 11,2008


re


The


eft!


te RDod 255 <
9- 10 4xd 262
Jf, JLo24/da

opei 24/1


One Eleven Grill
invites you to join us for a special
Father's Day Buffet
Sunday June 13th Hours : Open 11:00 am 2:30 pm

Patric O'Toole s Chef Pamela Myers-O'Too[e
Reservations are recommended,
Make yours today!!!

850-973-4115


D AKA


The History Of Father's Day


The Old
-Bookstore
317 S.W. Pinckney St.
Madison, FL.
850.973.6833
For All Your
Reading Needs
New Old
Out of Print
Fiction, Non-Fiction
Biography
Americana
War Military
Sports
The Frontier West



Records!
78's, LP's, Albums
Magazines Many Old,
Scarce Issues
Sheet Music -
Old, Rare, Popular
Vintage Paperbacks!!
After Hours or Weekends
850.973.6718


Father's Day, contrary to popu-
lar misconception,. was not estab-
lished as a holiday in order to help
greeting card manufacturers sell
more cards.
In fact when a "father's day" was
first proposed there were no Fa-
ther's Day cards!
Mrs. John B. Dodd, of Washing-
ton, first proposed the idea of a "fa-
ther's day" in 1909. Mrs. Dodd want-
ed a special day to honor her father,
William Smart. William Smart, a
Civil War veteran, was widowed
when his wife (Mrs. Dodd's mother)


He didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and
let me watch him do it. -Clarence Budington
Kelland
* *
My father used to play with my brother
and me in the yard. Mother would come out
and say, "You're tearing up the grass." "We're
not raising grass," Dad would reply. "We're
raising boys." -Harmon Killebrew
Fatherhood is pretending the present you
love most is soap-on-a-rope. -Bill Cosby
Henry James once defined life as that
predicament which precedes death, and cer-
tainly nobody owes you a debt of honor or
gratitude for getting him into that predica-


died in childbirth with their sixth
child. Mr. Smart was left to raise
the newborn and his other five chil-
dren by himself on a rural farm in
eastern Washington state. It was af-
ter Mrs. Dodd became an adult that
she realized the strength and self-
lessness her father had shown in
raising his children as a single par-
ent.
The first Father's Day was ob-
served on June 19, 1910 in Spokane
Washington.
At about the same time in vari-
ous towns and cities across Ameri-


can other people were beginning to
celebrate a "father's day.".
In 1924 President Calvin
Coolidge supported the idea of a na-
tional Father's Day. Finally in 1966
President Lyndon Johnson signed a
presidential proclamation declar-
ing the 3rd Sunday of June as Fa-
ther's Day.
Father's Day has become a day
to not only honor your father, but
all men who act as a father figure.
Stepfathers, uncles, grandfathers,
and adult male friends are all hon-
ored on Father's Day


merit. But a child does owe his father a debt,
if Dad, having gotten him into this peck of
trouble, takes off his coat and buckles down
to the job of showing his son how best to
crash through it. -Clarence Budington Kel-
land
* *
Father is always making his baby into a
little woman. And when she is a woman he
turns her back again. -Enid Bagnold
Blessed indeed is the man who hears
many gentle voices call him father! -Lydia
M. Child, Philothea: A Romance, 1836
A father carries pictures where his money
used to be. -Author Unknown


When I was a boy of fourteen, my father
was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have
the old man around. But when I got to be
twenty-one, I was astonished at how much he
had learned in seven years. -Mark Twain,
"Old Times on the Mississippi" Atlantic
Monthly, 1874
There's something like a line of gold
thread running through a man's words
when he talks to his daughter, and gradual-
ly over the years it gets to be long enough for
you to pick up in your hands and weave into
a cloth thatfeels like love itself -John Gre-
gory Brown, Decorations in a Ruined
Cemetery, 1994


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Wednesday, June 11, 2008


12A Madison County Carrier


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"0I









Wednesday,June 11, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com



SCHOOL EDUCATION



Six Ways to Help Students


Raise Their Grades


With the school year ending, millions of high-school
students are preparing for that last minute push to raise
their grades and parents are looking for ways to help.
Here are six tips to boost your child's final-exam scores.
1) Exercise the body to give the brain a boost.
Physical activity increases blood flow to the brain,
feeding it with oxygen and learning-boosting nutrients
like glucose. "Exercise, in many ways, optimizes your
brain to learn," says Dr. John Ratey, a Harvard Medical
School professor.
Getting students to workout greatly improves their
classroom performance. One study found that 15 to 45
minutes of exercise before class reduced fidgeting
among children by half. In a study that looked at three
groups of students with different physical education
routines, the group that exercised the most did the best
on tests, even though they spent the least amount of
time in class.
2) Create a healthy study space.
Where kids study is almost as important as what
they study. So designate a specific spot for studying. Do-
ing so sends the message that your household takes aca-
demics seriously And although the area should be free
of distractions like TV, video games, and phones, it
should also reflect what the student needs not what
mom wants. Developing this habit early in life will pay
off immensely during college.
Aesthetics matter. One study found that grades Were
25 percent better for students who study near a window;
natural lighting promotes concentration.
3) Encourage interactive learning.
An ancient Chinese proverb goes: "Tell me, I forget.
Show me, I remember. Involve me, I understand." Stu-
dents perform better when actively engaged with the
material. A great way to ensure that engagement is to
hire a personal tutor.
Tutors were once too expensive for most Americans.
Calculus tutors cost about $100 per hour and an in-
structbr's quality varied with location. That's all
changed thanks to online tutoring services They pro-
vide all the benefits of old-fashioned tutoring -- like one-
on-one attention, a customized educational experience,
and instant feedback at a considerably lower price.
Kids who use our tutoring service typically raise their


After Much Time

and Anticipation,

The Recipe Book



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Here
At The cost of this "one of a kind"
A recipe book is just $28.

Last! DON'T WAIT!
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S. Jackson's Drug Store
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S. :. Guys & Gals Styling Salon
.\ .: in Madison, Florida and
S Greene Publishing, Inc.,
located at
1695 South SR 53
in Madison, FL.


City of Madison
Public Service Announcement

DAMAGE PREVENTION IS EVERYONE'S
RESPONSIBILITY

The City of Madison requests that you
please call Sunshine at 1-800-432-4770
at least 48 hours before you dig, but not
more than 5 days. Have information
ready when calling: company name/ad-
dress, contact person, phone number,
location of dig site, extent and type of
work, and date/start time of excavation.
Wait 48 hours for underground facilities
to be marked. Respect and protect the
facility operator's marks. Dig with care!
Always hand dig when within two feet on
either side of any marked lines.


grade by at least half a letter.
4) Get plenty of sleep.
Sleep is essential to the brain's ability to learn.
Teenagers should get at least eight hours each night.
Grade schoolers need at least 10. Late-night cram ses-
sions don't produce much long-lasting knowledge, and
they compromise the ability to analyze and recall infor-
mation during tests.
One study by Harvard psychiatry professor Robert
Stickgold found that after learning a new skill, student
performance didn't improve until after at least six hours
of sleep. "It's as if you have to wait for the dough to rise,"
he explained.
Psychology professor Pamela Thacher cross-refer-
enced college student grade point averages with sleeping
habits and fourid that "you can't do your best work when
you're sleep-deprived... If you use all-nighters, your GPA
is slightly lower on average."
5) Encourage commr nal learning.
Group learning is more exciting than thumbing
through a textbook. As social psychologists David Bran-
don and Andrea Hollingshead have concluded, "interac-
tion with others leads to active processing of information
by the individual."
Thanks to the Internet, kids don't need to confine
their study partners to people in their immediate area.
There are plenty of high-quality online forums for kids to
talk to each other or adult experts. As psychology profes-
sor Rena Palloff and international studies professor Kei-
th Pratt noted in a paper on online learning communi-
ties, the "keys to the learning process are... the collabo-
ration in learning that results from these interactions."
6) Have a study plan.
Creating a study plan is an effective way to manage
stress and use time efficiently. A recent study by the
American College Health Association rated stress as the
#1 impediment to academic performance among college
students in the United States. And during finals season,
academic anxiety can be especially bad.
Luckily stress can be substantially reduced with just
a little bit of planning. By creating a realistic study
schedule and breaking down assignments into small,
manageable pieces, students can avoid stress leading up
to an exam.






YOU might be a school employee if you believe the
playground should be equipped with a Ritalin salt lick.
YOU might be a school employee if it is difficult to
name your newborn because there's no name you can
come up with that doesn't bring high blood pressure as
it is uttered.
YOU might be a school employee if you can tell it's
a full moon or if it going to rain, snow, hail....anything!!!
without ever looking outside.
YOU might be a school employee if you believe that
unspeakable evils will befall you if anyone says, 'Boy,
the kids sure are mellow today.'
YOU might be a school employee if when out in pub-
lic, you feel the urge to snap your fingers at children you
do not know and correct their behavior.
YOU might be a school employee if you laugh un-
controllably when people refer to the staff room as the
'lounge.'
YOU might be a school employee if you think caf-
feine should be available in intravenous form;
YOU might be a school employee if you can't imag-
ine how the ACLU could, think, that covering your stu-
dents' chair with Velcro and then requiring uniforms
made out of the corresponding Velcro could ever be
misunderstood by the public.
YOU might be a school employee if the words 'I
have college debt for this?' have ever come out of your
mouth.
YOU might be a school employee if you know how
many days, minutes, and seconds are left in the school
year!

Public Service Announcement
From the City of Madison
NATURAL GAS

A Gas leak could be dangerous but gas itself
has no odor. So, for your safety, a smell like
rotten eggs is added. If you smell such an
odor:

1. Don't use the telephone
2. Don't turn lights on or off, or use anything
electrical.
3. Go outside right away.
4. Ask a neighbor to call the Gas company.
5. Don't go back into the house until the gas
company says it's safe.

PLEASE KEEP GAS SAFE.

(850) 973-5081 City Hall Working Hours
(850) 973-5075 Fire Department After Hours


Madisoi County Carrier 13A


By: Joyce Wells

Secretary at
Greenille Elementary


Blueberry Delighl

1 large box of instant vanilla pudding mix
18 oz Cool Whip
1 or 2 cans of Blueberry Pie Filling
Graham Crackers
(enough to line a 9 x11 dish twice)
Mix the instant vanilla pudding mix according to
directions on box and let is set for five minutes, add
the cool whip, mix together and pour one half into
a 9 x 11 dish that has been lined with graham
crackers, add another layer of graham crackers
and pour remaining pudding mitiyre ,ontop. Top
with blueberry pie filling and refrigerate until
ready to serve..


Hand Vac



.Cordless/
Rechargeable
SHand Held Unit
Detaches From
Docking Unit For
Quick Clean Ups
$100o Value-FREEI
NEW MODEL


2


5 Lb. SUPER COMPACT CANISTER
$169 Value-FREE
* Strong Enough To Pick Up A 16 Ib. Bowling BallI
* 8 Attachments
* Weighs 5 Lbs.




k]P.I~g] I:


I I


I I


r
.~-YC'


---









14A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 11, 2008



HEALTH & NUTRITION




What' s Wrong With You?
Doctor Gives Four Tips To Gauge Your Health Before It's Too Late


The kind, gentle old family practitioner keeping an
eye out for the patient's overall health is a thing of the
past. These days, doctors are as swamped with HMO pa-
perwork as they are with patients.
The New England Journal Of Medicine reports the
average doctor's appointment lasts less than 22 min-
utes. An American Medical Association report sites pa-
tients changing health insurance providers as a reason
few have the same 'family doctor' watching over them
year after year. It's becoming the patient's responsibili-
ty to keep an eye on their own changing health, guide









Nursing HUn me





S ison ursingCenter
Professional Rehabilitation and
Skilled Nursing Facility
2481 W.L 5 S90 850-973-4881
Madison. FL 32340 Fax: 850-973-3900






SLake Park Of Madison
A skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility,
serving the long term care and rehabilitation
needs of Madison and the surrounding area.
259 SV Captain Brown Rd. Madison. Fl.
(850) 973-8277
^~> .. .


their doctors, and do their own bodies 'preventive main-
tenance.'
In his new book, "Medical Crisis: Secrets your doc-
tor won't share with you," Dr Anthony Martin asserts
that breast cancer and prostate cancer are nearly 100-
percent preventable. It takes more than 5 years for most
cancers to grow to the size of the tip of a ball point pen.
By the time cancer is found by routine blood tests or
feeling a lump, the patient may have missed precious
time.


"Your car has dashboard warning lights to alert you
that the oil is low, or you're out of gas," says Dr. Martin,
"The body has those same warning signals. You just
have to know how to read them."
Here are Dr. Martin's 4 warning signs to find out if
you are on the path to cancer, stroke or other illnesses:
1) Energy. "If you've been tired for three weeks
straight, your body is trying to tell you something is
wrong." Long-term fatigue is tied to red blood cells. Red
blood cell problems can lead to liver, kidney or brain
trouble.

S There is no right or wrong way to grieve after a loss.
Let's talk about it.
lg Bend HW pire offer iornndential jnei uppor to anyone in lhe tommuniry
'iwh h s lost a IL'ved one regardless of whether they ued hospice service. Both
indivMdual fourseling And group support areaviilable.
(~ nm ~i iln. pip.: v who hlien Next meeting:
U June24,at 6.00pm.
contact : Casey Shaffer BBen
(850) 556-6189 .H spic
for more information .
-. :" :"" "... : "_ "" ;. : = .'. ,,,' 7,.;7-.,".:7 .- -, .:.'';, ;,"* .- ,


Check yourself: Ask your doctor for a simple blood
test.
2) PH Balance. 70-percent of the human body is
water. Water, like in your swimming pool, is either
acidic or alkaline. An unbalanced PH (Potential Hydro-
gen) is a breeding ground for cancer, cardiovascular dis-
ease, diabetes and pre-mature aging.
Check yourself: Ask your doctor for a saliva test.
3) Free Radicals. The body produces free radicals
as a process of detoxifying itself. When balanced, they
are used by the immune system to destroy bacteria and
viruses. Unbalanced free- radicals can lead to cancer,
coronary heart disease, stroke, arthritis or
Alzheimer's.
Check yourself: Ask your doctor for a urine test.
4) Inflammation. You need cells to 'puff up' to stop
bleeding but too much can strangle the arteries and
cause coronary heart disease. Fat cells are a side affect
of obesity Too many fat cells or cells that are too 'puffy'
can lead to asthma, diabetes and cardiovascular dis-
ease.
Check yourself: Ask your doctor for a blood test.
Most doctors know these warning signs, but few sit
back to contemplate how these symptoms work together
to affect your health.
"More than half of people who make appointments
with their doctor complain of fatigue," says Dr. Martin,
"but doctors rarely bother to ask why you're tired, or
how that affects long-term health. They (doctors) wind
up prescribing sleeping pills, or dealing with the short-
term affects of exhaustion. They don't stop to think
that lack of energy is a big, red, flashing warning sign
that something is seriously about to go wrong with the
body"
Dr. Martin suggests once you've got a realistic idea
of where you stand you can start giving yourself the
antidote. "Change your attitude, change your diet,
change your exercise habits and change your supple-
ments."
"So much of what Americans are dying from these
days is 100-percent preventable," says Dr. Martin.
"These four tips really can save your life."
About Dr. Anthony Martin
Dr. Martin is certified as a Natural Medicine Practi-
tioner as well as a qualified Chiropractor. He is a re-
spected and renowned nutraceutical consultant, nutri-
tional practitioner, author and medical spokesperson.
He is a world famous research leader in the fields of
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia and environ-
mental toxins and has spoken at seminars across the
United States, Canada, France, China and South Korea.
Martin is also a frequent guest on television and ra-
dio across the US and Canada, where he also hosts his
own radio show "'Ask The Doctor." He heads up his own
practice, The Martin Clinic, in Sudbury, Ontario and is
passionate on educating people about the importance of
proper nutrition. His says his personal purpose in life is
to help people regain their health. Dr. Anthony Martin's
website can be found at www.drmartin.ca.


L


Question: My mouth feels so dry. I keep a bottle of
water beside me that I sip from all the time and my
mouth is still dry. What is going on?


Answer: We see dry mouth several times a week.
The patients are usually easy to spot by the bottle of
water they bring into the office with them. The dental
term for dry mouth is Xerostomia and it effects a
significant percentage of the population over 65.
Xerostomia can be a result of radiation, medication, or
illness including diabetes and Sjogrens syndrome.
Sjogrens syndrome is a disorder which effects the
salivary glands and the eyes. For most patients,
xerostomia is an undesirable side effect of
medications. There are over 400 medications known
to contribute to dry mouth. The top of the list includes
medications for high blood pressure and depression.
For a more detailed list of medications referto Learn
about dry mouth: Medicatioms that may. cause Dry
Mouth at www,laclede.com.- For more information
about what you can do for your dry mouth read Part II
of this column next week.



Roderick K Shaw II, DMD
Let us feature your questions. Contact us at
S(850) 250-5964 or rkshaw@embarqmai'.oom
Ask the Dentist is devoted to answering your
questions about the Art and Science of
Dentistry.









Wednesday, June 11, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 15A



HEALTH & NUTRITION
II I I


Grant Will Help Improve Oral


Health For Florida'


Early exposure to oral
health care provides a cru-
cial foundation for long-
term overall health, yet
many children in Florida
don't have equal access.
With the help of a $200,000
grant from the Health
Foundation of South
Florida, Frank Catalanot-
to, D.M.D., and Jill Boyl-
ston Herndon, Ph.D., of
the University of Florida's
colleges of Dentistry and
Medicine, hope to bring
care to thousands of un-
derserved children in
Dade, Broward and Mon-
roe counties.
A disproportionate
number of children living
in low-income households
develop a serious dental
condition known as early
childhood caries, or ECC.
ECC is characterized by
one or more decayed, miss-
ing or filled teeth in
preschool children. With-
out early intervention,
EEC leads to dental health
problems that last a life-
time and can have serious
medical repercussions for
the patient.
About 700 pediatri-
cians and family practice
physicians in Dade,
Broward and Monroe
counties have been target-


ed for this educational pro-
gram. Catalanotto says the
grant grew from a similar
program funded through
the Health Resources and
Services Administration
that provides group in-
struction relating to oral
health training for Florida
physicians. Both the Flori-
da Pediatric Society and
the Florida Academy of
Family Physicians have


cooperated in implement-
ing the training program
to their members.
"We'll address the
problem by training pedia-
tricians and family physi-
cians who accept Medicaid
to provide dental screen-
ings, preventive treat-
ments and education to
their young patients, cre-


Children
ating a larger pool of ser-
vice options for these chil-
dren and their families,"
said Catalanotto, a profes-
sor in the UF College of
Dentistry's department of
community dentistry
Lack of access to den-
tal health care is a signifi-
cant problem for many of
the state's underserved
children. A review of Med-
icaid claims data indicates
that only 10 percent of
Florida's dentists accept
Medicaid and only a frac-
tion of those are willing to
treat children younger
than 5 years of age.
Herndon, a research
associate professor in the
department of eidemiolo-
gy and health policy re-
search and Institute for
Child Health Policy, will
assist in the evaluation of
the program.
The Health Founda-
tion of Florida is a not-for-
profit grantmaking foun-
dation dedicated to ex-
panding access to afford-
able, quality health care
and providing funding
that directly benefits the
health and well-being of
underserved individuals
in Broward, Miami-Dade
and Monroe counties.
Since its inception in 1993,
the foundation has award-
ed more than $75 million
in grants and direct pro-
gram support.
The UF College of
Dentistry is the only pub-
licly funded dental school
in Florida and is a nation-
al leader in dental educa-
tion, research and service.
The college is widely rec-
ognized for its oral health
research enterprise, em-
phasizing infectious dis-
eases in dentistry, bone bi-
ology, pain and neuro-
sciences, and translational
research to improve clini-
cal and dental care.


Play Safe In

Thel Summ-er Sun


Encourage children to play in
the shade between 10 a.m. and
4 p.m. when the sun's rays are the
strongest.

Apply sunscreen with a Sun
Protection Factor (SPF) of 15 or
higher everyday. Reapply after
swimming and sweating.

Do not use sunscreen on babies


less than 6 months old. Their skin is
thin and their systems can absorb
chemicals causing toxicity. They
should be kept out of the sun entire- .
ly.

Cover up with hats and cloth-
ing.

Wear sunglasses that block ,
.99%-100% of UVA'andUVB rays.
U


SSAFE



HITTERR


June 6, June 20

July 16 OR July 18


Parents, would your babysitter know what to do if your child began to
choke? Safe Sitter classes have helped thousands of adolescents
across the country learnbasic lifesaving and safety techniques.
Register Now for Safe Sitter South Georgia Medical Center is offering
this ONE DAY Safe Sitter course for boys and girls ages 11 to 13.


SAFE SITTERS learn:
How to entertain children and keep them safe
Basic child care skills (diapering, feeding, etc.)


* What to do when a child chokes
* Safety for the sitter
* How to call for emergency help
* Babysitting business skills


SITTER
SITTER


Medicine Is our life. sgmc.org


Classes are $25 per child. To enroll your sitter or your ownrson or
daughter, call 229-333-1610, ext. 5.
The Safe Sitter program may save someone you love!
IIII I 1


4..,' h..


180 S. Cherry St., Suite D 3116 Capital Circle NE. Ste.2
Monticello, FL 32344 Tallahassee, FL 32308
850-997-1400 [fia 850-668-4200
Now excepting Blue Cross Blue Shield and most other insurances


Tri-County Family Health Care
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon, Wed, Fri 8 am 5 pm
Tues 10 am 5 pm
Thurs. 10 am 7 pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.


Valdosta Medical Clinic
James A. Sinnott, M.D.
Edward J. Fricker, M.D.
Specialist In All Gastrointestinal Disorders
Dr. Sinnott A A-.-- L _- Dr. Fricker


Home Oxygen Nebulizer Medication
Diabetic Shoes & Supplies Home Medical Equipment
24 Hour Service


* A353NE


I; Madis


E Marion St.
on. FL


Phone: 850-973-4125
Fax: 850-973-8922


228 NE Hancock Ave.


Cactn* Irv Acttobi
Senior Citizens Council of Madison County, Inc.
Current Needs of our Elderly Consumers:
u 3 elderly people need either new wheelchair ramps or
repair to a current one
a I elderly person needs used electric stove.
o Yard Work (mowing & some raking)
o *Adult diapers; all sizes including plus and extra small
o *New grab bars, or used in good condition
S *Ensure, Boost, & Glucerna, all flavors
a Upbeat, energetic person to teach simple line dancing
class
o Several volunteers to lead variety of arts and crafts
projects once/month
*Can either donate actual items or gift certificates from
Medicine Shoppe, N. Fla. Pharmacy, or Option Care in
Madison.
. p p p


4


I Medical Supplies I


EMMM


:.C...r *.U~;L~:~:~:~.~P~n*'r~F~~


A,


,

-:U,..rr









16A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 11, 2008


Voice & Piano Lessons
Intermediate & Beginning
Levels, for more information
Contact Shelly Holbrock
850-673-7447
6/11.6/13

MAC SERVICES
Home Repaid / Remodeling and
home related services
35 years Home Maintenance and
Construction Experience
Will do Subcontract work
Call Curt or Mary Ann 973-4180
License and Insured
References available on request
6/11-6/20





BIBLICAL COUNSELING
For Individuals &
Families
Dr. Sylvia Tomberlin,
Director/Counselor
Middle Florida Baptist
Association Office
349 SW Captain Brown
Road, Madison, FL 32341
850-973-8607
(M-W until 4pm), or
850-508-6877 anytime.
(not a licensed mental
health provider)







HOME CARE FOR SENIORS
WILL ASSIST WITH
ACTIVITIES OF DAILY
LIVING, NFCC PATIENT
CARE TECHNICIAN
CERTIFICATE CPR &
CNA CERTIFIED
AVAILABLE NOW.
CALL BEVERLY AT
850-973-2264
RTN





Dunn's
Lawn Mower Repair
Welding
New & Used Parts
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340
SENIOR CITIZEN
DISCOUNT
rtn






eenville Pointe

Aprtments
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers accepted.
Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Frail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal
Housing Opportunity
rtn


Qouthem 1/illas of

00dis1onC partments


Rental assistance may be available.
HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, & 3
BR HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call 850-973-8582, TDD/TTY
711. 315 SW Lawson Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Equal Housing Op-
portunity
rtn


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.) Subsidy available
at times. HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd, Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Provider
and Employer r
rtn




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


HOUSE FOR RENT
Nice 4 BR house in country sub-
division, South of Madison.
Lease with contract to buy in
one year $5,000. down,
$1,300. per month
Possible owner financing
References required
850-856-5221
RTN

2BD, 2Bath Mobile Home,
quiet residential area.
$400 per month,
$200 deposit
Call for info 850-869-0916
6/4-7/2

FOR LEASE:
2BR / 2Bath $700.00
or
4BR / 2Bath $1,200.00
Beautiful country setting, on
Cypress Pond, 1 mile from town
850-973-3025
or
850-591-2642
6/4-7/4

House for Rent
3BR, 2 Bath 3,000 S/F
$1,200. per month
$1,200. Deposit
In City Limits
850-869-0916


6/4-7/4


$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385


LOG HOMES
With as little as
$500 Down
Prestige Home Center
Lake City, Florida
1-800-355-9385

3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751


FOR SALE BY OWNER
5 acres Lee, North of Hwy 6,
Cayenne Rd. rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995. $5,000
down $325/mo

4.7 acres Lee, county graded
road, $39,995, restrictions,
$5,000 down, $325/mo.

Madison, North of Hwy 6,
Cactus Rd., restrictions
14.8ac $99,995

25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee, high
and dry, $4,500/ac

Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
rtn

Real Estate For Sale

3BR One Bath, New Electrical-
Wiring, New CHA System,
New Carpet,
New Exterior Vinyl Siding
$78,500

Newly Constructed:
2BR 2 Bath Townhouse
1200S/F Heated Area
$139,500
McWilliams Realty
850-973-8614


3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751


$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385


STOP!! YOU TIRED OF
THE NO TRUTH AD
SIGNS... WANT WHAT IS
ADVERTISED... COME SEE
ME AND I WILL DO MY
BEST TO GET YOU THE
HOME THAT FITS YOUR
BUDGET WITH TOTAL
HONESTY UP FRONT.
365-5129 LYNN SWEAT
RTN


CASH..... FOR YOUR USED
MOBILE HOMES 1980 OR
NEWER. LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129


DESPERATE TO SELL 2.68
ACRES BETWEEN LAKE
CITY AND LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE ZONED
COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT


RTN


"HAVE TO SALE"... MY 2
BED ROOM MFG HOME
ON 1 ACRE FENCED &
LANDSCAPED ON PAVED
ROAD, WORKSHOP,
COVERED PARKING $459
PER MONTH WITH AP-
PROVED CREDIT ASK
FOR LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129
RTN

MANUFACTURED HOME
WITH AS LITTLE AS
$500.00 DOWN. TO SEE IF
YOU QUALIFY CALL 386-
288-4560

SPECIAL FIRST TIME
BUYERS PROGRAM 4
BEDROOM 2 BATH ON
LAND $699 MONTH
386-288-4560
RTN


LOW CREDIT,
rtn NO CREDIT? I MAY BE
ABLE TO HELP YOU BUY
A HOME. TO FIND OUT
CALL
386-288-4560
RTN

rtn HOME ONLY LOANS


No mortgage on your land.
Put Home on your land,
family land, state land or
rental lot. Singlewides start
at $350.00 month and
Doublewides at $440.00.
EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
CINDY 386-365-5370
RTN


ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
Singlewide your land $340.00
P&I per mo, Doublewide
your land $422.00 P&I per
mo. Singlewide & $30,000.00
for land $602.00 P&I per mo.
Our land your land or buy
and I specialize in credit
challenged customers. Appli-
cations over the phone, credit
decision next business day.
Let me help make your new
home dream come true.
Trades welcome.
Cindy 386-365-5370


FOR SALE BY OWNER (5)
NEW SPEC HOMES IN
UPSCALE SUBDIVISION
FOR IMMEDIATE
LIQUIDATION. CALL
STEVE 386-365-8549
RTN

FOR SALE BY OWNER
(8) USED 2 BEDROOM
DOUBLEWIDES SEVERAL
3,4,AND 5 BEDROOMS
MUST GO MAKE OFFER
386-365-8549
RTN

STARTER HOME 14X60
MOBILE HOME EXCEL-
LENT SHAPE, NO WORK
NEEDED! A MUST
SEE! ...386-623-4218
RTN

MODULAR HOME FOR
SALE TURN KEY, NEVER
LIVED IN UNDER
PRICED, CLOSE TO
INTERSTATE MUST SELL
386-623-4218
RTN


MODULAR HOME, SEEK-
ING SILENT BID, A MUST
SEE, EXCELLENT
NEIGHBORHOOD,
LAKE CITY, FL
386-623-4218
RTN


MBLHOEMOILEHOESMEICLAT
FO SLEFO SLE H LP1 UWIANTED Reonstructin AlY


IME
, 3
AAr


SPACIOUS MFG HOe
WITH 4 BEDROOMS
BATH, BONUS ROO
WITH LOTS OF
WINDOWS. DISCONT
UED FLOORPLAN. M
SELL 386-288-0964

TURNKEY 2008 3/2


DOUBLEWIDE ON YOUR
LAND FOR AS LITTLE AS
$499 PER MONTH.. W.A.P.
386-288-0964
RTN

NEED MORE SPACE FOR A
GROWING FAMILY? 2001,
5 BEDROOM, 4 BATH
TRADE-IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION. 386-288-0964
RTN



Land for Sale
80 acres in South Georgia
10 acre grass field, balance in
Pine & hardwood.
Paved road frontage
$152,000
912-568-7480
6/11-7/4



Office / Retail for lease
downtown next to Post Office
and Courthouse,
Good Parking
200 to 1500 s/f
850-567-1523


Commercial/Industrial
Property


with state highway frontage
23 acres, Corner lots.
Fronts both Harvey Greene Dr.
and Highway 53 South.

Natural gas line,
8 inch water main,
access to city utilities,
fire hydrant, and service from
two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.

Will build to suit tenant.

Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141


FOR SALE
2003 KIA SORENTO
850-508-3391
Excellent Condition!
1 Owner, $10,000.00
70,500 miles; V6 3.5 Liter;
Automatic Transmission; 2WD
Air Conditioning Power Seat
Power Steering Roof Rack
Power Windows Alloy Wheels
Power Door Locks/keyless entry
Premium Sound
Front Side Air Bags
Dual Front Air Bags
Tilt Wheel Cruise Control
(4-Wheel) Leather Seats
6 Disk, in-dash CD Changer
Two Tone Paint
Wood Grain / Leather Steering
Wheel
4 Wheel Traction Lock
(for rain or snow)


wow!
90 Miles per gallon 50CC
Scooter, Great for around town
and short commutes
$950.00
Robert or Joan Emerson
850-242-9342
5/28-6/20

2003 Mercury Sable
Platinum Edition
Excellent Condition
with Sun Roof,
Leather Interior
Bucket Seats
850-971-5059
6/11,6/13

1994 GMC Sierra
Excellent Condition
Original Owner
$5,900.
850-228-8380
6/11,6/13



Wanted
Chevy Luv
Diesel
any condition
912-568-7480
6/11-7/4
WANTED
BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004.
IF NO ANSWER, PLEASE
LEAVE NAME, TELEPHONE
NUMBER AND INFORMATION
ABOUT THE MILL.


Heartland Rehabilitation
Live Oak


wi Build THEIR strength and
YOUR career!
FIN- We are seeking full-time Physi-
UST cal Therapists who will have
great bonus potential, profit
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Wednesday, June 11, 2008 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 17A





LEGALS


NOI I I.
Ih i al dioa i-11il lll. | illtI' t.i .l r I I,,l l lll'l [ il l %%1 h1 hl t1 l tir In illll n l intlh ll el ,,
h 1.l % \ M iii ht 111 1)\% NW I tll ill II 1n I o IF. i6 MAl i.till llll IIIIL In 21HIS ,
I eic public I, % t l..' .



NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV

Under the Authority of the Self-Service Storage Facility Act, Section83.805 the de-
scribed below has been seized for nonpayment of rent and other accrued expenses.
Property consists primarily of household & personal goods in units rented by: Minnie
Robinson, Bessie Palmore, Delores Akins, Darlene Mccormick, and Donna Wright. The
property will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the Self-Storage
Facility Act, Section 83.806. The sale will be held Saturday June 21, 2008 at 9:00 a.m.,
at the Madison Mini Storage, 1098 E. U.S. 90, in Madison. Florida. For further infor-
mation call 973-6246.


6/4/08 & 6/11/08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-241-CA
JUDGE: DAVID W. FINA


IN RE: Forfeiture of
One (1) 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 .
VIN: 1GCEK19T4XZ114527


NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS

ALL.PERSONS who claim an interest in the following property: 1999 Chevrolet Sil-
verado 1500, VIN 1GCEK19T4XZ114527, which was seized because said property is
alleged to be contraband as defined by Sections 932.701 (2)(a)(1-6), Florida Statutes, by
the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, Division of Florida Highway
Patrol, on or about March 18, 2008, in Madison County, Florida. Any owner, entity,
bona fide lienholder, or person in possession of the property when seized has the right
to request an adversarial preliminary hearing for a probable cause determination with-
in fifteen (15) days of initial receipt of notice, by providing such request to Sandra R.
Coulter, Assistant General Counsel, Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehi-
cles, 2900 Apalachee Parkway, Room A432, Tallahassee, Florida 32399, by certified
mail return receipt requested. A complaint for forfeiture has been filed in the above
styled court.

6/4/08 & 6/11/08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


FLORIDA D. SMITH,
as Mortgagee,
Plaintiff,'


CASE No. 2008-57-CA


NORMAN BARFIELD & DENEEN BARFIELD

Defendants)

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated March 12, 2008, in the above referenced case in which ARTHUR GLEN
SMITH is Plaintiff, and NORMAN BARFIELD & DENEEN BARFIELD; unknown
tenants; and other unknown parties in possession, including the unknown spouse of
any person in possession of the property, and if named Defendant is deceased, the sur-
viving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by,
through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties natur-
al or corporate, or described Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash in the Madison County Courthouse in Madison, Florida as the Clerk of the Court
may direct provided that said sale must be commenced on the 23rd day of June, 2008,
at 11:00 am the following described property set forth in the Default Final Judgment
_pf Foreclosure:
Lot number 3, Block B, Meadow Run Subdivision, as recorded in Plat
Book 2, Page 13, of the Official Records of Madison County, Florida, Containing .33
acres more or less.
Any and all bidders, parties or other interested persons shall contact the information
desk of the Clerk of the Court prior to the scheduled foreclosure sale.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE
IF ANY OTHERS THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 20th day of May, 2008 at
Madison, Madison County, Florida.


(COURT SALE)


Monica Taibi
Attorney for the Plaintiff
'0. Box 836
Madison, FL 32341
Phone: (850) 973-1477
FL Bar 035058


HONORABLE TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk


6/4/08 and 611/08


[N THE CIRCl'lr COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NO. 2008-47-CP


IN RE: ESTATE OF
DELORISE LEWIS


Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Delorise Lewis, deceased, whose date of death
was July 26, 2007; is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division; File Number 2008-47-CP; the names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and
who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITH-
IN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or de-
mands against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated ']
claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. |
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY *
CLAIMS FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS June 4, 2008. ,1


Attorney for Personal Representative:

Is/ Clay A. Schnitker
Clay A. Schnitker
FIa Bar No.349143
Davis, Schnitker, Reeves & Browning, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 652
Madison, Florida 32341
(850) 973-4186


JKune 4. 2(8 and June 11.2008


Personal Representative:

/s/Truman Clyde Cruce
Truman Clyde Cruce
262 NW Woodpecker Way
Greenville, Florida 32331

/s/ Kathrvn Kinsey Lewis Ly
Kathryn Kinsey Lewis Lynn
11057 SW Mount Gilead Ro
Greenville, Florida 32331


ad j
"d [:1


ARTHUR GLEN SMITH,
as Mortgage,
Plaintiff,
V.


IN Il IIi:. C I I COl'RI 01 IIlI j
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 08-55-CA


.ELIZA HAWES & TAWANHA HAWKINS

Defendant(s)

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated March 12, 2008, in the above referenced case in which ARTHUR
GLEN SMITH is Plaintiff, and ELIZA HAWES & TAWANHA HAWKINS; unknown
tenants; and other unknown parties in possession, including the unknown spouse of
any person in possession of the property, and if named Defendant is deceased, the sur-
viving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming b).
through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties natur
al or corporate, or described Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for .
cash in the Madison County Courthouse in Madison, Florida as the Clerk of the Cour I '
may direct provided that said sale must be commenced on the 23rd day of June, 2008.
at 11:00 am the following described property set f6rth in the Default Final Judgment
S of Foreclosure:
S From the southeast corner of the West half of the Southeast quarter, section 28.
Tobwnship I North Range 9 East, run North 21.94 chains, thence West 14.31 chains to a
POINT OF BEGINNING thence run North 1.59 chains, thence run West 1.59 chain.
thence run South 1.59 chains, and thence run East 1.49 chains to POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, containing 1A acre, more or less.

Any and all bidders, parties or other interested persons shall contact the information
desk of the Clerk of the Court prior to the scheduled foreclosure sale.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE
IF ANY OTHERS THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 20th day of May, 2008 at !
Madison, Madison County, Florida.

(COURT SALE)
HONORABLE TIM SANDERS
0 S CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
Monica Taibl By: Ramona Dickinson
Attorney for the Plaintiff as Deputy Clerk
SP.O. Box 836
Madison, FL 32341
Phone: (850) 973-1477
| FL Bar 035058

6/4/08 and 6/11/08_

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Arthur G. Smith, the holder of the following
certificate haS filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and name in which it is
assessed is as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO. 03-904-TD ,
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2003
NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: STACEY SHERMAN
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Beg at NE Cor of SE4 Run W 863' S 44' to POB
Then count S 423' E 131' S 477' W 623' N 486' E 210'
'N 420' E 272' to POB
S09-2N-10-5937-004-000

All of said property being in the County of Madison, State of Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed according to the law, the property described in such certifi-
cate will be sold to the highest bidder at the west front door at the Madison County
Courthouse on the 23rd day of JUNE 2008 at ll:00)a.m.


Dated this 3 day 'of June, 2008.


(Court Seal)


TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

MADISON COUNTY
MADISON, FLORIDA

BY: Ramona Dickinson
EPUTY CLERK


I6/11/08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

FARM CREDIT OF NORTHWEST
FLORIDA, ACA, CASENO.:08-138-CA

Plaintiff,

vs. I

RUDOLPH J. HENRIQUES
and UNKNOWN TENANTSS,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June
5,2008, in Case No. 2008-138-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit, in
and for Madison County, Florida, in which FARM CREDIT OF NORTHWEST
FLORIDA, ACA is the Plaintiff and RUDOLPH J. HENRIQUES is the Defendant, I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the West Front door of the Madison
County Courthouse in Madison, Madison County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on June 26,
2008, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particu-
larly described as follows:

See Exhibit "A"
DATED: 6/5/08

TIM SANDERS
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk
Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth & Bowden P.A.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308

EXHIBIT "A"

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
-RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTIC-
ULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF SAID SECTION 26 ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF A 30 FOOT COUNTY MAIN-
TAINED GRADED ROAD; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 52 SEC-
ONDS EAST, ALONG SAID ROAD 316.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 34 MIN-
UTES 52 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID ROAD 316.45 FEET; THENCE LEAVING
SAID ROAD SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST, 688.04
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8.9 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST, 316.45-
FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, 688.04
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

6/11/08 & 6/18/08


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Man Finds 30-Carat Diamond After

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NOT/CE what's going on in your community.


School District Budgets Local Tax Changes


Property Auctions


Public Hearings


Adoptions








Find out aboul public nolites in this newspaper.
01 f enich oiline nd

www.floridapublicnotices.com


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18A Madison County Carrier


www.ureenepublishinv!.com


Wednesday, June 11, 2008


The Fourth of July was tradi-
tionally celebrated as America's
birthday, but the idea of an annual
day specifically celebrating the
Flag is believed to have first origi-
nated in 1885. BJ Cigrand, a school-
teacher, arranged for the pupils in
the Fredonia, Wisconsin Public
School, District 6, to observe June
14 (the 108th anniversary of the of-
ficial adoption of The Stars and
Stripes) as "Flag Birthday." In nu-
merous magazines and newspaper
articles and public addresses over
the following years, Cigrand con-
tinued to enthusiastically advocate
the observance of June 14 as "Flag_
Birthday,", or "Flag Day."
^., On June 14, 1889, George Baleh,.
a kindergarten teacher in New'
York City, planned appropriate cer-
emonies for the children of his
school, and his idea of observing
Flag Day was later adopted by the
State Board of Education of New
York. On June 14, 1891, the Betsy..
Ross House in Philadelphia held a
Flag Day celebration, and on June
14 of the following year, the New
York Society of the Sons of the
Revolution, celebrated Flag Day
Following the suggestion of
Colonel J Granville Leach (at the
time historian of the Pennsylvania
Society of the Sons of the Revolu-


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tion), the Pennsylvania Society of
Colonial Dames of America on
April 25, 1893 adopted a resolution
requesting the mayor of Philadel-
phia and all others in authority
and all private citizens to display
the Flag on June 14th. Leach went
on to recommend that thereafter
the day be known as 'Flag Day',
and on that day, school children be
assembled for appropriate exercis-
es, with each child being given a
small Flag.
Two weeks later on May 8th,
the Board of Managers of the
Pennsylvania Society of Sons of
the Revolution unanimously en-
dorsed the action of the Pennsylva-
.. a Society of Colonial Dames. As a
"result of the resolution, Dr. Edward
Brooks, then Superintendent of
,,blic Schools of Philadelphia, di-
rected that Flag Day exercises be
held on June 14, 1893 in Indepen-
dence Square. School children were
assembled, each carrying a small
* Flag, and patriotic songs were sung
and addresses delivered.
In 1894, the governor of New
York directed that on June 14 the
Flag be displayed on all public
buildings. With BJ Cigrand and
Leroy Van Horn as the moving
spirits, the Illinois organization,
known-as-the-American-Flag Day -


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Association, was organized for the
purpose of promoting the holding
of Flag Day exercises. On June
14th, 1894, under the auspices of
this association, the first general
public school children's celebration
of Flag Day in Chicago was held in
Douglas, Garfield, Humboldt, Lin-
coln, and Washington Parks, with
more than 300,000 children partici-
pating.
Adults, too, participated in pa-
triotic programs.. Franklin K. Lane,
Secretary of the Interior, delivered
a .1914 Flag Day address in which
he repeated words he said the flag
had spoken to him that morning: "I
am what you make me; nothing -
more. I swing before your eyes as a
bright gleam of color, a symbol of
yourself."
Inspired by these three decades
of state and local celebrations, Flag
Day the anniversary of the Flag
Resolution of 1777 was officially
established by the Proclamation of
President WQodrow Wilson on May
30th, 1916. While Flag Day was cele-
brated in various communities for
years after Wilson's, proclamation,
it was not until August 3rd, 1949,'
that President Truman signed an
Act of Congress designating June
14th of each-year as National Flag
-Day---


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The American's Creed
"I believe in the United States of America as a Gov-
ernment of the people by the people, for the people, whose
just powers are derived from the consent of the governed;
a democracy in a Republic; a sovereign' Nation of many
sovereign States; a perfect Union, one and inseparable; es-
tablished upon those principals of freedom, equality, jus-
tice, and humanity for which American patriots sacri-
ficed their lives and fortunes.
I therefore believe it is my duty to my Country to love
it; to support its Constitution; to obey its laws; to respect
its flag, and to defend it against all enemies."
Historical Notes: The American's Creed was a re-
sult of a nationwide contest for writing a National
Creed, which would be a brief summary of the Ameri-
can political faith founded upon things fundamental in
American history and tradition. The contest was the
idea of Henry Sterling Chapin, Commissioner of Edu-
cation of New York State. Over three thousand entries
were received, and William Tyler Page was declared to
be the winner. James H. Preston, the mayor of Balti-
more, presented an award to Page in the House of Rep-
resentatives Office Building on April 3, 1918. The Speak-
er of the House of Representatives and the commis-
sioner of education of the state of New York accepted
the Creed for the United States, and the proceedings re-
lating to the award were printed in the Congressional
Record of April 13, 1918. It was a time when patriotic
sentiments were very much in vogue. The United States
had been a participant in World War I only a little over
a year at the time the Creed was adopted. -
The author of the American's Creed, William Tyler
Page, was a descendant of John Page, who had come to
America in1650 and had settled in Williamsburg, Vir-
ginia. Another ancestor, Carter Braxton had signed the
Declaration of Independence. Still another ancestor,
John Tyler, was the tenth president of the United
States. William Tyler Page had come to Washington at
the age of 13 to serve as a Capitol Page. Later he became
an employee of the Capitol building and served in that
capacity for almost sixty-one years. In 1919 he was elect-
ed clerk of the House. Thirteen years latetiwhen the De-
mocrats again became a majority party, they created for
Page the office of minority clerk of the House of"Repre-
sentatives. He held this position for the remainder 'f his
life.
Referring to the Creed, .Page said: "It is the summa-
ry of the fundamental principles of the Ameiican polit-
ical faith as set forth in its greatest documennts, itswor-
thiest traditions, and its greatest leaders." FMs.wording
of the Creed used passages and phrases from the 'Dl3li
ration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitu-
tion, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, and Daniel Web-
ster's reply to Robert Y Hayne in the Senate in 184P.


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THE HISTORY OF



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