Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00085
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Uniform Title: Madison County Carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: November 21, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00085
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text


...*ALL FOR ADC 320
University of Florida Library
Dept. of Special Coil Fla History
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THE SPIRIT OF MADISON COUNTY


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Madison Beats
Chiefland 45-35
In Pre-Season Basketball
Page 13A


I-wwr -eubis in cm Maiso Cuny' Aar-WinningNesppe 504I f-41


Time To Dust Off


Your Voter's


Registration Card


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.


On January
29,2008, Florida
voters will go to
the polls to vote
in the Presiden-
tial Primaries.
Additionally;
Floridians will
be voting on
perhaps the
most debated
Tax Amend-
ment in recent
times.
Regardless
of one's parti-
sanship on the
issues however,
to gain admis-


Madison County
Supervisor of
Elections, Jada
Williams, has an en-
during mission state-
ment; "Everyone has
the right, and the re-
sponsibility, to vote."


sion to this important affair, an "ad-
mission ticket" is required. That ticket
is a current, valid Voter's Registration.
Often one hears that voting is
Samong.the. greatest privileges, and re-.
sponsibilities, citizens possess in a
democracy, especially here in the great-
est democracy on earth. Arguably
more than any time prior, the United
States, Florida and Madison County,
face the most pressing issues in their
history. And again, in order to be
Please see VOTERS, Page 2A

Property Tax Reform

Package May Be

Misunderstood
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The proper-
ty tax reform
package. that
passed during
the special ses-
sion of the
Florida Legisla-
ture is creating
both confusion
and anticipa-
tion. Intended
to stem the tide
of rising tax eigh Barfleld,
bills brought on LMadison County
by surging real Tax Appraiser, wants
estate prices, to make sure every-
eas. one understands the
the new package new Property Tax Re.
has several com- form Legislation.-
ponents.
Some elements will .apply to one's
specific situation, others won't, and
knowing what's what can be a bit chal-
lenging. Fortunately we have officials
in Madison County that want to make
sure all county residents understand
the proposed legislation and are able to
take advantage of all the benefits, while
avoiding the hazards.
On January 29, Florida voters go to
the polls to make the decision whether
or not to enact this controversial
Please see PROPERTY TAX, Page 2A


ROBBERIES HIT MADISON COUNTY


Four Men Arrested For Armed Robbery


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
According to the Madison
County Sheriff's Department,
on November 19, four sub-
jects were arrested for armed
robbery and possession of
concealed firearms.
Pierra Blackshear,
Christopher Rayam, Nigel
Wilson and Randy Jones were
arrested after their victim
called police. The victim stat-
ed that he was sitting in his
car at his girlfriend's house
when three men approached
his vehicle.
One subject came to the
driver's window and pointed
a shotgun at the victim's
head. The other two went to


Pierra Blackshear Christopher Rayam Nigel Wilson


the passenger's side of the
car where they told the vic-
tim's girlfriend that the mat-
ter didn't concern her, and
that she should go inside.
The victim managedato
escape his would-be attackers


and ran into the woods,
where he hid and called po-
lice. A Greenville volunteer
firefighter discretely followed
the men in their black sports
utility vehicle into Madison,
where they were apprehend-


Randy Jones


ed. Jimmy Fletcher and Cor-
poral Mike Maurice arrested
the subjects and Madison Po-
lice Department Patrolman
Joey Agner assisted.
Please see ROBBERY,
Page 2A


Man Arrested For Robbery And Possession Of Cocaine


By Jessica
Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
According to the
Madison Police De-
partment, on Novem-
ber 17, Tommie Lee
Christian, Jr., robbed a
local convenience
store.
The clerk phoned
911 after the incident,


and told dispatchers
that the store had been
robbed.
The clerk stated
that Christian entered
the store with a white
t-shirt wrapped around
his head. He forced
her to go around the
counter and take the
cash drawer out of the
register. Christian fled


the store on foot.
Deputy Keith Kirk-
land located Christian
at the intersection of.
Parramore and Colum-
bia Streets. Patrolman
Joey Agner transport-
ed Christian to the
county jail.
During a search,
officers discovered
crack cocaine and an


unidentified pill in
Christian's right back
pocket, along with a
small amount of mon-
ey An undisclosed
amount of cash was
stolen from the store.
Christian's voice
was identified by the
clerk in a lineup, and
he was also identified
on video.


Foster Children In

Need Of Gifts This

Holiday Season
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Big Bend Community Based Care
and the Florida Guardian ad Litem
program are joining together to ensure
that foster children from this area and
other children who are victims of
abuse, neglect, and abandonment will
be provided with gifts this holiday sea-
son.
Each year, Big Bend CBC collects
gifts of toys, clothing, and diapers, as
well as monetary donations from busi-
nesses and private citizens. Each year,
the gifts of the heart are given to a
child that would not otherwise have
them.
Big Bend CBC and the Florida
Guardian ad Litem program are ask-
ing that individuals, churches, clubs,
business, and schools get involved and
help to brighten the lives of unfortu-
nate children.
There are approximately 147 dis-
placed children whose cases originated
in Madison County "There are so
many kids in care," said Marla Zorn
with Camelot Community Care Foster
Home Management, "and we can only
do so much." Gifts from the communi-
ty are a cheerful reminder that some-
one cares.
Big Bend Community Based Care
Please see FOSTER, Page 2A


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
According to the Flori-
da Highway Patrol, on No-
vember 15, a semi tractor
and trailer, driven by San-
dra Martinez, was involved
in a traffic crash.
Apparently Martinez,
age 38, was traveling west
on 1-10, in the inside lane.
The semi was carrying beef
cattle as cargo. At some
point, Martinez drove off
the road and partially into
Please see SEMI, Page 3A


MrdiSSBlffipWa st.*4 .' -I t A" 'a&0 . *i *U.
Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo by Jessica Higginbotham, November 15. 2007
The semi truck and trailer that overturned was car-
rying approximately 90 head of cattle bound for
slaughter. According to Charlie Dickey, 20 of the cows
were killed in the crash.


I You L ca *We th r


2 Sections, 28 Pages

Bndal 8A

Classifieds/Legals 14-15A
'H olth' . '.4--M .* -- ; -..* : . d .' I '. It A


Money & Finance 11A
School/Slports,..L.:..;,. ,t...... .;.................,.12,13A
View points.................................................... 2-3A


1Wed
11/21


82/61
Mix of sun and clouds.
Highs in the low 80s and
lows in the low 60s.


Thu
11/22


75148
A few thunderstorms
possible.


Fn
11/23


66/47
More clouds than sun.
Highs in the rid 60s and
lows in the upper 40s.


|Thanksgiving Day FeastI

11:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.

1550 BaytreeRoad Valdosta Z2 oeeMax


USDA Usti


Tommie Lee Christian, Jr.


Paint Spills


Semi Crashes On Interstate, Damaging Load Of Cattle


rLM UL .!,! ..........
. .. I UP


IA








2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 21, 2007



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


VOTERS


Cont from page 1A


Wandering
With The Publisher
Mary Ellen Greene
Columnnist


r~ gr ^



T' '
IAAPY"


Thanksgiving is all about to-

getherness, love, and sharing

and giving thanks for our bless-

.ings. Strengthen the ties that

bind you and your family and

loved ones together!

Happy Thanksgiving

to you, from us!

ROBBERY cont from page 1A
When the men were arrested, an AK-47, shotgun,
and two pistols, loaded and ready to fire were recovered.
The subjects told deputies that they were basketball
players at North Florida Community College in Madi-
son.
Blackshear, Rayam, Wilson, and Jones are listed on
the North Florida Community College Men's Basketball
Academy roster, posted online at www.nfcc.edu. In a
statement issued by Trish Hinton, head of media and
public relations for NFCC, she stated that she can nei-
ther confirm or deny that the men were students at
NFCC, at this point. "It's a law enforcement issue," she
said. "As soon as we receive more information, Presi-
dent Steen and the college will take appropriate action."


FOSTER


cont from page 1A


and the Florida Guardian ad Litem program encourage
donations from individuals and civic organizations. Op-
tions include adopting a child, an entire family, or just
providing monetary support.
Foster children have prepared Wish Lists with some
of their hopes for. Christmas gifts this season. The
monthly stipend provided for foster parents is simply
not enough to purchase children gifts. The gift you give
could change the future of a foster child.
For more information about Big Bend Community
Based Care and how to give gifts this holiday season,
contact Tammy Webb with Guardian ad Litem at (850)
973 9342 or Karen Fletcher with BBCBC at (850) 948 -
1240. The last day to give gifts so that children receive
them is November 28!

Question Of The Week




"Have i.
you ever o- ;6,7%
called in
to work '
and not
been
sick?"
es 1 %


Log on to wwwgreenepublishing.com to answer this week's question..
"Do you make long distance telephone calls at
work so your employer pays the bill?"
Voting for this question will end on November 26, at 9 a.m.


heard, be in control, protect family and self, one must
vote.
"We're looking for a 70-80 percent voter turnout for
the January 29 election. All voters, whether they're De-
mocrats or Republicans need to be registered no later
than December 31 to be eligible to vote in that election.
Rules state that voters must be on the books at least 29
days before the election date," Jada Williams, Madison
County Supervisor of Elections, explains.
"Currently there are 11,741 registered voters in
Madison County and we're working to improve that
number everyday. We're also planting seeds for the fu-
ture. Virtually every school in the county has a close re-
lationship with us. I really want the kids to be educated
on the importance of voting," Williams noted.
"Starting in 2008, 16 year-olds with a valid driver li-
cense can register early to vote, although they must be
18 before the can vote in an actual election. Governor
Crist has challenged all departments to include younger
people in their programs and planning," she added.
"I'm from Madison County, and I love working for
the people of Madison County I'm committed to ensur-
ing that both Democrats and Republicans are well rep-
resented at the polls. When someone comes into my of-
fice, I don't see political parties. I work for everyone,"
Williams concluded.
Williams, who holds a Master's degree from Florida
A&M, has a background in political science. Her hus-
band, Rod Williams, is the Defensive Coordinator for the
MCHS Cowboys. They have two children, Rod Jr. (5) and
Rihanna (seven months).
Voter Registration Forms are available throughout
the county, including the libraries, City Hall, Health De-
partment, or at the Supervisor of Elections office in the
Court House Annex. Visit www.votemadison.com for im-
portant dates and deadlines. Florida Voter Registration
Applications can be downloaded and returned by mail,
or simply call the Supervisor of Elections Office at 973-
6507 for more details.


PROPERTY TAX


Cont from page 1A


amendment, which requires a sixty percent vote to pass.
If approved, it will be effective as of January 1, 2008.
The fact that the amendment is retroactive to the
first of January, even though the vote is on the 29th, is a
small point of confusion.
The larger misunderstanding is believing that if one
waits until after the first of the 2008 to pay their current
2007 tax bill, that there may be some savings created by
the new legislation. This is not the case. Although the
current 2007 tax bills allow payments to be made later
into next year, the current amendment will have no ef-
fect on 2007 taxes owed, regardless of when they're paid.
Leigh Barfield, Madison County Property Appraiser,
and her staff, have been extremely supportive during
this transition, graciously providing a useful summary
regarding the details of the package. "There are a lot of
pieces to the property tax reform package, and we just
want to make sure everyone understands it," Barfield
noted.
There are four components that make up the amend-
ment. However voters will not be voting on the four
pieces separately, instead either voting for or against the
whole thing. Within these components, there are val-
ues, rates and exemptions that apply in some instances
and not in others. Some of the new exemptions do not
apply to school district levies, for instance. Separately,
local governments will have certain revenue limitations
that will continue in effect. The following is an
overview of the four components.
INCREASED HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION
A lot of voters have heard that the current $25,000
homestead exemption has simply "doubled" to $50,000
with the proposed legislation. While it is true that there
is now $50,000 of potential exemption, it's broken up
over certain value ranges.
For example, suppose you have a homestead proper-
ty worth $100,000. Under the new amendment, the first
$25,000 would be exempt. The next $25,000 however IS
NOT exempt. But the next $25,000 IS exempt. And then
everything over that level is not exempt.
In other words, the $50,000 potential exemption is
broken into two pieces. One piece is the first $25,000 of
assessed value, but the second piece is not the next
$25,000. Instead, it's the $25,000 of assessed value be-
tween $50,000 and $75,000 that's exempt.
Practically speaking, this means that someone with
a $47,000 homestead property will only get an exemption
on the first $25,000. And someone with a property val-
ued at $58,000 will only get a $33,000 exemption, consist-
ing of the first $25,000, plus the $8,000 of assessed value
above $50,000. And again, any amount over $75,000 will
not qualify for exemptions.
That being clear, there is one additional stipulation.
The first $25,000 exemption applies to all levy categories.
However, the additional $25,000 of qualified exemption
is not exempt from school district levies. In fact, one
will notice other new exemptions in the package do not
apply to school district levies either.
TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY
Farmers have tractors, retailers have cash registers;
the first $25,000 of assessed value of these types of prop-
erty, and any property subject to the Tangible Personal
Property Tax, shall be exempt from ad valorem taxation,
including school district levies.
PORTABILITY
Homesteaded homeowners will be allowed to trans-
fer their "Save Our Homes" benefit, up to $500,000, to a
new home (reduced from the original $1 million). This
new exemption applies to all levies, including school dis-
trict levies. Special note: one should take care to accu-
rately determine the value being ported.
CAP ON NON-HOMESTEAD REAL PROPERTY
The reform package sets a 10 percent cap on in-
creases in the assessment of non-homestead real prop-
erty The cap does not apply to assessments of tangible
personal property and does not apply to school levies.
Determining a position on the amendment will be
left to each voter, and certainly one should consult a li-
censed practitioner regarding accounting and taxes if
applicable. This review is simply offered as a first step
to understanding the January 29 proposal. And again,
huge thanks to Madison County Property Appraiser,
Leigh Barfield, and staff for their education about these
and all key issues affecting residents of Madison Coun-
ty


November 29
The Perrys of Morristown, Tennessee will be in con-
ceft at Macedonia Baptist Church Thursday, November
29, at 7 p.m. Admission is free, however a love offering
will be received during the concert.
December 7
Benny Daniels presents .his Third Annual Holiday
Gospel Sing with The Diamonds, Gandy Brothers, Col-
bert and Joyce Croft, ,and Bro. Benny Daniels. Admis-
sion is free. The concert will take place at Yogi Bear's
Jellystone Park in Madison starting at 7 p.m. For more
information, please call (850) 519-1613.
December 9
The Dixie Echoes will be in concert at Bible Deliver-
ance Church on December 9, starting at 6 p.m. Admis-
sion is free, but a love offering will be received during
the concert. For more information, please call (850) 973-
4622 or (850) 973-6596.
Every Tuesday Saturday
The Diamonds in the Ruff Adoption Program at the
Suwannee Valley Humane Society is open every Tues-.
day through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is located
on 1156 S.E Bisbee Loop Madison FL, 32340. For a
healthy lifestyle, adopt an animal and they will make
your life more fulfilled. For more information or direc-
tions call (866) 236-7812 or (850) 971-9904.
Third Tuesday of Each Month
The Greater Greenville Area Diabetes Support
Group is a free educational service and support for dia-
betes and those wanting to prevent diabetes. The group
meets the third Tuesday of each month at the Greenville
'Public Library Conference Room at 312 SW Church
Street, Greenville, 11 11:30 a.m. Everyone is welcome!
Third Wednesday of Each Month
The Madison County Health Education Club is hold-
ing a free educational service and support group for peo-
ple interested in preventing or controlling diabetes,
high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol levels, obesity,
and other chronic health conditions. The club meets the
third Wednesday of each month at the Madison Public
Library Conference Room at 378 NW College Loop,
Madison, 12:15 12:45 p.m. Everyone is welcome to bring
their own lunch!
Third Wednesday of Each Month
The Madison County Diabetes Support Group is a
free educational service and support group for diabetes
-and those wanting to prevent diabetes. The group meets
the third Wednesday of each month at the Madison Pub-
lic Library Conference Room at 378 NW College Loop,
Madison, 11:45 a.m. 12:10 p.m. Everyone is welcome is
bring their own lunch! Details: contact Marcia Kazmier-
ski at 386-752-2461 or Lorraine Miller at 386-752-6439.
Fourth Wednesday of Each Month
An informational meeting for those injured and
needing help returning to work will be held the fourth
Wednesday of each month from 12-3 p.m. at the Madison
County Extension Office located on 184 College Loop.
The meeting is free and open to the public. For more in-
formation, please call (850) 245-3489.


FOK SALE



Fill DiN &aTOp Soil


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Wednesday, November 21, 2007 www.2reenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS






Pictures ..
Limelight

SColumist H '- ^
Ci -.o. tw-nn .-l-,6a...:


Happy Thanksgiving

I hope that everyone has a blessed Thanksgiving and
gets lots of food and goodies. If you are traveling this
week, please stay safe and sober. Also, be careful if you
are out hunting.
Happy birthday wishes are extended to Tim Cline on
Wednesday, November 21, and to Roger Kinard, Lynn
Wyche and David Quackenbush on Thursday, November
22. Karissa Kervin, Lori Blount, Janice Flowers and An-
nie Laura Thomas celebrate their birthdays on Sunday,
November 25. Suzanne Lasseter and Gail Nagel cele-
brate their birthdays on Monday, November 26. Mary
Raines, Sharon Cressley and Joyce Taylor celebrate
their birthdays on Tuesday, November 27.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week
and a beautiful forever! May God bless each and every
one of you!





Arthur V. Strock vs. Gardien Jean and Marie A.
Jean-mortgage foreclosure
Shaloucha S. McDonald and DOR vs. Elshaunti
Ivory-support
Ericka D. McNair and DOR vs. Ronald L. Hicks-sup-
port
NRLL East, LLC vs. Peter Amariel-mortgage fore-
closure
LaSalle Bank vs. Katie Nixon and O'Neal Nixon-
mortgage foreclosure
TB&W Mortgage Corporation vs. Mary Frances
Mauldin-mortgage foreclosure
Annie M. Barfield vs. Madison County School
Board-other civil
Priscilla S. Craddock and DOR vs. Lorenza Cherry,
Jr.-other domestic
Paula Cox and DOR vs. William Yarbrough-UIFSA
Joyce Hazzard and DOR vs. Michael Moore-UIFSA


Did You Know...
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.


Did you know that most people
fall asleep in seven minutes?

SE MI Cont from page 1A

the median.
Martinez overcorrected her steering in an attempt
to come back onto the roadway. The trailer began to list
to the left side as the semi came back onto the Interstate.
Martinez attempted to regain control of the semi,
but could not, since the trailer had already turned onto
its left side. The rig was partially jackknifed as Mar-
tinez continued out of control for about a mile.
The semi fully overturned onto its left side before
coming to a final rest in the wooded median of 1-10.
Madison County Sheriff's Department assisted with
traffic control and the Fish and Wildlife Commission
helped on scene. Greenville Fire and Rescue also assist-
ed.
The estimated damage done to the 2004 Peterbilt
Semi driven by Sandra Martinez was approximately
$20,000. Martinez suffered minor injuries. According to
Sergeant Charlie Dickey of the Madison County Sher-
iff's Office, the trailer was carrying approximately 90
cattle bound for slaughter. He said that 20 of the cows
were killed in the crash, while the remaining 70 were
loaded onto another rig.


Missionary
Ridge is a six-
mile long ridge- National
line that begins
in North Georgia Security
and extends
northward Joe Boyles
across the border Guest Columnist
into Tennessee.
It lies just to the "-- -
east of Chat-
tanooga and over-
looks the city from a height of several
hundred feet. On a clear day, the vistas
from Missionary Ridge are simply spec-
tacular, particularly at sunset. It is a
tranquil place.
'It was a different story 144 years ago
on the afternoon of November,25,, 1863.
Two months before, the Confederate
Army of Tennessee had routed the
Union Army of the Cumberland at
Chickamauga. Now they overlooked the
Yankees who, with the Tennessee River
at their backs, faced starvation.
Sensing danger, President Lincoln
rushed his best generals and their troops
to reinforce the beleaguered forces of
General George Thomas. From the west
came Ulysses Grant and William Sher-
man. From the east came Joseph Hook-
er and Phillip Sheridan. Thomas would
get all the help he needed.
The defense of Chattanooga was crit-
ical to the Union strategy There were
only two routes for a large Union army
to attack the Confederacy The eastern
(1-95) corridor was blocked by Robert E.
Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. The
gateway to the western corridor through
the Tennessee Valley was Chattanooga.
The Appalachians blocked any other
route that 19th Century horse-drawn lo-
gistics would permit.
Just days before, Hooker's corps had
forced the Confederate batteries that
commanded river traffic from Lookout
Mountain. Now Grant turned his atten-
tion to the 44 thousand Confederates un-
der Braxton Bragg that invested the
heights of Missionary Ridge.
Grant held back Thomas' forces in
the center and pushed his flanks forward
in the attack. On the right or southern
flank, Hooker bogged down in a series of
bridge crossings. Sherman attacked on
the left or northern flank but ran into
stiff resistance from Hardee's corps.
Sherman asked for relief in the form of
a demonstration on another part. of the
front.
Grant ordered forward Thomas'
Army of the Cumberland to attack Con-
federate rifle pits at the foot of Mission-
ary Ridge. Now, the Cumberland boys
were spoiling for a fight they had been
on the receiving end of ridicule from
Sherman and Hooker's troops who had


Hamburg-Lovett Fire


Department Holds


Annual Peanut Boil

A picture of contentment David Pa
i,- left, and Mike Register smiling
-' gooooood peanuts at the Hamburg-Lo
annual peanut boiling.


7
w.'.
~Jti


aulk,
over
Dvett


Madison County Carrier Photo, August 23, 1997


imda Press Associ,.

2007

Award Winning Newspaper








P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Website:
www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
Sports _
news@greenepublishing.com
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
Classifieds/Legals
susan@greenepubflshing.com
PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene KIinsley
AssocATE PUBLISHER
Ted Ensminger
EDITOR
Jacob Bembry
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Lisa Greele
SrAFF WRITERS
Michael Curtis and
Jessica Higginbothain
GRAPHIC DESIGNER
Heather Bowen
TYPESE TER/S UBSCRIPIIONS
Bnrni Thigpen
AID\ERTISING
SALES EPRESENTATIVTS
Mary Ellen Greene.
Doroihv McKinney,
Jeanne Dund and Lenie Sexton
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Deadline for classieds is Monday
at 300pm
Deadline for Legal Advertisement is
Monday at 5pm.
There will be a'3" charge for Affidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Sheree Miller
SuastRcmToN RArIs:
In County $28 Out-of-Couny $35
(State & local axes included)

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the
right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the matn-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene
Publishing, Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


come to their
rescue. At about
4 PM, the Army
of the Cumber-
land moved for-
ward from their
positions to at-
tack.


SJ Quickly,
they overcame
--.'.-.-- the skirmishers
that Bragg had
sent to the pits at the base of Mission-
ary Ridge, and then, an amazing thing
happened with no orders to do so,
they kept moving forward, now climb-
ing up Missionary Ridge.
The Union commanders had lost
control of their troops. As Grant and
his generals tried in vain to sort out the
situation, the troops kept attacking on
their own. Regiment after regiment, 20
thousand strong, rushed up the ridge
line. Who would reach the summit
first?
Eye-witness accounts and histori-
ans generally agree that the race to the
summit was won by the 24th Wisconsin.
Following the colors of the unit banner
wasn't easy the first two standard
bearers were killed. The third man to
grasp the colors was really a boy 18
year old Arthur MacArthur of Milwau-
kee. To the call of "On Wisconsin," the
soldiers of the 24th followed their young
adjutant to a point about a hundred feet
from Braxton Bragg's headquarters.
By now, Confederate resistance was
melting, and the Army of Tennessee re-
treated from Missionary Ridge to the
east. All along the ridge, colors of
Union regiments popped up to the
cheers of blue-clad soldiers. After them
scrambled their commanders trying to
make sense of what had happened.
The Union victory at Missionary
Ridge had a profound impact upon the
war and afterward. It opened the back
door to the Confederacy that Sherman
was able to exploit in 1864. The generals
at Chattanooga all went on to distin-
guish themselves in other theaters and
other pursuits and one of them became
the 18th president. And Arthur
MacArthur grew up, married, and had
two sons, the second whom he named
Douglas who would go .on to eclipse the
many accomplishments of his father.
Today, a drive along Crest Road
takes a visitor from north to south
along the heights of Missionary Ridge.
The carnage of war has been replaced
with gracious homes. There are monu-
ments along the road and in yards that
mark the placement of units and com-
memorate their losses. Great things
were contested on this hallowed ground
and great things were accomplished.


~S Li ~i V~r~i~c 1c c~ 1 rz e ws r cm lhi e!

VI TV VT - .1.


-.M. .. -, .-


~-


i11


., wwg--,-- -- -. -


Missionary Ridge








4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishin2.com Wednesday, November 21, 2007



LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


Internet Predators Arrested As Part Of


Multi-Agency "Operation Travelin' Man"


The Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement,
in partnership with local,
state and federal agencies,
recently arrested four men
as part of an undercover
operation created to arrest
Internet predators who
target children for sex.
Dozens more remain un-


Gree Inb h .Inc


der active investigation.
The multi-agency ini-
tiative, dubbed "Operation
Travelin' Man," began in
early October after orga-
nizers from participating
agencies put together a
plan for identifying inter-
net predators who infil-
trate chat rooms for the
purpose of targeting un-
derage children or meet-
ing "dirty parents," adults
willing to allow predators
to engage in sex with their
underage children.
"The investigators
from each agency involved
in Travelin' Man did an ex-
cellent job," said FDLE
Commissioner Gerald Bai-
ley "Dirty parents and
predators should note
these agents and officers
are vigilant and commit-
ted."
Agencies involved in
Operation Travelin' Man
include FDLE, the Florida
Attorney General's Cyber-


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850-973-6134


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386-755-9753
Jasper Store
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Crime Unit, U.S. Attor-
ney's Office, Tallahassee
Police Department, Leon
County Sheriff's Office,
U.S. Marshal's Service,
State Attorney's Office
(2nd Judicial Circuit) and
the Florida Highway Pa-
trol.
"Every time agencies
exhibit this type of coop-
erative approach to com-
bat Internet child preda-
tors, more exhaustive re-
sources are available to
target this deplorable
crime," said Attorney
General Bill McCollum.
"Cybercrime knows no
geographical boundaries,
therefore we must work to-
gether to more effectively
protect our children from
this devastating form of
sexual exploitation."
The operation utilized
agents and investigative
personnel trained within
Internet Crimes Against
Children/ (ICAC) guide-
lines to chat online with
suspected predators. Pos-
ing undercover as under-
age children or parents
with underage children,
law enforcement officials
arranged to meet with
four subjects, all of whom
were soliciting sex. with
children.
Four individuals were
arrested during the first
week of the operation
when they traveled to the
designated meeting place.


Two of them traveled
to Tallahassee from Orlan-
do and Rutledge, Georgia;
one was a Tallahassee res-
ident. The fourth man was
arrested in Tennessee by
FBI agents working in co-
operation with the opera-
tion.
Arrested during the
initial phase of the opera-
tion were:
-Mohammed All Liton,
26, Orlando
-Jonathan David Duke:
45, Rutledge, Georgia
-Charles S. Faris, III,
54, Tallahassee
-Bobby Albert McGee,
62, Linden, Tennessee
All were held under
federal detention and are
facing federal charges of
using an interstate facility
(the Internet) to coerce
and entice a person under
18 to engage in illicit sexu-
al conduct. If convicted,
each could face a mini-
mum of 10 years in prison
and a maximum of life in
prison, as well as fines up
to $250,000. Additionally,
Jonathan Duke is charged
with interstate travel with
intent to engage in illicit
sexual conduct, punish-
able by a maximum of 30
years in prison and a
$250,000 fine.
Investigations into
other solicitations are con-
tinuing and more arrests
are anticipated.


Madison County

3 CRIME BEAT

-ALL SUSPECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED INNOCENT
UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY IN A COURT OF LAW

Man Arrested For Petit Theft
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc. 90.
According to the Madison 7
Police Department, on No- o80
member 11, Vinson Emmanuel
Allen was arrested for petit
theft. Patrolman David 70
Jarvis was dispatched to aid .
convenience store in refer-
ence to a theft of cigarettes.
After speaking with the clerk,
it was discovered that the
suspected thief was Allen.
A local "be on the lookout" Vinson Emmanuel Allen
was issued via the radio, and
Deputy Jason Whitfield found Allen riding a bicycle down
Brooklyn Street. Whitfield also discovered that Allen had
active warrants. Allen apparently took off onfoot and ran
through the Woods headed toward Happy Street.
Units closed in on the area, and Allen was found in the
woods close to Happy Street. Allen was arrested and
transported to the county jail.

Man Flees To Avoid Arrest After Theft
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc...
According to the Madison
Police Department, on No-
vember 11, Rudolph Marshall .
was arrested for petit theft
and resisting arrest without
violence.
Corporal Chris Cooks wasj
dispatched to the Fast Track
in reference to a theft. He
was advised that the suspect
was a black male, wearing a
black cap, and riding a bike. Rudolph Marshall
The officer noticed a black
male riding a bike on Bunker Street.
When Cooks attempted to make contact with Marshall,
he fled on the bike.. Before; apprehending Marshall, ,Cooks.
noticed that while he was running, he was attempting to
pull items from under his jacket and discard them.
A bottle of Old Spice body wash and two packs of
steaks were recovered. When Marshall was apprehended,
he stated that he took the items from Harvey's. Marshall
was arrested and transported to the county jail.


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Wednesday, November 21, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


In Loving Memory Of

Our Dear Father And Grandfather

Mr. A.C. Akins, Sr.
Sometimes it is difficult to understand why some-
things have to be,
- But in His wisdom. God has planned beyond our pow-
. er to see.
-. 'So looking back in tenderness along the path we trod,
We cherish the years we had with you, and leave the rest
to God.
We love you dad, and granddad. and we will always re-
member and treasure those special moments.

Your children and grandchildren


B y Bete Bud ir,
madismcm City
Sheriff,


Benjamin Rogers Davis Sr.
Benjamin Rogers Davis Sr., 81, formerly of Talla-
hassee, Florida, died at his Ormond Beach home on Vet-
erans Day, November 12, 2007. He was a WWII Veteran
and one of two surviving Navy "frogmen" (Underwater
Demolition Team) currently known as the Navy Seals..
His service culminated in the Pacific Theater at the
end of the war as part.of the first group to land from an
LST in Tokyo Harbor after the Japanese surrender. Pri-
or to his Navy service, he attended Bolles Military
Academy in Jacksonville, FL. After WWII, he attended
Florida State University and was a charter member of
Theta Chi Fraternity, graduating from Auburn Univer-
sity with a BS in Agricultural Science.
Although retiring from the State of Florida with 20
years of service, his notable career included Agricul-
tural Land Development Manager for Ayavalla Planta-
tion, the Sugar Ranch, and the King Ranch, as well as a
Certified Life Underwriter. He was also active in the
successful political campaigns of Florida Gov. Ferris
Bryant, Sec. of State Tom Adams, Sec. of Agriculture
Doyle Conner, Comptroller Fred "Bud" Dickinson, and
Gov. Reuben Askew. He served as a State Vice President
and National Director of the Florida Jaycee's, a mem-
ber. of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie 3800 Or-
mond Beach since 1993, the Loyal Order of Moose Day-
tona Beach Lodge 1263 since 1995 and a 45 year member
of the Elks Club. He was also Vice President of Van-
guard Commercial Realty, Ormond Beach and Tallahas-
see.
Born in Miami, reared in Madison, he was the son
of the late Dr. George 0. and Elida Bergstrom Davis. A
passionate outdoorsman, -he loved teaching about Flori-
da history and family, wildlife, navigating various
streams, rivers and lakes, outdoor sports, and hunting
and fishing. He passed this along to his cousin's Char-
lie and Bob McClure and his nephew George Davis ear-
lier in their lives and later to his own children and
grandchildren as well.
Ben, "Pop" to more than just his children, is sur-
vived by his former wife of 43 years, June Jensen Davis
of Tallahassee and Holly Hill; daughter Sarah Davis
Vandagriff and Oliver her husband; son Benjamin R.
Davis Jr. and Mary Beth, his wife; daughter Margaret
* "Missy" Davis Whiddon and her husband "Dr. Scottie;"
daughter Kathryn Davis Dilworth and her husband
James; Son-in-law Phil Carter of Tallahassee, grand-
children Brian Carter and wife Krystal of Bainbridge,
Ga.; John Vandagriff of Tallahassee and Ormond
Beach; James and Christine Dilworth of Tallahassee;
Travis Carter of Tallahassee; Crystal Davis of Ormond
Beach; great-grandchild Clayton Carter of Bainbridge,
Ga; a nephew George 0. Davis Jr. of Beaufort S.C.; and
cousins Robert and Charles McClure of Tallahassee.
A memorial service will be held at Lohman Funeral
Home, Ormond Beach, at 1 p.m., Friday, November 16,
2007. Funeral services will be held at St. Johns Episco-
pal Church, Tallahassee, at 3:30 pm, Sunday, November
18, where he was a member since 1964. Interment will
be at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may
be made to the Kiwanis Club of Daytona Beach Foun-
dation for Local Children, PO Box 4235, Ormond Beach,
FL 32175, MooseHeart or to West Florida Teen Chal-
lenge, a Christian Mission to help youth with life-con-
trolling -problems become established in society
through faith-based men-
vitit 1,i touring, counseling, educa-
r a ,tion and job training, 1213
N1 iii i v ipp1" Hope Lane, Bonifay FL
32425. Condolences may be
shared with the family on-
339 1IS tIW ,I ,I FR line at


www.lohmanfuneral-
homes.com.


David Carlton

Johns
David Carlton Johns,
age 46, died November 16,
2007 in Texas.
Funeral services will
be Wednesday, November
21, 2007 at 2 p.m. at Madi-
son Church of God, Madi-
son, Fl. The family will re-
ceive friends one hour pri-
or to the service from 1-2
p.m..
Donations may be
made to Madison Church
of God, 771 NE Colin Kelly
Hwy, Madison, Fl. 32340.
He was born in West
Palm Beach. He was em-
ployeed by Walmart and
was a member of Madison
Church of God, Madison,
and the Christian Motorcy-
cle Assoc. *
He is survived by his
wife, Jackie Johns; one
son, John Henry Johns;
mother, Phyllis Johns;
three brothers, Bryant
Johns, Charlie Johns, and
Paul Ritzau; two sisters,
Debbie Bryant, and Erika
Ratcliffe, and numerous
nieces and nephews.
He is proceeded in
death by his father, Lester
Bryant Johns.


We would like to ex-
press our deepest appre-
ciation to all our friends
who made the passing of
our Mama (Grandma) a
little easier with their
expressions of thought-
fulness. All of the
prayers, personal visits,
phone calls, cards and
food during this time
helped more than words
can express. The beauti-
ful flowers and the
memorial Bible dona-
tions were especially
thoughtful.
We would like to
thank everyone for the
support they showed our
family during this diffi-
cult time. Again, every-
one please accept our
warmest thanks for
everything that you did
during this heartbreak-
ing time in our lives.

With Thanks,
The Family of
Mrs. Emma Lou Brooks


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6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 21, 2007



AROUND MADISON COUNTY



Winn-Dixie Offers Free Rotary Club Has Busy Meeting

Milk To Customers

t- -g' 1me


Beginning today, and
running through Tuesday,
January 1, Winn-Dixie
shoppers will receive one
free gallon of Winn-Dixie
whole, low-fat, or fat-free
milk for every five gallons
purchased.
"We are committed to
providing our customers
with the best possible val-
ue when shopping their
neighborhood Winn-Dix-
ie," said Robin Miller,
Winn-Dixie's director of
communications.
"In these times of eco-
nomic pressure, this is
just one more way for us
to save our customers


money on a product so vi-
tal to the health of their
families."
Customers will re-
ceive a coupon for one
free gallon of Winn-Dixie
milk after every purchase
of five gallons when they
use their Customer Re-
ward Card. After the pur-
chase of the fifth gallon, a
special code will print on
their receipt entitling
them to receive the sixth
gallon free. Receipts may
be redeemed through
Tuesday, January 15.
This offer is valid in all
Winn-Dixie and Save-Rite
stores in Alabama, Flori-
da, Georgia and Missis-
sippi.
Winn-Dixie Stores,
Inc., is one of the nation's
largest food retailers,
with 521 stores. Founded
in 1925, the company is
headquartered in Jack-
sonville, Florida.
For more informa-
tion, please visit
www. winn-dixie. com.


Photo Submitted
Rotarians were inducted into the Paul Harris Fellowship. Pictured left to right are: Bob Earnest, Ron Bass, Mor-
ris Steen, Alston Kelley, Ed, Meggs, Joe Boyles and Lee FerDon.

. T -7


Photo Submitted
Alston Kelley (right) presents a $250 donation to
Rev. Deron Gillespie in support of TeenChallenge of Talla-
hassee.


The first Wednesday in
November was a busy
noon hour for the Madison
Rotary Club. Ivan John-
son, the District Rotary
Foundation Chair, was on
hand to present a very spe-
cial award to in-coming
President-Elect, Alston
Kelley Kelley was induct-
ed into the Rotary Bequest
Society and received a
beautiful crystal award.
In a related incident,
six Rotarians were induct-
ed. into the Paul Harris
Fellowship. They were:
Ron Bass, Bob Earnest, Ed
Meggs, Joe Boyles, Morris
Steen and Lee FerDon.
Monies received in the
Paul Harris Fellowship go
to assist people all around
the world. While these Ro-
tarians have been con-


tributing to the Paul Har-
ris Fellowship for several
years, it was the generosi-
ty of Alston Kelley in
sharing his "extra" points
that enabled these men to
receive this honor at this
time.
Guest speaker for the
Rotary Club was the Rev.
Deron Gillespie, the Exec-
utive Director of Teen-
Challenge in Tallahassee.
TeenChallenge is a non-
profit organization found-
ed by David Wilkerson of
"Cross & the Switchblade"
fame and has over 300 cen-
ters across tha nation for
the treatment of drug
abuse. The program is
normally a year long and
boasts an 86% success
rate. There are separate
centers for boys, girls, men


Photo Submitted
Ivan Johnson, right, presented Alston Kelley, left,
with the Rotary Bequest Society Award. It was a beauti-
ful crystal keepsake.


and women. The Tallahas-
see program is for men
only at this time, although
expansion of the program
is in the overall plan.
Three Madison Coun-
ty residents currently sit
on the Board of TeenChal-
lenge Tallahassee. They.
are Alston Kelley and Mr.
and Mrs. Ed Meggs. The
Madison Rotary Club con-
tributed $250 toward the
work of this important
ministry
Sargeant-at-arms Jar-
go Clark, a past district
governor, introduced Roy
Million, Bill Roberts,
Mike Curtis and the Rev.
Bob Laidlaw as guests of
the Madison Rotary Club.
A Rotary Executive
Board decision, which met
prior to the regular meet-
ing, elected to increase its
annual gift to the Salva-
tion Army and the Rotary
Youth Camp to $1,000 each.
Each year, the Madi-
son Rotary Club supports
many wonderful organiza-
tions in north Florida
such as: NFCC Scholar-
ship, Needy Families Pro-
gram, Madison County Ed-
ucation Foundation,
North Florida Livestock
Show, Project Graduation,
Madison County High
School Boosters, the
Southern Scholarship
Foundation, the Salvation


Army, and the Rotary
Youth Camp.
The next Rotary Club
fund-raiser will be a giant
Yard Sale during the Four
Freedoms Festival. Be
sure to look for them. ".


Considering Bonds?

Be Aware of "Call Risk"
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones
When you buy a bond, it's yours until you sell it or
it matures, right? Not always. Sometimes, the bond
issuer can buy it back early. If that happens, your invest-
ment strategies can change so you'll want to be pre-
pared to take action.
Why would a bond issuer buy back, or "call," a
bond? The answer is pretty straightforward: to save
money. When market interest rates drop, the issuer,
such as a corporation, or state or local government (vir-
tually all U.S. Treasury bonds are not callable) may
decide to call its bonds, pay off bondholders like you,
then reissue new bonds at the lower rates, thereby sav-
ing money on interest payments and depriving you of
a high-yielding asset.
At first glance, this scenario may not look particu-
larly favorable, but you're not quite as vulnerable as you
might think. First, "callable" bonds, because they con-
tain the risk of being cashed in early, may offer a high-
er interest rate than comparable, but non-callable,
bonds. Also, some issuers may pay you a "call premi-
um" such as one year's worth of interest when they
call your bond.
How can you know if a bond can be called? Before
you buy a bond, check its specific terms, which are set
forth in its indenture the written agreement between
the bond issuer and the bondholders. These terms
include the bond's interest rate, maturity rate and other
terms such as call provisions. Some bonds are "freely
callable," which means they can be redeemed anytime.
However, you can avoid unpleasant surprises by
buying a bond that cannot be called that is, a bond that
offers "call protection" for a given period of time. For
example, if you buy a bond whose first call is three
years from now, you'll be able to take advantage of your
bond's interest rate for at least three years, regardless of
market rate movements. (Some bonds, called "bullet
bonds," cannot be called at all. Bullet bonds, like other
bonds with call protection, are typically more expensive
- i.e., they pay lower interest rates than callable
bonds.)
Nonetheless, you may not always be able to find the
bonds you want with call protection. And if you own a
bond that is currently callable and pays more than
newer bonds of identical quality, you may well get a
call in the near future. You should be prepared for bond
calls well before they occur. To help .protect your port-
folio from call risk, you may want to create a "bond lad-
der." To build a bond ladder, you buy bonds with vary-
ing maturity and call dates. Then, if some of your bonds
are called, you'll still have other bonds with many years
left until maturity; some of these bonds may still enjoy
call protection. So, while some of your bonds may still
be at risk of being called, your bond ladder can help
provide you with some overall portfolio stability.
You can't prevent a bond call but if you know it
may be coming, you can at least be poised to take pos-
itive action.

Brad Bashaw EdwardJones
Investment Representative -. .
114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334 -
wwwedwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


UVv'f ('p4tike A eiu re!
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Wednesday, November 21, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY




www.WherelsMadison.com


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Knock, Knock: Who's
There?...the Internet, web
sites, and the credibility to
deal with public and pri-
vate commerce every-
where, that's who.
Every child is learning
about it; every one of them,
without exception. Mil-
lions of adults and chil-
dren everywhere already
run around with a portable
machine called a laptop so
they can access it anytime,
any place.
Better yet, it's super
cheap now. The bottom
line is that if the Internet
and a unique website has
any use for one's personal
or business life, then not
using it is about as sensible
as riding a horse to work.
Seriously let's face it, one
could still get around on a
horse, but at the end of the
day it smells, and you have
to clean up after it.
.And lastly, and serious-
ly, if anyone thinks the In-
ternet is a passing fad like


the poodle skirt, or may be-
come obsolete like the
eight track, or should be


avoided like drug use,
there are one and a half
billion people, that's bil-


lion with a "b," who would
disagree. That's the num-
ber of people worldwide,


:~


iiV 4--: -


--- .1 i


1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Y ijl *2~ :~ 'i ;


IF 1 "GOOGLED" HEAVEN

WOULD YOU BE IN THE RESULTS

SELECT JESUS TO CONFIRM !


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, November 12, 2007
Demonstrating the popularity of the Internet, the Faith Baptist Church sign displays
a message referring to Internet giant Google.


including professional,
government, retail, farm-
ers, and more than twenty
million kids in America
alone, who are on the Inter-
net daily And where do
they all go? They all go'to
somebody's web site.
But what about a local
gas station, they don't need
a web site do they? And
what about the, "I'm too
old, or too set in my ways,
to change or need the In-
ternet?" Well, to this
crowd please know this re-
port was not intended to
blindly promote the Inter-
net.


There are cautions,
just like those for music,
television or driving a car
that should be considered.
There are fears of be-
ing targeted for scams, and
pornography, identity
theft; the list goes on and
on. But frankly, and not to
abuse the driving example,
it's as simple as learning
how to safely operate your
"electronic" vehicle on the
"electronic" highway


Dennis Roberts Receives


Florida Cross And Legion Of Merit


Amorfg websites, there
are a variety .of ways to
construct them. The goal
is to have a site that is easy
.to navigate and conveys
the desired message. If ad-
vertising is involved, ad-
vertiser preferences
should be considered.
Mostly though, especially
in the case of public, or
quasi-public entities pro-
moting Madison, like the
Chamber of Commerce for
instance, it is all about
credibility and being pre-
pared.


begin Jan.7
Madison, Fla.
menr and women
encouraged to apply

* Learn building trades
* Learn carpentry skills
* Certification in one year
* On-the-job training
*Financial aid (a )


Lieutenant Coionel
Dennis Roberts of Lake
City was recently awarded
the Florida Cross, the high-
est award given by the
Florida National Guard,
andthe U.S. Army Legion
of Merit, which is the sec-
ond highest non-combat
award given by the U.S.
Army The criteria for both
of the awards requires ex-
ceptional and meritorious
conduct by a key individual
over a significant amount
of time above and beyond
the performance of expect-
ed duties.
Roberts is serving his
fifth term as Public Defend-
er for the Third Judicial
Circuit, which includes
Madison County His broth-
er & sister-in-law, Bill and
Barbara Roberts, are long-
time residents of Madison
County. Roberts served as
Madison School District
Superintendent of Schools.
Colonel Roberts re-
ceived the awards during
his retirement ceremony at
Florida National Guard
Headquarters in St. Augus-
tine, Florida from Major
General Douglas Burnett,
the Adjutant General of
the State of Florida. Gener-
al Burnett remarked:
"Colonel Roberts has
excelled in all military as-
signments arid is the 'con-
summate example of a Cit-
izen/Soldier.' Colonel
Roberts is the only Judge
Advocate General (JAG)


wno nas served as eiiner
Staff Judge Advocate or
Deputy Staff Judge Advo-
cate at all five Florida Na-
tional Guard Major Com-
mands. Colonel Roberts
has tried more cases than
any other JAG officer in
the Florida National Guard
to this point. He has also as-
sisted the Florida Air Na-
tional Guard, serving as
both a prosecutor and de-
fense counsel. He was in-
valuable during times of
State Mobilization during
numerous hurricanes and
wildfires. The legal ser-
vices provided such as
wills, trusts and re-employ-
ment rights to Guard mem-
bers and their families,
sent the troops off with
peace of mind concerning
their legal issues.
"The fact he was able to
have a distinguished and
highly decorated military.
career while having a de-
manding civilian job, in ad-
dition to serving his com-
munity in numerous lead-
ership capacities, speaks to
the type individual he is. I
know his wife and chil-
dren, and they reflect an
outstanding Florida Guard
family We are proud that
he has been a fellow soldier,
colleague and most impor-
tantly, a friend, to the Flori-
da National Guard."
The Florida Bar previ-
*ously recognized Colonel
Roberts as the "Outstand-
ing Military Lawyer" and


was the first Florida Na-
tional Guard JAG to re-
ceive this award. He also re-
ceived the 1999 "Outstand-
ing Career Senior Guard
Attorney" award in Wash-
ington, D.C. from the Na-
tional Judge Advocate's As-
sociation.
Colonel Roberts began
his military career in 1968
at age 18 by enlisting in the
United States Marine
Corps, where he achieved
the rank of Corporal. He
served one-year overseas
duty with the 3rd Marine
Division and was awarded
an Honorable Discharge in
1974. In 1977 he enlisted in.
the Florida National Guard
at the 153rd Engineer Com-
pany Lake City, Florida. He
was selected for Officer
Candidate School at the
Florida National Guard
Military Academy and was
Commissioned a 2nd Lieu-
tenant in 1978. He then
completed the U.S. Army
Officer Infantry Course in
Ft. Benning, Georgia and
served as a Platoon Leader
with the 631st Maintenance
Co. in Starke, Florida.
Upon graduating from
the University of Florida
School of Law, Colonel
Roberts made a Branch
transfer from Infantry to
JAG Corps and was one of
the first four National


Guardsmen in the country
to attend the Active Compo-
nent JAG Course at the
University of Virginia. He
is also a graduate of the
U.S. Army Command and
General Staff College in Ft.
Leavenworth, Kansas.
Colonel Roberts has
served as the Chief or
Deputy Chief JAG to the
General Staff at the five
Florida Major Commands:
Tampa Infantry; Miami -
Support and Mainte-
nance; Orlando Air De-.
fense Artillery; St. Augus-
tine Headquarters; and
Tallahassee Troop Com-
mand.
In civilian life, Colonel
Roberts serves as the
elected Public Defender
for the seven counties of
the Third Judicial Circuit
as well as Chair of the
Justice Administrative
Commission in Tallahas-
see, Florida. He is active
in numerous civic and
professional organiza-
tions including service as
President of numerous or-
ganizations, including the
Chamber of Commerce,'
the Third Judicial Circuit
Bar Association, the Lake
City Rotary Club, CARC
and three tours as Com-
manding General of the
Blue/Grey Army.
Colonel Roberts and


his wife Tina have three Bu,,digcst, c, e,
children, Dennille Fol- T-u "
som, Daniel Roberts and 1| 1fI
Dianna Roberts.


Big Bend Hospice
and the
Madison County
Advisory Council
invite you to attend the


Tuesday, Nov. 27
5:30 PM'
Madison County
Community Bank
Madison

Come light a candle and honor a,
loved one. This time of healing
and remembrance is open to
everyone. A reception will follow
the service.

Big Bend
o Hospice

For more info, call 566-7491.


I









8A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 21, 2007



BRIDAL GUIDE





0-o.S mm


\ OF


p.


bbev- B3rysi~t-

To- W ed


Wedding Day Flowers


The carrying of flowers
by the bride has its roots in
ancient times when it was be-
lieved that strong smelling
herbs and spices would ward
off and drive away evil spir-
its, bad luck and ill health.
Garlic and chives were also
popular for the same reason.
During Roman times,
this tradition was extended,
with the bride and groom
wearing floral garlands signi-
fying new life and hope for
fertility The bouquet in par-
ticular symbolized a woman
in bloom. During Victorian
times, flowers took on an ad-
ditional significance as
lovers would send messages
to each other using different
flowers, with each flower
having its own meaning.
These associations were soon
adopted for the bride's bou-
quet and are still used today


by many brides. The most
popular flowers with their
traditional meanings are:
Apple Blossom Better
things to come
Camelia Gratitude
Carnation Fascination and
love
Chrysanthemum (white) -
Truth
Cyclamen Modesty and
shyness
Daffodil Regard
Daisy Innocence
Fern Fascination and sin-
cerity
Flowering Almond Hope
Forget-me-not True love
and remembrance
Heliotrope Devotion and
faithfulness
Honeysuckle Generosity
Hyacinth Loveliness
Hydrangea Boastfulness
Iris Warmth of affection
Ivy Eternal fidelity


Japonica Loveliness
Jasmine Amiability
Lemon Blossom Fidelity
in love
Lilac (white) Youthful in-
nocence
Lily Majesty
Lily-of-the-valley Return
of happiness
Magnolia Perseverance
Maidenhair Discretion
Mimosa Sensitivity
Orange Blossom Purity
and virginity
Peach Blossom Captive
Rose (red) Love
Rose (white) Worthiness
Rose (other colors) Love
and beauty
Rosemary Remembrance
Snowdrop Hope
Sweet,Pea Delicate plea-
sures
Tulip Love ..
Veronica Fidelity
Violet Faithfulness


Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow McAbee of South Carolina
announce the engagement of their daughter, Kimber-
ly McAbee of Jacksonville to Johnathan Bryant of
London, England.
The wedding will take place in Madison, the home
of Kim's grandmother, Shirley Snyder, at St. Vincent
de Paul's Catholic Church on Saturday, November 24,
2007.
The couple will reside in Jacksonville.
Quality Clearners
""'fztr C-isrn rri Dry-V C.'leaners"
We Specialize iin
tlbe Cleainhg .& a

of ]Bridal G owIs


Monday- Friday 7:30 a.m. :00 p. m Salrday 730 Noon ,
229-263-4149
101 Webster Sl. Quilman, GA


I


I


Bridal Gowns -


How To Choose The Perfect

Wedding Dress For Your Figure


: I
Fo 6lr nfrain
Co Sat


35 Years of Experience!..




Rolex Service 4
Platinum Work
Ccerified Diamonds 656-2871
Appraisal & Repair 758 Capital Circle NE
Bridal Sele: ions Closed Sun. & Mon. iPThI Aj., I-I.:-.i.


Everyone thinks they know how to
choose a wedding gown style. What most
women don't realize is fabrics, style and
measurements can influence the style of
wedding dress ,that best compliments a
particular body type.
FULL FIGURED WOMEN If you


are a full fig-
ured woman,
the best silhou-
ette is an A-
Line. A-line
lengthens the
whole body
without draw-
ing attention to
your waistline.
The empire
waist is anoth-
er good choice.
The empire is
narrowest just


~. ~ \


below the bust and conceals your waist
and hips.
Many plus size girls tend to purchase
wedding gowns that cover a lot of skin. If
religion isn't an issue don't be afraid to
show some skin. Skin is sexy and showing
your arms and neckline can often make
one appear smaller.
Deep V necks and scoop necks flatter
curvy figures and always look best on full
figured women.
PETITE A-line wedding dresses are
also flattering on a petite women. As we
stated earlier, it lengthens the body.
Sheaths seem to shorten a small body


even more. Stay clear of very full skirts.
You want to keep your wedding.dress in
proportion to your body.
Be careful with strapless.
A petite woman may have to lift her
arms to reach up to her new husband.
A cap sleeve gives the feeling of a
-. strapless gown
". .". and also serves a
S '.-practical purpose
in holding the
gown in place.
LARGE
B U S T E D
WOMEN Off the
shoulder gowns
look wonderful on
a full bust. It
: draws our atten-
: tion upward, em-
S. phasizes the
shoulders and
minimizes the chest. Keep your skirt nar-
row. Wearing a full skirt will make you
look large on top and bottom.
BOTTOM HEAVY Women who are
larger through their hips and buttocks
should look for a wedding dress that fo-
cuses on their upper body preferably with
a full skirt.
Show your arms, back and bustline.
Corset style bodice with lacing will
highlight your upper body. We want to
draw attention away from your hips.
Avoid pleats or gathered fabric around
the waist. An A-line skirted wedding
dress always works the best.


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Wednesday, November 21, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 9A



THANKSGIVING DINING


Thi


Top Turkey Day Tips

FROM START TO FINISH
Thawing Your Turkey
It is unsafe to thaw a frozen turkey at room temperature.
safe ways to thaw your turkey are in the refrigerator or la
water. See the chart below for estimated thaw ing times. 4
Whether you have a frozen or a fresh turkey, cook it \ tl
or 2 days of purchase or after thawing.
In the Refrigerator (40 F or below)
Allow approximately 24 hours for every 4 to 5 pounds
4 to 12 pounds 1 to 3 days
12 to 16 pounds 3 to 4 days
16 to 20 pounds 4 to 5 days
20 to 24 pounds 5 to 6 days
Keep the turkey in its original wrapper. Place it on a traN or in a pan
to catch any juices that may leak. A thawed turkey can remain in the
refrigerator for 1 to 2 days. If necessary, a turkey that has been prop-
erly thawed in the refrigerator may be refrozen.


I H us: mo -sa 8 .m.- Spm


In Cold Water
Allow approximately 30 minutes per pound.
4 to 12 pounds 2 to 6 hours
12 to 16 pounds 6 to 8 hours
16 to 20 pounds' 8 to 10 hours
20 to 24 pounds 10 to 12 hours
Wrap o6ur turkeN securely, making sure the water is not able to leak
through the wrapping. Submerge yourwrapped turkey in cold tap wa-
ter. Change the water every 30 miinutes. Cook the turkey immediately
after it is thawed. Do not refreeze.
Cook It Your Way!
No matter which method you. use to cook your turkey, use a food
thermometer to insure that your turkey and stuffing are cooked to a
safe minimum internal temperature of 165 F. These times are ap-
proximate and should always be used in conjunction with a properly
placed thermometer.
Approximate Whole Turkey Cooking Times
Times for fresh or thawed turkey in a preheated 325 F oven


Weight
8 to 12 pounds


Unstuffed Timing Stuffed Timing
2 3/4 to 3 hours 3 to 3 1/2 hours


3 1/2 to 4 hours


14 to 18 pounds 3 3/4 to 4 1/4 hours 4 to 4 1/4 hours
18 to 20 pounds 4 1/4 to 4 1/2 hours 4 1/4 to 4 3/4 hours
20 to 24 pounds 4 1/2 to 5 hours 4 3/4 to 5 1/4 hours
Electric Roaster Oven
Generally, the cooking time and oven temperature setting are the
same as for conventional cooking. Preheat the oven to at least 325 F.
Place the turkey on the roaster oven rack or other meat rack so the
turkey is raised out of the juices that collect in the bottom of the oven
liner. Leave the lid on throughout cooking, removing it as little as
possible to avoid slowing the cooking process. Always check the
roaster oven's use and care manual for the manufacturer's recom-
mended temperature setting and time.
Grilling a Turkey
Outdoor cooking of a big.bird for the holiday meal is becoming a pop-
ular cooking method. During grilling, a turkey cooks by indirect heat
in an outdoor covered gas or charcoal grill, and a pan of water is
placed beneath the grilling surface to catch the fat and juices that drip
from the turkey as it cooks. Cooking is done by the hot, smoky,
steamy air.
Turkeys that are 16 pounds or less are the recommended size for
safe grilling. A. larger turkey remains in the "Danger Zone" be-
tween 40 and 140 F too long. Do not stuff the turkey.


-..,,DiN No


The Farm House Restaurant Will Be Open On Thanksgiving Day, between
10:00 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. featuring our lunch menu, plus our THANKSGIVING DAY SPECIAL:
S: TfIANKSGIVING DAY SPECIAL
'* YOUR CHOICE.OFONE. / For Onyi
*Bakedirkey Baked Ham Baked or Fried Chicken Roast Beef F1 O9Z
'Served with Cornbread Dressing, Cranberry Sauce and your choice of 0 *
S: two fresftvegetables with drink included. ,
S -",. .. TO-GOORDERS
SFor Faiiliethat want to eat at home we are currently taking
FAMILY-TO-GO orders that feed 10-12 people: (Please Call (229) 559-5445.)
S ----7 Whole Turkey or Ham (10-12 Ibs.)
l o ~ For'"nly Farmhouse Cornbread Dressing with Gravy
!' .Choice of two pans of Vegetables:
O Turnips, CoHards, Candied Yams, Black-eye Peas, or Green Beans
ti ,our choice of either a Pumpkin or Pecan Pie. Served with a 24 ct. of rolls.
Deadlines for taking orders is Tuesday 20th at noon., .
All orders will need to be picked up either Wednesday the 21st
between 12 p.m. 9 p.m. or on Thanksgiving Day
* between 8 a.m. 10 a.m. only. t ,
Greg Bennett, Owner Lake Park, Ga.
(229) 559-5445 RsESTAuRAI-r' j


LUKE ORCHARDS

Retail Store

NOW OPEN!


im The Nut House
All types of pecans chocolate covered, honey roasted, Praline, etc. along
with other types of nuts are available, plus an assortment of jams, jellies,
syrup, pecan oil, crackers, gift baskets and other pecan related items.
Come see us for all your Nutty needs.


Hwy 129 One Mile North Of Ray City 229-455-3071
Hours: Mon. Sat., 8 am to 6 pm
Buy Direct from the Grower. 401587gvI


Be Food Safe


12 to 14 pounds 3 to 3 3/4 hours


L IL;! 3









10 OA Madison County Carrier www.2reenepublishin2.com Wednesday, November 21, 2007



HEALTH & NUTRITION


Big Bend Hospice Offers

Grief Support In

Madison County
Big Bend Hospice is offering an adult Grief Support
Group that meets on the fourth Tuesday of each month
at the Madison Senior Center from 6:00 PM 7:00 PM.
The group is open to anyone in the community who has
experienced the death of someone in their life. The
Madison County Senior Center is located in Madison at
4886 S.W Rutledge.
The Grief Support group helps with coping skills,
offers support and provides education regarding the
grief process. Sharing memories, feelings, and coping
strategies with others who are grieving can be helpful in
healing and recovery.
Big Bend Hospice offers grief and bereavement ser-
vices to anyone in the Big Bend area who has experi-
enced the loss of a loved one. Individual counseling or
group support is available regardless of whether you or
your family has used Hospice services. The support
groups are a free community service.
The next meeting will be held on Tuesday, November
27th at 6 p.m.
For more information, please call Wendy Vargo, 451,
878-5310, ext. 134.

Diabetes And Your Heart


Explaining the risk fac-
tors for hypertension and
diabetes, the links between
them ,and the Medicare
benefits that can keep se-
niors healthy is the pur-
pose of "Con-
nect the Dots:
Diabetes and
Your Heart-
H -o w
Medicare a
Helps," an
initiative by
the National Council on
Aging.
Risk factors include be-
ing overweight, physically
inactive, high glucose, high
cholesterol,' consistently
high blood pressure, age,
gender, smoking, race, fam-
ily history and waist cir-
cumference.
Both diabetes and hy-
pertension can be treated
and managed through reg-
ular exercise, a healthy


diet, taking medication as
prescribed, not smoking,
and monitoring your glu-
cose levels.
Medicare covers dia-
betes screenings, supplies
and self-man-
a g e m e n t
training, eye
exams, glau-
coma tests,
foot exams,
medical nu-
trition thera-
py services and smoking
cessation. Medicare pre-
scription drug plans typi-.
cally cover insulin, oral
therapies for diabetes, and
hypertension medications.
For more information,
log on to www.ncoa.org.
For information on Medicare,
call 1-800-MEDICARE or log,
on to www.medicareov. The
initiative is supported by a
grant fromNovartis Pharma-
ceuticals..


V
~4,4*


4.
.4 1
DR JOW



'p
9 .*


Tackling Obesity One Meal At A Time


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Measures of mortality are frequently use
identify and quantify public health problems.
most commonly used of these measures are d
rates (crude, cause-specific, and age-adjus
which permit comparison of mortality between
ulation groups, and by cause of death. Alth
these death rates provide an important measu
the. public health, they may not reflect the mort
trends of young persons, due to the dominant
many chronic diseases among the elderly.
Looking at the broader population, there
very useful measurement to examine premz
mortality named "Years of Potential Life I
(YPLL). YPLL is calculated by subtracting a
death from age 75 (the standard "death age") for
death group being studied, and then adding all
differences for a total YPLL, usually group
cause of death per the same population. 'This c
lation effectively emphasizes mortality due to ca
of death that tend to be more predominant ai
younger persons.
A deep understanding of this measure isn't
essary; just keep in mind that it measures prem,
death, and looks at the health trends of younger
ple, including traffic deaths that are also no
high for the area. So while it isn't complete:
and dry, by comparing the number between diff
counties, one can get a better look into Ma(
County numbers. And in this analysis, an epid
will be revealed; that epidemic is obesity.
Comparatively, obesity is a health problem tl
easy to understand, and even easier to observ
though extremely challenging to reverse. Obesi
a formal measure is defined as having a Body
Index (BMI) over 30. BMI compares one's h
with weight in a statistical formula. Body fat
centage is also a good measure for obesity, but
ty comparisons in this report employ BMI. Fo
record, however, body fat over 30% for women
25% for men is generally considered obese.
For the entire state of Florida, the percent
adults who are obese is 22.3%. For Dade County
ami), the number is 19.9%. Orange County, C
do's home, has an obesity rate of 25.7%. Ala
(UF) and Leon (FSU) have rates of 16.8% and 2
respectively. Madison County has a rate of 34.1
One in three Madison County residents is o
according to these numbers obtained from th
apartment of Health.and the research pages fou
www.floridacharts.comrn,
The YPLL, or premature death measure, for
same counties is as follow: Dade (6832), Or
(7320), Alachua (6560), Leon (5416) and Mad


ed to
The
death
3ted),
pop-
ough
re of
:ality
ce of

is a
nature
Lost"
ge at
each
these
*d by
alcu-
auses
among

nec-
ature
rpeo-
tably
y cut
erent
dison
lemic

hat is
re, al-
itv


4F4


.7. V

9- -'

I

~... 4

I'.-


-.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 31, 2007
Laura Coleman, with the assistance of. Judi Wyche
and the Curves program, is committed to returning to a
healthy lifestyle.


sTa 11,248. These numbers are on a scale per 100,000 in
Mass population, but again, it's the comparison that's so
eight compelling.
per- Madison County's premature death levels are
coun- 107% higher, more than double, our neighbors in
r the Leon only 60 miles to the west, and 54%. higher than
iand Mickey Mouse and the gang in. range County.
Smoking has not increased; neither has homicides.
ge of Poverty is certainly an associated cause and driving
(Mi- fatalities do contribute. But the only glaring, and
)rlan- ironically preventable, health 'issue plaguing Madi-
Lchua son County from top to bottom, and measurably
0.5% stealing years at an epidemic pace, is obesity.
%. Except in rare cases, obesity is completely pre-,
bese, Ventable. The heart and joint diseases it brings, in-
e De- cluding blood pressure issues and diabetes, are
nd at therefore also costly preventable. Once obesity is
t part of one's life however, it's often as challenging to
those eliminate as drug and smoking addictions.
ange Kim Barnhill, Administrator for the Jeffer-
lison, son/Madison County Health Department, confirmed
that.obesity in Madison County is. definitely at epi'
W .S' demic levels. "The county numbers are bad, espe-
cially among the minority population. The Health
Disparity Task Force is aggressively searching for
; solutions. So far, we've set up about a dozen "Health
Ministers" at churches around Madison. These
Health Ministers receive health education and train-
ing, including a $1500 exercise equipment donation,
I upon completion of the course work," Barnhill ex-
plained.
In the course of exploring other practical solu-
tions to counter and prevent obesity, another real
ally to the overweight was discovered. Judi Wyche,
owner/manager of Curves in downtown Madison,
devotes her life's work to'reversing obesity and
building good health habits in others. In fact, one of'
her new members, Laura Coleman, also of Madison,
graciously offered her "Before" shot, agreeing to
serve as a "real world" subject so readers could
share in her progress and challenges.
Obesity is much better challenged with a team,
whether with family or friends, with proven pro-
grams under the supervision of professionals like
Wyche, or by programs developed and launched
through public agencies devoted to these critical
health issues.
Starting small is fine, cutting a few calories and
'walking a few more minutes really adds up fast; It's not
complicated, but just as it takes time to pile on the
pounds, it takes a while to get it off. In the interim,
Coleman and Curves will be revisited, Health officials
and their programs will be reviewed, and volunteers
will share their experiences, so those choosing to do so
will have the means and the formula for tackling obesi-
ty one day, and even one meal, at a time.


UNINSURED??

We have a sliding-fee program for
those who qualify.at
Tri-County Family Health Care
Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician
You may save $ on your prescriptions
from us, when filled at Jackson's Drugs
Please call 850-948-2840
for more information
TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.


IOU get to see

incredible

things happen here.

William R. Grow, M.D.
Internal Meadiine



"I've been at SGMC for over 30
years. We've truly evolved from a
very good hospital with a general
medical staff to a superb medical
facility with very comprehensive
coverage.

We have always worked together
towards obtaining the same goal,
which is taking the best care of oui"
patients that we can. There's really
very little reason to go outside this
community when you have South
Georgia Medical Center.

You get to see incredible things
happen here."





(SOUTH RGECGA
MEDICAL CENTER
Medicine is our Ift www.ftse.or m


- .


,," 4-. .,e '...
7,%,F ...rq


6









Wednesday, November 21, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11A



MONEY & FINANCE




How Your Resolution to Make



More Money Can Become Reality


"Earn more money"
and "advance my career"
are common New Year's
resolutions. But when the
goals appear on your list
year after year, it's time to
take action to improve your
attractiveness to employ-
ers, both current and poten-
tial.
Americans admire self-


made millionaires whose
degrees come from the
school of hard knocks. The
reality of the work place,
however, is that the more
education you have, the
more you are likely to earn
- and the more job satisfac-
tion you are likely to enjoy
According to United
States Census Bureau data,


workers with a bachelor's
degree earn on average
about $25,241 more per year
than those with only a high
school diploma. And those
with a master's, profession-
al, or doctoral degree earn
on average about $25,257
more per year than col-
leagues with only an under-
graduate degree.


Stemady, Strcxng.
C cx wrp 0!

_______________. .


PeoplIe You K'aow.,
~.. .*. A Bank V'os Can TrmsL


Madison County Community Bank
S. .. MNadinon Counr,' C.ommunitr Bnnk B
301 E. Base Street P.O. Box 834 Madison, FL 32340 "
Phone 850-973-2400 Fax 850-973-8161 info@nccbflorida.com


Professionals heading
back to school will find a
wealth of educational op-
portunities tailored for
busy people. From night
classes at traditional brick-
and-mortar schools to on-
line courses and accelerat-
ed degree programs, the op-
tions are numerous. Sites
like ClassesUSA.com can
assist prospective students
in finding the degree or cer-
tificate program best suited
to advancing their profes-
sional goals.
For those looking to
earn a degree relatively
quickly accelerated degree
programs can be particu-
larly appealing. Offered for
a variety of certificate and
degree endeavors, these
programs typically com-
press the course workload
into a shorter time frame.
For example, courses might
span' 20 hours of class time
in just five weeks, as op-
posed to more than 40 hours
over 16 weeks. And "class
time" doesn't necessarily
mean sitting in a classroom
at a set time every week.
Many accelerated pro-
grams are offered online,
making it even easier to fit
learning time into a busy
lifestyle.
An accelerated degree
program can make finan-


cial sense as well. Fewer se-
mesters as a student could
translate into fewer tuition
payments. And by earning
a degree quickly, you can
have more time in the work
force at your new higher
earning potential.
Remember, however,
that compressing an entire
degree into a shorter time
period can mean pressure
that is even more intense
than what you would expe-
rience pursuing a degree at
a traditional pace. But take
heart, even if you don't per-
form well under pressure
or at an accelerated pace,
there are still other ways
you might be able to speed
up your educational
process:
Transfer, transfer,
transfer Check with the
registrar to see. whether
previous college courses
you have completed can
count toward your degree


requirements elsewhere.
Life experience
counts Some degree pro-
grams will grant you credit
for knowledge acquired
through work experience.
You may have to pass an
exam that measures your
level of expertise and famil-
iarity with the subject mat-
ter, but this can still save
you time, and tuition mon-
ey, in the long run.
Go online Many de-
grees or certificates can be
completed partially or en-
tirely online. The flexibility
of taking classes online
may enable you to complete
the program faster and will
almost certainly allow you
greater control over your
time commitments than
you would have in a tradi-
tional class structure.
To learn more about on-
line and traditional higher
education opportunities,
visit www.ClassesUSA.com.


,Capital CiJ
Ean' Inwves tments
Larry DiPietro, CFFP j Investment Executive
Registered Representative of INVEST Financial Corporation
343 W. Base St. I Madison 973.4161
www.capitalcitybancinvestments.com
Securities, advisory services and Insurance products are offered through
IN4VEST Financial Corporation (INVEST) and affiliated Insurance agencies and
are: NOT FDIC INSURED, NOT BANK GUARANTEED and MAY LOSE VALUE.
INVEST, member FINRA, SIPC, a registered broker dealer and registered
investment advisor, is not affiliated with Capital City Banc Investments
11/07-46094 .


Need A Financial Boost? Consider Seasonal Work


S There are, many. reasons people, work full-time,or
part-time -- socializing, using your education and skills
or tackling challenges -- but most often it comes down to
earning money According to an American Staffing As-
sociation survey, 69 percent of respondents said that
additional income was an important factor in employ-
ees', decision to pursue temporary or contract work.
Seasonal work is one of the most beneficial ways to
pursue temporary employment. Potential employees
can choose when, where, and how they want to work.
Companies love the operational flexibility of being able
toincrease staff during their busiest seasons.
Here are the top five considerations for seasonal
work opportunities from the team at Snelling Staffing
Services, which has 182 staffing agency offices nation-
wide.
Consider the time of year you want to work.
Did you know that September is a great time of year
to fill out applications for holiday jobs? Many compa-
nies accept applications in September and October for
work that begins around Thanksgiving through New
Year's. Shipping and fulfillment are popular winter
jobs, in addition to loss prevention, customer service,
merchandising and stocking inventory
In the summer, some restaurants extend their
hours to accommodate families and travelers, creating
a need to help fill those orders. Popular summer jobs
can also include positions within recreation and aquat-
ics centers, amusement parks, athletic teams and
camps.
Employers that need temporary staffing help year
round include conventions, hospitality and banquet
events. Think of June weddings, while January and
February are popular months for conventions and
tradeshows. This allows you as a candidate to pick the
season that works with your needs.
What are your strengths or skills?
If you have experience in a particular industry, es-
pecially a specific skill, or have pursued a field with
continuing education, you are more likely to be hired
for that expertise. Some specific skills being sought af-
ter right now include manufacturing jobs, such as parts
assembly, or information technology help desk associ-
ates.
If you have accounting experience, the spring tax
season is a great opportunity for seasonal work. Com-


CROWN


WEALTH


MANAGEMENT
I-, .. w. 1Tr st, -

3227 N. Oak St. Ext. Suite C
Valdosta 229-247-0850
www.crown-wealth.com
xxxxC01rownW


panies and staffing agencies begin employee recruiting
in the fall for the following year's tax season.
Consider your strengths along with the seasonal
hiring needs of a .particular region. Florida, for exam-
ple, is experiencing a construction boom from hurri-
canes in recent years, along with population growth,
and needs workers, full and part-time, for jobs related to'
all aspects of the construction industry
What's your availability?
What are your time constraints or parameters dur-
ing the season you want to work? Do you have family
time to work around? If so, you might want to consider
the night shift or early mornings during school hours. If
you look for opportunities that fit within your schedule
and are up front with your potential employer about
your availability, the better your situation.
Selling caps, gowns and announcements during the
school day in the spring might be right up your alley to
earn the extra cash you need. The ASA also finds that 64
percent of staffing employees report that their work
gives them the scheduling flexibility and the time for
family that they desire.
Do you have an industry or dream job in mind?
Think about seasonal work as an opportunity to try
something new or pursue your dream job. If you've al-
ways wanted to pursue baking, think ahead to the
month of June when bakers are their busiest prepping
for the influx of weddings. If you have a healthy obses-
sion for shopping, consider being a part-time mystery
shopper. If you've always wanted to travel, consider
temporary employment within the travel industry when
travel volumes increase during the summer and compa-
nies need extra help working with customers. Beyond
your paycheck, the travel perks can be beneficial.
Will you need a full-time job
within the next five years?
According to Workforce Management, the number
of temporary workers retained as full-time employees is
expected to grow by 15 percent this year. One of the
main reasons employees choose temporary assignments
is the opportunity for full-time employment. The same
is true for seasonal hiring. If you prove your worth dur-
ing a seasonal project, the company may find a spot for
you or at least provide a shining reference for a similar
position.
With all these considerations in mind, where do you


Never before have there been so many opportunities
for pursuing your financial goals. In today's fast-
paced world, time is a scarce commodity. It's time, in-
formation and experience that make the difference in
choosing the right financial opportunities for your
future. Let us assist you with your investment needs.
Call Steve Schramm to schedule your appointment.


* Estate Planning
* Income Planning
* College Planning
* IRA Rollovers and
Account Consolidation


Registered representative of
and securities offered through


ING ~l
FINANCIAL. PARTNERtS


MemberSIPC


CWM is not a subsidiary of or
controlled by ING financial partners.


:go from here? Visit a staffing agency le. Snelling,
where they have experienced employment recruiters
that can help you find the job. you need that fits into
your seasonal schedule. Their aptitude tests can also
help you pick an industry suited to your personality.
For more information about seasonal opportunities
in your area,, visit Snelling Staffing Services 'at
www.snelling.com to find the office near you or by call-
ing (800) 411-6401. Snelling delivers temporary, career
and professional staffing solutions to companies, with
182 offices throughout the U.S.


. Gives you the knowledge of what
price range to shop

. Saves you time while shopping


. Preapproval letter lets real estate
agents and sellers know you are
serious and ready to buy


. Preapproval increases your
bargaining power


. Gives you the information you need
to be prepared for closing .


* Reduces the time between contract
to purchase and closing.







People You Know.
A Bank You Can Trudt


S Madison ounty Community B...ank....ank


301 E. Base Street Madison, FL 32340
Phone 850-973-2400 Fax 850-973-2910
info@mccbflorida.com


Ummbir
FDN


There is no mcm-tgage
lewding crIsIs Por community
banks. That's 11101-CaLiSe
conimunity basks are well
I-Lin, highly carAtalized and
tigititly regulate-d.
Community banks
are, arid always havo
been, common sense lenders
rocused on dohig what is
best for their customers and
their communities.
Community banks are in
solid shape with nioney to
lend.
Madison Comn-Ounity Bank
col:ects deposits hore
and ends money here It
Madison County.
e,
The way It should be don j


I I I I I- :% i








12A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, November 21, 2007



SCHOOL & EDUCATION


Madison resident and
computer science instruc-
tor Karen Todd Pickles
ran for the position of
vice-president with the
Florida Association of
Community Colleges
(FACC); the statewide or-
ganization that represents
Florida's 28 public com-
munity colleges.
Pickles, business in-
structor at NFCC who is
also a doctorial student,
sought the elected position
during the Nov. 13-16 FACC
statewide convention in


Orlando. She sought the
position of Vice-President
Elect of Commissions. At
press time, the result of
the election was unknown.
She .has been with
NFCC since 1993 and a
member of FACC since
1999. Pickles currently
serves as NFCC's FACC
chapter president. Pickles
has served as a deputy di-
rector and director on the
Region II level and as tech-
nology commission chair-
elect and technology com-
mission chair at the com-


mission level. Statewide,
Pickles has served as
member and chair of the
awards committee, as well
as serving on various task
force and sub-committees
of FACC.
"As VP-elect of Com-
missions, I plan to pro-
mote greater involvement
in all of our 16 commis-
sions, bolstering the effec-
tiveness of smaller, less ac-
tive units and encouraging
greater professional
growth opportunities,"
she said. "I plan to encour-
age each and every mem-
ber to share their ideas
and concerns regarding
Commission activities. I
believe if we all work to-
gether, we can increase
Commission interest,
awareness, involvement -
and thus increase our
,membership in FACC
Commissions."
FACC Commissions
represent various interest
and professional special-
ties within the organiza-
tion. Much of FACC's
work is done through the
commission network.
Pickles .is an NFCC and
FSU graduate and is current-
ly working on her Ph.D.
through Capella University
with a major focus in instruc-
tional design for online learn-
ing. She also has a back-
ground in correctional work
and with Raymond James Fi-
nancial. She is married and
has two children, ages 18 and
16.


:1


J.T. Ward


Named Top

Academic

Scholar
J.T. Ward, a 2007 gradu-
ate of Aucilla Christian
Academy, was recently
named the Top Academic
Scholar for this district by
Florida Bright Futures.
J.T. is currently attend-
ing the University of Flori-
da and was a recipient of
the Bright Future Florida
Academic Scholar Award.
This FAS award pays 100%
tuition to any four-year
University or College in
the state of Florida.
In addition to the FAS
award, Ward will receive
an additional $1500 a year
as the Top Academic
Scholar from this district.
This award was based
on a combination of his fi-
nal high school GPA and
his score on the ACT.


NFCC's Karen Pickles


Ran For State Association


VP Position


- iigesFatRof&Mea .Ros .l~ ~o


I Stu p ridig-Tree R mov 0l*


NFU IC Buidlng

Construction Program

Taking Applications
NFCC's Career and Technical Education Center is
now taking applications for the building construction
program at the Madison campus starting Jan. 7. The vo-
cational certificate program satisfies FDOE standards
for training as a Building Construction Technician.
A year-long curriculum covers all the building
trades, but carpentry is the mainstay of the program.
Students will construct carpentry projects in a state-of-
the-building-arts student laboratory The program also
offers instruction in related subjects, such as math, com-
puters, communication and employability skills.
"Monthly, on-the-job training activities, will be one of
the most important parts of the Building Construction
Technician program," said instructor John Sirmon.
Classes are from 8 a.m. to,3:30 p.m., Monday Friday,
Room 211, in the Career and Technical Center, Bldg. 13,
Madison. Sirmon encourages men and women interest-
ed in the program to begin the application process as
soon as possible in order to complete required TABE test-
ing and NFCC admission procedures.
Pell Grants are available to qualified applicants. Ap-
plicants must have either a high school diploma or
G.E.D. and have completed the Free Application for Fed-
eral Student Aid (FAFSA). For more details about finan-
cial aid, visit the NFCC website www.nfcc.edu. keyword:
fees and financial aid.
For more information, contact Sirmon at sir-
moni(anfcc.edu or telephone 850.973.9440.

Don't spend all day cooking for Thanksgiving! Come eat an all
home-cooked meal at Wiregrass and spend the rest of the day
doing what you want not cleaning up!!
Thanksgiving Lunch Buffet Fromi larn 2pm
Thanksgiving Day,- Nov. 22.
Featuring:
Turkey & Dressing with Cranberry Sauce
Baked Ham Turnip Greens Baby Lima Beans Green
Bean Casserole Sweet Potato Souffle Rice/Giblet Gravy
Deviled Eggs-* Glazed Carrots Yeast Rolls
Full Salad Bar including:
'Apple Salad and Cole Slaw
Dessert including:'
Cake, Bread Pudding and Peach Cobbler
Drink Included
$14.95 all you can eat
Reservations are encouraged but not required. You can make
a reservation at the register or by calling 229-263-5550.
Hope to see you on Thanksgiving Day.
We will not be open for dinner on Thanksgiving night.
We will resume regular hours on Friday November 23.
'Wirerjrass Restaurant
o3 S. 'Iasfiiiigto St., Quitman, gsi 3i643


(850) 973-5326
PAUL KINSLEY
OWNER I


X7rrN=-Jc?1C-A7'H AEAZX7

@Mao
ufflugmffin








Wednesday, November 21, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 13A



SPORTS


Warriors Named


Big Bend Leaders
IFran Hunt at number 15 with 29 P
Monticello News pass receptions for 405 !
Athletes from Au- yards, six touchdowns.
cilla Christian Acade- Casey Anderson


my were named to the
list of Big Bend Lead-
ers in football, Friday,
Nov 9.
For rushing, Matt
Bishop stands at num-
ber 11 with 95 carries.
for 847 yards, and 11
touchdowns.
Quarterback Matt
Dobson stands at num-
ber six in passing with
75 pass completions
out of 146 attempts, for
1115 yards, ten touch-
downs and six inter-
ceptions.
On the receiving
end of the pigskin,
T"rlra evqtqr-lln o+ofndi


T TAM DOBSON


stands at number 19 in
receiving with 20 pass
receptions for 31
yards, three touch-
downs.
On the. defensive
side of the field,
Woody Vollertsen
stands at number sev-
en in tackles with 67
solos and 30 assists for
a total of 97 tackles.
For sacking the op-
ponent quarterback,
Vollertsen stands at
number two with 16
sacks.
Hunter Greene
stands at number five
with nine


KYLE BARNW ELL yie iajn .IJCU. iVL L .IVI. I UUU UI, .... .... .

Varsity Lady Warriors


,Defeat Branford 36-10


Fran Hunt
Monticello News,
The Lady Warriors' varsity basket-
ball team downed Branford 36-10 in
hoop action Thursday, Nov. 15.
The ladies buried Branford in the
first quarter 12-0 and outscored their op-
ponent, 13-2, in the second quarter.. Both
teams held steady at four each in the
third, and the Lady Warriors came back
to drop in seven while holding Branford
to four.
"We were beating Branford so badly,
I was able to pull out my starters and let
some of the younger girls get some ex-
perience on the court," said Head Coach
Daryl Adams.
Lindsey Day led the scoring for the
Lady Warriors with ten points, five re-
bounds, two assists and two steals.
. Mallory Plaines dropped in eight
points, snagged ten rebounds, four as-
sists, and two steals.
Chelsea Dobson scored seven points,
nine rebounds, and two blocked shots.


She was one of four at the free-throw
line.
Nicole Mathis had three points,
three rebounds; and Hannah Sorensen,
three points, one blocked shot.
Sorensen was one of two at the free-
throw line.
Jodie Bradford scored two points,
four rebounds, and six steals. She was
two of two at the free-throw line.
Miranda Wider scored two points,
going two for two at the free-throw line;
Courtney Brasington, one point, one of
two at the free-throw line; Savannah
Williams, five rebounds, two steals; and
Bethany Saunders, two steals.
"Our defense is playing really strong
this year and hopefully they can keep it
up to help carry us through the season,"
said Adams. "On the offense, we need to
fine-tune the usual little mistakes seen
at the beginning of the season."
The Lady Warriors hit the courts
facing off against Liberty County, 6
p.m., Nov. 29 here.


Lady Warriors


Fran Hunt
Monticello News
The Aucilla Christian
Academy varsity girls'
basketball team won the
first official game of the
season against Chiles, 35-
28, Tuesday, Nov. 13.
The Lady Warriors
scored 16 in the first quar-
tet, compared to Chiles'
six, and two in the second
compared to Chiles which
scored six.
ACA chalked up six
during the third, upped by
Chiles. with nine, and in


the fourth, the Lady War-
riors racked up 11 points
in the fourth while hold-
ing Chiles to nine.
Mallory Plaines led
the Lady Warriors with 18
points, one of which was a
three-pointer and 18 re-
bounds for her first dou-
ble-double of the season,
two assists, thYee steals
and she was five of 11 at
the free-throw line.
Bethany Saunders
scored six points, one of
which was a three-pointer,
eight rebounds, three as-


,35-28

sists, and she was three of
six at the free-throw line.
Nicole Mathis had four
points that included one
three-pointer, seven re-
bounds, and three steals.
Lindsey Day had four
points, five rebounds, one
assist, four steals, and one
blocked shot.
Chelsea Dobson scored
three points, with three re-
bounds and she was one of
two from the free-throw
line; and lastly, Courtney
Brasington, had four re-
bounds, and one steal.


Players of the






., .. ,


MAI I SIHUP


HUNTER GREENE


The NFCC Men's Bas-
ketball Academy season is
underway, and the MBA is
working for a win that so far
has eluded the team.
NFCC was on the road
Nov. 3 when the team played
Albany Tech in an afternoon
game in Albany Ga. NFCC
lost that game 80 to 63.
High scorers for that
game were Pierre Wilson of
Sarasota with 14 points; Bri-
an Hill of Madison with 12
points; and Terrence Mc-
Clain of Jasper and Charles
Williams of Camden, Ga
with 10 points each.
On Nov 6, NFCC met
ABAC in Tifton, Ga for a


MCHSV Beats


Chiefland


45-35


In Pre-Season

Basketball


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
In a pre-season basket-
ball game against
Chiefland, Madison's boys
stepped up, despite the fact
that the game was a little.
rough. Coach Eddie Richie
commented that points
were hard to come by, and
it was certainly not an of-
fensive showcase like the
night before.
Chiefland had no trou-
ble adjusting to Madison's
three-point shooting, while
the Cowboys didn't find it
easy to adjust to their
(Chiefland's) defense.
"We turned up the
pressure defensively in the
second half and pushed
the tempo offensively and
those two things proved to
be the difference. Our
young guys stepped up as
well. Sophomore big man
Solomon Griffin stepped
up and led us with 13
points and hit key free
throws down the stretch.


night game, losing to ABAC
95 to 60.
High scorers in that
game. were Terrance Mc-
Clain of Jasper with 20
points; Brian Hill of Madi-
son with 14 points and Mar-
cus Brinson of Madison
with 12 points.
The public is invited and
encouraged to attend the
games, which are free.
The team's first home
games will be Nov. 16-17
when they meet ABAC of
Tifton, Ga in Madison at the
Colin P Kelly Gym on cam-
pus. The Nov. 16 game will
begin at 7 p.m. while the
Nov 17 game will begin at 2


Also, Freshman Mar'Ter-
rius McDaniel had 8
points, 3 steals and was 4/4
from the free throw line.
6'5" Senior Xavier Tillman
had another block party
with 6 blocks. Overall, it
was a great defensive effort
by our entire team with 20
steals and forcing 28
turnovers," Richie said.
Madison turned the ta-
bles to win the game with
45 points to Chiefland's 35.
The regular season
starts on November 20
with the Lowndes County
Thanksgiving Classic.
Stat Leaders for Madi-
son were:
Solomon Griffin 13
points, 3 rebounds
Xavier Tillman 8
points, 9 rebounds, 6
blocks, 3 steals
Mar-Terrius McDaniel
- 8 points, 3 steals
Brad Bruton -, 10
points, 4 steals, 33-pointers
DeAngelo Tucker 4
rebounds, 4 steals


p.m.
The team will again be
on the home court Nov. 19
when they meet Florida
Community College of Jack-
sonville (FCCJ) at 6 p.m.
The MBA will play
CFCCmin Madison at 7 p.m.
Nov 28. The home games
,will end for a short while af-
ter the Dec. 6 game where;
the team meets Albany
Tech, again at 5:30 p.m.
Then, it's on the road.


Sweet Potatoes
.15 per bushel already picked


Call
Tanya

971-5362
Call First To Make A "Pick-Up" Appointment
Directions: Take Hwy. 53- South 3.5 miles past 1-10, to
Midway Church Road and take a left. Tanya's U Pick will be down
the first dirt road on the left (Gunpowder). Look for the signs,
Mon. Fri. 9:00 1:00 and after 4:00 &
all day Saturday and Sunday Afternoon


Beat Chiles


Serving Madison, Jefferson,
Taylor & Lafayette Counties

Auto, Life, Health, Home


Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager

Jimmy King, Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison *- (850) 973-4071

Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213

Freddy Pitts
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL,* (386) 294-1399

24/7 Claim Service: 1-866-275-7322
"Helping You Is What We Do Best."


LNF(CC Sentinel Men's Basketball Academy On The Roadi


FARM

BUREAU

INSURANCE










14A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, November 21, 2007


BETTER BUILT DECKS
10'xlO' with hand rails $800.
12'x12' with hand rails $1,000.
Materials included in price. Also
build sheds and privacy fence.
Call: 850-264-1923 or
850-971-0005

Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848




TidyURp

cleaning services.

Cleaning Services
Rental apartments, houses & mo-
bile homes cleaned after tenants
move out. Thorough and depend-
able. Call Carla. cell 229-834-1110
I build sheds, decks,
exterior carpentry work,
window and
door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342

Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326


DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
Welding
New & Used Parts
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340







Nintendo-64
5 Controllers
2 Memory Cards
10 Games
Excellent Condition
$100
Call 973-3497

Homemade Fresh Fruit Basket
Order now for Christmas. Includes
fresh fruit, dry fruit, and nut mix
and yogurt or chocolate covered
raisins. Small $8.00 (4 fruits plus
extras) Large $12.00 (6 fruits plus
extras). Orders will be accepted
until December 20th. Phone in or-
ders to Michelle (850) 971-2727.
FOR SALE
1800s STYLE LOG CABIN
38ft X 26ft
GO LOOK/ MAKE OFFER
CALL FOR DIRECTIONS
850-528-1684


25 lbs. of
Clean Newspapers
just $2 a bundle
973-4141


SURPLUS PROPERTY
SALE
MADISON COUNTY,
FLORIDA

The Board of County Commis-
sioners of Madison County,
Florida will hold a public auc-
tion for the sale of surplus prop-
erty on Saturday, December 8,
2007 at the Madison County
Public Works' Department locat-
ed north of Madison at 2060 NE
Rocky Ford Road, Madison,
Florida. Auction registratiofi
shall begin at 7:30 am, with the
auction beginning at 10:00 am.
All necessary bid forms will be
supplied on the day of the' auc-
tion.

Surplus items include vehicles,
equipment, machinery and mis-
cellaneous assorted tools,
pumps, motors, etc. All items
sold as is. Successful bidders
shall pay by cash or cashiers
check during regularly sched-
uled working hours at the Madi-
son County Clerk of Court's of-
fice located in the Madison
County Court House beginning
on Tuesday, December 11, 2007.
All items being purchased must
be paid for and removed from.
Madison County property no
later than 3:00 pm on Thursday,
December 20, 2007. For more
information, contact the Madi-
son County Board of County
Commissioners' office at (850)
973-3179, or the,Public Works
Department office at 850-973-
2156. The Board of County
Commissioners of Madison
County, Florida reserves the
right to reject any and all bids.

Surplus items shall be available
for viewing by the public begin-
ning Saturday, December 1,
2007 from 8:30 am to 10:30 am
and during the week of Decem-
ber 3 thru December 7, 2007
from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm.


AUCTION
GIANT CHRISTMAS
SALE NOVEMBER 24
5:00 PM
SERVING FREE DINNER
STARTING At 4:00 PM
( until auction begins )
1693 SW MOSELEY HALL
RD. (CR360) MADISON
850 973-2959
CALL FOR DIRECTIONS
HEATER-COMFY SEATS
AU691-Col.Ron Cox
AB2490


SOMEBODY ELSE WANTS IT!
Got something you no longer use or need?
Sell It n the classiflieds.
imlfi 850-973-4141 i


New commercial canopy kitchen
"hood. 48x48x24. $3,000. Call
(850) 997-5683...





Need 10-20 chickens.
Maybe a Rooster or two
also guineas and peafowls.
850-464-1165
Wanted Farm land for long term
(5+years) lease to grow perennial
native warm season grasses for
seed and hay. Excellent food and
cover for doves, quail and deer.
Contact Joe Reams, III
850-948-1709
850-879-6481
sandyford@embarqmail.com





For Sale; 3 Nanny Goats, all ap-
pear. to be carrying babies. For
Sale: One 3/4 Great Pyrenees &
1/4 German Shepherd dog, less
than one year old. All Shots &
meds completed. $300 absolute
firm. Call 850-973-4004.





Home For Rent
3 bedrooms 1 bath
388 Church Ave. Greenville
Contact: Mrs. Mary Washington
850-948-2540
MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT
2br/2bth Singlewide home $400.
3br/2bth Doublewide home $500.
First & Last Months Rent
Contact Tom or Butch at 973-2353


1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers accepted.
Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal
Housing Opportunity
FOR RENT
BEAUTIFUL HOUSE ON 2
ACRES IN MADISON
3BDR/2BTH
LARGE L/R; LARGE D/ROOM:
LARGE STUDY
LAUNDRY AREA W/ WASH-
ER/DRYER
CENTRAL HEAT & AIR
$800.00/MONTH
SERIOUS PERSONS ONLY
NEED APPLY
850-973-4997


: outhern illas of
0C adison apartments

Rental assistance may be available.
HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, & 3
BR HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call 850-973-8582, TDD/TTY
711. 315 SW Lawson Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Equal Housing Op-
portunity
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms,
HUD vouchers accepted Call 850-
973-3786 TTY Acs 711.
Equal Housing Opportunity
For Rent $75 Weekly
Fully furnished rooms, Includes
lights and water.
Call: 850-973-4606
800-785-7433
Luxury Apartments- overlooking
the Courthouse Circle in downtown
Monticello, 3BR/2BA, $1050.
Monthly, Contact Katrina Walton at
510-9512






Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage-23
acres, Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Drive and High-
way 53 South. Natural gas line,
8 inch water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and ser-
vice from two power companies.
Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build to
suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141

Pioneer
Excavating & Tractor
Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump
Removal, Demolition, Roads,
Mowiog, Discing, Box-Blading,
and Tilling.
We have top soil and fill dirt
Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326
$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385





Two 1 acre lots on small lake
Pinetta area Madison County, own-
er financing 17,900 each. Landcall-
now.com 941-778-7980


40 private acres in Glenwood
Forest subdivision. Beautiful
homes already built. Fantastic op-
portunity to own property with re-
strictions for all owners & family
members. Call 954-495-3841 or
gauchal @bellsouth.net
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751


Pinetta, By Owner, 3/2
2000sf 11.8 acres, shop
pond, greenhouse $275k
850-929-2074 for Appt.
www.3ws.us

WANTED: 100,TO 600 ACRES
OF LAND for farming/ recreation/
hunting in Madison or surrounding
counties. Willing to pay cash at a
quick closing. Inquiries in confi-
dence.
Please call 850-673-9425.
LOG HOMES
With as little as
$500 Down
Prestige Home Center
Lake City, Florida
1-800-355-9385


INSERTION

DEADLINE
Classified
r Deadlines
Are
Monday at 4:00 P.M.


BeriCK D j3u xh llouse W/limplacU,
hardwood & ceramic tile floors,
oak cabinets, 2000+ sq ft heated,
pool, outdoor kitchen, 2-car car-
port, RV/5th wheel shelter on prop-
erty & 12x16 workshop. Under-
ground sprinkler, utilities & invisi-
ble fence. 2 miles from Madison on
.1.2 acres $290,000. 850-973-2339





$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751



HELP WANTED


GREENE .

Publishing, Inc,(

Greene Publishing, Inc. is now ac-
cepting applications for current as
well as future position -openings.
Experience is preferred but we will
train the right individuals. Working
at the newspaper, is fun rewarding,
fast paced and requires a person
that is outgoing and capable of
working easily under stress and
deadlines. No two days are ever the
same. Key full time. or part-time
positions include:


Reporters
Advertising Sales Associates
Layout & Design
(Experience required)

If you're a responsible adult, punc-
tual, and have a great attendance
record, please fax your resume to
Ted at 850-973-4121, email to:
2ted@greenepublishing.com or ap-
ply in person at our office on Hwy
53, just south of Madison. We wel-
come those who want to grow
with us.


The City of Madison has one open-
ing in the 'Street Department for a
Maintenance worker, light equip-
ment operator, and truck driver.
Applicants must have a valid Flori-
da Class B, Commercial Driver's li-
cense or obtain the same within
six months after being employed,
or you will forfeit your position.
Applicants must read and write the
English language, be able to com-
municate orally and be able to fol-
low .oral and written instructions.
This position requires a lot of
medium to heavy physical labor.
Applicants should have experience
driving large trucks, 26 tons (trash
and garbage trucks.) It is preferred
that applicants have a high school
diploma or GED. The person hired
for this position must pass a physi-
cal examination, background check
and drug test. We will be accepting
applications for this position from
November 13, 2007 until Novem-
ber 26,2007.
Applications may be picked up at
City Hall Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.
The City of Madison is an EOE, a
drug free workplace and recog-
nizes veteran's preference.


Registration and Records Spe-
cialist. Duties include: Assisting
with the day to day record keeping
in the department of Enrollment
Services. Complete job description
on web site. Qualifications: Must
be High School Graduate, AA/AS
degree preferred. Proficient in Mi-
. crosoft software. Applications to:
Director HR, North Florida Com-
munity College, 325 NW Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. A complete packet includes:
resume and application (available
at www.nfcc.edu). Questions call
850-973-9487. Application packet
must be received by 11/30/2007.
EOE
The City of Madison will be ac-
cepting applications for a trainee
for the Potable Water Department.
Applicants must be 18 years of age,
possess a valid Florida Driver's Li-
cense, High School Diploma or
GED, and pass a drug test, back-
ground check and physical exami-
nation. We prefer someone with at
least one year of field experience in
pipe fitting or related background.
Job applications and job descrip-
tions may be picked up at City Hall
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.
We will be accepting applications
for this position from November
13, 2007 until November 21, 2007.
The City of Madison is an Equal.
Opportunity Employer and recog-
nizes veteran's preference.


$ Christmas Is Coming $
Earn gift dollars
Sell AVON part time
50% earnings
Kit Only $10
Call Dorothy ISR
(850) 973-3153











et la ies,


theCommun ty

Calendar



so much more!


Fiial


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All The Local News

Subscribe Today!!!

The Price For Both Papers Is Just
$28 per Year In-County

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--------- - - - - - -
f NEW RENEW

IName I
lAddress


City /State/Zip
IPhone#
I 0 I
SMailTo: GreenePublishing, Inc, P.O.,Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341

I or bring by theEnterpriseRecorder office,
L -------------------------


General News/School Reporter
needed. Must be a team player,
able to handle multiple tasks, and
be able to cover a variety of stories.
Experience in writing/reporting
preferred, computer experience re-
quired. Must have an excellent
knowledge of English grammar,
and its proper .usage.
Apply in person only at the Madi-
son County Carrier newspaper of-
fice, located at 1695 South SR 53.


PAYMENTS
Classified
advertisement
is paid in advance.
We do accept:

fSVISA


PRICE
Ads start at $10 for the
first 20 words and


104t a
word
thereafter.


FREQUENT

RUNS
Your Classified will
appear in both
of our papers s
for the same
low price.


HOW TO PLACE
YOUR CLASSIFIED
You may e-mail your ad to us or use
U.S. Mail Service. And of course,
you are always welcome to stop by to
place your classified with us
or call us
Monday Friday
8am-Spm at
850-973-4141
J











Wednesday, November 21, 2007


Madison Superstorage, 401 Martin Luther King Drive, Madison, Florida and Jasper
Superstorage, 1213 US HWY 129N, Jasper, Florida, will have a liquidation sale on
delinquent storage units on August 31, 2007, Storage units to be sold will be, in Madi-
son are, Nicholette Williams #12B Unit 8D, John McDonald #5E, Montrell Hawkins
#12. In Jasper, Leon Black Unit #14 & 44, Marie Brown Unit #70, Monica Green Unit
#78, Curtis McCormack Unit #55, Joseph Miles Unit #80, James Sheppard Unit #41
and Mary Beth Windham Unit #1. Contents are believed to be household items. Inter-
ested buyers please contact our office at 850-973-2215 before November 30, 2007 for in-
formation on placing bids.
11/21, 11/28


LEGAL NOTICE

The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting of
the Board of Directors on Monday, December 3, 2007, 6:00 P.M. at the Suwannee Riv-
er Economic Council, Inc., Senior Center Building in Live Oak, Florida
11/21


Under the Authority of the Self-Service Storage Facility Act, Section 83.805 the de-
scribed below has been seized for nonpayment of rent and other accrued expenses.
Property consists primarily of household & personal goods in units rented by: Melvin
Alexander. Clinton CogdelL Marvin King. Chris Parker. and Shirley Scott. The prop-
erty will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the Self-Storage Facil-
ity Act, Section 83.806. The sale will be held Friday, November 30. 2007 at 9:00 A.M.,
at the Madison Mini Storage, 1098 East U.S. 90, in Madison, Florida For farther in-
formation call 971-5744.
11/14, 11/21


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

There will be a regular meeting of the Madison County Board of County Commission-
ers on December 5, 2007 at 9:00 a.m. in the County Commissioner's Meeting Room,
229 SW Pinckney Street, Room 107, Madison, Florida, to hear the following item.

TEMPORARY USE PERMIT CASE NO. 07-2. Catharine Wren is requesting a Tem-
porary Use Permit to allow a second dwelling in order to care for her husband, on a
parcel of land located at 774 NE Dill Street, Madison, Florida Section 31, Township 2N,
Range 10E, in Madison County. Said parcel contains 10 acres more or less and is
zoned Agricultural -2.

For a more complete and accurate legal description, please feel free to contact the Madi-
son County Planning & Zoning Department at (850) 973-3179.

11/14. 11/21


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ARTHUR G. SMITH, the holder of the following
certificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number, year of issuance, description of property and the name in which it is assessed
is as following:

CERTIFICATE N0.02-959-TD
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2002
NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED. JEFFREY NAPIER, TRAVIS NAPIER &
FREDRICK, NAPIER
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Parcel S17-1N-1 1-6183.1ET.012
LOT 12 OF MADISON ESTATES S/D

All of said property being in the County of Madison, State of Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed according to the law, the property described in such certifi-
cate will be sold to the highest bidder at the WEST FRONT DOOR at the Madison
County Courthouse on the 18th day of DECEMBER, 2007 at 11:00 am.

Dated this 6th day of NOVEMBER, 2007.
TIM SANDERS
OF CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY
MADISON, FLORIDA

BY: RAMONA DICKiNSON
Deputy Clerk


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ARTHUR G, SMITH, the holder of the following
certificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon, The certificate
number, year of issuance, description of property and the name in which it is assessed
Is as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.01.361 -TD
YEAR OF ISSUANCE; 2001
NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: JAMES VICKERS
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Parcel #00.00-00-2567-000-000
LOT 9 BLK D SOUTHERN SAWMILL S/D

All of said property being in the County of Madison, State of Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed according to the law, the property described in such certifi-
cate will be sold to the highest bidder at the WEST FRONT DOOR at the Madison
County Courthouse on the 18th day of DECEMBER, 2007 at 11:00 am.

Dated this 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2007.
TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY
MADISON, FLORJDA

BY: RAMONA DICKINSON
Deputy Clerk


ON OCTOBER 15,2007, OSCAR AGUERO MINISTRY, TENDERED TO THE FED-
ERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION AN APPLICATION FOR A CON-
STRUCTION PERMIT FOR A NEW CLASS A FM RADIO STATION TO OPERATE
ON 90.7 MHZ, SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF LEE, FL. THE CALL LETTERS
OF THIS STATION HAVE NOT YET BEEN ASSIGNED.

THE PROPOSED TRANSMITTER ADDRESS IS LOCATED NEAR STATE RD 141
AND NW 69TH DR. THE PROPOSED HEIGHT OF THE STATION BROADCAST
ANTENNA IS 55 METERS ABOVE GROUND LEVEL WITH AN EFFECTIVE RA-
DIATED POWER OF 6 KILOWATTS.

THE STATION'S STUDIO WILL BE LOCATED IN LEE, FL. COPIES OF THE AP-
PLICATION AND RELATED MATERIAL ARE AVAILABLE FOR PUBLIC IN-
SPECTION AT LEE PUBLIC LIBRARY 190 SE COUNTY ROAD 255, LEE, FL
32059. THE BOARD MEMBERS ARE: OSCAR AGUERO, STELLA AGUERO,
DIEGO AGUERO, FERNANDO CASTRO, MAXIMO SOTELO, HECTOR P#REZ,
JAVIER RODRIQUEZ, YADER SIMPSON, RENE BETANCOURT, AND ELIAM
SAUCZUK.

11/14.11/21


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.


D & E POOL 1995, LLP
Plaintiff,


Case No.: 2007-526-CA
CIVIL DIVISION


vs.

CYNTHIA ELAINE JOHNSON,
Defendant.
/
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CYNTHIA ELAINE JOHNSON
Post Office Box 933
Madison, Florida 32341

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to said com-
plaint on the Plaintiff's attorney, whose name and address is: Cary A. Hardee, II, Post
Office Drawer 450, Madison, Florida 32341 on or before NOVEMBER 28, 2007, and
file the original with the Clerk of this court before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court on this 26th day of October, A.D.
2007.
By: TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the Court
By: Christy R. Wilson, Deputy Clerk
10/31.11/7.11/14/11/21


www.greenepublishing.com





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Pioanr (00)461-5422.




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ADVERTISING NETWORK$ oF FLORIDA


Classified I Display [Met~io Daly


FlmzidaRea1Estate


FL RIDAIAIND OWNER FINAIC ED- 10- un ti mtas,
osan macny, pnaid,mdupundr lutri,B9900,Sgrat
valm. Limited tim offar, www.l00Salland.cam Fld Week of November 19, 2007
Woodland Group, In. (800)352-5263 LiG 1E r. eek f ovember 19, 2007J


k


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 83. PART IV


PUBLIC NOTICE


LAILI, IJL/Aa. IA13


lif


11/14, 11/2i. 11/28. 12/5


11"/1A l 11/1i n11/ i/ic







www.greenepublishin2.com


eo Nestle Unters
ris Proud To Be A Part of
The Madison Community and
Supports The Cowboys!


Mladison


Bottling '

1 NORTH AMERICA


Connecticut vs. West Virginia

IT'S EASY! Just pick the winners
of this week's games featured in each ad
and send us your entry!
Each week, the entry with the most
correct picks (and the closest to the game
score in the tie breaker) will win a Beef
and Cheddar Combo Meal from Arby's
and their choice of a $20.00 check from
Greene Publishing, Inc. or 2 tickets to
Wild Adventures Theme Park. The
Second Place winner will receive 4 movie
passes and the Third Place winner will
receive 2 movie passes from Greene 4
Publishing, Inc.
This Week's Winners


1. Kelsey Mercer

2. Jon Steiner

3. Jesse Dobbs


GOOD LUCK, COWBOYS!
PI &I-2---- Wi- s-iS


Made Fresh Daily
Main Street Greenville, FL
Virgini85a vs0-948-3034 Virginia Tech


Virginia vs. Virginia Tech


i1525 Ba'tree Rd.
Suite H
Valdosta. GA
AmnericasHomePlace.com.


America's Propane Company
LP Gas, Appliances, 24 Hour Emergency Service
1606 NE Colin Kelly Highway
Madison, Florida /
(850) 973-2218



Tulanevs. East Carolina

/'

Before or Anter
the Game
Itop by Arby's For a Delicious
Beef & Cheddar Combo. u


4


Boise State vs. Hawaii


Prizes can be picked up at
Greene Publishing, Inc.
1695 South SR 53
Madison, Florida 32340

Official Football Mania Rules
* One entry per person. All entries must be on an
official entry blank. No photocopies accepted.
* Entries must be completely filled out, legible
and dropped off at Greene Publishing. Inc..
1695 South SR 53. Madison, no later than 5 pm
on Friday or mailed to P.O. Drawer 772,
Madison. Florida 32341: postmarked by Friday.
Judges decisions are final
Winners will be announced each Wednesday in
the Madison County Carrier:
Employees of the newspaper and their family
members are not eligible for the Football Mania
contest.
Must be ten (10) years old, or older to play.
In the FSU vs. Florida, write down
what you think the final score will be.
This will be used to break a tie if needed.



SOfficial Entry Form'
SName: I
| Address: |
I City:
IState: ZIP: I
I Phone:


t Hall's

Muffler Center
See I's For All Your New & Used Tire Needs
We Keep All Sizes In Stock!
Automotive Services Also Available
1064 E. US 90 Madison. FL/
50-973-302


FSU vs. Florida


Excavating & Tractor Services Mowing Stump
L Removal Land Clearing Ponds
Construction Cleanup Roads Culvert Pipes
Paul Kinsley Owner/Operator
850-973-6326

Clemson vs. South Carolina


y. 14 S. at 1-10 Madison, FL
973-9872


\ Maryland vs. North Carolina
State


EXHflAUST SYSTEMS
SOLD HERE INSTALLED HERE


Wallace Motors
1512 E. Base St L* Madison, FL
50-973-123

7 Georgia vs.
Georgia Tech


in the name of the team you think will win.


1 I
2.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.I
19.
110.
L-'------.-----.--.--- J


xntmisrte- rorher

Good Luck To The
Cowboys and Warriors


10
Madison vs. Ft. White


Missouri
vs. Kansas


Fill


Nestie -1
Wn+jmrc--


16A Madison County Carrier


Wednesday, November 21, 2007






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Missing
or
Unavailable




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