Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00080
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Uniform Title: Madison County Carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: October 17, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00080
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month


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Cowboys Tame
Bears In
Homecoming Game


See Page 12A See Page4B


According to a Madison County
Sheriff's Department report,
Deputy Josh Harris was dispatched
to the home of Joe and Mary !
Thomas, regarding some stolen


LIFE IN PRISON WITHOUT PAROLE


Hand Pleads Guilty To Murder

I(Ue shot Geraldine Ko-
E nan in the back and,
as she fell to her knees, he
shot her three times in the
face," State Attorney Craig
Jacobsen said, "just so he
could buy some cocaine..."


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Harold Hand pled guilty Mon-
day, October 15, to the February
2006 first-degree murder of Geral-
dine Konan, of Lee.
Judge Leandra Johnson sen-
tenced Hand to life in prison with-
out parole on Tuesday, October 16.
Recommending the sentence,
State Attorney Craig Jacobsen de-
scribed Hand's actions during the
murder.
"He shot Geraldine Konan in
the back and, as she fell to her
knees, he shot her three times in
the face," Jacobsen said, "just so he
could buy some cocaine. He is an
evil person and he deserves to be
prosecuted to the fullest extent of
the law. I had intended to seek the
death penalty for Harid, until some-
one changed my mind several
hours ago. I wish that Hand lives a
long life and he thinks about what.
he did every day of his life."


19-Year-Old

Arrested After

Chase
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing. Inc.
According to the Madison Coun-.
ty Sheriff's Office, Michael Fiffia
was arrested on October 14. The
charges levied against Fiffia in-
clude possession of marijuana, less
than 20 grams, possession of drug
paraphernalia, possession of a con-
trolled substance with intent to sell,
possession of a concealed firearm,
carrying a concealed weapon dur-
ing the commission of a felony,
child abuse and resisting arrest
without violence.
Deputy Kevin Anderson was dis-
patched to a location on Turner
Street in reference to an unknown
black male waving around a
firearm. Contact was made with
Michael Fiffia, age 19. Fiffia was
advised to place his hands on the
hood of the patrol vehicle, but he
would not comply
Deputy Anderson removed his
tazer from his side and advised Fif-
fia again to place his hands on the
vehicle. Fiffia began to walk
around the passenger side of the ve-
hicle, and still would not comply
Fiffia then fled on foot east on
Booker Avenue. He entered the
woods, and following a foot chase,
was located by Sergeant Chris
Cooks, an officer with the Madison
Police Department. Fiffia was in a
wooded area behind Hall's Tire and
Muffler.
Fiffia kept saying, "What?" over
and over, as Cooks ordered him to
leave the woods. Anderson came up
behind Fiffia while he was focused
Please See CHASE, Page 2A


3 Sections, 32 Pages
Around M adison County...................................................5-7A
Bridal....................................................................:.............. 8A
Church................:.,..................................................Section C
Classifieds/Legals................................ ......................... 6-7B
Health............................................................................10-12A
School..................................................... ......................... 4B
Sports.................................................................................... 2B
Viewpoints......................... ........................................ 2-3A


By Ginger Jarvis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Utility customers in the City of
Madison will have an opportunity
to contribute toward college educa-
tion if the city
commissioners
approve a plan .-j" i e have
under consider- W: dles to
action. North sid Steen "A
Florida Commu- ,ws -$d go for
nity College -
president Mor-
ris Steen presented the plan at the
October 9 meeting of the commis-
sioners with Mayor Jim Catron pre-
siding.
Steen explained the "Round-
Up" program as a way to build the
scholarships at the college. The
city's gas or water customers could
choose to round their payments up


By Ginger Jarvis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The City of Madison will get


more parking and
ments in the com-
ing months,
thanks to a Com-
munity Develop-
ment Block Grant.
Brian Hepburn of
Jones Edmunds
reported the bid


street improve-

SJg epburn s
should b
with the complex
April 2008."


results for the work to the city com-
missioners at their regular meeting
on October 9.
According to Hepburn and City
Manager Harold Emrich, Dixie


items, at approximately 12:13 p.m.
oil Saturday, February 25, 2006.
Lt. Tina DeMotsis and Sgt. Art
Deno were called and arrived at the
Please See HAND, Page 2A


to the next dollar with the extra
money going into a scholarship
fund. "We have unique hurdles to
consider." said Steen "All the funds
would go for scholarships."
Steen report-
ed that Tri-
anique hurt County Electric
consider" .Company has
th* funds, ;Ialready ap-
holaships. proved a simi-
lar program,
with the schol-
arship money set aside for chi. dren
of TCEC customers Steen said that
the city could earmark their contri-
butions for residents of Madison if
they wish.
Commissioner Sumter James
commented, "It looks like that
Please See COMMISSIONERS,
Page 2A


Paving, out of Tallahassee, present-
ed the low base bid of $1,029,493.60
for a project to include bricking and
paving crosswalks, adding parking
spaces, and
doing other
aid that the work d oing other
street work on
begin in December s Horry Av-
>tion target set for enue, Shelby
Avenue, Dade
....,,_ .. .,. Street, and
Rutledge
Street. An additional $47,000 for
landscaping brings the total to
$1,076,493.60. The project will in
Please See CITY MEETING,
Page 2A


SCAM ALERT .!!
According to Ben Killingsworth, head principal at
Madison County High School, an "organization"
calling themselves Signature Sports is soliciting lo-
cal businesses for money for ad space. Killingsworth
says that Signature Sports, out of Philadelphia, has
no affiliation with Madison County Schools, and
urges citizens not to be fooled by this scam.


PLEASE DON'T STEAL THE PAPER
The papers of o bur community aren't just abqu.t
the news and events they cover i They are- aboti=
people who get the stories, the people Who place an-
build the ads, and the people who worklate t akie,
sure it's just right and then deliver it.
When a paper is stolen, it harms'-everyone -ow"
volved. Thp paper represents our liveliood,, and
more than that, stealing is just plain Wrong, so;:
PLEASE DON'T STEAL THE PAPERS


The State Of The County:


The Status Of


Madison Families
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
It is this reporter's privilege to introduce The Sta-
tus Of Madison Families. In a timely, four-part series,
Publisher Emerald Kinsley, Associate Publisher Ted
Ensminger, and Edi-
tor Jacob Bembry of-
fer these articles as a
foundation to review
and renew our com-
munity The prevail-
ing sentiment that
has been echoed
among officials, busi-
ness owners and resi-
dents of Madison
County again and
again is "Growth
without Pain." It is in
this framework that
this series is offered.
At the conclusion
of the series, the
"light at the end of
the tunnel" will come
into close view, but
more importantly,
along the way, readers
and their neighbors
will be interviewed and heard as new topics are sys-
tematically introduced. And, of course, reader feed-
back is definitely wanted and welcome. Simply email
your ideas, articles, and opinions to
Please See MADISON FAMILIES, Page 3A

County Commission

To Discuss Cost

Recovery For EMS
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A discussion concerning cost recovery for Madi-
son County Emergency Medical Services (EMS) will
be held at the commission's meeting, which will begin
at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, October 16.
Items on the agenda will include:
CONSENT AGENDA
1. Approval of Emergency Management Subgrant
Agreement.
2. Proclamation from the Suwannee River Eco-
nomic Council Declaring October 30, 2007 as National
Weatherization Day.
3. Grant-in-Aid Agreement for Courthouse Facili-
ties for Madison County
4. Appointment of Members Nominated to the
North Florida Workforce Development Board.
5. Budget Amendment Request for Recreation De-
partment (4).
6. Budget Amendment Request for BOCC / General
Fund (2).
7. Budget Amendment Request for Administration
8. Budget Amendment Request for SHIP Program.
9. Budget Amendment Request for State Court Fa-
cility Surcharge.
10. Budget Amendment Request for $2 Article V IT
Fees.
Please See EMS, Page 3A

Wed Thu Fri
10/17 10/18 10/19


87/71
Partly cloudy. A stray
shower or thunderstonn
is possible. High 871F.


-'---,
86/72
Scattered thunderstorms.
Highs in the mid 80s and
lows in the low 70s.


84/64
Scattered thlimderstonns
possible.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, October 1t, UU2007
Harold Hand, left, listens to his sentence being read as he stands with
his attorney, Brent Hargrove.


MADISON CITY COMMISSIONERS MEETING

Madison Commissioiluirs Consider

Scholarship Plan


MADISON CITY MEETING

Madison To Get More Facelift Work


o
(I
i-


7#-: 460 -., 4,C









2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 17, 2007



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


HAND


cont from page 1A


Pet Peeves
Life is good. By all standard measures the saying goes
... 'Any day above ground is a good day"
But even with good days, we all have thinks that just ir-
ritate us to no end. Go ahead, admit it. Everybody has
those certain pet peeves that just get on the last nerve.
A few weeks ago I was going to write my column on one
pet peeve in particular, but by the time I was half way
through writing, I realized I was griping, not writing a col-
umn, so I highlighted it all, and hit delete (that's computer
talk).
So, I decided I would strike out again but put a lighter
mood on the matter and discuss all pet peeves, some I'm
sure all readers can relate to.
Here they are.....in no particular order.
Hearing a name and telephone number on an answering
machine so fast that I cannot write it down. I'm sure
everyone can relate to this one. Those are times that you
have to hit re-play three times in order to make sure you
have the number written down correctly PLEASE speak
slowly I can't write that fast.
Crying babies in church. Please don't take me wrong on
this let me explain. By all means I love babies and chil-
dren, and church is where they need to grow up. However,
most churches have a nursery If your baby is crying,
please either walk outside or take her to the nursery Or, if
you cannot make your four-year-old sit and behave in
church, please teach him how, or take him to the nursery
Some people cannot block out the crying/fussy child and
they will spend more time wishing the noise would stop
than they actually spend on really hearing the sermon. As
the mother/father of this child, you've learned how to
block out certain things not everyone in that church has
learned that.
Smacking gum. This used to not bother me, until I mar-
ried a man that HATES it. Now I can hear gum smacking
as well as he can. ,
People YELLING at their children. Now, I'm not saying
not to discipline them I'm saying don't YELL at them.
We've all seen it before, while in the grocery store or at a
ball field; a mother is yelling at a child telling them to shut
up. or yelling obscenities at them about beating their
(I think this would be classified as my number
one pet peeve.)
Talking during a movie. This is one thing I can't block
out. I1have to get upand move when the folks behind me
continue to talk.
Answering the telephone and hearing, "Did you just
call me?" I don't know - who are you?
Listening to someone eat, while on the phone with
them. Yes the person you're talking to can hear you
chew that food.
OK, I feel much better now. I'm sure I could have come
up with a lot more if given a few more minutes to think
about it.
I guess this column would kind of fit in with last week's
column about respecting other people. There's just so few
good manners left in the world today
What if all the children/young people had manners like
Beaver (Leave It To Beaver) and Opie (Andy Griffith
Show)? Kind of out-dated but a nice thought none-the-
less.
Until then..... I'll see you around the town.

CITY MEETING


clude only parts A and B of
the original plan; the sec-
tions omitted would have
added $148,000 to the cost.
Hepburn said, "The city
does not have that at pre-
sent."
Hepburn said that the
work should begin in De-
cember with the comple-
tion target set for April
2008.
The board approved
awarding the project to
Dixie Paving in a unani-
mous vote.
In other business, Em-
rich reported that he is
consulting with Tommy


Greene and Charles Webb
regarding the trimming of,
trees in the downtown
area. "I will continue to
consult them and other e
perts about doing it prop-
erly and at the proper
time," he said.
Commissioner Judy
Townsend thanked the
board for their proclama-
tion of Thomas Lee Day.
"That was very thoughtful
of you," she commented.
She also asked City Clerk
Lee Ann Hall to look into
the idea of direct deposit
for paychecks of city
employees.


Got something you no longer use or need?
Sell it in the classifieds.
oala 850-973-4141 E


Thomas home. While they were speaking to owner
of the residence at 1323 NE Juniper, a neighbor, Gabriel
Garcia, who lived north of the Thomases, arrived and
reported to the officers that he had been riding his four-
wheeler on his property and located the body of a white
female in some planted pines.
DeMotsis was shown the location and secured the
scene, beginning the investigation. The victim, Geral-
dine M. Konan, 46, of Lee, was found lying face down
and had been shot once in the back by a small caliber
weapon. It was discovered, after an autopsy on Monday
that she had been shot three times in the face.
The coroner determined that the murder had proba-
bly occurred Thursday, February 23.
During the investigation, it was learned that a sus-
pect in the death, Harold Hand, would be returning to
the scene to see Mary Thomas.
At approximately 8:30 p.m., a beige four-door,
Chevrolet HHR LT sedan ,came nearing the homicide
scene in a suspicious manner. The murder victim had
leased the car.
Members of the Madison County Sheriff's Depart-
ment stopped the vehicle. The occupants were removed


and taken to the Madison County Jail.
The driver of the vehicle, Cynthia A. Taylor, of
Madison, was arrested and charged with possession of
crack cocaine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
The passenger in the front right, Gilbert "Chico"
Jones, Jr., of Madison, was arrested and charged with
possession of crack cocaine and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Harold Hand, the passenger in the right rear, was
arrested on warrants from Columbia County for leav-
ing the scene of an accident and as a suspect in the
murder.
After confessing to killing Konan, Hand was
charged with murder in the first degree. He was also
charged with possession of crack cocaine while armed,
possession of a firearm by a convicted felon and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
A loaded Heritage Arms Rough Rider .22 LR single
action revolver was located beneath the front passenger
seat. A fixed blade knife was located on the left rear pas-
senger floorboard.
A suspected crack cocaine pipe and suspected crack
cocaine were also located in the vehicle.


CHASE


cont from page 1A


on Cooks, and pulled him to the ground, placing him under Sheriff's Department Deputy Jason Whitfield had been
arrest. searching for the firearm that Fiffia allegedly possessed. A
A search revealed a handgun magazine with four HI Point 9mm was located behind a sofa in an old trailer in
Wolf 9mm bullets, two baggies of a green leafy substance the direct path that Fiffia fled. The gun had a Wolf 9mm
(which field tested positive for marijuana), rolling papers, bullet in the chamber.
and hundreds of small plastic baggies. Fiffia was arrested on the above listed charges and
Madison Police Department Ptl. David Jarvis and transported to the county jail.

COMMISSIONERS cont from page 1A


could be a problem," Steen
assured him that strict
rules of confidentiality
would apply Commission-
er Judy Townsend asked,
"Could a customer add
more than just the amount
to the next dollar if he
wants to?" Steen said that
would be allowed.
After some other dis-
cussion, Catron appointed
City Manager Harold Em-
rich, City Clerk Lee Ann
Hall, and City Attorney
Clay Schnitker to prepare
a plan for the
contributions and present
it at a future meeting.
In other business, the
commissioners narrowly


cont from page 1A

Mayor Jim Catron and
Commissioners Myra
Valentine, Sumter James,
and Jim Stanley were pre-
sent for the meeting.


approved a new wording
for an impact-fee ordi-
nance. A resident had re-
quested that he not be re-
quired to pay the fee for a
construction site that
would have been affected
by the ordinance. Emrich
told the board. "My re-
view is that the ordinance,
as it stands now, is that
the fees associated with
the project are proper for
payment." Responding' to'
a question about the rea-
son for the
exemption, Emrich said
I 1 i .


that the owner has been
under "an assumption
that was incorrect"
even though he had been
told of the fees when ap-
plying for his building
permit.
Hall told the commis-
sioners, "We have had this
ordinance a year and al-
ready amended it three
times." Schnitker recom-
mended an amendment
rather than' granting the
owner a waiver as request-
ed. Adding to the owner's
confusion was the fact the


city manager's position
was in transition at the
time and the man had to
work with three different
Officials in that position.
Catron said, "Every
time we amend the ordi-
nance, they (residents) say
go in and build a case and
they (commissioners) will
give in."
So the final vote to ap-
prove amending the ordi-
nance, Catroin,' Myra
Valentine, and Jim Stan-
ley voted for it, Townsend
and James voted against.


you Are Invit
To a Barbeque Buffet To
Our Florida Cabinet Membi

Thursday, Octobe

at 6:00 p.m.
Madison Woman's Club
Lakeshore Drive Madison, F1
Hosts: Madison Count) Republican Executi
Wend\ Branham. Chairman
Madison County Area Veter
To Be Recognized & Honor


$20 Donation For Tickets Call Marianne Green 973-326700,
Veterans: Call J.P. Maultsby at 973-8685(h) / 948-2211 (w)_
7Thi adrvermerntpawdjfrbT o'' m nrep U..nkn.,



Question Of The Week


90
"Do you
think
teachers 70
should
get
bonuses 5so
based on
how well 40
their 30
students
test?" 20
10


Log on to www.greenepublishing.com to answer this week's question...
"Have you registered to be an organ donor?"
Voting for this question will end Monday, October 22 at 9 a.m.









Wednesday, October 17, 2007 www.2reenepublishin2.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee

Limelight
Jacob B5embry
Colunmnst


Lee UMC Hosts Homecoming Sunday

Lee United Methodist Church will host their homecom-
ing on Sunday, October 21. Rev. Tim Blanton, pastor of
Branford UMC, will be the guest speaker. Services begin at
10 a.m. Dinner on the church grounds will immediately fol-
low the service.
First Baptist Church of Lee will host its fall festival on
Wednesday October 24, from 6-8 p.m. All are invited to go
out and have a great time in the Lord.
Lee Elementary School will hold their fall festival on Fri-
day October 26, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the school. Every-
one is invited to come out and enjoy a great time.
Midway Church of God will host its annual "Dare to Be
Different" Halloween alternative on Wednesday, October
31. The church will be showing children that drugs and
witches are bad and that God is good. There will be a hobo
supper, hayride with trunk and treat following. All are in-
vited.
Deanna Hauss, Emily Cline, Robert Phillips, Maria May-
field, Ernie Blanton and Brian McMullen celebrate their
birthdays on Wednesday, October 17. Billy Sealey and Rob-
bie Phillips celebrate their birthdays on Thursday, October
18. J.W Phillips, Glenn Fenneman, Dennis Martin, Gail
Carter, Lori Dowdy and D.J. Rye celebrate their birthdays
on Friday, October 19. Tyler Gilbert celebrates his birthday
on Saturday, October 20. Libby Welch and Lance Billy cele-
brate their birthdays on Sunday, October 21. Dub Wyche
celebrates his birthday on Monday, October 22. Rich
Sweitzer celebrates his birthday on Tuesday, October 23.
Gene and Ramona Guess and Tommy and Lenora Pate
celebrate their anniversaries this Thursday, October 18.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week and
a beautiful forever! May God bless each and every one of
you!


MADISON FAMILIES


Cont from page 1A


michael()greenepublishing.com.
There is another theme that will also become more vis-
ible as the series develops. Placed under the title, "Old
School versus New School," there will be an examination
of what is and why it is. Questions like "Who's doing it?"
will be combined with "Why and how are they doing it?"
The difficult questions will also be asked, "Could it be done
better.?'and ",What does this do for ourohidren?" ,-. ..
A few ghosts may come out of the closet as well, but not
simply for community amusement. Instead, the brave in
public service will be given the opportunity to educate and
address the community Again, this is not for the sake of
conversation and gossip. The goal is to establish a founda-
tion of communication-on which solutions to these core
concerns can be advanced.,
"Lead-, follow or get out of the way," might be the se-
ries' slogap turtied war cry considering the Stateiof Flori-
da has designated Madison County as an area of "critical
economic concern." Anyone who has ever had a loved one
in critical condition understands that a critical status in-
cludes being closely and constantly monitored, which is
exactly how the series will begin.. Moreover, The Status of
Madison Families will closely examine the current "criti-
cal" state, concluding with a prognosis and proposed treat-
ment for a total recovery.
Facts and figures will ba an important element for ex-
tracting the "real-world" side of what lies beneath The Sta-
tus of Madison Families. Accordingly demographics and
statistical comparisons will be introduced. Mark Twain,
in his "Chapters from my Autobiography" made a notable
quote he once heard all the more famous saying, "There
are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics;."
So, as details of the series are read, and perhaps de-
bated, Twain's sentiment may become personally relevant.
And although writers and readers alike are challenged to
make it a practice to support their differences and mini-
mize opinion, the fact that business and social statistics
have historically been twisted to support selfish goals is
undeniable. In order to prevent, or at least minimize this
from happening, statistics will be limited to those with the
least likelihood of bias, like baseball statistics for instance,
where batting average and home run numbers are simply
counted. However, also like baseball, determining
whether the numbers are relatively "good" or "bad" will be
prone to opinion. Consequently, community statistics will
be come from the most objective sources available and la-
beled as such.
Developers, both from the current pool of Madison
businesses and from those looking to join or enlarge the
pond, and anyone else with an entrepreneurial spirit for
that matter, are also strongly urged to participate.
"Growth without Pain" implies that the community has
close ties that must never be ignored. It also implies that
the "needs of the many" and the "needs of the few" must
be considered to achieve a true "win-win" outcome. So, old
and new, rich and poor, short-term and long-term, as well
as all races, cultures and backgrounds will be included
without exception if they fall into those elements that
comprise the The Status of Madison Families.
Considering the qualities that make and preserve the
community, things like belief in the divine, preserving
virtue and values, easy living, rolling pastures, and all the
simple pleasures that make us what we are, must be
dropped in priority to the bleeding man at our feet. In oth-
er words, there is no longer a debate as to whether the crit-
ical condition exists. And, the ambulance service out of
town is overrun and will not be considered an option for
now. Besides, who among us would stop to smell the roses.
or defend our proud heritage while children are falling at
the door?
Madison County is the home of the Four Freedoms:
freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship,
freedom from want, and freedom from fear. They are cen-
tral to the commitment necessary to change the state of
the county Are we our brother's keeper? The readers will
decide, and in doing so, may just change The Status of
Madison Families.


STRAY VECTORS


(Editorial Note:
Stray Vectors is
Boyles' byline for National
random thoughts.) National
The three pil- *S
lars of counterin- Secunity
surgency are:
clear (an area of Joe Boyles
the enemy); hold Guest Columnist
(keep the peace);
and build (stable
institutions that
support the peo-
ple). That is Petraeus' surge strategy in a
nutshell.
An exclusive resort in Sri Lanka has cre-
ated a dessert called the "Fortress Stilt
Fisherman Indulgence" that goes for a
mere $14,500. I don't think I'll be ordering
that off the menu it would give me heart-
burn.
In questioning General David Petraeus
during -the Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee hearing, Senator Hillary Clinton
said that to accept his testimony required
"a willing suspension of disbelief." Now I
know that folks here in Madison don't use
that kind of language, but I think she called
him a liar.
Democrats desperately want to improve
their image on national security and yet,
Hillary Clinton and Barrack Obama voted
against extending the Foreign Intelligence
Surveillance Act and John Edwards says
that the war on terrorism is a "bumper
sticker slogan." Do these candidates really
expect the American people to believe they
are serious about protecting us from ji-
hadists like those that attacked on 9/11?
About one-third (34 percent) of our na-
tion's gross domestic product (GDP the
sum total of all goods and services pro-
duced) are consumed by government in the
form of taxes at federal, state and local lev-
el. How much more of our income can we
stand to hand over to the government and
still keep the economy viable?
The reauthorization bill for the State
Children's Health Insurance Program
(SCHIP) passed by Democrats expands the
program and eliminates the Medicare trig-
ger passed by Republicans in 2003 which
requires Congress to address Medicare's fi-
nancial insolvency Apparently liberal os-
triches want to hide their heads in the
sand and pretend that Medicare's $32 tril-
lion unfunded liability doesn't exist. Does
that sound responsible to you?
Why can't people just make a decision
and then stick with it? "I think I'll retire.
No, on second thought, I'll unretire." Last
time I checked, there is no such word as
unretire. First it was Magic Johnson.

EMS


11. Budget Amend-
ment Request for Law
Enforcement Education
& Surcharge.
12. Budget Amend-
ment Request for Special
Law Enforcement Trust.
13. Budget Amend-
ment Request for Fiscal-
ly Constrained County.
14. Budget Amend-
ment Request for Solid
Waste / EMS / Fire.
15. Budget Amend-
ment Request for Fire /
Recycling.
16. Budget Amend-
ment Request for Li-
brary.
17. Budget Amend-
ment Request for Solid
Waste.
18. Budget Amend-
ment Request for Exten-
sion Office.
19. Budget Amend-


/ Then Michael
4 b Jordan. Billy
7 Donovan heads
S to the NBA and
reverses himself
over the week-
| end. Now, it is
Larry Craig's
turn. Yikes.
The biggest
L" problem an orga-
nization (two or
more people unit-
ed in a common purpose) has is communi-
cation. It has always been that way, still is,
and despite all the improvements brought
by technology, will continue to be in the fu-
ture.
Our principal enemy in Iraq is al-Qaeda.
Not only do they create unspeakable vio-
lence, but they sparked the sectarian con-
flict between Sunni and Shia by the Febru-
ary, 2006 bombing of the "Golden Dome";.
mosque in Samarra. Al-Qaeda in Iraq is
led by foreign Sunni Arabs from surround-
ing countries entering Iraq through Jor-
dan and Syria. The al-Qaeda "soldiers" are
Iraqi street thugs and criminals.
Hillary Clinton's efforts in 1993 to pro-
vide universal health care was entitled
"managed competition." Isn't that an oxy-
moron? How do you manage competition
... determine the winner before you play
the game? Stand by for round 2.
We have been in Afghanistan and Iraq
for less than six years. How long will we
remain? Maybe we can learn something
from history Sixty-two years after the fall
of the Axis, we are still in Germany, Japan,
'and Italy. Fifty-four years after an
armistice signaled the end of the Korean
War, we are still in Sough Korea ensuring
the peace. How long will we be in
Afghanistan and Iraq maybe a long, long,
time.
The level of violence in Iraq is both de-
plorable and discouraging, but let me ask
you this question: what would have been
the level of violence among Iraqi factions
without outside interference from al-Qae-
da, Syria and Iran? Although we'll never
know for sure, I'm willing to bet it would
be far lower than it is today
Those of you who regularly read this
column know that I am pretty hard on Lib-
erals and Democrats, but when I see some-
thing good that deserves praise, party affil-
iation is immaterial. So, kudos to our Sen-
ator Bill Nelson who, unlike most Democ-
rats, used his time as a member of the Sen-
ate Foreign Relations Committee to ask ex-
cellent questions to General David Pe-
traeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker. It


Cont from page 1A


ment Request for EMS.
NEW BUSINESS
1. Presentation Re-
garding Waste in the
County Mr. Elmer
Spear.
2. Public Hearing for
Enactment of CPA 07-5
(Small Scale Amendment
for Ag 2 to Commercial).
3. Public Hearing for
Enactment of CPA 07-6
(Small Scale Amendment
for Residential to Com-
mercial).
4. Public Hearing for
Enactment of Ordinance
07-8 (Amend Landscape
Buffer Requirements in
Land Development
Code).
5. Resolution 07-10-17,
Memorandum of Agree-
ment with the Florida
Department of Trans-
portation for Financial


Project ID 212536-1-43-01
(Bridge Replacement of-
Bridge over the Little
Aucilla River).
6. Discussion Con-
cerning Cost Recovery
for EMS Billing.
7. Surplus Property
List for Auction.
8. Request for 1-year
Extension for Summer-
wood South Preliminary
Plat.
9. Approval of Tem-
porary Use Permit for
Ms. Amelia Mulkey.
10. Discussion on
Loper Pond Plantation
Public Purpose Site.
11. Discussion on No-
vember 21st Commission
Meeting Date.
12. Discussion on
"Class C" Meals.
13. Lease Agreement
for County Air Strip.


rida Press Asso^ ,


2007
Award Winning Newspaper







Chnmeot(Ftozid'sTbmont tudtqNepapm
P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Website:
www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
*' ports
news@greenepublishing.com
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
Classifieds /Legals
susan@greenepublishing.com
PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene Ktnsley
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Ted Ensminger
EDITOR
Jacob Bembry
SSTAFF WRITERS
Jessica Higginbotham
and Michael Curtis
GRAPmc DESIGNERS
Carla Barren and Heather Bowen
TY-PESETrER/SaBSCRIPTIONS
Bryant Thigpen
ADVERrISING
SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy McKmney,
Jeannene Dunn and Lettie Sexton
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Deadline for clssifieds is
Monday at 3:00 p m.
Deadline for Legal Advertisement is
Monday at 5pm.
There will be a '3' charge for Affidavits
SUBSCRIPnON RATES:
In County $28 Out-of-Couty $35
i State & local taxes included
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT.
MANAGER
Sheree Miller

Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS
324 800] designed for the
express reading pleasures of the
people of its circulation area, be
they past, present or future resi-
dents.
Published weekly by
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
South State Road 53, Madison,
Florida 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the
right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the man-
agement, will not be for the best
interest of the county and/or the
owners of this newspaper, and to
investigate any advertisement
submitted.
All photos given to Greene
Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up
no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene
Publishing, Inc. will. not be
responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


LO/












Griner Cadillac-Pontiac And Griner Nissan



Celebrate 25th Anniversary


Today, the Griner Auto Group includes these two state of the art locations. His
Cadillac Pontiac dealership and his Nissan Dealership are located side by side on In-
ner Perimeter Circle, with the Chevrolet Pontiac dealership being located in Quitman.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
For 25 years, since Tommy Griner pur-
chased the Cadillac-Pontiac and Nissan
dealerships from Reddick Motors in 1982,
the Griner Automotive Group has grown
into a real family affair. "This has been
the family business since my father, Felton
Griner, first opened a used car dealership
in Valdosta in 1953. At that time, my un-
cle, Virgil Griner, had already opened a
Chevrolet dealership in Quitman, Ga. in
1948," Griner noted.
Since joining their father in the used
car business, Tommy Griner, along with
sister Janis and brother Larry, has seen
family involvement grow with the dealer-
ship. .
"My brother [aTif'U joibn'Tny uncle in


Quitman in 1978. His daughters, Reagan
Hall and Ginger Rothrock have also joined
the business. That makes nine of us in
all," Griner explained. "We run the busi-
ness as a family, and like a family, we treat
our customers the same way," he added.
Tommy Griner's children also play key
roles in the Griner Automotive Group, un-
der which the three dealerships operate.
Son Craig Griner serves as the General
Manager over the Cadillac-Pontiac and
Nissan dealerships; son Clay Griner is the
dealer-principal of the Chevrolet-Pontiac
dealership in Quitman, Ga.; daughter Am-
ber Griner runs the Internet department;
and daughter Amy Avant works in the
dealership's administrative department.
Her husband, Scott Avant, is a sales man-
ager.


This classic photograph is of Fel-
ton Griner, Tommy's father, shown here at
the dealership on North Ashley Street in
1986.


' ?^.


RE YOUR CHEVY NOWl
S LTZ 2007 SILVERADO RC W/T
^ 'I'Bain^, "Noww


-p


or 6276/mo. SALE -6- ,929* or .27838*y

Truck Month Ends October 311
With $0 Down for 72 months/1.9% with GMAC approval. Plus tax & title.

7 AN AMERICAN REVOLUTION


/mo.


2004 TRAILBLAZER LS


2004 CHEVY TAHOE LT
., -:\ fl


2007 CHEW SILVERADO


Hiti
C ~ lE~nA R^aWEO ffaSl nnM11 n~~


pproyal. Plus tax & title. Yo FUK OU IWjIV I I VIIV r IVI rKJVcU IKUII 395823

VL K USED VEHaICLES n
100 K /5 Year Powrtrain


Still selling after all these years. Tom-
my Griner. at his dealership in 1982 right)
and 25 years later in front of his Cadillac -
Pontiac location (above).


This Iswhiereitfganfor Tommy Griner. This photograph, taken in 1982,
the original location on Ashley Street, just north of downtown Valdosta.


SALE~


DoUuwln tVIlAG


www.greenepublishing.com


LVL1(A^Xf&ILI U4,MXI "jJ.Wllf,


Wednesday, October 17, 2007


4A Madison County Carrier


. '** ,'. * '








Wednesday, October 17, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


EO gNNV I1


CALfJAI


Browning
Mildred G. Brown-
ing, age 89, died Tuesday,
October 9, 2007 in Madison,
Florida.
Funeral services were
held 11 a.m. Monday, Octo-
ber 15, 2007 at Cherry Lake
Cemetery in Cherry Lake.
The family received
friends one hour prior at
Beggs Funeral Home in
Madison. In lieu of flow-
ers, donations may be
made to Big Bend Hospice,
1723 Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee, Fl. 32308.
She is survived by six
grandchildren: Sabrina
Whitaker (Todd) of Madi-
son, Ray Browning (Deb-
bie) of Madison, Andrea
Blitch (Randy) of
Gainesville, Michael
Browning. (Brandi) of
Madison, Mark Browning
(Jennifer) of Madison, and
Kris Browning of
Thomasville, Ga.; two
daughters-in-law, Kay
Browning of Madison and
Lavonne Browning of
Cherry Lake; 14 great-
grandchildren; and six
great-great grandchildren;
three nephews; Kenneth
and Michael Calderone
and Tommy How and Wife
Jana.
She was pre-deceased
by her husband, H.A.
Browning and two sons,
Stekre Browning and Gene
Browning.
She was born in Pasco
County and lived in Cher-
ry Lake and Tampa before
moving to Madison six
years ago. She loved fish-
ing, dancing, poetry and
rhyme. She was a former
member Cherry Lake Bap-
tist Church and one of the
pioneers of Cherry Lake.

Robbie

Patterson

Gandy
Robbie Patterson
Gandy, age. 98, died Sunday
October 14, 2007 in Madison.
Funeral services will be
Wednesday October 17, 2007
at 11 a.m. at Beggs Funeral
Home Madison Chapel with
burial to follow at Oak Ridge
Cemetery in Madison.
The family will receive
friends Wednesday 1 hour
prior to the service from 10
to 11 a.m. at Beggs Funeral
Home.
She was born in Madison,
Florida, where she was a life
long resident. She was em-
ployeed with Madison
County School Board, and
Fraleigh/Ashley Tobacco
Co. She was Secretary and
Treasurer for Madison Pres-
byterian Church, where she
was a member.
She is survived by one
son: Jack Austin (and Betty)
of Alachua, Fl.; one daugh-
ter: Harriett Smith of Madi-
son; three grandchildren:
Gareth Smith (and Chan-
dra), Travis Smith (and
Marie), and Susan Nazworth
(and Terry); four great-
grandchildren; one great
niece: Mikak Ford (and
Shawn), and one nephew,
Mike Patterson (and Becky).



<,Y'^^3


Elaine Webb
Connie Elaine Webb,
age 46, died Friday, October
12, 2007 in Tallahassee.
Funeral services were
held Tuesday, October 16 at
Beggs Funeral Home with
burial at Midway Cemetery
in Madison County
Visitation was held Sun-
day, October 15, from 3-5 p.m.
at Beggs Apalachee Chapel
in Tallahassee and Monday,
October 16, at Beggs Chapel
in Madison from 7-9 p.m.
A native of Madison, she
resided in Tallahassee the
past 17 years. She was a
computer specialist at Flori-
da State University and was
a Baptist and attended Mid-
way Baptist Church in
Madison.
She is survived by her
lifetime partner, Dena Mc-
Daniel; two daughters, Dena
McDaniel and Tori Smith of
Tallahassee; a son, Cody
Smith of Tallahassee; five
brothers, James Webb, Arlie
Webb (Sonja), Ira Webb
(Judy), Johnny Webb (Jessi-
ca), and Dennie .Webb
(Rhonda), all of Madison;
two sisters, Margie Revels
and Robbie Overby (Jim) of
Madison; and several nieces
and nephews.

Dorothy

Mouzon

Seals Sockel
Dorothy Mouzon Seals
Sockel, 73, died Wednesday,
October 10, 2007, in Madi-
son.
Funeral services were
held at 2 p.m. on Saturday,
October 13, 2007 at Beggs Fu-
neral Home with burial fol-
lowing in Pine Grove Ceme-
tery
The family received
friends 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on
Friday, October 12, 2007 at
the funeral home.
She was born in Madison,
where she lived most of her
life. She was a shipping
clerk with Gold Kist for 20
years before retiring. She
was a member of Pine
Grove Baptist Church in
Madison.
She is survived by four
sisters Lorena Kelley (Ed) of
Madison, SuEllen Seals of
Madison, Rose Gaston
(Loren) of Madison, There-
sa Washington (Joe) of
Pinetta; one brother, Bennie
Seals (Sherry) of Tallahas-
see; an uncle, Lawrence Lat-
ner, of Avon Park; and many
nephews, nieces, and great
nephews.













'r- i

iet lead 0n uddw
classifedsl
he ommunithy


Each Tuesday Night in
October
Madison County Cen-
tral School will be hosting
Parent Workshops every
Tuesday night in October,
starting at 6 p.m. in the Me-
dia Center. A different topic
will be discussed each
night. Come join us for
some refreshments, fun,
and information. Please call
973-5022 ext. 314 for more in-
formation.
October 19-21
Several regional quilt-
ing guilds, Lady of the Lake
Quilters' Guild, Withla-
coochee Quilter's Guild,
Springhouse Quilters and
the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Support Organiza-
tion is hosting a viewer
judged quilt show at the
Stephen Foster Cultural
Center in White Springs,
October 19-21, 2007. If you
have made a quilt you
would like to show or own a
quilt you would like to dis-
play, please contact folk-
lorist Kelly Green at the
Stephen Foster Cultural
Center for entry instruc-
tions at 386-397-4331. Quilts
are due at the park no later
than Sunday October 7th.
October 21
The Madison County
Historical Society will be
meeting October 21 at 2:30
p.m., at Elmer's Genealogy


Library The speaker will be
Judge Edwin Browning.
October 21
Installation Service for
Pastor James Thompson
will be held at Cascade Mis-
sionary Baptist Church on
Sunday October 21, at 3 p.m.
Come and share in this spir-
itual worship service where
God will be praised and the
victory celebrated.
October 25
Our Commissioner of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services, Charles Bronson,
is guest speaker at the bar-
becue 6:30 p.m. Thursday
October 25th hosted by
Madison County Republi-
cans at the Woman's Club.
Other special guests are
Madison County veterans of
Iraq and Afghanistan ser-
vice. The community is in-
vited. Tickets and infor-
mation: 973-3269.
October 29
TABE (Test of Adult Ba-
sic Education) Testing will
be held at NFCC Testing
Center (Bldg. #16), on Oct.
29 at 5 p.m. TABE is re-
quired for acceptance into
vocational/technical pro-
grams. Photo ID and pre-
registration is required. To
*register, please call (850) 973-
9451.
November 3
The annual family re-
union of WT. Taylor and


Luch at& Sun-1ipm


Luella McLeod-Taylor will
be held November 3 begin-
ning at 10 a.m. with dinner
at 12 p.m. at the Suwannee
State Park cabin area (fol-
low signs). As always, the
extended families of Isacca
Newton Lamb, Daniel Web-
ster McLeod, and David
Walker are cordially invited.
to attend. Bring any old pho-
tographs of family.
November 3
Diabetes overview, psy-
chology and exercise, pre-


sented by Bonnie Gobar
Mathis, Senior Health Edu-
cator with the Madison
County Health Department
Diann Douglas, Director of
the Madison County Exten-
sion Office, will present a ses-
sion on food portion control
Each participant will receive
a free pedometer (a great de-
vice to add to your exercise
tools that counts the number
.of steps you take each day)
and free recipes to take home
after completing this class.


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6A Madison County Carrier www.2reenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 17, 2007



AROUND MADISON COUNTY




Outback Expanding Fences To Meet New Opportunities


a challenge. Operating
four businesses under the
Outback umbrella, Plum-
mer now brings to Madi-
son, Outback Fence and
Deck, Outback Lawn and


Beltone To Visit


Lions Club
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
In an abbreviated meeting, ,
Tom Moffses, presiding over
last week's Lions Club meet-
ing at Madison County Meimo-
rial hospital, reminded those
in attendance that the follow-
ing week's meeting, scheduled '
for Tuesday,- October 16 at y
12:00 noon, would include a
gast'speaker"from Beltone,
the hearinghlealthicompany. _
Lions International, 'l
through -its local clubs, focus- "
es pfrt of its efforts on vision
an4 hearing health. ;,The Li- Tom Moffses presided
ons appreciate your participa- over last week's Lions
tion in their-fuindraisers and Club meeting.
gratefully ask ;residents to
look for their donation boxes, mainly for recycling eye-
glasses at offices and retailers around Madison.


Retirees Need Regular -
and The Potential For Rising Income
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones
In all likelihood, the prices of goods and services will
continue rising year by year. This may not be too much of a
problem for you when you're working, because your salary
is probably also going up over time. But. when you retire,
you may find that inflation becomes a bigger concern and
that's why you need to take steps to help provide some
investment sources that have the potential for rising income
during your retirement years.
Of course, as a retiree, you may feel that you need to
invest more conservatively than you did when you were
working. After all, you may think, you're no longer drawing
a paycheck, so you can't really afford to take chances 6n
investments that constantly fluctuate in value.
Consequently, you may be inclined to stick with fixed-
income vehicles, such as investment-grade bonds and cer-
tificates of deposit (CDs). When you purchase these securi-
ties you typically have the expectation that your principal
will be preserved and you will receive regular interest pay-
ments. So, there's no risk involved, right?
Actually, that's not the case. Bonds, CDs and other
fixed-income investments carry their own type of risk pur-
chasing power risk. Suppose, for example, that your bonds
and CDs provide you with interest income of $1,000 a year.
Even with a relatively mild inflation rate of 3 percent, your
$1,000 will only be worth $863.00 in five years, and
$744.00 in 10 years. And if inflation picks up to 5 percent,
the purchasing power of your $1,000 will drop to $774.00
in five years and to just $614.00 in 10 years.
Those are big drops. And if you spend two or even three
decades in retirement a definite possibility you could
lose even more purchasing power if you invest solely in
fixed-income vehicles. That's why you need to consider
investments that provide you with not just regular income,
but the potential for rising income. That's why you may
want to consider dividend-paying stocks.
You can now find dividend-paying stocks in a wide
variety of industries, including financial services, food pro-
ducers, consumer products, pharmaceuticals, technology,
publishing and others. But in searching for stocks that pay
good dividends, it's important not to be "short-sighted" and
just go after those companies that seem to be paying the
highest dividends at the moment. You need to be sure that a
company's earnings are sufficiently strong to support its
dividend payouts. If a firm's earnings are weak, it may well
cut its dividends, thereby jeopardizing your income stream.
By doing some research, you can find many stocks that
have actually increased their dividends for 25 or more con-
secutive years. Although past performance is not an indica-
tion of future results, that's a pretty good track record, and

it's an indicator of strong, well-run companies who seek to
reward their investors.
Still, as a retiree, you do need to keep two points in
mind about dividend-paying stocks. First, they are not obli-
gated to pay dividends, no matter how good their history
they have the ability to increase, decrease or totally elimi-
nate dividend payments at any time without notice. And
second, they are stocks, which means their price can and
will fluctuate so it is possible to lose some or all of your ini-
tial investment amount.
In short, dividend-paying stocks can be a valuable part
of your portfolio during your retirement years but you
should also include bonds, CDs, government securities and
other investments. By making the right moves, you can
work to stay ahead of inflation without taking on an exces-
sive degree of risk. And that's a winning combination.

Brad Bashaw Edwardjones
Investment Representative
114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
www.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871

4'


Tractor, Outback Land-
scape and Irrigation, and
Outback Marine Construc-
tion.
Originally from the
Jacksonville area where
his father heads up eastern
Florida operations for the
company Plummet; his


wife Brandy, and his two
children, Jett (7) and Ja-
dyn (4) reside in Madison.
"We selected Madison for
the people and the busi-
ness opportunities. It's a
great place to raise a fami-
ly and run a business,"
Plummer noted.
"I've worked with some
of the nicest people. In
fact, a few people that I bid
against in the past now
work for me. These grow-
ing relationships are so
important to me," Plum-
mer added, who under-
stands and appreciates the
challenges coming into the
Madison market.
"The work we perform
is sometimes attempted by
do-it-yourselfers. Many
times this works out fine,
however other times it is
highly problematic and
has even ended in disas-
ter." Plummer explains.
"Independent labor, with-
out proper licensing and li-
ability insurances, offer
rates that may appear good
at first glance. However,
when you take workman-
ship, warranties and liabil-.
ity exposure into account,
the Outback value really
stands out."
"Workers' Comp for in-
stance is very misunder-
stood, but essential to pro-
tecting the home or busi-


ness owner contracting for
services. A decent wage,
payroll taxes and the right
tools aren't optional. It's
just a matter of doing busi-
ness the right way, and I
would like the people of


N


Madison to know that we
do it according to plan the
first time and we stand be-
hind all that we do, "Plum-
mer went on to say
Each of the four divi-
sions of Outback Enter-
prises has its own local
manager who possesses
the know-how one would
look for when contracting
a job. From docks on Cher-
ry Lake, to conventional
fencing and home addi-
tions, Outback Enterprises
is doing it the right way
right now. Plummer in-
tends to build on this repu-
tation, as he becomes a
General Contractor.
"We really want people
to know how glad we are to
be here, and that we don't
ever want to burt or disap-
point anybody, and that
goes for customers as well
as others working in this
market," Plummer said in
closing. And certainly if
-the quality and perma-
nence of Outback products
are any indicator, both
family and business are
here to stay
Outback Enterprises are
conveniently located at
1554 S SR 53 at the inter-
section of US 90 and SR 53
in downtown Madison.
Call Jessica Wise or.David
Plummer at (850) 973-3422
for more information.


I)ERRIAN LEWIS



MARINE BOOTCAMP


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On October 5, Derrian
Lewis, a Madison native,
graduated from United
States Marine Corps boot
camp at Parris Island.
Derrian is the son of
Gordon and Wendy Lewis.
He is the grandson of
Katherine and EL. Lewis
of Mariana, and Helen
Pearson and the late Priest
Maxwell. Derrian has four
brothers and sister, Gor-
don, Briana, Shonte, and
Donte.
Derrian is a 2007 grad-
uate of Madison County
High School. During high
school, he played as a de-
fensive tackle on the varsi-
ty Cowboys' football team.
When Derrian joined
the Marines, he signed his
military occupation spe-
cialty, or MOS, as recon-
naissance. Derrian said
he wanted something in-
teresting to do. On Octo-
ber 21, he's headed to
Camp Lejeune for school
of infantry, or SOI.
Derrian said his most
memorable moment at
Parris Island was the Ea-
gle, Globe, and Anchor
Ceremony It is at that cer-
emony that the young re-
cruits are first called
Marines, after they affix
the symbolic pin to their
cover, or hat. The eagle
represents a proud coun-
try, the globe points to
worldwide service, and the
fouled anchor -stands for
the maritime tradition.


Toe Remod'a & St vmp Gfn~dinlg






~ILE


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 9, 2007
David Plummer is glad to be part of the Madison
Community. Outback Enterprises is located at the cor-
ner of SR 53 and US 90 in downtown Madison.



SPECIALIZING IN GARLIC CRABS & GARLIC SHRIMP


GARLIC POTATOES
CORN ON THE COB
BOILED EGGS & SAUSAGE


David Arthur
386o36299762

Madison Store
850-973-6134

Lake City Store
386-755-9753


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
For David Plummer, Jr.,
owner of Outback Enter-
prises, expanding his busi-
ness has been a thrill and


Serving Madison, Jefferson,

Taylor & Lafayette Counties

Auto, Life, Health, Home.


Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager

Jimmy King, Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071

,Freddy Pitts
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213

Freddy Pitts
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County* Mayo, FL o (386) 294-1399

24/7 Claim Service: 1-866-275-7322
"Helping You Is What We Do Best."


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Wednesday, October 17, 2007


www.igreenepublishin2!.com


Madison County Carrier 7A


.AROUND MADISON COUNTY


NFCC Artist Series IDresents Comedy

"All The Way from

Maanc lia Sprinas9"
Another hit from Fannie Flagg with the Southern charm of
"Fried Green Tomatoes"


Famous author
Fannie Flagg
knows Ed Howard / the
and they both
know all about M A
comedy and the
South. Howard is [
one of the three
creators of the fa-
mous "Tuna"
plays. Now,
Howard's friend
(and fellow Al-
abamian) Fannie
Flagg has handed
over her best-sell-
ing novel, "Daisy
Fay and the Miracle
Man" and asked
Howard to adapt it
to the stage. The
result is a brand
new Southern com-
edy called 'All the
Way from Magno-
lia Springs"- a one-
woman tour de
force starring
Birmingham actress Amber Quick.
The North Florida Community College
Artist Series brings "All the Way from Mag-
nolia Springs" to Van H. Priest Auditorium,
NFCC campus in Madison, Fla., on Thurs-
-day, Oct. 18, at 7 p.m. Tickets are on sale now
from the NFCC Office of College Advance-
ment, 850-973-1653.
The Birmingham News says the play is
"hilarious, will make you laugh out loud!"
The story opens in the summer of 1958 as
snaggle-toothed Daisy Fay Harper is pack-
ing for her trip to the
Miss Mississippi -
Pageant in Tupelo.
Daisy Fay is sassy, re-
sourceful and deter-


mined to make some-
thing of her life and
goes on an astonishing
journey through her
formative years in rur-
al Mississippi where-
she rises from awk-
ward tomboy to a star
at the local community
theatre and an aspir-
ing Miss America.
Along the way, Daisy
Fay does a lot of grow-
ing up, emerging as
one of the most hilari-
ous, appealing, and
prized characters in


Actress Amber
Harper in the south


a


modern fiction. Way from Magnolia
"Ed Howard has
written a perfect adaptation of my book,
and Amber Quick is the perfect Daisy Fay I
couldn't be more thrilled!" said Flagg.
Fannie Flagg officially entered the pan-
theon of Southern writers with the publi-
cation of her novel, "Fried Green Tomatoes
at the Whistle Stop Cafe." With each suc-
ceeding book, Flagg has been compared to
other Southern female writers like Eudora


-?


Cole Bgros. Circus


In 7allahassee


Welty, Harper Lee
and Carson Mc-
wfy ro Cullers. "Daisy Fay
and the Miracle
N 0 LI IA Man" was on the
SW New York Times
P R I N 0 S' bestseller list for 10
weeks. Her second
novel, "Fried Green
Tomatoes at the
Whistle Stop Cafi,"
was on the Times
list for 36 weeks
and made into the
Memorable hit
j movie "Fried Green
Tomatoes," star-
ring Jessica Tandy
and Kathy Bates.
The screenplay,
S also written by
Flagg, earned her
the coveted
Scripters Award
and was nominated
for an Academy
Award and the
Writers Guild of
America Screen Award. Flagg lives in Cali-
fornia and in Alabama.
'All the Way from Magnolia Springs" is
produced on tour by the Springer Theatre,
the official State Theatre of Georgia. The
Springer is a 135-year-old National Historic
Landmark theatre with a year-round sched-
ule of plays, musicals and a top ranked
Academy of Theatre Arts. the theatre also
has one of the nation's busiest touring
schedules, performing in cities in over 80
Southeastern cities each year.
Don't miss this
great Southern come-
dy at NFCC on
Thursday, Oct. 18, at 7
p.m. In addition to
the t performance,
there' will be an art
S exhibit by the Trea-
S '; sures of Madison
a. DCounty Art Guild on
display on the Van H.
Priest Auditorium
grounds before the
performance, during
intermission and af-
ter the performance.
A variety of art,
all created by local
k artists, will be fea-
tured in the exhibit.
Quick as Daisy Fay Tickets for 'All
ern comedy "All the the Way from Magno-
Springs." lia Springs" are on
sale now. Other up-
coming Artist Series performances are The
Piano Men II on Nov 1; War Bonds: The
Songs and Letters of WWII on Jan. 24;
Dance Alive National Ballet on Feb. 14; and
Pastures of Plenty: A Tribute to Woody
Guthrie on March 6. For information or
tickets call 850-973-1653, email Artist-
Series(nfcc.edu or visit the NFCC Artist Se-
ries online at www.nfcc.edu.


world's wackiest acrobat.
Bulgarian gymnasts, Petya
and Viky, center an array of
artists on twin chiffons,
slender swings and twirling
ladders in a stunning aerial
display. And Abuhadba's
poodles compete with the
Cole Bros. Circus ele-
phants, Tina and Jewel, to
steal the show!


Under the direction of
Ringmaster Chris Connors
and singing co-host, Alis-
sandra, Cole Bros. Circus of
the Stars is pure circus-ex-
citing, surprising and a real
treat for kids of all ages.
For ticket information,
please call (800) 796-5672 or
visit
www.gotothecircus.com.


The Cole Bros. Circus is
coming to Tallahassee on
Monday, October 22, and
Tuesday, October 23 at the
Governor's Square Mall.
Show times are 4:30 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m. daily.
The 2007 edition of Cole
Bros. Circus of the Stars
shines the spotlight on
thrills in over 100 minutes
of high action presented by
daredevil performers from
around the world. Revving
immediately into high gear,
The World's Largest Circus
under the Big Top opens
with the ThunderDrome,
where extreme riders from
Latin America defy gravity
in an act that doubles the
danger when the Moto-
Globe of Death splits in
two.
Beijing's bungee Divers
display pluck and impecca-
ble timing, plummeting
from a lofty roost in a hu-
man cascade. From
Guatemala, the Ponce Fam-
ily Flyers fearlessly soar
across the tent, triple-som-
ersaulting from the trapeze.
Taking juggling to new
heights, 'the. Kiirn; Brothers
vault onto horseback to ma-
nipulate spinning objects
while balanced atop their
rapidly moving mounts.
Ukraine's Zarina, the
bravest woman on the plan-
et, blasts off from the Can-
non in a trajectory that tra-
verses a maze of rigging
and spans the length of the
Big Top.
On hand to provide com-
ic relief are The Bermudez
Clowns, along with Brazil's
amazing Andrey, the


THIS MAY BE THE MOST IMPORTANT
DINNER YOU WILL HAVE ALL YEAR.


~1~


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FREE SEMINAR
Tuesday. October 23rd. 6:00 to 7:30pm
Live Oak Garden Club
11th Street. Live Oak
(Dinner provided.)

GUEST SPEAKER
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Associate Clinical Professor of Radiology
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Reservations required Space is limited


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8A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, October 17, 2007


I-A
5,-
4

-~ -~ ~-'
-I
2
~
K.*'~ '~4~
'~I


Sprene- drown So e

Mr and Mrs. Harold E. Sprenkle III of Pinetta are
pleased to announce the engagement
and upcoming
marriage of their
daughter; Cortni
Blair; to William
Lincoln Brown III,
son of Mr William
L. Brown, Jr of
Live Oak and Airs.
Martha R. Van-
brunt of Cairo, Ga.
The couple will be
married on Noem- ,
ber 4, 2007 at Unity .
Baptist Church in'" "^ '
Hanson at 4 p.m. No
local invitations are .
being sent, but all fam-
ily and close friends
are invited to attend.


(


I

I


oov.4


YOUR FORMAL WEA
In Tuxedo Sales & Rentals!


IVEY's


GIR-'
/ 11 ^ ~ ~ 4-,*-. /^.i-t^J^^,^


TS...


DIN!
/n I A, A


Piotrowski -oyd& *

Announce v --
A announce 3321 N. Valdosta Rd. ., r
nga em ent aldosta, Georgia 31602
EngagetL 229-242-8r46 Member American Gem S
Michael Piotrowski of Tallahas- -
see and Jake and Judy Bentley of Madi- "urb -ity cC t e, e
son pre pleased to announce the en-
gagement and upcoming marriage of We Specialize i n
their daughter Katie Lynn Piotrowski, the Cleaning &
-aftthewt David Boyjd,-the son of Mr l" eiloomaiiing
David and Mrs. Lorena Boyd of Moul- of Br'idal Go'w s
trie, Ga.
Katie is a 2006graduate of Madi- 2".. of : -ic
son County High School. She is cur- .,. -..,
son County High School. She is curMonday Friday 7:30 a.m. O- 8:0 p.m. Saturday 7:311 NIoon
rently attending North Florida Cornm- : 229-263-4149
unity College and will graduate 101 Webster St. auitman, GA
with an Associates of Arts degree in .. .
the summer of 2008.
AMatthew is a 2002 graduate of
Colquitt County High School. He is
currently employed by Nestle in
Lee.
The ceremony will take place on aterin Photo.raph. '
Saturday, November 17, 2007 at 5
p.m., at Fellowship Baptist
Church in Madison. A reception
will be held at the Madison 0
Women's Club immediately fol-
lowing the ceremony. All family.
and friends are invited
to attend. No
..* *.7~IL


19~23



Society


~rs
~rs


- , ... ^ ..^ ., ": ..:_:.


-. '- . = -, 1

o =5':


.-Ifnnounce Engagement
Mr: and Mrs. Glenn Peacock of
Madison are pleased to announce the en-
gagement of their daughter Michelle to
Rutherford Klein.
Michelle is the granddaughter of
Mi: and Mrs. John Peacock and Mr. Ju-
nious C. Bedsole, Sr and the late Mary
Elizabeth Bedsole.
Rut is the son of Mri: Richard
Klein, Sr and Ms. Connie Klein of Al-
bany, Georgia, and grandson of Mrs.
Dorothy Shaw and the late Mri:
George Shaw and Mrs. Martha
Klein and the late Mr: Rutherford I.
Klein.
Michelle is a 2002 graduate of
Berry College, Rome, Georgia, with
a Bachelor's degree in early child-
hood education.
Her fiance is the president of
Mobility Plus, Inc., a company lo-
cated in Tallahassee specializing
in customized equipment for indi-
viduals with disabilities.
They will pledge their lives to
each other on October 20, 2007,
at Fellowship Church at 3:00 in
the afternoon. Friends are wel-
come to attend.


kara~ok~epr-oducfio-ns
9Oed~4pl em ,


I


As ou rush around planning
.our wedding, be sure to
lake the time to check out the
upcoming bridal section of the
M.ladisoni County Carrier & the
Mlladison Entterpri'e-Recorder.
You'll find savings on 3our
special occasion.

GREENE t
Publishing, Inc. -
P.O. )rraker 772 lMadison, 1'L
850-973-4141


he


I


'^


i


"*'' t L,: .


ik








-N1r-4]*--- A


sday, October 17, 2007


www.i!reenepublishin2.com


Madiason County iUarner o!)


MONEY & FINANCE


Don't Let Wild Markets Give You the Jitters


Article Submitted
By Brad Bashow
If you watch the financial markets, you've seen just about every-
thing in the last few months. First, the Dow Jones Industrial Average
raced from 13,000 to 14,000 in record time. Then, in about four weeks,
the Dow lost all these gains and fell below 13,000. What's a long-term
investor to do? Before we answer that question, it might be
useful for you to understand why the
market soared so quickly and then -aSh3-
plunged so far and so fast. Brad Bah eav
The Dow's big gain was fueled, in Investment Representat iv
large part, by strong corporate profits,
low interest rates and relatively low in- 114 s Range Avenue
flation. But in the past few weeks, those p.O. Box 632341
impressive corporate profits and the eco- Madison, o- 334
Snomic boom in Asia helped kick already- Bus 85g0516-25967
high oil prices even higher. Furthermore, Fax 8 362-6204
problems in the credit market, particular- 11 386 866-973-8334
ly in regard to mortgage-backed securities, Toll Feareones.com
have shaken investors' confidence. These ww.ed
factors are widely thought to be somewhat
responsible for the sell-off in stocks.
Will the decline continue? And, if it does, how far will stock prices
fall? No one can really answer these questions with any certainty.
Keep in mind that "corrections" (declines of 10 percent from a market
peak) are actually a normal part of the investment process; and we
haven't seen a correction since the. spring of 2000, so what is happen-
ing now is no cause for panic. Also, market declines often begin and
end without warning. Furthermore, even in the midst of these turbu-
lent times, investors still have reasons to be optimistic. After all, the
economy is growing faster than three percent annually, inflation and
interest rates are still low, corporate earnings continue to outpace an-
alysts' expectations and economic growth has been strong overseas.
In any case, regardless of what's happening in the markets, you'll
want to consider these moves:
Focus on quality There's never a "wrong" time to buy quality in-


vestments but there's also never a better time than when the market
is shaky Quite simply, during market downturns, quality investments
- such as stocks of some large companies in developed markets** and
top-rated corporate bonds tend to not drop as far as riskier invest-
ments. And quality investments generally bounce back faster when
declines are over. Just keep in mind that
there are no guarantees that past perfor-
l arf lOnes mance is an indication of future results.
Look for buying opportunities. The best
buying opportunities often occur when
the market is down. That's because a mar-
ket slump tends to drag down all stocks,
even those with good prospects for future
i growth. Consequently, you might find
"good deals" among those stocks whose
fundamentals are strong but whose
price has dropped substantially.
Think long term. To put some per-
spective on the market decline, look
back 20 years, to the summer of 1987, when the Dow Jones In-
dustrial Average stood at around 2,500. Since that time, the Dow has
gone up more than 400 percent not including fees, commissions, sales
charges and taxes which would have a negative effect on these results.
Of course, as you've no doubt heard, past performance is no guaran-
tee of future results. Still, if you don't let short-term drops send you
to the investment "sidelines," your patience and perseverance may
give you an opportunity to be well positioned for the long term.
No one likes to see the stock market shed so much wealth in a short
period of time. But if you concentrate on quality, look for good deals
and think long term, you can navigate the sometimes-bumpy roads of
the investment world and continue on your journey toward your im-
portant financial goals.
The Dow Jones Industrial Average is an unmanaged index and not
available for direct investment. ** Special risks are inherent to for-
eign investing -including political, social, economic and currency
risk.


We Are Overextended And Our Kids Are Watching


Submitted by Deidra McRory Newman
Business Development
Officer- MCCB
Teens are a powerful force in our economy and they are f
luring advertisements of the must-have fads. Teens are buyi
saving for the future.
Did you know that Americans spend $1.22 for every $1.00 1
Americans are overextended and our kids are watching. T
this development, bankers have ,set out to teach teens an
that credit is an important tool for the future in hopes that
ally help reverse this trend. _
As many as 86 percent of NW '
America's High School stu- F.l'I
dents have never taken a
class in personal finance ed- b -
ucation. Many young Amer-
icans- don't know the finan-
cial facts of life because wl -
many schools cannot afford
financial education. Actual-
ly, very few states require a
personal finance class for
high school graduation. It's
no wonder we end up in
trouble.
According to the National
Endowment for Financial
Education, just 10 hours of
financial education can help
students manage their mon-
ey better. Educated con-
sumers are better cus-
tomers. Teaching children
how to save and budget will
help them to manage their .
finances in the future. Fi-
nancially educated con- I ad
sumers are more likely to M adi
save for the future and man- P-
age their finances responsi-


bly.
Bankers not only bank, they educate. Madison County Community
Bank has set out to provide guidance and help young people learn how to
flooded with al- budget, save, and manage their money responsibly through programs such
ing and are not as "Get Smart About Credit Day" throughout the school. system.
The goal of the "Get Smart About Credit" program is to raise awareness
they earn? Yes, about the responsible use of credit so teens and young adults can learn
'o help remedy how to use credit correctly The choices young adults make with their first
d young adults credit card will impact their lives for many years when they apply for a car
it may eventu- loan or even a mortgage. Teaching young people how best to use credit
W... ill equip them to handle
adult financial responsibili-
,...- _ties.
S.t. e dy, Stro l"-ties. Our plan is to teach sim-
Mr Oorens& ple lessons through interac-
;Rtive presentations with
..gL.._1d._er % games and activities about
S-- ': -----. .. the concept of saving, how
S. interest makes money grow,
how to budget and deter-
mining needs and wants, to
help .get children and teens
on the right track.
Our children watch and
-bimitate our actions. Ask
yourself if you want your
children to follow in your fi-
nancial footsteps. If you feel
that your family needs to
know more about how to
save for the future and re-
...store your credit, visit your
here local bank on Thursday, Oc-
I ....... ..C tober 18th for "Get Smart
. . .. About Credit Day" for help-
ful pamphlets. A customer
son County Community Bank service representative, or
loan officer that will assist
Madison Couni .Cornimunri3 Bank
301 E. Base Street P.O. Box 834 Madison. FL 32340 you in getting back on
Phone 850-973-2400 Fax 850-973-8161 infoc.mcebflorida.com track.


Alpha
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
An IRA is an Individ-
ual Retirement Account -
a personal, tax deferred
account for people who are
employed and their spous-
es, according to New York
Life. Tax laws let people
contribute up to $4,000 to
an IRA for 2005-2007.
The catch on an IRA?
Any money withdrawn is
taxed at the ordinary in-
come tax rate of the indi-
vidual, and if the individ-
ual withdraws the money
before age 59 %, there
might be a 10% penalty
tax.
The Roth IRA is a vari-
ation on the traditional
IRA that allows individu-
als to withdraw the money
tax-free after age 59 %,
permitting that the money
has been in the IRA for at
least five years.
The annual percentage
rate, or APR, is an interest


bet Soup Explained


rate that is different from-
the note rate. The APR
measures the true cost of
a loan, creating a level
playing field for lenders.
Mortgage companies
are required to disclose
APR when they advertise
their rates; the Federal
Truth in Lending law gov-
erns their actions. Howev-
er, even though companies


are required to advertise
APR, the concept is con-
fusing, even for lenders.
Computing APR has a
few rules -
What is included
in APR?
Points discount and
origination points
Pre-paid interest
Loan-processing fee
Underwriting fee


CROWN WEALTH

MANAGEMENT
'i,..,, Trust, Integrity"

3227 N. Oak St. Ext. Suite C
Valdosta 229-247-0850
www.crown-wealth.com
xxxx01CrownW


Document-prepara-
tion fee
Private mortgage-in-
surance
Sometimes these fees
are included in APR -
Loan-application fee
Credit life insurance
These fees are not in-
cluded in the APR -
Title or abstract fee
Escrow fee


- IRA, APR, CD


Attorney Fee
Notary fee
Document preparation
(closing agent)
Home-inspection fees
Recording fee
Transfer taxes
Credit report
Appraisal fee

The APR is simply a
starting point used to com-


Never before have there been so many opportunities
for pursuing your financial goals. In today's fast-
paced world, time is a scarce commodity. It's time, in-
formation and experience that make the difference in
choosing the right financial opportunities for your
future. Let us assist you with your investment needs.
Call Steve Schramm to schedule your appointment.


* Estate Planning
* Income Planning
* College Planning
* IRA Rollovers and
Account Consolidation


Registered representative of
and securities offered through


lNGjW
FINANCIAL PARTNERS


Memte StPC


CWM Is not a subsidiary of or
controlled by ING financial partners.


pare loans!
A Certificate of De-
posit, or CD is a pretty
simple, yet restricted way
of using a checking ac-
count. A sum of money,
typically above a mini-
mum required by the
bank, is put in a CD,
where it matures at a
higher interest rate for a
specific period of time.
For people to receive a
higher interest rate, they
can't withdraw their mon-
ey before that time period
is up. If the original CD
was set up for 12 months,
the owner of the CD
would have to pay a penal-
ty if he or she withdrew
the money before the 12
months.
Having money in a CD
(for a certain period of
time) allows the bank to
use the money, and it
gains interest, which is
just the bank paying the
owner to use their money


Now

,e







now








10A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 17, 2007



HEALTH & NUTRITION



LEADING CAUSE OF VISION LOSS IN AMERICA CAN

BE CORRECTED WITH APPROPRIATE EYE CARE


Despite the fact that
cataract surgery has a 95
percent success rate,
cataract is still the leading


cause of blindness in the
world. It affects those in de-
veloped countries as well as
developing countries. It is


the leading cause of low vi-
sion in the United States,
contributing to half of all
cases. And, Americans


M any May Not Be Aware of Cataract
Services Available to them.


-wY..flrrfl ~ r..'.. .,--,-~.. ,. .~"Or- r~.-w~ -


We're Moving!

DR. THOMAS WALSH IS RELOCATING HIS PRACTICE.

Thomas R. Walsh, MD, is proud to announce the relocation of his office in
Valdosta. Dr. Walsh has served the Valdosta community for 10 years. -He is a
board-certified, fellowship-trained, orthopaedic spine surgeon with over 19
years of experience. He earned his medical degree from the University of
Missouri-Columbia, graduating second in his class. Dr. Walsh completed his
residency at the University of Iowa. His special interest is in spine and neck surgery.
While his office is here in Valdosta, he performs surgery at St. Francis Hospital in
Columbus, Ga. To continue or seek treatment with Dr. Walsh, please contact:

1-800-982-1185
3368 Greystone Way
Valdosta, Georgia 31605
www.sfhorthopaedic.com '



THOMAS R. WALSH, MD
ORTHOPAEDIC SPINE SURGERY


spend $6.8 billion every
year on direct medical costs
for outpatient, inpatient
and prescription drug ser-
vices for cataract, accord-
ing to the 2007 "Economic
Impact of Vision Problems:
The Toll of Major Adult
Eye Disorders, Visual Im-
pairment, and Blindness on
the U.S. Economy" study
funded by Prevent Blind-
ness America.
Cataract, which devel-
ops slowly and painlessly, is
a clouding of the eye's lens
which blocks light needed
for sight. With age, old cells
in the lens build up and
block light as it tries to pass
through. The end result is
cloudy or foggy vision. Ac-
cording to EyeCare Ameri-
ca, more than half of those
ages 65 and over have some
degree of cataract.
With the increasing
number of aging baby
boomers, it is estimated
that by the year 2020, more
than 30.1 million Ameri-
cans will have cataracts.
More than 2.7 million
Americans undergo
cataract surgery annually,
making it the most fre-
quently performed surgery
in the country The surgery
involves an eye doctor re-
moving the existing lens
and replacing it with an ar-
tificial intraocular lens
(IOL). The IOL is implant-
ed inside the eye and is
meant to be permanent. It
does not require replace-
ment or cleaning, and only
10 percent of surgeries re-


quire an overnight hospital
stay
Many cataract patients
may not know what bene-
fits are available to them.
Prevent Blindness Ameri-
ca, the nation's oldest eye
health and safety organiza-
tion, has dedicated August
as Cataract Awareness
Month to educate the public
on the condition and how to
get treatment for it.
"At some point, most of
us will develop cataract, so
we need to be educated now
on where we can turn for
help," said Daniel D. Gar-
rett, senior vice president
of Prevent Blindness Amer-
ica. "Those that are in-
sured may not know exactly
how much of the treatment
will be covered. And for
those that aren't, services
are available for qualified
individuals."
There are currently 43
million Americans enrolled
in Medicare, but many are
not aware of the vision ben-
efits they are eligible for. In
relation to cataract surgery
coverage, because of
changes in Medicare policy
in 2005, cataract patients
now have a choice of re-
ceiving either basic lens re-
placement, paid in full by
Medicare up to $2,000, or ap-
plying the credit to new re-
placement lenses that can
correct farsightedness in
addition to cataract re-
moval. Prevent Blindness
America has created a free
fact sheet entitled
"Medicare Benefits and


I


Your Eyes" to help explain
these and other vision-re-
lated Medicare policies.
The group can also provide
help in referring patients to
public assistance pro-
grams.
"Not every cataract pa-
tient will require surgery,"
added Garrett. "But, for
those who do, there are a
number of new devices and
treatments. The key is to
make sure you receive regu-
lar eye care and discuss the
options with your eye doc-
tor."
Prevent Blindness Amer-
ica recommends that you
visit your eye doctor imme-
diately if you experience
the following cataract
symptoms:
Blurred vision, double
vision, ghost images, the
sense of a "film" over the
eyes
Lights seem too dim for
reading or close-up work, or
strong lights seem to "daz-
zle" eyes
Changing eyeglass pre-
scriptions often, without
experiencing improvement
A milky or yellowish
spot appears in the pupil
(the center of the eye that is
normally black).
For free information on
cataracts in both English
and Spanish, or to receive
the "Your Guide to Cataract
Surgery" and "Medicare
Benefits and Your Eyes"
fact sheets, call 1-800-331-
2020 or log on to www.pre-
ventblindness.org.


1-



Nursing Hcmeie



Lake Park Of Madison
A skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility,
serving the long term care and rehabilitation
needs of Madison and the surrounding area.

259 SW Captain Brown Rd. Madison, FL
[ (850) 973-8277


p


into a. n@w carePr

Find your next job in the classified.


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Wednesday, October 17, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11A


HEALTH & NUTRITION




Spontaneity Helps Many Quit Smoking


New survey reveals many successful "quit smoking attempts' made without planning


(Family Features) Some smokers may not want to care-
fully plan their next quit attempt in order to become
smoke-free. According to recent research, successfully
quitting may not always require advance planning.
A recent survey sponsored by new Nicorette Cinnamon
Surge gum showed that spontaneous quit attempts were
also successful. In addition, spontaneous attempts are oc-
curring frequently Half (49 percent) of successful quitters
surveyed reported that their most recent quit attempt
started without any advance planning. These study results
are leading some researchers to believe that spontaneous
quit attempts shouldn't be discouraged.
"Any attempt to quit smoking is a positive step in the
right direction; the right method depends on each smokers
individual needs," said Frank Vitale, national director,
Pharmacy Partnership for Tobacco Cessation. "These sur-
vey findings don't necessarily imply that planning quit at-
tempts would be counterproductive or that smokers should
quit without any assistance. Even spontaneous quitters
can improve their chances significantly by developing a
plan to deal with tough situations and cravings and by tak-
ing advantage of proven stop smoking tools such as
Nicorette Cinnamon Surge gum."
Here are a few of the most reliable and effective tips
Frank Vitale recommends to quit smoking; even for the
most spontaneous quit attempt.
Don't resist the urge...act on your impulse to quit!
Choosing a form of nicotine replacement therapy such
as Nicorette Cinnamon Surge gum reduces the intensity of
nicotine withdrawal cravings so you can focus on changing
your behavior. When used as directed, nicotine replace-
ment therapy (NRT), like Nicorette Cinnamon Surge, can


als


aoubie a smoker s cnanices oi quittig versus uuiu .itttey.
In fact, a recent survey showed that 85 percent of smokers
like the taste of cinnamon so don't let any past barriers
deter you from making a quit attempt today!
Reward yourself, and do something....spontaneous
Think of special rewards you can give yourself at par-
ticular milestones. The first day, week, month and year
should be celebrated. Keep a list of rewards you look for-
ward to it will help keep you motivated. According to
the survey, many people tried new activities to keep their
minds off cravings such as cutting their hairor joining a
gym.
Find your support
Family and friends are a great source of strength and
support when going through such an important lifestyle
Change. In addition, visit www.nicorette.com to find and
customize tools that help you stay motivated on your quit
attempt. These tools are designed to help give you a better
idea of how you can succeed at quitting.


II


S Change your habits
Learning a new skill and changing your routine are also
important steps in quitting smoking since nicotine with-
drawal cravings are often triggered by smoking habits.
There are many ways to do this such as eating breakfast in
a different place,. drinking tea instead of coffee, taking a
: new way to work or changing your everyday routine.
To learn more about how to quit smoking successfully
with the new Nicorette Cinnamon Surge gum visit
www.nicorette.com.


(NU) With the preva-
lence of child obesity and
diabetes, it's important to
keep your kids on a
healthy diet, even during
holidays such as Hal-
loween. Here are some tips
to help you this Halloween:
Set limits.
Don't leave the candy
out.
Make the focus of Hal-
loween something other
than candy.
Encourage your chil-
dren to eat healthy, Hal-
loween-themed food such
as Blue Witch's Brew,


made with Old Orchard
juice cocktails.
Blue Witch's Brew
Serves 2
1/4 cup each Old Or-
chard Healthy Balance
Cranberry juice and
Pomegranate juice cock-
tail
2 cups low fat blueber-
ry yogurt
1 cup fresh blueberries
Blend cranberry juice,
pomegranate juice and
blueberries until smooth.
Add yogurt and. blend.
Keep in refrigerator or
serve immediately.


II


'I


"Tm

%.


You may save $
on your prescriptions
. as a patient of
Tri-County Family
Health Care and our
partnership with
S t Jackson's Drugs

Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician

Open Thursday Evenings Until 7 PM
Please call 850-948-2840
for more information

Tri-County Family Health Care
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.


Are You In Need Of Chi-
ropractic Services?

Dr. Michael A. Miller

180 S. Cherry St., Suite F 3116 Capital Circle NE, Ste.2
Monticello, FL 32344 Tallahassee, FL 32308
850-997-1400 *Bg 850-668-4200
Now excepting Blue Cross Blue Shield and most other insurances




T Down Home Medical
256 SW Wahington Ave.
Madison, FL
(850) 973-4590


Michael Stick, MD
Tammy Williams, NP-C
"Professional Healthcare At Home"
HEALTHPLAN SOUTHEAST Provider


"ammy Wiliams


.steeie

Chiropractic
Massage
Therapist
Dr. Connie Steele
Chlropractic
Nutritional Consultation
School/Sports Physical


Madison Eye Center
Comprehensive Eye Care
In Madison Since 1978
1 Hour Optical Service Available
Visit Our Website:
Melanie Hill, O.D. .
Board cen ea www.madisoneyecenter.com
234 SW Range Ave. Madison, FL 850-973-3937


HOMECARE
SOLUTIONS

Home Oxygen INebulizer9 Medict
Diabetic Shoes & Supplies Home Medical E
24 Hour Service'


353 NE Marion St.
Madison, FL


. '


Phone: 850-973-4125
Fax: 850-973-8922


Valdosta Medical Clinic


D~r. Sinnott


James A. Sinnott, M.D.
Edward J. Fricker, M.D.
Specialist In All Gastrointestinal Disorders
Appointments Only
(229) 245-7345 or 1-800-587-0777


3207 Country Club Drive Valdosta GA


14 MAP-0,


1A






12A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday,October 17, 2007




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Section

Wednesday, Octobe 17
Inside: .,
Founder's Day 1B Classifieds
School 4B Legals
Sports 2B Farm


Saturday, October 20...


Hickory Grov e Founder's Day


Greene Publishing Inc. Photo
With the cane mill in the foreground, Dickey Bland
and his mule are seen in the background. (The mule is
the four-legged animal.)


Ya'll Come!! This Saturday, October 20th, is the big
day! 8 a.m. till 2:30 p.m.
Hickory Grove United Methodist Church is holding
its 16th consecutive Founder's Day Celebration. This is
a great way to spend a wonderful Fall day visiting with
friends under the trees and enjoying life as it was in the
"olden" days.
Experience life as our forefathers did, making butter
and sausage, cooking on wood stoves, grinding cane and
making syrup, making their baskets for storage and
quilts for warmth, and preserving the bounty from their
farms to have jams, jellies and canned goods throughout
the year. Enjoy the hearty country cooking of our pio-
neer ancestors chicken pileau cooked in the wash pots,
barbecued hog, collard greens and hoe-cake cornbread,
corn-on-the-cob, and homemade biscuits and cakes to
name just a few.
See the old farm equipment, have a slingshot made,
watch all of the various demonstrations. Buy some
sausage, a whole cake, some boiled peanuts, cracklins,
or syrup to take home for some finger-lickin' good eating
later.
Sit a spell and listen to some great gospel singing
and await the arrival of the circuit-riding preacher
making his appearance riding on a mule.
This year's Hickory Grove Founder's Day is dedicat-
ed to Neil and Delvina McLeod.
The McLeods were residents of Hickory Grove,
where Neil was born, for years. Neil was a farmer and a
manager for Gold Kist.
Delvina was a housewife and their home was open
for everything from holiday dinners and Sunday din-
ners to when anyone was hungry Delvina would always
have a full course dinner on the stove, waiting for some-
one to stop by.
Neil and Delvina were members of Hickory Grove
Church, which held a special place in their hearts. They
were both very active in the church and raised their
children to respect' and love the Lord.
Neil was the church's treasurer for many years and
also served on the church's Board of Trustees.
Delvina played an important role in the church,
teaching Sunday School and being the MYF leader.
Neil and Delvina took a great deal of pride in their
children, Elwyn and Gail, but their grandchildren,
Michel, Mikah, Donna and Dennis, held a special place
in their hearts.
Everyone at Hickory Grove and many friends in the
community work really hard to provide a great day for
you. Founder's Day is a very special part of the
church outreach to the community The strong faith and
Christian commitment of their ancestors is something
that they recognize with great pride.
Come join everyone on Saturday. Have fun. Sit a
spell. Meet a lot of great folks. Enjoy the beauty of the
outdoors. Eat a lot. Take home some goodies and crafts.
And above all, just let the day warm your heart.


This year's Founder's Day is dedicated to the memo-
ry of Neil and Delvine McLeod.


~' -v~


Nestle Wa


MickJorY


4


iters...
proud to be a part of
rove Tounder s






NORTH AMERICA


200 W. Base St. 850-973-8700
Madison, FL







WACHOVIA

Proudly Supporting Hickory

Grove's Founder's Day


13a& 9e6y& QO VA l 04' -




People You Know. A Bank You Can Trust.

Madison County
Community Bank


~M.b- r


301 East Base St. Madison, Florida 32340
850-973-2400 Fax 850-973-8161
Banking Lobby....Mon.-Thurs. 9am-4pm Fri. 9am-6pm
Hours: Drive-Thru......Mon.-Fri. 9am-6pm Sat. 9am-12pm


Photo submitted
Dan Buchanan cooks for the crowd at the recent
Hickory Grove work day.


Photo submitted
Barry Scroggs, left, and David Anthony, right, pre-
pare peanuts for the workers.


Got news
straight from
the horse's mouth?

We Do.

The Madison County Carrier
& Madison Enterprise Recorder


The Spirit Of Madison County


1-


jGoodmanj


mew









2B Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 17, 2007




SCHOOL & EDUCATION



ACA Fall Festival Set For October 19


By Fran Hunt
Special from The Monticello News
The annual Aucilla Christian Academy Fall
Festival festivities begin 3 p.m.. Friday, October 19,
and continue until 6 p.m.
As usual, there will be every student's favorite
game, the Dunking Tank, where they get the oppor-
tunity to dunk their teachers, upperclassmen and
administrators. Old favorites also include the gi-
ant slide, face painting and hair coloring.
Several new attractions have been added this
year, including the Bungee Run, the Balloon Dart
Throw, the Velcro Wall and pony rides.
Class sponsored games include: the K-3 Duck-
pond, the K-4 Maze, Clark's K-5 Needle in the
Haystack, Wheeler's K-5 Candy Count, Roberts'
first grade Roberts'Rowdy. Ropers, Stephens' first
grade Skeetball, Mincy's second grade Velcro Wall,
and Love's second grade Love Those Warriors.
Johnson's third grade Coke Bottle Ring Toss,
Aman's third grade Pony Rides, fourth grade Leap
Frog, fifth grade Pinewood derby, sixth grade Gold-
fish, seventh grade Football Toss, eight grade Face
Painting/Hair Coloring, ninth grade Bungee Run,
tenth grade Dunking Tank, eleventh grade Obstacle
Course, and twelfth grade Cake Walk and Giant


Slide.
Game tickets are 25 cents each and games are
two to four tickets each.
This year there will also be four vendors on site
including. Premier Jewelry. Debbie's Jewels,
Mary Kay and a cotton
il" candy vendor.
Si ,,i IL. Available food will in-


lp clude seniors:
pulled pork, macaroni and cheese,
and green beans; juniors: barbecue ribs.
baked beans and cole slaw: sophomores: hot
dogs, chili and French fries; and freshmen:
nachos. Longtime ACA partner Coca-Cola do-
nates all drinks.
Class-sponsored theme baskets are available
through the sale of raffle tickets, at $1 each.
Theme baskets include: K-3 Mary Kay; K-4 Fishing;
Clark's K-5 Webkins; Roberts' K-5 Hunting;
Roberts' first grade Hunting; Stephens' first grade
GamesEntertainment: Love's second grade Beach;


Mincy's second grade FSU; Aman's third grade
Gift Cards; Johnson's third grade Tupperware;
Brown's fourth grade Gators; fifth grade Kitchen;
sixth grade Vera Bradley, and Premier Jewelry.
Tickets are now on sale through anyone at ACA
and baskets are currently on display in the ACA li-
brary. Tickets will also be available during the
Fall Festival until 5:45 p.m. and winners will be
drawn at 6 p.m. Winners do not have to be present
to win.
Students, parents, friends, staff and fans are
encouraged to attend the football game Friday
night at 7:30 p.m., when the Warriors will face off
against Cottondale. "Come on out and cheer the
Warriors on to their sixth victory of the season,"
said spokesperson Leslie Wilkinson.


Bus Safety Week Gets Support From Art Students At MCHS


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 11, 2007
Brandon Poole (left) and Kaila Haire contribute their
art skills for Bus Safety Week at MCHS.
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
In support of Bus Safety Week, October 22 thru Octo-
ber 26 nationwide, several students from Donn Smith's
Art Class at MCHS are constructing a model bus to be
used for instructional.pr'poses with elementary age chil-
dren. Art students Lydia Hernandez, Kaila Haire and
Brandon Poole are designing and painting the model.


Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 11, 2007
Gloria McCloud (left) and Jennifer Fulmer are bus dri-
vers with a love for helping kids during Bus Safety Week.
Bus drivers Jennifer Fulmer and Gloria McCloud
have a real passion for the kids. "We'll be teaching the
kids about safety and treating them to pencils, booklets
and other popular handouts that make learning fun," Mc-
Cloud noted.
Between the models, learning supplies and instruc-
tion, Bus Safety Week will be useful and fun for the kids
of Madison.


Event Dates Oct. 18-21, 25-28 and 31

The New BlaA,k Forest A CHjO EE
A"; 2 ,dn ,i -V 0p 0 P rso. a. 'f r E it ca' O'ra' 1 r d ay chbet tAy .RXrIrr n '. t uat cretylt'pRffttt
Iva9,21A'9 0 17 t r 13,d ort- s t O, r 'wllv ennIet. neto
229,219.7080 1-75 Exit 13, Valdosta, GA wildadventures.net


C m ecas Re id nta Feti.zaton *Wee Co tro
EdIlTJ6rMMM ShrbMineac
S SStu pGinig -Tre emva.


ShiglsFlt oof &MealRofs Bil U Ro.
9igl.PyMoifed MbieHoes*.e-oo.Secals


(850) 973-6326
PAUL KINSLEY
OWNE 71


10 RLrv-
MQ%- IL









3B Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com



S& aeT 'S Pizza
Call-In / Carry-Out
'0229-263-6827
Tues.- Fri. 11 a.m. 8:30 p.m.

Large 1-Topping $10.50
Fresh Toppings, Calzones, Breadsticks, Baked Spaghetti


Wednesday, October 17, 2007


4TH ANNUAL


"MIDNIGHT SUN" HORSE SHOW


The Quitman/Brooks
County Museum & Cul-
tural Center proudly pre-
sents the 4th Annual
"Midnight Sun" Charity
Horse Show & Festival.
This show won TWBEA'S
Emerald Award for "Best
New Show" in its first
year.


site. Box seats including
6 chairs & surrounding
the arena are available
for both nights for
$100.00. Hors d'oeuvres
will be provided for Box
Seat Holders.
Over $29,000 in prize
money will be _


Nation's Capitol one of
the world's most classic
cities.
The mansion at Dixie,
begun in 1938 and com-
pleted in 1940, is one of
the only two residences of
his design in the south.


Horse Clubs.
Box seats are avail-
able for the horse show.
Breakfast is served in the
Mansion after the Horse
Show for Horse People
and Volunteers.
On Saturday morn-


then continue the trail
ride.
An Entertaining Cul-
tural Event with History,
Art, Music and Activities
for everyone. A revival of
a Plantation that is a part
of our History One Major
Fundraiser to


special opportunity to
host a horse show and
festival at the famous
Dixie Plantation in
Greenville, Florida.
The Livingston family
owned Midnight Sun,
perhaps the most presti-
gious Tennessee Walk-
ing Horse to


...- t .ni f au-be ftB.,
. .. .. nnfora numbr f ctivtie-


will be me
The horse show and
festival has something
for everyone!! The arena
built two years ago is sit-
uated near the Plantation
Mansion and overlooks
hayfields, orchards and
forest. The location is a
natural for the beautiful
Tennessee Walking hors-
es who perform there.
There will be active
art exhibitions as well as
tours in the Mansion. On
Wednesday, there is a lun-
cheon and fashion show
and on Thursday evening
, there is a cocktail party,
banquet, and dancing un-
der the stars. Tickets for
these two events must be
ordered in advance.
The horse shows are
on Friday and Saturday
nights, with a free
"thank-you" BBQ and
live music on Friday af-
ternoon preceding the
show for all the owners,
exhibitors, trainers,
grooms, and volunteer
workers. On Saturday
night, after the show,
there will be a free full
country breakfast in the
mansion.
There is ample park-
ing, including favorable
sites with water for
campers. Food & craft
vendors, carriage rides,
conducted nature rides
and live music are all on


awarded in 28 classes
on Friday night and 28
classes on Saturday
night.
Ribbons will be
awarded in all classes
and floral horse shoes
will be awarded in Cham-
pionship Classes.
The first three years
have been very successful
with thousands of atten-
dees and a great competi-
tion.
The 14,000 square foot
mansion, not counting
the third floor servants'
quarters, the basement
and other service areas,
is located miles from any
paved highway and looms
impressively on a knoll
surrounded by the beau-
ty of its natural environ-
ment. Its very isolation
enhances the uniqueness
of this neo-classical man-
sion.
The house was de-
signed by internationally
renowned architect John
Russell Pope. Mr. Pope,
known in the architectur-
al world as "the last of
the Romans," set the clas-
sic style for architecture
in.Washington, D.C., with
his design for the Jeffer-
son Memorial, the Na-
tional Archives, the Na-
tional Gallery of Art, as
well as other Washington
momnuments. His influ-
ence helped to make the


This is the life-size bronze statue of Midnight Sun.
This statue is the only life-size statue of a Tennessee
Walking Horse in existence.


The entrance to the Dixie Plantation, the site for
the Midnight Sun Horse Show and Festival, north of
Greenville, is ready to open to guests.


He also designed one for
"millionaires row" on
Jekyll Island, Georgia.

The Tennessee Walk-
ing Horse Show will be-
gin at the Horse Show
Arena at 5:00 p.m. Begin-
ning Saturday, November
4th at 9:00 a.m., a guided
trail ride for pleasure
horse riders of all ages
(bring your own horse).
Have lunch and shop
with area vendors. Begin-
ning at 5:00 p.m. the sec-
ond night of the Horse
Show opens with a cos-
tume parade by area 4-H


raise
the finances to support
the Museum and Cultural
for the year.
The event is located
on the Dixie Plantation
about 15 miles out of
Quitman on the Monti-
cello Highway, Once you
turn in at the Plantation
entrance, there is a three
mile stretch of dirt road
before you come to the
Mansion, Horse Show
Arena and Stables. Prim-
itive Camping sites are
available (generators
welcome). We have plen-
ty of outdoor lighting.
RV's and campers are
welcome.
Each year the M &
CC holds a charity event
for raising the necessary
funds to carry out our
mission. For the third
year in a row, they feel
proud that the Geraldine
C.M. Livingston Founda-
tion has again given us a


have
ever lived.
To order tickets, box
seats, or make stall reser-
vations, please call the M
& CC at (229) 263-6000 or
(229) 263-3333. Orders
may be paid for by credit
card or check and may be
mailed or picked up upon
arrival at the show.


We iowuem&'to" & come otid aad 1 1.
e#op*Ihisea-y tt R-wohA Cow4mHo



Quality Dry Cleaners
101 N. Webster St. Quitman, Georgia
229-263-7551


IMI[)lSIGHT SUN
I I I I I I I
Pride of Midnight Talk of Setting Sun's Jet Sun's Midnight
Midnight Merry The Town Sun Parade Delight Mack K.
1949 1951-1952 1958 1957 163 I
1 I Delight Rodgers' Mack K's
Pride's Secret Delight Pride's Final Pride's Pride's Gold Pride's Bumin Perfection Handshaker
Threat ofPride Edition Jubilee Coin Generator Around 1959 1960
1982 1984 1985 Star 1 1973 I
1986 Coin's Hard GLL's
I Cash Carbon Shaker's Handshaker's
Pride's 19B7 I Copy Shocker Delight
Sundance Gen's Armed Santana 1964 1966 1972
Star & Dangerous 1997 ., I
1995 1994 Shades of Mark of
GRAND AND GREAT- GRANDSONS OF MIDNIGHT SUN Carbon Carbon
i i I i 1976 1978
Ace's B. Major Triple Threat Pride's Dark Ebony Masterpiece
Sensation Wilson 1965 Spirit 1962
1970 1961 I I I .. .


The Pusher
1981
The Pushover
1990


Threat's Dark Spirits Ebonys Ebony's Ebony's Another Ebony's
Supreme Rebel Bold Courier Mountain Man Senator Masterpiece True Grit
1979, 1992 1983 1980 1969 1974 1975
R.P.M.
1999







4B Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishin2.com Wednesday, October 17, 2007


SPORTS


All Photos Courtesy of Tudor Rose Photography


Cowboys Tame Bears In Homecoming Game


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County High School Cowboys blasted
the Bartram Trail Bears 41-10 in the Cowboys' home-
coming game played Friday evening. October 12.
The Cowboys' racked up 15 points in the first quar-
telr, then six in the second quarter to lead 21-3 at half-
time.
The Cowboys added 14 more points in the third quar-
ter to lead 35-10.
In the third quarter. Bear quarterback Kyle Parker
threw an interception to Cowboy noseguard Eli Spren-
kle, who rumbled 30 yards to the end zone for his first ca-
reer touchdown.
The Cowboys rounded out the scoring with six
points in the fourth quarter.
Chris Thompson racked up 222 yards on 12 carries in
the Cowboys' win. Cory Akins had 92 yards in the game.
Quarterback Clay Sapp went three of seven for 81
yards.
Cortez Akins had 18 tackles in the game.
The Cowboys play host to Fort White on Friday, Oc-
tober 19, at 7:30 p.m.
Go, Cowboys!


I M"


**4~** .4*4.4.


gig~


7 %


1 '.4-


"*' *-' .:-*.1-"


LI


LV;


Players of the
r7 4 4v'q


H ITITO


- .. ... ..... Carla Sullivan Barrett
P cel: 229-834-1110
References Available
cleaning services

HEY Realtors, landlords & Contractors!
WE CLEAN YOUR:
VACANT APARTMENTS VACANT HOUSES
VACANT MOBILE HOMES POST CONSTRUCTION CLEANING
POST REMODEL CLEANING
.-SutirTo .vrt-y lo al ne ws online!
v~'1'A'1''1LiF;mT, ~t1 l ,1 .I [1t7i7Ta1, i


www.greenepublishin2.com


Wednesday, October 17, 2007


4B Madison County Carrier


*r ^


..........
A

ML


maw---- J-n







www.greenepublishing.com


eieorNestl6 Waters
is Proud To Be A Port of
The Madison Community and
Supports The Cowboys!
AiN M 11 if l


iiladison


( Grocery N
GOOD LUCK, COWBOYS!


Bottling

NORTH AMERICA


FSU vs. Miami

IT'S EASY! Just pick the winners
of this week's games featured in each ad
and send us your entry!
Each week, the entry with the most
correct picks (and the closest to the game
score in the tie breaker) will win a Beef
and Cheddar Combo Meal from Arby's
and their choice of a $20.00 check from
Greene Publishing, Inc. or 2 tickets to
Wild Adventures Theme Park. The
Second Place winner will receive 4 movie
passes and the Third Place winner will
receive 2 movie passes from Greene
Publishing, Inc.
This Week's Winners

1. Keith Bochnia

2. Kelsey Mercer

3. Allen Lee

Prizes can be picked up at
Greene Publishing, Inc.
1695 South SR 53
Madison, Florida 32340

Official Football Mania Rules
One entry per person. All entries must be on an
official entry blank. No photocopies accepted.
Entries must be completely filled out. legible
and dropped off at Greene Publishing, Inc..
1695 South SR 53. Madison. no later than 5 pm
on Friday or mailed to P.O. Drawer 772.
Madison. Florida 32341: postmarked by Friday.
Judges decisions are final
Winners will be announced each Wednesday in
the Madison County' Carrier:
Employees of the newspaper and their family
members are not eligible for the Football Mania
contest.
Must be ten (10) years old, or older to play.
In the FSU vs. Miami. \\rite down what
you think the final score \will be.
This will be used to break a tie if needed.

F f---.--------r.r.

| Official Entry Form
| Name:


Pizza & Wings
Made Fresh Daily


2


Main Street Greenville, FL
850-948-3034


Florida vs.


Kentucky


0 1525 Baytree Rd.
SVINCdSuite H
Valdosta. GA
1 ~ U "IT 5


America's Propane Company
LP Gas, Appliances, 24 Hour Emergency Service
1606 NE Colin Kelly Highway
Madison, Florida I
(850) 973-2218 7


Vanderbilt vs
South Carolina


AmericasHomelace.cm
lc.om sBefore or After
4 the Game
; top by Arby's For a Delicious
California vy, Beef & Cheddar Combo.



'HjllI S Hwy. 14 S. at I-10 Madison, FL
Tire 6 973-9872
Muffler Center 5
See Us For All Your New & Used Tire Needs USC vs. Notre Dame
IWe Keep All Sizes In Stock!
Automotive Services Also Available
1064 E. US 90 Madison, FL UA
73-30 EXHAUST SYSTEMS
SOLD HERE INSTALLED HERE


0


Tennessee vs. Alabama


-- Mastercraft-
1 EaHES S.iso

Ne a& UsLed Tirel Automoie Repairs
1512 E. Bas SLt -Madison, FL


Auburn vs. LSU


Excavating & Tractor Services Mowing Stump
Removal Land Clearing Ponds
Construction Cleanup Roads Culvert Pipes_,


IAddress:
ICity:
iState:
Phone:
Fill in the name of the team
I1.
2.
13.


ZIP:


I
I


you think will win.1
I
I
I


14.
15.


18.
19.I

L ...... ..... --


Cterprist- rorer

S Good Luck To The
%Cowboys and Warriors


10
MCHS vs. Fort White


Aucilla vs.
Cottondale


IMUZOLIV I
WntarQ


Wednesday, October 17, 2007


Madison County Carrier 5B


v%









www.greenepublishing.com


6B Madison County Carrier Wednesday, October 17, 2007


Veteran Handyman
25 years exp. and new to area. Elec-
trical, plumbing, carpentry etc.,
hauling, clean outs, painting.
No Job Too Small
and Always Fair
Call anytime 850-973-0344
Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848

I build sheds, decks,
exterior carpentry work, win-
dow and
door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342




TidyUj"

cleaning services

Cleaning Services
Rental apartments, houses & mo-
bile homes cleaned after tenants
move out. Thorough and depend-
able. Call Carla. cell 229-834-1110
Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326


2 bedroom 1 bath mobile
homes in park, 135/week, own-
er pays electric, $300 deposit,
call Erin at 850-570-0459


/ Q.outhem Villas8 of
C.adison Cpartments

Rental assistance may be available.
HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, & 3
BR HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call 850-973-8582, TDD/TTY
711. 315 SW Lawson Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Equal Housing Op-
portunity.

reenville Pointe

Apartments
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers accepted.
Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal
Housing Opportunity
Mobile Homes for Rent 2 and 3
bedrooms. Start at $500 per month.
Off Hwy 90 west on Lonnie Rd.
Call 352-359-2647.
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms,
HUD vouchers accepted Call 850-
973-3786 TTY Acs 711.
Equal Housing Opportunity


-Pioneer
Excavating & Tractor Ser-
Yard Sale October 20-21, 9 am, vices
household furniture, knives, Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
clothes, books, tackle, plus inore ..' moval, Demolition, Roads,, Mow-
1404 Cactus Ave. in'Lee.,97 1-.288q7 '"' .ing, Discing, Box-Blading; and
. or 464-4502 after 4 pm.' Tilling.
We have top soil and fill dirt
Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326


Dunn's
Lawn Mower Repair
Welding
New & Used Parts
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340






Nintendo-64
5 Controllers
2 Memory Cards
10 Games
Excellent Condition
$100
Call 973-3497

25 lbs. of
Clean Newspapers
just $2 a bundle
973-4141

Rednose American Bulldog
pups. Only one male left. Brindle-
white, grey eyes, tail docked, 8
weeks, $150. Also females, white-
blue, grey eyes, 16 weeks, $150.
(850) 971-2727





Free Puppies
Three Beagle mix puppies
Call 850-971-2757

End of season Pond Sale!
All Water Garden plants 50% off!
Save on all cleaning additives!
Decorative Koi buy 2 Get 1 FREE!
Creatures Featured Pet Shop
973-3488





Luxury Apartments- overlooking
the Courthouse Circle in downtown
Monticello, 3BR/2BA, $1050.
Monthly, Contact Katrina Walton at
510-9512
Rentals
Mobile Homes, newly renovated, 3
BR/1 bath, $375/month
Rooms $75/week, utilities includ-
ed, 2 BR/1 bath, $135/week, utili-
ties included. Call 1-800-785-7433
or 1-850-673-9564


$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385


Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage-23
acres, Comer lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Drive and High-
way 53 South. Natural gas line,
8 inch water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and ser-
vice from two power companies.
Property has easy access to I-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build.to
suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141







3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751

For Sale 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
1583 sq ft. 2 story Victorian home
in Madison County 5 acres w/ op-
tion for 11. Hilltop site; guaranteed
high and dry. Needs some work.
Call for details. 850-973-7007
LOG HOMES
With as little as
$500 Down
Prestige Home Center
Lake City, Florida
1-800-355-9385


Pinetta, By Owner, 3/2
2000sf 11.8 acres, shop,
pond, greenhouse $275K
850-929-2074 for Appt.
www.3ws.us


SOMEBODY ELSE WANTS IT!
cGt something y,..no. onger ., orn ned?
Sell It 5 n tile- 7 -la -inld,.
";?; 850-973-4141 --' -.


DWMH FOR SALE
326 SE Vera Ave., Madison, FL
1,152 sq. ft. 3 bedrooms/2baths /.50
Acre Lot. Price $30,000 or make
offer. Call (850) 402-8015
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751

$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385





Great Opportunity
RN House Supervisor
7P 7A
Great Schedule and Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact
Amelia Tompkins/DON at
386-362-7860

Deputy Clerk Needed
The town of Greenville (pop 837) is
seeking a qualified, dependable and
highly motivated individual with
Quick Books as well as other com-
puter software experience for the
position of Deputy Clerk.

The Deputy Clerk will report to the
Town Clerk. This position will be
responsible for monthly 'utility
billing, waiting on customers; post-
ing payments, making deposits, at-
tend all council. meetings and as-
sisting the Town Clerk in other du-
ties as needed.

The individual must possess a high
school diploma or higher, qualify to
be bonded, with communication
and computer skills being essential.

Salary negotiable depending upon
qualifications. Any applications
and resumes submitted prior to this
posting must be resubmitted for
consideration. Open until position
filled.

Please send resume and at least
three letters of recommendation to
Town Clerk, Town of Greenville,
P.O. Box 235, Greenville, Florida
32331.
Position: OAA Coordinator,
(Older American Act)
Duties include: assessments, obser-
vation, maintaining confidential
records, and reports as well as oth-
er in-home services, Coordinate
activities for seniors that come into
the center and all services pertinent
to the frail homebound elderly.
Experience: High school diplo-
ma/GED or a degree in social work'
/ years of work experience will be
considered. Must have experience
working with group activities, and a
valid driver's license.
To obtain an application please
come by the Madison County Se-
nior Center at 486 SW Rutledge
Street, office hours are 8:00 am to
5:00 pm.
$ Christmas Is Coming $
Earn gift dollars
Sell AVON part time
50% earnings
Kit Only $10
Call Dorothy ISR
(850) 973-3153

DRIVERS
DRIVERS NEEDED
NO EXPERIENCE RE-
QUIRED
Get your CDL in just a few
short weeks with CRST's
Company Sponsored Training
1st Day Medical
Start Your New
Driving Career Today!
866-917-2778
www.joincrst.com
CRST VAN EXPEDITED

Area Representative familiar with
local communities and schools.
Place and supervise high school
foreign students. Part-time supple-
mental income, bonus, travel op-
portunities. We welcome families
to call about hosting an internation-
al student too! Call toll free 1-866-
431-8556 or e-mail
joan.iseusa@hotmail.comrn


Full Charge Bookkeeper. -
Monday thru Friday 8 am 5
pm. Must be knowledgeable in
bookkeeping; payroll taxes;
sales tax; federal and state in-
come taxation. Must be comput-
er literate. Salary dependent on
work experience. 24 paid days
off, retirement benefits, excel-
lent working conditions. Send
resume to P. 0. Drawer 570,
Madison, FL 32341-0570






Publishing, ln -(

Greene Publishing, Inc. is now ac-
cepting applications for current as
well as future position openings.
Experience is preferred but we will
train the right individuals. Working
at the newspaper is fun rewarding,
fast paced and requires a person
that is outgoing and capable of
working easily under stress and
deadlines. No two days are ever the
same. Key full time or part-time
positions include:

Reporters
Advertising Sales Associates
Layout & Design
(Experience required)

If you're a responsible adult, punc-
tual, and have a great attendance
record, please fax your resume to
Ted at 850-973-4121, email to:
2ted@greenepublishing.com or ap-
ply in person ,at our office on Hwy
53, just south of Madison. We wel-
come those who want to grow
with us.


FOOD STORES
Managers, Assistant Man-
agers & Customer Sales
Associates
Looking for highly motivated
employees for the Convenient
Store business for multiple ar-
eas. ALL positions, ALL shifts.
Offering a competitive salary,
weekly pay, vacation, paid holi-
days, bonus arid 401K Plan.
Please fax resume to Kim at
352-333-1161 or call her at 352-
494-7550 or 866-539-7685 ext
42 for more information.

Experienced Mechanic
Wanted
Good Pay Health Benefits
401K Uniforms
Call Wayne or Keith 973-2245
LPN or RN Needed
7A 7P
With Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center :
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Contact Angela Akins or Amelia
Tompkins at 386-362-7860
Multiple Positions available.
$7.50 hourly plus commissions.
Dental, medical, and 401K bene-
fits. No experience needed, paid
training. Apply at Florida Visitors
Bureau, Lake Park, Ga. (I-75 exit 5)
or call Robert at 9229) 326-0070.
Driver Wanted
Class A CDL, hauling cars. Need
at least one year OTR experience.
Will train to haul cars. Potential
$60,000 $80,000 a year. Call
Rusty at 386-590-1700.


Why work just anywhere?
At Cracker Barrel Old Country
Store, Inc.
you can enjoy:
*Flexible Schedules
Part-Time, Full Time
*Top Wages
*Excellent Benefits
*Employee Discounts
Apply Today:
4914 Timber Drive
Lake Park, GA 31636
229-559-0864
LPN or RN needed
7P 7A
WITH BENEFITS!!!
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact Angela Akins or
Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860


g Come



GROWW

wi/ihus!


Nesti6 Waters North America
Sis hiring!

A rewarding job with the nation's
leading bottled water company may
be closer than you think.

Nestle has several immediate openings at its Madison
County bottling facility. Employment opportunities
are available for flexible and self-motivated individuals
seeking careers in production, maintenance, logistics
and quality assurance.

Nestle Waters offers great starting pay, ranging from
$1050 to $1750 an hour, depending upon the position.
Our outstanding benefits package includes health and
dental insurance,, along with 401K and profit-sharing
plans.

Stop by the plant and fill out an application (directions
below), and take the first step toward a challenging and
rewarding future with Nestle Waters.

For more information, call Nestle Waters in Madison
at (850) 971-2100 or visit the Madison plant website at
www.madisonblue.org.


PRODUCTION
OPERATOR
$1165 per hour

FORKLIFT
OPERATOR
$1165 per hour

BLOWMOLD
TECHNICIAN
$1400 per hour

DOCK
COORDINATOR
$1165 per hour


I


Deadline For Classifieds (850)9754141 5:50 p.m. Every Monday


Nest e


r m mp m I dmm
Waters

50 )












Wednesday, October 17, 2007


www.2reenepublishinti.com


Madison County Carrier 7B


NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN That Pursuant to a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued in
the County Court of Madison County, Florida, on the 10th day of August, 2007 in the
cause wherein MLH FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., by assignment from BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A., the successor in interest to NCNB NATIONAL BANK OF FLORI-
DA, was plaintiff, and HAROLD ANTHONY BLANTON AND BETSY BLANTON
were defendants, being Case No. 91.35-CA in said Court.

I, Peter C. Bucher, as Sheriff of Madison County, Florida, have levied upon all the
right, title and interest of the defendants, HAROLD ANTHONY BLANTON AND
BETSY BLANTON, in and to the following described property lying and situated in
Madison County, Florida, to wit:
2003 Ford, VIN #1FTRF17283NA55662

and on the 30th day of October, 2007 at Stewart's Automotive Service, 115 S.W. Bunker
SL, in the City of Madison, Madison County, Florida at the hour of 11:00 A.M., or as
soon thereafter as possible, I will offer for sale all of the said defendant's, HAROLD
ANTHONY BLANTON AND BETSY BLANTON, right, title, and interest in aforesaid
property at public outcry and will sell the same, subject to all taxes, prior liens, en-
cumbrances and judgments, if any, to the highest and best bidder or bidders for CASH.
The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfac-
tion of the above described execution. The property will be available for inspection at
Stewart's Automotive Service between the hours of 10:00 AM through 11:00 AM the
morning of'the sale. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons
with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact the Clerk of Court, telephone (850) 973-1500, no later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceeding.
Peter C. Bucher, as Sheriff
Of Madison County, Florida

Bill Hart
Deputy Sheriff

September 26, 2007
October 3, 2007
October 10, 2007
October 17,2007
9/26. 10/3.,10/10,.10/17




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

CASE NO. 2007CA338
OLD BLUE SPRINGS, LLC,


Plaintiff,


PAUL FULLER and JOAN FULLER, husband
andwife, and SAMANTHA GRAHAM, a single
woman, as joint tenants with right of survivor-
ship; unknown
tenants; and other unknown parties in possession,
including the unknown spouse of any. person in
possession of the property, and if a named Defen-
dant is deceased, the surviving spouse, heirs, de-
visees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties
claiming by,
through, under or against that Defendant, and all
claimants, persons or parties, natural or corpo-
rate, or whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the named or described De-
fendants,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated September 27, 2007, in the above referenced case in which OLD
BLUE SPRINGS, LLC is Plaintiff, and PAUL FULLER; JOAN FULLER and
SAMANTHA GRAHAM; unknown tenants; and other unknown parties in possession,
including the unknown spouse of any person in possession of the property, and if a
named Defendant is deceased, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors,
and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that Defendant, and all
claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is un-
known, claiming under any of the named or described Defendants, are Defendants, I,
TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the Court, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in
the Madison County Courthouse in Madison, Florida, at 11:00 o'clock a.m. (or as soon
thereafter as Plaintiffs counsel may direct provided that said sale must be commenced
prior to 2:00 o'clock P.M.), on the 14th day of November, 2007, the following described
property set forth in the Default Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
Lot 12, Block A, River Trace Subdivision, in accordance with the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 28-30, Public Records of Madi-
son County, Florida.


Any and all bidders, parties or other interested persons shall contact the
information desk of the Clerk of the Court prior to the scheduled foreclosure sale who
will advise of the exact location in the Madison County Courthouse for the foreclosure
sale.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE. IF ANY. OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

[NOTE: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administrator, Post Office Box
1569, Lake City, Florida 32056-1569, Telephone: (386) 758-2163, within two (2) work-
ing days of your receipt of this Notice or pleading. If you are hearing or voice impaired,
please call: 1-800-955-8771.


WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 28 day of Sep-
tember, 2007 at Madison, Madison County, Florida.


HONORABLE TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

BY Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk


THE DECKER LAW FIRM, P. A.
320 White Avenue
Post Office Box 1288
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Telephone: (386) 364-4440
Telecopier: (386) 364-4508
Email: decklaw@alltel. net
Attorney for Plaintiff
10/10. 10/17


PIEDRA SPRINGS RANCH
Sellingto the Highest Bidder Above $4.9 Million Previously Listed at $9.5 Million
242 acres of recreational paradise Adjoins SanJuan National
Forest. Frontage on Piedra River, Yellow Jacket Creek and US-16o
8 acre lake Water, oil & mineral rights Abundant wildlife

Q [Tuesday, October 30 at 1:00 PM (MT)]
Ja G 80055 .


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 2007-360-CA

THE CIT GROUP/CONSUMER FINANCE, INC.

Plaintiff,


NOLA M. VOTAVA; _, UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF NOLA M. VOTAVA; and all unknown parties
claiming by, through, under or against the herein
named Defendants, who are not known to be dead
or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, credi-
tors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; TEN-
ANT #1 and/or TENANT #2, the parties intended
to account for the person or persons in possession

Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Oc-
tober 4, 2007 in this cause, I will sell the property situated in MADISON County, Flori-
da described as:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 1
NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SEC-
TION 26 ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY OF A 30 FOOT COUNTY
GRADED ROAD ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF
WAY RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 52' 13" WEST-1325.79 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 07' 31" EAST 300.61 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 52' 13" EAST 665.62 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 18' 21" WEST 271.01 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 52' 13" EAST 679.93 FEET TO THE
WEST RIGHT OF WAY OF A 30 FOOT COUNTY GRADED ROAD;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08' 14" WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT
OF WAY 30.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER
WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999 SPG H DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE
HOME HAVING VIN NUMBER GAFLX34A29193SL21, TITLE NUM-
BER 0084630665 AND VIN NUMBER GAFLX34B29193SL21, TITLE
NUMBER 0084630772.

a/k/a 1809 NE RUTHERFORD RD, LEE, FL 32059

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the West Front Doorstep of
the Madison County Courthouse located at 101 South Range Street, Madison, Florida,
at 11:00 o'clock a.m., on November 4, 2007.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60
days after the sale. Dated at Madison, Florida this 4 day of October 2007.
TIM SANDERS
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

Douglas C. Zahm, P.A.
18830 U.S. Hwy 19 N.,#300
Clearwater, FL 33764
(727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMO-
DATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTI-
TLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE,
PLEASE CONTACT THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, TIM SANDERS, 101
SOUTH RANGE STREET, MADISON, FLORIDA 32340, (850) 973-1500 (V/TDD). IF
YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771.

10/10. 10/17






867 ACRES 418 ACRES SELLING ABSOLUTE
[Prime Timber/Hunting Land in Webster County, Georgia]
Area rlchinwildlile and game* Most ofthe acreage coveredwith pine ready far
harvest in approximately 6 years Excellentnetwork ofroads throughout the prop-
ertyfor easy vehicle access Ideal for leasing to hunting dubs or for development
^ [Saturday, November 3 at 11:00 AM (ET)]A



Jerry grag Bing; J. R King Auction Company, in.; 800-662-5464 Jerry Cg-g KJng, NRO125 10% Bu4ye"rs "eium


if rthl i a The donation is tax deductible.
SPidk-up is free.
ior- Ol t If 'We take care of all the paperwork.






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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

CASE NO. 2007CA000245001XX
POW WOW, LLC,

Plaintiff,

VS.
WILFRID J. DUFRESNE and DIANNE E. HELLER,
husband and wife; unknown tenants; and other unknown parties
in possession, including the unknown spouse of any person in pos-
session of the property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the
surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all oth-
er parties claiming by, through, under or against that Defendant,
and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or
whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the
named or described Defendants,


Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURESALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure
dated October 11. 2007, in the above referenced case in which POW WOW, LLC is
Plaintiff, and WILFRID J. DUFRESNE and DIANNE E. HELLER; unknown tenants;
and other unknown parties in possession, including the unknown spouse of any person
in possession of the property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the surviving
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through,
under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or cor-
porate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the named or de-
scribed Defendants, are Defendants, I, TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the Court, will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash in the Madison County Courthouse in Madison,
Florida, as the Clerk of the Court may designate at the time of sale, at 11:00 o'clock A.
M. (or as soon thereafter as Plaintiffs counsel may direct provided that said sale must
be commenced prior to 2 o'clock p.m.), on the 14th day of November, 2007, the follow-
ing described property set forth in the Default Final Judgment of Foreclosure:

A parcel of land lying in Section 2, Township 2 South, Range
10 East, Madison County, Florida, and being more particular-
ly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of
said Section 2, and run S 8938'00" W, a distance of 1,348.73
feet to the Point of Beginning, from said Point of Beginning
run S 00*00'00" W, a distance of 652.89 feet; thence S
89034'42" E, a distance of 630.99 feet; thence S 00o22'58" E, a
distance of 628.17 feet; thence N 8934'42" W, a distance of
665.19 feet; thence N 0000'00" E, a distance of 1,280.61 feet;
thence North 8938'00" E, a distance of 30.00 feet to the Point
of Beginning, containing 10.01 acres, more or less. SUBJECT
TO all county maintained graded roads. SUBJECT TO a 10
foot utility easement on each lot line.

Any and all bidders, parties or other interested persons shall contact the information
desk of the Clerk of the Court prior to the scheduled foreclosure sale who will advise of
the exact location in the Madison County Courthouse for the foreclosure sale.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE


F THE DATE
) DAYS


[NI'TE: If you are person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact Court Administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City,
Florida 32056-1569, Telephone: (386) 758-2163, within two (2) working days of your re-
ceipt of this Notice or pleading. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call: 1-800-
955-8771.]

WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 12 day of October, 2007 at
Madison, Madison County, Florida.

HONORABLE TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


BY RAMONA DICKINSON
As Deputy Clerk


THE DECKER LAW FIRM, P. A.
320 White Avenue.
Post Office Box 1288
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Telephone: (386) 364-4440
Telecopler: (386) 364-4508
Email: decklaw@alltel.net
Attorney for Plaintiff


10.17.10.24


SALE, IF ANY. OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWN
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM 1
AFTER THE SALE.


in Baxley,Southeast Georgia

LAND LIQUIDATION
By Owner
Lots from 2 to 40 acres
ANY LOT,ANY SIZE, ANY PRICE

Only $500 Down + closing costs

OWNER FINANCING NO CREDIT CHECK
352 231 9938 www.blackwaterreserve.com
Email: BuyGeorgiaLand@gmail.com


We work hard to bring you the latest is your
locals news. Stay current on all the local

happenings here in Madison County, FL.



SUBSCRIBE


TODAY!!


(Court Seal)


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that FANNIE SMITH, the holder of the following cer-
tificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the description of property, and name in which it is as-
sessed is as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO. 02-45
YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2002
NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: ESTATE OF HOUSTON LEWIS
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Parcel #02-2S-07-0535-000-000

NW 1/4 OF SW 1/4 TC #2 1974

All of said property being in the County of Madison, State of Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed according to the law, the property described in such certifi-
cate will be sold to the highest bidder at the WEST FRONT DOOR at the Madison
County'Courthouse on the 23rd day of OCTOBER, at 11:00 am.

Dated this 21th day of SEPTEMBER, 2007
TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON, FLORIDA


By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk


1t 9/610/3.10/10).10/17


LEGALS









Wednesday, October 17, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 8B



FARM & AGRICULTURE



FRAT, ETGH NURSERY WINS COMMISSION JER'S


2007 AG-ENVIRONMENTAL TIEADERPSHIP AWARD


Jay Fraleigh, own-
er of Fraleigh Nursery
in Madison County has
invented a new water-
saving, runoff-reducing
method for growing ..
containerized nursery
plants. His patented
"Gro-Eco" system is
good for the planet and
good for the grower's
wallet because it uses
just a fraction of the
water consumed by
conventional overhead "
irrigation systems. -
Gro-Eco offers a whole '
range of benefits, in- -
cluding lower startup '
costs and healthier, -.
more beautiful plants. .
There are other
low-pressure watering
systems for large containers,
but Gro-Eco is an exciting
new development because it
is designed primarily for
smaller pots, between one
and seven gallons. Gro-Eco
is flexible enough to work for
larger pots, too, and can be "
usedforgrowingbothwoody I4
and herbaceous species. It
allows ornamental plant } ,
growers to take advantage of "
the technology used by cut-
ting-edge vegetable farmers.
The Gro-Eco system
works like this: Raised beds
are built and covered with
weed cloth. Holes are
burned in the cloth and
pockets dug in the beds to ac-
commodate nursery potsfof
various sizes. Only the up-
per third of each pot extends
above the top of the bed. Ir-
rigation drip tape runs down
each row of plants along the
tops of the containers, while
another drip tube, buried under the cloth in the center of the
bed, helps keep the roots cool. Moderating the temperature of
the roots keeps the plants healthy and further cuts down on
the amount of water they need. Fertilizer can also be applied
through the drip system.
The Gro-Eco system has numerous advantages and solves
many of the problems presented by conventional overhead ir-
rigation. First and foremost, it saves as much as 80 percent of
the water used by overhead sprinkler systems for irrigating
small containers. Because less water is being pumped for ir-
rigation, the grower also sees a substantial reduction in ener-
gy use and costs.
Only a small fraction of the water applied by overhead
sprinklers is retained for plant growth, while the rest becomes


NORTH


V-
p rituoff and evaporation. But
with Gro-Eco, water and fertil-
izer runoff, as well as nitrogen
leaching, has been eliminated.
Water quality is protected, and
D ithe nursery is able to substan-
tially reduce its chemical us-
age since drchip-tape fertilizer
applications are more efficient.g
The Gro-Eco system meets and exceeds current Best Manage-
ment Practices for runoff issues.
Dealing with runoff is a high-priced problem in the nurs-
ery business. Growers using overheadT irrigation must dig re-
tention ponds and install culverts to catch and direct runoff
an expensive and time-consuming process. By eliminating
runoff, Gro-Eco reduces construction costs by 40 percent
Plus, a nursery can be up and running much more quickly
The system is less labor intensive, so growers see a 24 per-
cent to 30 percent reduction in operating costs. Many common
nursery tasks are eliminated or made easier with Gro-Eco.
For example, there are fewer weeds to pull, and plants don't
blow over in strong winds.
Gro-Eco produces healthier plants than those grown un-


AServing Madison, Jefferson,
Taylor & Lafayette Counties
Auto, Life, Health, Home

Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager
Jimmy King, Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071


der overhead irri-
- gation. Overhead
irrigation means
S..... wet leaves, which
--- can lead to fungal
S- .. .......1^ problems-and the
""-.:";""":"-need to apply ex-
S...pensive chemical
fungicides. By
keeping the leaves
....... W -_ drier, Gro-Eco re-
duces the need for
fungicide applica-
tions. Plants are
.................- healthier and so
is the environ-
ment.
- Gro-Eco
moderates the tem-
perature of plant
roots, providing in-
sulation from cold
and heat damage
and resulting in quicker, healthier
groiwtlh. Since implementing the sys-
tem, Fraleigh Nursery reports that
residency time for many cultivars has
been reduced by as much as 30 per-
cent.
The final advantage is in market-
ing. Water conservation is an issue of
increasing concern to the public.
Groi-Eco adds value to plants because
growers can market them as being
produced in a way that is environ-
mentally friendly
Jay Fraleigh is a sixth-generation
Florida farmer, born and raised in
Madison. After graduating from
Lake City Community College with a
degree in landscape design, he. spent
15 years working for Wight Nursery
in Cairo. Georgia. before returning to Madison to open
Fraleigh Nursery on the family farm where he grew up. To-
day. three-quarters of the 40-acre nursery produces plants us-
ing the Gro-Eco method.
Fraleigh serves on the Florida Farm Bureau State Orna-
mental Horticulture Advisory Committee and is a member of
the board of directors for the Madison County Farm Bureau.
He lives in Madison with his wife, Donna, and sons, Russell
and Lane.

congratulations, Fraleigh Nursery


FARMER'S

COOPERATIVE, INC.
748 SW Horry St. Madison, FL 32340
850.973.2269
-* *


EQIP Application Deadline Is November 13, 2007


The 2008 Environ-
mental Quality Incen-
tives Program (EQIP) ap-
plication period will re-
main open until Novem-
ber 13, 2008 according to
Jeffrey Woods, Assistant
State Conservationist for
the USDA-Natural Re-
sources Conservation
Service (NRCS) in Flori-
da.
EQIP is a key pro-
gram under the 2002
Farm Bill that provides
federal cost-share funds
to working farms and
ranches for conservation
improvements.
Like all NRCS pro-


grams, participation is
voluntary, and available
to all eligible producers
without discrimination.
"EQIP provides incen-
tive payments and cost-
share funds to private
agricultural and live-
stock producers to imple-
ment conservation prac-
tices," said Woods. "It pro-
motes agricultural pro-
duction and environmen-
tal quality as compatible
goals. And, it is extreme-
ly important for produc-
ers to note that the appli-
cation deadline for the
2008 Program Year is No-
vember 13th." Woods


says.
According to Woods,
the deadline is a continu-
ing effort to improve the
funding process.
The accelerated pro-
gram cut-off dates will al-
low producers time to
complete practices dur-
ing the first years of
their contracts.
The earlier applica-
tion deadline date will
help accommodate field
work in preparation for a
project to be done in the
fall as soon after they fin-
ish with crop harvest, in
most cases.
"The accelerated
process makes coming in
to our field offices early
to meet with the NRCS
staff more important
than ever," said Woods. "I
would encourage our
farmers and ranchers to
come in and visit with
our staff now. We know
that producers that get in
early have more time to
resolve certain program


or land eligibility issues.
EQIP, like all NRCS
programs, is a voluntary
program that is intended
to yield high quality, pro-
ductive soils; clean and
abundant water; healthy
plant and animal commu-


.'1


. nities; clean air; an ade-
quate energy supply; and
working farms and
ranchlands.
For more information
on the 2008 EQIP pro-
gram, contact the NRCS
Field Office in the Farm


Service Center at 1416
East US-90 Madison, FL
phone (850) 973-6595 or
visit the Florida NRCS
web page at
http://www.fl.nrcs. usda.
gov/programs/eqip/fle-
quip.html.


Gordon Tractor thanks


FrafZiNuwsery


for all of their local






Gordon Tractor, Inc.
Co 0 1 ro SEl E l f,, 5i h 'I l 5- , ,, ILN \' i L, Ho/I'II E.tlllEllipu t
491 SVV Range Ave. nladison. FL-
S% 850-973-2245
rEN nHOLLArV






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