Group Title: Madison County Carrier
Title: Madison County carrier
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00051
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Uniform Title: Madison County Carrier
Alternate Title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Publication Date: March 28, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067855
Volume ID: VID00051
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn96027683
lccn - sn 96027683

Full Text




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THE SPIRIT OF MADISON COUNTY


Cars

Burglarized
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc."
The Madison Police De-
partment is urging everyone to
lock their cars when they are
not in them.
MPD reports that a num-
ber of cars have been burglar-
ized. On Saturday, March 24, a
silver, red and black JVC
1100-watt amplifier was stolen
from one vehicle. The next
day, a total of $70, which was
in one woman's purse, was re-
ported stolen from another ve-
hicle.
If anyone has any infor-
Smation on who may have com-
S mitted these crimes, please call
the MPD at 973-5077.

Fast Track

Burglarized
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Fast Track at 903 West.
Base Street was burglarized
early Monday morning,-March
"' 26.
According to a Madison
Police Department report, filed
by Sgt. Jimbo Roebuck, an un-
known subject busted the front
glass and entered the building.
The subject reportedly
stole an unknown amount of
lottery tickets and tobacco
products before exiting out the
back window.
If you have any informa-
tion on the burglary, please call
the Madison Police Depart-
ment at 973-5077.
School Board
Institutes A
Business-Community
(ABC) School
Program
The Madison County
School District has formed a
committee to evaluate propos-
als for the "A Business-Com-
munity (ABC) School Pro-
gram." The ABC School Pro-
gram was'written into 2006
Florida Statues, Section
1013.721, in order to increase
business partnerships in edu--
cation and reduce school and
classroom overcrowding
throughout the state.
An ABC school is a public
school that offers instruction to
students from Kindergarten
through third grade or any sin-
gle or multiple grade levels
within this range. First priority
Please see School Board,
Page 3A


Wed 881/7
3128 "' - A few paselng cloud, otherwiao
generally sunny, Warm, High 6OF,


Thu 885
A low oloodn, HIUh In Ihe upper
ON andI lowa In the upper Me,

Fri 63M17 L
3/30
Tim.. ot un and oloudo, High@ In
the low 004 and low In the upper
800.


Two Teens Critcally Injured

m'.1. M M


(Photo Courtesy of Action Photos. March 26. 2000
A nurse holds two-year-old Teliya Burns, as paramedics attend to Sabrina C. Gandy, at the left of the pho-
to, and Jeremy E. Alexander, at the far right of the photo. The two-year-old suffered only minor injuries, while
Gandy and Alexander were critically injured in the rollover.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Two teenagers were critically injured in a wreck on State
Road 53, south of Midway Church Road.
According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Jeremy E.
Alexander, 18, of Madison, was northbound on State Road
53. Alexander's right side tires traveled off the roadway onto
the east shoulder.
Alexander over-steered to the left, causing the 2000
Chevrolet to re-enter the northbound lane. Alexander then
over-steered to the right, causing the car to rotate in a clock-


wise spin, going back off the east shoulder of the roadway.
Alexander overturned, colliding with a fence before
coming to a final rest.
Alexander and his passenger, Sabrina C. Gandy, 17, of
Mayo, were ejected from the vehicle as it overturned.
Teliya Burns, 2, was properly restrained in an approved
child safety device, located in the center rear of the car. The
child stayed in the car and sustained only minor injuries.
Neither Alexander nor Gandy were wearing seatbelts.
FHP Trooper Charles Swindle was the crash investiga-


Letter To County Commission Sparks Meeting

To Discuss Coal Plant Waste Management
By Jessica Higginbotham .to light that any ash
Greene Publishing, .. -.'a-lition, we waste could possibly be
Inc. .on Clean" col enter's *~ transported to the re-
In a Ie Keeph lor neu d coal gional landfill in
meet- liners: cities from tn address pulveria Greenville, since Tay-
i n g Dearer co e ommisso t 800Greenv e lor County no longer
sched an April 4, ion aste dll l tential for from operates one. Ash
uled for att p ose of oouninthe ona aoute arsenic opera- waste is a hazardous
April 4 plantrohocay af ic mateicallYor such a long material, with the
at 9 a.m., plant Prowing concern, os, epe s that their elements of mer-
members is d eaage "i, even wi i sed t cury, lead and ar-
of Keep 0llute i Comiss the Pro senic, among oth-
o Kepn anhs"'.apo!lant wastes' aoe Service C ai l plants On the sre ml
Madison c p the public rvedditl are t pts would ers present. In
Clean, an ton.has tng of wo, plan GCCaddition, coal
aEc staf would Incl eoa plant eapprovenlea br Countyfor emissions con-
environ- r e l vrC emissions con-
mental pro- iTtyhoreCou 1o plant site in yo This tain trace
section orga- iTn ed cO o oa nt ist d 5-60 yerdison amounts of ra-
erz ionpl ian wasra dispose 3 000 Ipa the In l dioactive ele-
Iretheo ePr yof rovid lifethe
nization plan r e waste onthe exect tplat wastes efor our region
rto once again ee eoal owe regiona land- ments.
proposedcoa.. to James
pirotest thwer moulie calwell over a ha ats that wou l plant tatestg ltae of 59 y (asnl. According
proposdor more oal t for tn esated pi i the area is to Jam
fired power couty bone amendm on County apac Brooks, the
plant.ired County ladste dispopwstes
e 1n disposaL twastes site manag-
plant. The Taylor Co Greenville in Madtes. Solid waste lluted, if coal p record of site manag-
plant, if passed, i located t dfillng t.gin to be O EA Supe tn and er of the re-
will be located in 2065) at cu ervre e proO r wells it stated, i the, relate rid- gional
Taylor County, d quate al p 0ten Greenville. dill in 9 2 portion ofteorm landfill
and could boost There b dispose Sanitary f s the upe s have be orhere in
...., allowed to be disntyposeeormd. atur
the overall econo- |are alo o the Madison" inofl d other slution o ean50-60l Madison
my of the area. Decisions S.arks For ol a ^ o us more, County,
However, this issue discontin dison r the geolog ic as d from thea to a r, bly due to
is not as much about ian aquifer gion during e truck traff ic an r a .m h eenvi J train cutting
Snfe raghich I taxpayers alry, ofaille train cutting
the power plant as it through hu constant heavctur, whC e ddit t hundreds edge
is about where of d ge o ons for ard be heavily sgs and traf heavy bur- tech- e
waste from it will go. yrvng ty) p of al nolo-
Jim and Lisa hM irdosos n td g coal P, barhe br t
S ahaz cities i to andrttO at:ons, plbearnt(s). ,response o gy
Flournoy, working in other caner o there
conjunction with the sca9 ever0.yMa of ou n
conjunction with the Mcar a 0. dison lution front ard of County tion opposingf that eso is
Environmental Alliance wa inc g air on ontstronclear they very
of North Florida and d 0, iof citizens, P Count have ade ratio, lit-
Taylor Residents United elmng concerns edrte offuture attle
for the Environment plan oe n a it asep thP opN's healthh or th his o any Plan
.. ...whe It..i..enet e rr ythisor ave respect-
to fight the proposal in tt te i chi ldren cts rom County c lean, ive ac-
every step of the process. do not want their ar ol lution otu to keep d icmntsa dt T from any (ru
tIt airwh o wan he d a Cu, nty from
The Taylor County acted by airon behalf of the at tct Ad dison ne
Coal Fired Power Plant pro- Therefore, e to cares meting tro p asing tro m b ing osed
coaleconuseetinfg ro being riate
ject has been stalled once ask you tomei CoInm to ain tliablteution waste fr' dey
again. Due to an error in the : on at our rndwater con hibit any co ,en matter ad
original cost estimates done tentialfuture g dment)to P'sider this eany giaer
by representatives from Talla- o comnP plan 0oty. We cond it a tielySincerelY,
hassee, the Public Service of in Mad is tng this solvedia & sa F ourrio
Commission has decided to re- your help in ge tnJ
view the proposal. This effec- chance that this
tively puts a stop in any imme- landfill will leak waste into the
diate plans for construction. environment. Before the landfill can operate,
Recently, it has been brought soil Please Coal Plant, Page 20A


Man Charged

With Sexual

Battery Of

Young

Teenager


Lorenzo rrasoy
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Madison man was ar-
rested for sexually battering a
young teenager on Friday,
March 23.
According to a Madison
Police Department report, Sgt.
Jimbo Roebuck was dis-
patched to the Madison Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital, in refer-
Please see Brasby, Page 3A

Downed

Long

Distance

Downs

Business
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Business was affected by
Embarq's consumers inability
to do credit card transactions
on Monday. Government was
affected by dropped phone
calls and not being able to
make calls.
The credit card machines
were not the only things affect-
ed by the failure to call long
distance in Madison and Jef-
ferson Counties. Business
done via the Internet also came
to a screeching halt. Cus-
tomers also attempting to use
Automated Teller Machines
(ATM) were also thwarted.
One Embarq employee
said that the lines were up then
they were back down again.
He said that he didn't know
how long it had been going on.
Danny Croft, owner of
O'Neal's Restaurant, said that
the downed lines had been a
little bad business.
"But what can you do?" he
said.
Please see Long Distance,
Page 20A


.2 Sections, 32 Pages
Around Madison Co........5-7A
Bridal............................9A
Church...................... Section B
Classifieds/Legals.......18-19A
Community Calendar..........5A
Crime Page.........................4A
Editorial..................... ... 2-3A
Health............................. 13A
Obituaries........................ 5A
School........................... 14A
Sports........................ 16-17A
Valdosta, GA Shopping.... 15A

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ASHLEY


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Shines
AsA
Univerhltg
Of
Mikmi
Cheedode
Page 14A I


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2A Madison County harrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, March 28, 2007



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Wandering
With The Publisher
Mary Ellen Greene
Columnist


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


What Were They Thinking?


Judging Florida

Newspapers Is Fun !!









I. c

Over 20 newspaper representatives participated in
the new judging procedure for the 2006 FPA "Better
Weekly Contest" held in Tallahassee recently.
__ .-... -g -apl ls


4 i 4
.



Three area journalists judging Florida newspapers
for the FPA's annual "Better Weekly Contest" included,
left to right: Mary Ellen Greene, co- owner and Advertis-
Ing Manager of Greene Publishing, Inc.; Vanessa Fultz of
the Suwannee Democrat in Live Oak; and Jacob Bembry,
a reporter for Greene Publishing, Inc.
Friday, March 23rd marked the implementation of a new
judging procedure for the FPA Better Weekly Editorial Contest.
For the first time, those choosing to enter the editorial contest
wei'Lrequi id,.^arli cgte' he re.ept e ~rst -ever in'st te judg-
ing of all entries. Fl ,Q4skciion is scheduled to have
three more judging locations throughout the State of Florida.
The first held in Tallahassee last week drew over 20 pub-
lishers, editors, reporters and photographers. The next judging is
scheduled for Friday, April 13, at the Orlando Sentinel, followed
by an April 20th judging in Miami at the Hampton Inn.
The final round of judging will take place on May 10-11, in
Orlando, with a distinguished panel of Florida Press Association
Contest Chairpersons from New York and Pennsylvania, as well
as journalism professors from the University of Florida. Florida
Press members can expect to see a random list of winners on the
flpress.com website no later than Friday, May 18th.
During last Friday's judging, memories of judging in years
gone by went flooding through my mind.
During the 1960's 1980's years the 01' Publisher and I
were active and on the Board of the Florida Press Association.
We judged many contests for area states of Georgia, Alabama,
Mississippi, etc. We actually had a "Judging Team" of Florida
newspaper publishers, and besides just doing the judging, we
had a fantastic time just traveling together to these various states
to actually do the judging.
Florida publishers have always been among the most com-
petitive, unusual, brilliant, and fun-loving. One of the books
'The Husband and I would like to write one day is on some of
these "characters."
As I looked on the "Hall of Fame," wall of the Florida Press
Association's photo gallery, so many of these men and women
were our very dear friends back then.
There was Al Neuharth, former Executive President of
Gannett newspapers and the founder of USA Today. I remember
when The Husband wore his green tennis shoes with his green
tux one night to a banquet when he was President of the Florida
SPress Association. We were seated at the head table that evening
with Al and his wife Lori, who was then a State Senator from
Brevard County.
Al went upstairs and came back down with white tennis
shoes on with his tux. He told us that if Tommy Greene, Presi-
dent of the Florida Press Association could wear green tennis
shoes with his green tux, theft Al Neuharth, President of Gannett
could wear white tennis shoes with his white and black tux.
From that day forward, that is just what he did, and he eventual-
ly went to all black and white outfits, just as The Husband had
done with his "green." What a hoot the two of them were to-
gether all those years. Each tried to outdo the other!!!
As I think of the various places we visited to judge newspa-
pers, I remember once when we flew into New Orleans, La. to
judge newspapers from Texas. We met the Texas judges there,
and they judged Florida newspapers as we judged Texas ones.
A friend of ours, David Arthurs, who owned the Crystal
River newspaper, and other newspapers in central Florida, as
well as all the radio stations there, was to meet us at the New
Orleans airport. We had flown into there from Tallahassee with
the publisher of the Tallahassee Democrat, Gus Harwell. Be-
cause he thought we wouldn't see one another, DAvid had
brought a huge green balloon that was flying over the heads of
everyone in the building, which had a green gorilla on the bal-
loon and read: "Tommy Greene, the "other" Howard Hughes."
Boy! What fun we had during all the active, exciting, and
competitive years. The younger generation of newspaper own-
ers could take a lesson in "judging" that we learned early on.
"Nuff said...Bye for now... See 'ya.


Letter to The Editor:
WHAT were they thinking ??? PLEASE, somebody tell me
What in the world were the YEA!s thinking when they voted to
allow these monster machines to prowl our dirt roadways, at
will, without insurance, registration, or without any guarantee of
financial responsibility. Did they think of the additional cost of
overtime for the roadgraders and operators? Zigzags, dough-
nuts, potholes, motorists losing control of their car due to deep
gouges in the roadway, injury, death, lawsuits backlogging our
court system, and on and on. Where will it stop?. Even a bicy-
cle can cause a lot of injury and personal liability.. READ on.
Some 65 to70 years ago I wasl3 and in my first year of high
school. I didn't know what the inside of a school bus looked
like, as most everybody walked to school except the rich, al-
though my mother told me that she rode the school bus back
when she was going to school, because they lived out so far in
the country. She would tell me about the mornings that she
would miss the bus, but she would be able to run it down as it
was pulled by a team of Mules.
I saved enough on my paper route to buy a good used bike,
so the four and a half miles to school was no problem, although
it did get chilly from December-March.
However this was summertime and I was coming home to
get ready for my paper route when this baby girl about 3, dart-
ed out into the street from behind a parked car as her grand-
mother was trying to catch her. I felt a bump and looked back
and saw the girl lying still. Her grandmother was screaming,
"you've killed my baby, you've killed my baby. She gathered up
the child as if she weighed 5 pounds and rushed her into the
house yelling for me to wait. In a few minutes the ambulance
was there and the grandmother was putting me through the third
degree. Pencil, and paper, name and address. I felt sick, I want-
ed to throw up in the worst way. Some how I got through my
route that day but the guilt wouldn't go away. I told my mom
and dad that night when they came home from work. My dad
and I went back that night and I showed him where she run
around the car and then I realized what had happened, My right"
knee, the same one I injured a year ago when the ambulance
rushed me to the hospital through the mine field created by Nes-


tie Waters INC., had struck the child in the head much like a
boxer throwing a punch.at another boxer. The little girl would be
fine, no cuts or bruises or missing teeth, but a real sore jaw that
alot of ice cream would fix.
The following Sunday, there was a knock on the front door,
and standing there was the child's parents and a man dressed like
he had just left church. They wanted to speak with my dad in
private, so I went outside. A few minutes later my dad was
showing the three to the door and I heard him say Do what you
have to do, we don't have a whole lot, but it wasn't my sons
fault, the grandmother should have had the child by the hand.
When I was about that same age, I pulled away from my
Aunt Thelma who lived on Woodland Ave., near the OLD SOL-
DIERS HOME in Atlanta GA. We were all on Peachy Tree
Street when I broke away to cross the street, just as a trolley car
was coming along. Needless to say the towcatcher scooped me
up just as clean as a front loader. I spent about 3 days in the hos-
pital after being unconscious for 10 hours. The Trolley Car paid
the bills and I got one hundred fifty dollars for pain & suffering.
That was BIG BUCKS back in 1929.
I'M appealing to the County Commissioners NOT to let this
get out of hand. People that have lost their driving privilege will
give MADISON COUNTY the most problem, especially if
Liquor is voted in, which I am in favor of, not because I drink
the stuff (which I don't) but the ones that do are going to get it
from some where, so Madison County may as well collect the
revenue. Perhaps it will help getting the HOSPITAL sooner.
SA correct solution for the thrill seekers on the KILLER
MACHINES would be for the County to lease about 10 acres of
swamp as close to the Hospital site as possible,.perhaps a land
owner might find it in his heart to donate such A piece of tract
for these diehards that are determined to self destruct.
As it stands the GOOD OLE BOYS THAT VOTED "YEA"
will be standing alone when it becomes PAY UP time. The
NAYS will be able to sit back and say

I TOLD YOU SO !!! I TOLD You SO"!!!

J. Ervine Hagan


Question Of The Week.,
*'.. : ." -... ..'.,. : ^ _. -.. x ^. *. "^',: t '


"Have you
ever abused
drugs, includ-
ing prescrip-
tion, over-5 "'
the-counter, Yes 7.
and illegal. .
drugs like
marijuana?"
-


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forward to?"
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Letters To The Edito








Wednesday, March 28, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 3A


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee Limelight
Jacob Bembry
4y Columnist




Lee Day Set


For Saturday
Lee Day will be held Saturday, March 31. The fun begins
on Friday evening with a Lee Reunion dinner at Lee United
Methodist Church. The next day, guests will enjoy a pancake
breakfast, the big parade, all-day entertainment and the fun will
end with a sock hop at the old Lee School Gym. Dawn's Kinder
Academy will be providing childcare for a cost during the sock
hop.
Evangelist Mike Carson is conducting a revival at Midway
Church of God Sunday through Friday, March 31.
Services will begin at 7 p.m. Wednesday through Friday.
There will be special singing each evening.
Carson has been a guest on various broadcasts including
TBN, The Dove Channel, and Lamb's Broadcasting, along with
his own TV and radio broadcast in Atlanta, Ga.
There will be a fellowship dinner on Wednesday evening,
March 28, beginning at 6 p.m. The youth from Midway Church
of God will perform that evening. On Thursday and Friday, the
youth from Live Oak Church of God will be on hand to perform.
Happy birthday wishes go out this week to Louise Webb,
who celebrates her birthday on Friday, March 30. Jerry Lind-
strand and Chuck Dickey celebrate their birthdays on Sunday,
April 1. Ruth Yates has a birthday on Monday, April 2.
My sister, Debbie, and her husband, Greg Leutner, cele-
brate their 20th wedding anniversary on Friday, March 30.
Happy anniversary wishes are extended to James and
Margie Phillips, Sunday, April 1. Sean and April Herring cele-
brate their anniversary on Tuesday, April 3.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week and a
beautiful forever!
May God bless each and every one of you!





Obra Juwan Baynard -V- Lee Ervine Baynard-Dissolution
Sof Marriage'
Ericka Bellamy & DOR -V- Henry Roberson Jr.-Support
Green Tree Service -V- Cassey M. Haynes, etal-Mortgage
Forclosure
Ivy Financial Corp. -V- Carlos G. Picart- Mortgage For-
closure
Deborah Albritton -V- William. Harold Swann Jr.-Sexual
Injunction
Willie Glee -V- Mt. Nebo Missionary Bapt. Church &
etal-Other Civil
Latonya Taylor -V- Gary D. Taylor-Domestic Injunction
Magell Arnold -V- Danterrius Howard- Domestic Injunc-
tion
Magell Arnold -V- Chris Arnold- Domestic Injunction
Chase Bank -V- Samuel R. Harris-Contract
Fatima S. Castro -V- Agustin S. Orozco- Domestic In-
junction
Rayne H. Halber -V- Robert Jordan-Rep. Domestic In-
junction



Slori& Press Associ.




Award Winning Newspaper
Founders: Tom, [.1,, mii .a'p II [VmITI yeEIr--


Chosen one oflorida's Three Oulstandlg Newspapers
P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Website: www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
Sports
news@greenepublishing.com
Advertisement
ads@greenepublishing.com
Classifieds / Legals
susan@greenepublishing.com


Emerald Greene Kinsley
Publisher/Editor
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Lisa M. Greene
STAFF WRITERS
Jacob Bembry, Ashley Bell
and Jessica Higginbotham
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
Carla Barrett, Heather Bowen
and Lisa M. Greene
TYPESETTER
Mary Miller
'ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Mary Ellen Greene, Dorothy McKinney,
Samantha Hall, Dan Mathis
and Candice McCulley
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Susan Grimes
Deadlie for classified is Monday at 3:00 pm.
Deadline for LegalAdvctisem nl is Monday at 5pn
Thrwill be a 3 charge for Affidavis.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Subscription Rates:
In County $28 Out-of-County $35
(State & local taxes included)


Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express
reading pleasures of the people of its circulation area, be they past, pre-
sent or future residents.
Published weekly by Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695 South State
Road 53, Madison, Florida 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post
Office in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY
CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news
matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not
be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper,
and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing, Inc. for publication in this
newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are
dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos
beyond said deadline.


National Security

Joe Boyles
Guest Columnist


ROE


By now after four years of war in Iraq, those of you who
pay attention to the news know that ROE is an acronym that
stands for rules of engagement. To a member of our military,
ROE are the set of tactical rules which govern their conduct in
war.
Every serviceman who enters combat must become inti-
mately familiar with the rules which govern their use of force.
The consequences can be dire if the ROE isn't followed we
hear of more than a few cases that have been investigated and
prosecuted where rules of engagement or other laws of armed
conflict have been violated.
Another reason why study of these rules is so important is
because they constantly change. As commanders gain more ex-
perience, they adjust the rules based on what is happening in the
field and modifications in our objectives. Recently in Iraq as
part of the change in strategy, our troops were authorized to cap-
ture and detain Iranian agents that previously were treated as
*"hands off." That's a good thing in helping to quell sectarian vi-
olence because the Irahians are training and equipping Shia
militia squads.
Recently, an Air Force buddy visited and I had an opportu-
nity to ask him about his experience in Iraq last year. Colonel
Russ Smith said, "The rules allowed us to return fire from any
place it came from. What the rules did not allow us to do was
attack a potential target when we felt there was hostile intent.
That required us to request permission from higher authority
which might take as long as two hours for approval and in that
time, the bad guys would often escape."
We teach our soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines to be ag-
gressive and take the fight to our country's enemies. Then once
they are engaged in combat, we tell them to slow down and be
careful because they are employing deadly force once a bullet
is fired, it is too late to take it back. It is a balancing act that
commanders are forced to deal with what is the right amount
of initiative in battle and where is it important to exercise re-
straint? Also, commanders must make the rules simple and easy
to recognize because they understand the dynamics of combat
and the necessity to make quick decisions.
Sometimes, the ROE just doesn't make any sense to the
troops. In the summer of 1972, one of the rules which I was re-
quired to follow in Vietnam prohibited us from attacking an en-
emy aircraft while it was on the ground. Once that sucker was
airborne, he was fair game but before that, his airfield was a
sanctuary. Now that didn't make any sense to me, but I was just
a lieutenant and I assumed whoever dreamed that one up knew
more about the "big picture" than I did. Later, the rule was lift-
ed and we were free to attack grounded aircraft as well.
The American fighting man has always labored under the
restrictions of rules of engagement and the Law of Armed Con-
flict (LOAC). Frequently, we are engaged in combat with an
enemy that follows no rules and that is certainly the case in Iraq
and with al Qaeda in general. That is certainly frustrating for
our troops but a fact of life nonetheless. I suppose it is a little
like the game of golf we play the ball as it lies, not how we


would like it to lie.
Two things about the modern day battlefield deserve atten-
tion. First, when the objectives of the war become more limit-
ed, the rules of engagement become more restrictive. The sol-
diers of today face many more restrictions than say, their World
War II counterparts because our recent wars have been much
more limited than the broad unconditional surrender objective
of prior years. Second with greater media coverage, there are
bound to be more rules as well as scrutiny as to how those rules
are followed.
We ask a tremendous amount from our soldiers of today
which is another reason why they deserve our profound respect.
44.


o1.k| EWS ^'


The t4ddi'on Coupty Carrier--.M Entill'lljse Recorder

Brasby cont from page 1

ence to a sexual battery. When Roebuck arrived, the com-
plainant advised him that Lorenzo Brasby, 21, had forced her
daughter to have non-consensual sex.
When Roebuck spoke to the victim, she said that she had
been at a relative's house when Brasby had entered the bedroom
she was in and forced her to have sex against her will.
Roebuck was later informed that Brasby was in the lobby at
the jail. He went and met with Brasby, who informed him that
he'd had consensual sex with the victim.
Roebuck arrested Brasby who was charged with sexual bat-
tery on a victim under 16.


School Board cont from page

for admission of students to an ABC school shall be given to the
children of the owners and employees of the host business. If ad-
ditional capacity remains after children of the owners and em-
ployees of the host business are admitted, the host business may
designate other neighboring businesses whose owners or em-
ployees may also participate to generate a reasonable number of
students for the schools.
The school district is responsible for providing the appro-
priate instructional support, administrative staff, teachers, text
books, materials, supplies, and curriculum. Parents are responsi-
ble for providing transportation to and from the school for their
children.
For more details about the ABC School Program, please
contact Cheryl S. James at 973-5022.


Big Bend Hospice Salutes Social Workes














Big Bend It takes a team.
to help families facing a life limiting illness..
Hospice Big Bend Hospice salutes our Family Support Counselors
and Grief & Loss Counselors and extends our heart-felt appreciation
your hometown hosFpce. Iensca since Il to community social workers for being our partners.
(850) 878-5310 or toll free 24 hours a day (800) 772-5862 1723 Mahan Center Blvd.


___ ii I ^


L









IA Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, March 28, 2007




LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTIER
1


Two Arrested For Selling

Black Market

Prescription Drugs
The owner and an employee of a Quincy convenience store
have been arrested following a multi-agency investigation into
he illegal sale of pharmaceuticals. Tony Saenz, owner of Mi Fa-
vorita Tienda Store, and Homero Campos, the store employee,
face charges of Sale or Delivery of Contraband Le'gend Drugs, a
2nd degree felony, and Operating a Pharmacy Without a Li-
cense, a 3rd degree felony.
The joint investigation by the Gadsden County Sheriff's Of-
lice, the Florida Department of Law Enforcemernt, the Florida
Department of Health and the North Florida Drug Diversion Re-
sponse Team (DRT), was launched after information was devel-
oped that black market antibiotics and birth control drugs were
being sold from the store. The investigation revealed that along
with the drugs, injection kits that included syringes and instruc-
tions for use were also sold to enable customers to inject the
,drugs themselves.
A search warrant was served on the store on Friday and
among the items seized were more than 100 boxes of pharma-
ceuticals, syringes and nearly $70,000 in cash. It is believed that
the drugs were smuggled into California from Mexico by a dis-
tribution network that takes orders then ships the drugs and sup-
plies across the United States.
The month-long investigation revealed that customers could
walk into the store complaining of various ailments and pur-
chase drugs without any medical consultation or prescription
from a physician. Mi Favorita Tienda is not licensed as a phar-
macy. Neither Saenz, 48, nor Campos, 43, are licensed pharma-
cists or physicians and are not qualified to administer or pre-
scribe drugs.
The two men, both residents of Quincy, were notified of the
charges and surrendered themselves to authorities at the Gads-
den County Jail this morning. The investigation continues and
additional arrests may follow.



I Want to Achieve Financial Goals?
Do the Math
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones
If you breathed a sigh of relief when you put away that
algebra or geometry textbook for the last time, you might
not be eager to take up the subject of math again. However,
by doing some number crunching, you can put a "price tag"
on your long-term financial goals and that's the first step
toward achieving them.
To quantify the csits oifyour objectives, you must be
Specific about what you're trying to accomplish. Do you
want to retire as soon as you possibly can and then spend
your time traveling the world? Or are you planning to work
Until 65 and then open your own small business? Obviously,
these are vastly different goals with vastly different costs
to you.
Once you know what you really want to do when you
retire, you should be able to project your annual yearly
expenses.' Then, you can ask yourself these questions:
How many years will I spend in retirement? None of
us can predict exactly how long we will live. But if you con-
sider your overall health, your lifestyle habits and your fam-
ily's history of longevity, you can come up with a reason-
able estimate of how many years you might have to pay for
in retirement.
Where will my income come from? To pay for your
retirement goals, you'll likely need to draw on all types of
income available to you, including Social Security and your
investments, such as your IRA, 401(k) and whatever indi-
vidual stocks and other securities you may own. To help
reach the level of income you'll require, you will need to
monitor all these investments over the years, and make
Changes as needed.

Calculating Costs of Other Goals
SAchieving the "ideal" retirement might be your biggest
financial goal, but it's almost certainly not the only one. But
no matter what goals you have, you'll still need to "do the
math" necessary to calculate costs and arrive at solutions.
So, for example, if you'd like to help pay for college for
your children (or grandchildren), you'll need to look at what
college costs today, how much it's likely to cost in the future
and how much money you can devote to paying those costs.
I To illustrate: For the 2006-2007 school year, it costs, on
average, $16,357 for students attending four-year public
colleges and universities, according to the College Board. If
college costs were to rise five percent every year, today's
newborns can expect to. pay about $162,000 for four years
at a public school.
With the presence of scholarships, loans and work-
study arrangements, you might not have to foot the entire
$162,000 bill. But at least you'll know what you might need
and you can start planning the appropriate savings and
| investment strategies.
And you can take this same approach to other long-
Sterm goals, such as buying a second home or a new busi-
ness. Keep in mind, though, that "doing the math" can
involve a lot of variables, so you may well want to consult
with a financial advisor someone with the tools and expe-
i rience to help you chart your course toward your goals.

But don't wait too long the sooner you start planning, the
more pleasant "the math" will be for you.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


114 SW Range Avenue
P0 Box 31
NMjdi~onFL 32 UJ Pr
SBL.~I;, 3~ 3 F.,\ 1I.>~-
Hir ,. Tr2I-1 il i FIc ,, '

So.-r~inpIndi,~idmjjI In~e-iq,r ',irk4 e 1-
Sj


Florida Department Of Law Enforcement


Agents Arrest Former Corrections Officer


On Sexual Misconduct Charge


Florida Department of Law Enforcement agents have
charged a former state corrections officer with sexual mis-
conduct after he allegedly had sex with an inmate in a South
Florida prison.
Gustavo Coronado, 34, turned himself in on Monday on
the single count of sexual misconduct. He was arrested with-
out incident and transported to the Turner Guilford Knight
Detention Center in Miami.
Agents said the investigation began in January 2006 af-
ter they received information from the Department of Cor-
rections Office of Inspector General that Coronado allegedly
had sex with a female inmate at the Homestead Correctional
Institution in Homestead in December 2005. Coronado was
terminated from his position in August 2006.


According to agents and prison inspectors, Coronado and
the woman allegedly had sex in her cell while the other in-
mates were having lunch. The female inmate was under
Coronado's supervision.
During the investigation, a pair of the inmate's under-
wear was submitted to the FDLE forensic laboratory in Or-
lando for serological testing. The undergarment had been re-
covered at an earlier date by prison inspectors. The lab de-
termined that a DNA profile matching Coronado had been
obtained from semen found in a pair of the female inmate's
underwear.
The investigation involved FDLE, the Department of
Corrections Office of Inspector General and the Miami-Dade
County State Attorney's Office.


Arrest Made In The 1991 Killings Of


A Charlotte County Elderly Couple


The Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office, North Port Police Department, and the
State Attorney's Office, 12th and 20th Judicial Circuits, an-
nounce an arrest in the 1991 murders of an elderly couple in
Port Charlotte. FDLE special agents served an arrest warrant on
Jeremy Sly, 37, today at the Charlotte Correctional Institution.
Sly is already serving a life sentence on an unrelated homicide
conviction. A Charlotte County grand jury returned an indict-
ment of two counts of first-degree murder against Sly on
Wednesday.
In the early morning hours of Dec. 19, 1991, Paul Stasny,
71, and his wife Rita, 69, were shot and killed during an alleged
home invasion robbery. On the same morning, less than five
miles away from the Stasny's home, Luis Villegas, 30, and his
stepchildren Revonda Peay, 13, Billy Ray Hall, Jr., 11, and
Richard Peay, 9, were shot and killed also during an alleged
home invasion robbery. Soon after the murders, forensic evi-
dence and investigative leads linked the murders and investiga-


tors believed the murders were committed by the same individ-
uals.
A multi-agency task force consisting of more than 40 in-
vestigators from FDLE, Charlotte County Sheriff's Office,
North Port Police Department, and the State Attorney's Office,
12th and 20th Judicial Circuits, was developed to investigate
the homicides. Investigators conducted hundreds of interviews
and poured through evidence looking for something that would
lead to the suspectss. For more than 14 years investigators
searched for the information that would lead to an arrest. That
information came from inmate Jeremy Sly. Investigators say
Sly revealed specific information regarding the crime that only
the killers) would know.
The investigation into the killing of Luis Villegas and his
step-children is still under investigation and more arrests are
expected. Police ask anyone with information on the murders to
contact local law enforcement or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-780-
TIPS.


Miami Jury Convicts Health Care Company


Owner Of Five Counts Of Medicare Fraud,,,


,R. Alexander Acosta, Unit-
ed States Attorney for the
Southern District of Florida,
Alice Fisher, Assistant Attorney
General for the Criminal Divi-
sion, Melody Jackson, Special
Agent in Charge, U.S. Depart-
ment of Health and Human Ser-
vices, Office of the Inspector
General, Jonathan I. Solomon,
Special Agent in Charge, Fed-
eral Bureau of Investigation an-
nounce today that a jury con-
victed Ricardo R. Aguera a/k/a
Pichi, the owner of three Miami
durable medical equipment
(DME) companies, of defraud-
ing the Medicare Program of
millions of dollars. Ricardo
Aguera was remanded into cus-
tody to await sentencing sched-
uled for June 12, before the
United States District Judge.
Four other defendants, Ivan
Aguera, Robert Berenguer,
Aristides Berenguer and Carlos
Berenguer, entered guilty pleas
to all counts in the indictment


B A


without plea agreements prior
to trial. All five defendants are
related and run health care
companies that were involved
in the fraud scheme.
Co-conspirator pharmacy
owners, Henry Gonzalez and
Alfonso Rodriguez, billed the
Medicare program for over 20
million dollars and reached
agreements with DME owners,
including defendants Ricardo
R. Aguera, Ivan Aguera, Robert
Berenguer, Aristides Berenguer
and Carlos Berenguer, to kick-
back half of the money paid by
Medicare in exchange for the
DME owners bringing patients
to the pharmacies. Testimony at
trial revealed that the DME
owners paid the patients to get
access to their Medicare infor-
mation so they could buy pho-
ny prescriptions from corrupt
doctors to provide to the phar-
macies.
The heart of the conspiracy
centered around three Miami.


pharmacies, Lily's,,Pharmacy,,
Unimed Pharmacy and Prestige
Pharmacy, that illegally manu-
factured aerosol medications
including Albuterol, Metapro-
terenol, and Ipatropium Bro-
mide. These aerosol drugs are
introduced into the lung
through a piece of durable med-
ical equipment known as a neb-
ulizer.
Medicare pays for such
aerosol medication through the
Part B program as it is taken
through a nebulizer. Knowing
this Medicare system rule, the
pharmacy owners exploited the
program by manufacturing the
unnecessary, non-FDA ap-
proved medicine through a
process known as "compound-
ing." Evidence at trial estab-
lished that at Lily's pharmacy,
one of the men making the
medicine was trained to repair
air conditioners and was not a
licensed pharmacist.
The fraud scheme further
relied on (1) paid patients who
provided their Medicare cards
and signed delivery receipts for
medicine which they did not
need and which they ultimately
discarded, (2) doctors who
signed fraudulent prescriptions
which listed non-commercially
available medications, and (3)
durable medical equipment
company owners that recruited
and paid the patients so they
could bring the false prescrip-
tions to the pharmacy owners.
At trial, evidence estab-
lished that patients were paid
$100 to $150 per month for the
use of their Medicare cards.


Pharmacy owners te~ifice4,,that,
the scheme of using "com-
pounding" was designed from
the beginning to defraud
Medicare. Unwilling to buy
FDA-approved medication to
fill those prescriptions, phar-
macies "compounded" the
aerosol medications by the gal-
lons, and then billed Medicare.
Patients testified at trial that
they did not want the boxes of
medicine and the only reason
they went to the doctor with the
DME owner was to receive
cash kickbacks.
"We must vigorously en-
force the federal laws that pro-
tect the fiscal integrity of the
Medicare Program so that we
may insure the viability of our
health care program for genera-
tions to come," said R. Alexan-
der Acosta, the United States
Attorney in Miami. Acosta not-
ed that Medicare fraud has a
substantial impact on the
strength of the program de-
signed to provide for the health
and welfare of the seniors and
disabled members of our com-
munity.
Mr. Acosta commended the
investigative efforts of the U.S.
Department of Health and Hu-
man Services, Office of the In-
spector General, and the Feder-
al Bureau of Investigation. The
case was prosecuted by Kirk
Ogrosky, Deputy Chief of the
Fraud Section of the Depart-
ment of Justice, and Jeffrey A.
Neiman, Trial Attorney in the
Fraud Section of the Depart-
ment of Justice in Washington,
DC.


UPCOMING CONCERTS
Brooks & Dunn............... Apr 7 '1
Bri lan McKnighl..............Apr 14
.'= -,I Volunteer Jam
JI Charlie Daniels, Marshall Tucker &
The Outlaws ..............A.pr 28
Hear......................May5 ,5
'p-d pOO) All conIcers and EVe ts A 1
FREE with park admission

220.210.7'IEo 1-76 Exit 1i, Valdosta, GA. ~llddvaenirts.net,.


EdwardJones








Wednesday, March 28, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A




AROUND MADISON COUNTY




SBenefit Horse Show For Melanie Wieland


A Benefit Horse Show sponsored by Suwannee
Valley Chapter of Deep South Dressage and Combined
Training Assn. for Melanie Wieland is scheduled for
March 31, at Trinity Farm, 5 miles north of Lee, on CR
255. In lieu of admission, a donation is requested. All
proceeds will go to Melanie's Healthcare Fund. Please,
no dogs. Bring your lawn chair or plan to sit on the
grass.
Special activities during the day include lunch time
entertainment by the Union County Flag Drill Team
and the Dixie Dynamite Trick Riders, a raffle/silent
auction, and show jumping in the afternoon. Business-
es from Madison, Lee and Valdosta have donated items
for the raffle and silent auction. Gift certificates from


The Rosary Florist, One Eleven Grill, O'Toole's Herb
Farm, Curves of Madison, Falling Waters Wellness
Spa, Hidy House, Boothill Western Wear as well as gift
items from Madison Builders, Cherry Farms, Horse
Tales, Avon Rep Kathy Harvey, Brenda's Styles, Pre-
mier Training and Show Horses, The Madison Florist,
Farmer's Supply of Valdosta, Jeffers, Valley Vet and
WMAF Radio will be available. The following individ-
uals have also donated items: Ms. Shirley Edmundson
(Debary, FL) and Mrs. Nanci Kendall (Valdosta, GA).
There will be something for every one!
The following businesses. are sponsoring classes
for the show: Madison County Community Bank,
Bank of America, Madison Veterinary, Town-N-Coun-


try Insurance, Park Avenue Bank of Valdosta, Alapaha
Veterinary Services, Michael O. Stick, MDPA, Mrs.
Jean Stick.
Lunch will be served by St Vincent's Catholic
Church, all proceeds from which will go to Melanie's
Healthcare Fund.
"We wish to sincerely thank these businesses and
individuals for their generous support," the sponsors.
stated.
The members of Suwannee Valley Chap of DSD-
CTA are looking forward to seeing our community
turnout for this special event. For further information
please contact Linda Boyles, 971-5392, Diane Riley,
850-210-5516, or Debbie Hudson 948-4209.


Metacarpa

Richard E. Metacarpa,
age 90, died on Friday, March
23, 2007 in Jacksonville, Fl.
The family received
friends at Beggs Chapel on
Monday, March 25 from 6-8
p.m.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, March 27, at 9 a.m.
at St. Vincent DePaul Catholic
Church, Madison.
Burial followed at 1:30
p.m. at Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell.
Richard was born in Stat-
en Island, NY, August 31,
1916, the son of the late David
Metacarpa, and Amelia Bozzo
Metacarpa. He moved to
Madison, from Sebring, in
2006 and resided with his son
Richard and his family. He
was a U S. Army Veteran,
serving in World War I in the
Philippine Islands. He re-.
ceived the American Service
Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Service
Medal, Good Conduct Medal
and World War II Victory
Medal, along with other
medals and a letter of com-
mendation. He was an elec-
trician with Torinno. Electrics
for many years. He was a/
Catholic and an avid Atlanta
Braves baseball fan.
He is survived by two
sons: Richard Metacarpa, Jr.,
and wife Lorraine of Madison,
and Robert Metacarpa, and
wife Christy of Albany, N.Y;
two brothers: Fredrick and
Thomas Metacarpa, both of
New York; one sister, Helen
Hughes of Nakomis; seven
grandchildren: Deana
Metacarpa Rackley, Brian
Metacarpa, Malisa Kent, Chris
Kent, Jeff Metacarpa, Justin
Metacarpa and Garrett
Metacarpa; two great-grand-
children, Caitlin S. Rackley
and Bryan C. Harris.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Rose Frances Di-
Angelo Metacarpa.


March 28
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild will hold its
monthly meeting on Wednes-
day, March 28, at 10 a.m. at
the Southside Recreation
Center, 901 Saint Margaret
Rd. Lake City, Hospitality
starts at 9:30 a.m. For details:
contact President Marcia
Kazmierski, 386-752-2461,
mrckaz@aol.com.
March 30
The Lee Homecoming
Dinner will be held at 6:30
p.m., at Lee United Methodist
Church.
March 30
On Friday March 30, at
7 p.m., the Cowboy Nights
will be hosting a night of jazz
and desserts. This is a ticketed
fundraiser event that will be
held at the MCHS gym. While
the "Nights" jazz up your
evening, the band parents will
be serving a dessert and cof-
fee buffet. Tickets will be $5
and went on sale March 5.
You may purchase a ticket
from any Jazz Band member
or e-mail Geoff Hill at
hillg@madison.kl2.fl. us.
March 30
Woman's Health Classes
are FREE! March 30th, April
6th, 13th, 20th,and 27th, May
4th, llth, and 18th. All class-
es will be held at the Madison
County Library from 12 1
p.m. Food, weekly prizes,
knowledge, fun, guest speak-
ers and a grand prize drawing.
For more information, or to
register for the class, please
contact Robin Walker at the
Healthy Start Coalition at
850-948-2741or email at
rwalkerhsc @ earthlink.net
S March 31
Lee Homecoming Break-
fast will be at 7 a.m., at Lee
United Methodist Church.


/,
//. ---- Y
/"- '-^


TOUCHTON'S

Sales Service *Installation
In Business For Over 30 Years
Commitment to Excellence
S Owners: Jan & Sarah Touchton
www' Tnrnhtnns.cnm CACfnRA747


The Lee Homecoming Festi-
val will start at 7 a.m., at Lee
City Hall grounds. The Lee
Homecoming Sock Hop will
be from 7 p.m. ? at the Old
Lee School gym. Everyone is
invited!
March 31
Country Gospel Sing,
Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park,
Saturday, March 31, at 7 p.m.
featuring the Mercy Mountain
Boys from Lake City. A love
offering will be received.
Everyone is welcome.
March 31
Benefit Horse Show for
Melanie Wieland on March
31, at Trinity Farm, north of
Lee on CR 255. Lunch break
demonstrations by the Union
County Mounted Flag Drill
Team and the Dixie Dynamite
Trick Riders. There will be a
food concession and a raf-
fle/silent auction. Show will
begin approximately 8 am.
Donations will be solicited
from the spectators in lieu of
admission. No dogs, please.
Bring your lawn chairs. More
info: 971-5392.
April 2
The Epilepsy Association
of the Big Bend will have a
representative in Madison
April 2. If you need medical
services or information relat-
ing to epilepsy, you may meet
with the representative at the
Madison County Health De-
partment between 10 a.m. and
12 noon. For additional in-
formation, call the Associa-
tion at 850-222-1777.
April 5
Rocky Springs and Han-
son United Methodist
Churches invite you to join
them in a Holy Week celebra-
tion.
Maundy Thursday April
5th at 7 p.m. at Hanson UMC,
and Good Friday April 6th at
7 p.m. at Rocky Springs
UMC.
Easter Sunrise Service,
will be April 8th at 6:30 a.m.
at the United Methodist Com-
munity Center.
Music and preaching to
stir the Soul!
Go out and join them for
a special blessing. Everyone
is welcome.


April 5, 12, 19, & 26
Critical Conditions SM
Family Workshop
South Georgia Medical
Center is sponsoring Critical
Conditions, a free program
designed to bring greater un-
derstanding to end-of-life
healthcare issues. SGMC will
host a free Workshop on Mon-
day, April 5, 12, 19, & 26
from 6 7:30 p.m. in the.
Pearlman Cancer Center's
Conference Room. For more
information or to register call
Valerie Swinson at (229) 333-
1610, ext. 5.
April 5, 12, 19, & 26
"Freshstart" Smoking
Cessation Class
South Georgia Medical
Center will host "Freshsart"
Smoking Cessation Class.
Classes will meet Thursdays,
April 5, 12, 19, & 26 at 12-
1:30 p.m. All classes will take
place at SGMC in Dining
Room 2. Lunch will be pro-
vided; To register or for more
information, call Community
Health Promotions at (229)
333-1610, ext. 55.
April 6 & 7
The Jeslamb AME
Church will be Celebrating
their Annual Pre-Easter Musi-
cal on April 6 and 7. Rev. Al-
bert Bivins and his congrega-
tion from Belleville, will de-
liver the message on April 6 at
6 pm. On April 7 they will be
Praising the Lord through
Music and Song starting at 7
pm. The Theme for this occa-
sion is "Glorifying and Prais-
ing the Lord through Music
and Song." They are welcom-
ing all Choirs, Soloist, Duets,
and any Musical Groups to


CA !0I


come out and join them in this
celebration.
April 7
Saturday, April 7, at 8
p.m., at the Elks Lodge in
Madison, Reckless Realty
will be performing live. Rock
music at its best! There will
be a $5 cover charge. CDs, T-
Shirts and stickers will be on
sale at time of performance.
April 12
Compassionate Friends
To assist parents in the
positive resolution of grief,
South Georgia Medical Cen-
ter's Compassionate Friends
Support Group will meet at 7
p.m., Thursday, April 12, in
SGMC Basement Classroom
C. Grieving parents, siblings
and grandparents are invited
to attend. For more informa-
tion, call Jim Schappaugh at
(229) 259-4510.
April 12
If your child was four
years old on or before Sep-
tember 1,,2006, they will en-,
ter Kindergarten in August,
and are not currently enrolled
in the School Year Voluntary
Pre-Kindergarten Program,
then your child is eligible to
attend the FREE Summer
VPK Program.
Summer VPK Tentative
Information is June 6th July
31st from 7:30 a.m. 5 p.m.
Breakfast and Lunch Avail-
able. Transportation WILL
NOT be provided
On-Site-Registration will
be completed at Madison
County Public Library April
12, 3 6 p.m.
For more Information
call, Debbie Cunningham-
973-9030 or Leigh McNutt -


973-5037.
April 17
Stroke and Head Injury
Support Group
The Stroke and Head In-
jury Support Group will meet
at 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 17,
in the Pearlman Cancer Cen-
ter conference room at South
Georgia Medical Center. The
group is offered free of
charge to anyone who has
had a stroke or head injury.
For more information, call
Dana Gibbs at (229) 259-
4292.
April 16 and 17
AARP Driver Safety Pro-
gram will be held at the Ex-
tension Building from 9 am-
1pm. For more information,
Please call Rich Olsen 850-
584-2193 or 973-4138.


The family of the late
Willie (Son) Pride, would
like to thank you for all the
kindness you bestowed upon
us during our time of be-
reavement.

The Pride Family





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- -----







6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, March 28, 2007



AROUND MADISON COUNTY






S. sculptures. Norris is serving as the President of










ted) D avis-M cClure A rt Center the Madison Art Guild. (Photo submitted)
D Me,







Holds Opening Reception
olyn E swell-known retired educator aThe Davis-McClure Art Center opened with a reception for
the artists and patrons of the Madison Art Guild at their first ex-
hibit Friday evening, March 16th. A variety of works including
two and three-dimensional paintings and drawings, sculpture,
ted)orialM metal sculptures. Norris is servings as the President of







Photographs, pottery, etc. aure on exhibit. Also, an area devoted
to the memory of artists from Madison County is on display.
The art center is established under the auspices of the Trea-
sures of Madison County, Inc. The gallery is currently opened on
Saturday. Volunteers are desperately needed to keep the doors
.... .- open. If you are interested, please call Ina Thompson at (850)
T.J. "Tommy" Beggs loaned works by his mother, 445-7755 or Debe Scott at (850) 948-3951.
Frances Beggs a well-known Madison artist to the The guild m&ets the third Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. each
memorial section of the exhibit. An accomplished month at the gallery on 196 SW Range Avenue. Membership is
their daughter. Sidney Ashley has several paintings in
artist himself, Beggs who is a member of the art guild, open to all artists ($30 annual dues) and patrons ($200 annual the exhibit and serves as a volunteer at the gallery.
exhibited his work. (Photo submitted) dues). (Photo submitted)
(Photo submitted)


MCTS CLASS OF 1962

PLANS REUNION
The Madison County Training School will have a re-
union July 27-29, and the class of 1962 will have its class
reunion at the same time. The class of'62 is trying to locate
the following classmates:
Gladys Dukes, Kate Anita Dukes, Dorothy Frazier,
Benjamin Herring, Robert Hughes, Emma Jenkins, Issac
Johnson, Lillian Mitchell, Delores Montina, Annie Proctor,
Leather Lou Pryor, Henry Smith, and Maggie Tyson.
lIf,; ;nyotne has information on: these classmate; please
send addresses or phone numbers to Catherine James Hon-
eywell, 382 S.W. Lee Street, Madison, Florida 32340.


TESTS CAN HELP SAVE YOUR LIFE

MADISON COMMUNITY HELPS

PROMOTE HEALTH AND WELLNESS


Residents living in and
around the Madison, Fla., com-
munity can be screened to re-
duce their risk of having a
stroke. Life Line Screening
will be at the Madison Country
Club on April 9th. The site is
Jo!ated at 445 S.W. Country
Club Estates Rd. in Madison.
Appointments will begin at 9
a.m.


A Stroke, also known as a
"brain attack," is ranked as the
third leading killer in the
world, and the second among
women, Through preventive
screenings, the risk of having a
stroke can be greatly reduced.
Screenings re fast,'pain-
less and low cost; They involve
the use of ultrasound technolo-
gy, and scan for potential
health problems related to:
blocked arteries which can lead
to a stroke, aortic aneurysms
which can lead to a ruptured
aorta, and hardening of the ar-
teries in the legs, which are a
strong predictor of heart dis-
ease. Also offered for men and
women, is a bone density
screening to assess their risk
for osteoporosis.


"It saved my husband from
having a major stroke."
William and Harriett West -
Zephyrhills.
All four screenings take
less than an hour to complete.
A complete vascular screening
package,' incliding" 'the
Stroke/Carotid Artery, Abdom-
inal Aortic Aneurysm and An-,
kle Brachial Index hardeningi
of the arteries) screenings is
$109. Sign-up for a complete
vascular package; which in-
cludes the osteoporosis screen-
ing and pay only $129.
Life Line Screening was
established in 1993, and has
since become the nation's lead-
ing provider of vascular
screenings. Over 85 ultra-
sound teams are on staff to


travel to your local community,
bringing the screenings to you.
These non-invasive, inexpen-
sive and painless ultrasound
tests help people identify their
risk for stroke, vascular dis-
eases. or osteoporosis early
enough for, th"i' p physician to
begin preventive proceduress.
For more information re-
garding the screenings or to
schedule an appointment, call
1-877-237-1287 or visit us on
the web at www.lifelinescreen-
ing.coin.
Pre-registration is re-
quired, and are offered by Life
Line Screening, 5400 Trans-
portation Blvd., Cleveland,
OH. 44125
See the insert in today's
newspaper.


SO MUCH FUN IT TAKES 10 TO HOLD IT ALL
FEATURING HILDEBRAND RIDES -"FLORIDA'S CHOICE"
WITH OVER 25 STATE FAIR RIDES PLENTY OF GAMES TO PLAY AND FOODS TO ENJOY
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SNEAK A PEEK AT THE MIDWAY $12 ARMBAND
RIDE ALL RIDES FROM 5 PM UNTIL CLOSE
ARMBAND DISCOUNT SAVES $18
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 AND FRIDAY APRIL 6
MIDNIGHT MADNESS $15 ARMBAND
RIDE ALL RIDES FROM 10 PM UNTIL AM
EARLY BIRD MIDNIGHT MADNESS $20 ARMBND
RIDE ALL RIDES FROM 8:30 PM UNTIL 1 AM
SATURDAY, MARCH 31AND SATURDAY, APRIL 7
MATINEE $15 ($10 WITH $5 OFF COUPON FROM AD)
RIDE ALL RIDES FROM NOON UNTIL 5 PM
EVENING $20 ARMBAND
RIDE ALL RIDES FROM 6 PM UNTIL CLOSE


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MIDWAY OPENS AT 1 PM UNTIL CLOSE $15 ARMBAND
RIDE ALL RIDES ALL DAY ALL NIGHT
MONDAY, APRIL 2
BUDDY NIGHT $1 GATE
YOU PAY AND YOUR BUDDY RIDES FOR FREE
RIDE ALL RIDES FROM 5 M UNTIL CLOSE $20
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TUESDAY, APRIL 3
RIDE ALL RIDES FROM 5 PM UNTIL CLOSE $15 ARMBAND
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(ID MAY BE REQUIRED)
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FREE ADMISSION AND ARMBAND COUPON SAVE $7
VALUABLE COUPON
SAVE $5
ON EVERY PURCHASE OF AN ARMBAND
ON SATURDAY MATINEE'S ONLY


FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL (386) 362-3247


F --- --- ----------- *
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Armband $15 ($10 with coupon) Rides All Rides
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I Featuring State Fair Rides
Plenty Of Games To Play and Food To Enjoy
Midway By Hildebrand Rides "Florida's Choice"
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SThe 92nd



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I WednesdayApr l 4 & Thur s ,Ap

VALUABLE STUDENTS' COUPON
I INCLUDES FREE ADMISSION SAVE $7
Wednesday, April 4 & Thursday, April 5 from 5 PM To 7 PM
Student Days Students (6-18) Admitted Free
Armband $15 ($13 with $2 Off Coupon) Rides All Rides
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Featuring State Fair Rides
Plenty Of Games To Play and Food To Enjoy
Midway By Hildebrand Rides "Florida's Choice"
(Coupon Compliments Of Greene Publishing, Inc. and The Suwannee County Fair)


slre~ry~ I --- --r~ --- --1 -








www.~reenepub1ishing.com Madison County Carrier e 7A


Wednesday, March 28, 2007


AROUND MADISON COUNTY



O'Roilly Auto P artK


HoldJ Ribbon GuLbing


Tommy and Mary Jane Beggs, left, Gayle and Bill Keast and Rae Pike were at the
recent Madison Rotary Club meeting. (Photo Submitted)

New Zealand Couple Visits

Madison Rotary Club


The Madison Rotary Club
was pleased to have guests from
New Zealand recently. Rotarian
Tommy Beggs and his lovely
wife Mary Jane brought as their
guests Gayle and Bill Keast
,whom they had met and be-
friended during a recent trip to
Christchurch, New Zealand.
Keast presented to the pres-
ident of the Madison Rotary
Club, Nancy Peterson, a travel-
ing banner in recognition of his
visit. Also present was Rae
Pike, a New Zealander, and
guest of Tommy Beggs.
An interesting program was
presented by Wendy Hobbs who
is employed by the Division of
Blind Services, Florida Depart-
ment of Education, who spoke
to the club on the importance of
,hiring the,isually-impaired.
Rotarian J6e Boyle hadas
his guests his lovely wife, Linda,
and Miss Melanie Wieland.
Rotarian Jack Proctor was
accompanied by his lovely wife
Melissa.
Another recent speaker to
the Madison Rotary Club was
Leslie Smith, Director of the
District 6940 Rotary Youth
Camp. The Rotary Youth
Camp is the longest running
program in Rotary District 6940,


'4


yles, Melanie Wieland, inda Boyles. (Phto
oyles, Melanie Wieland, Linda Boyles. (Photo


Submitted)
and is a summer camping pro-
gram for children with disabili-
ties. There is no cost to the
Scampers or their families for the
n summer camp,: The actual cost
'is about $1,500 per, camper but
this cost is paid by the Rotary
Clubs of District 6940. The
Madison Rotary Club in addi-
tion to being a strong supporter
of the Rotary Youth Camp, was
one of the founding clubs of
this important event.
Parents or guardians of chil-
dren with disabilities who are in-
terested in the Madison Rotary
Club are urged to contact Leslie
Smith at (850) 383-1559 or via


e-mail at www.nfrvc.org. The
first Rotary Youth Camp is July
7-13 and the. second is July 14-
20. The camp is held at the
United Methodist Centenary
Camp in Gadsden County, a
ministry of the United
Methodist Church in Quincy.
The Madison Rotary Club
supports many great social orga-
nizations and serves thousands
of people around the world.
For over one-hundred years the
Rotary Club has been the vehi-
cle of change and betterment for
whatever community in which it
is located. Anyone interested
in becoming a Rotarian is invit-
ed to talk with Alston Kelley,
Club Membership Chair, or Jim
Catron, the Club Secretary.


4.



Store manager Bruce Reagan, store employees, as well as local dignitaries and
"Miss Lee," Robin Ellison, were on hand at the ribbon-cutting ceremony at O'Reilly
Auto Parts. (Greene Publishing Inc. Photo by Dan Mathis, March 8, 2007)


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
O'Reilly Auto Parts ribbon cutting went
just as expected, according to store inanager
Bruce Reagan. As part of the ceremony, a two
hundred dollar donation was given to the
Madison Senior Citizen's Council. Reagan
says that the turnout was great, and business
has been booming since the ceremony.
SOn March 18, a drawing was held for a
two hundred dollar gift certificate to the store,
and the proud winner was Brad Johnson.
O'Reilly's appreciates the continued business
from the "very cordial" residents of Madison
County.
The opening of another branch of O'Reil-


ly Auto Parts in Madison has created a few job
opportunities for locals. Among the employ-
ees at O'Reilly's are included Connie
Collingsworth, Johnny Slusher, Reggie
Alexander, Jonathan Reagan, Monica
Williams, John Aust, Jr., and District Manager
Jim Turvey.
Store manager Bruce Reagan has lived in
Suwannee County for years, though he spent
much time in Hernando County. Before join-
ing the O'Reilly team, he worked for Napa
Auto Parts for 35 years.
O'Reilly Auto Parts is located at 667 East
Base Street, and can be reached by phone at
(850) 973-2052.


NFCC instructors Rebecca Burkart and
Rose Nixon accompanied a group of NFCC
students to see the Broadway musical, Wicked!,
on tour at the Tampa Bay Performing Arts Cen-
ter in Morsani Hall, Tampa, Saturday, March
3. Many making the trip had performed in the
NFCC fall concert, Oz Three. The annual con-
cert, which highlights the Sentinel Singers and
the NFCC Jazz Ensemble, featured songs from
Wicked, including the well-known, "Defying
Gravity."
Travelers were Erin Smith, J.T. Davis,
Luan Rauscher, Jessica Nixon, Ginny Brantley,
Vicki Brantley, Janis Courson, and the NFCC


instructors. Burkart directs the music program
at NFCC and Nixon teaches English and read-
ing.
Wicked, the smash musical that tells the un-
told story of the witches of Oz, features music
and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz (Godspell, Pip-
pin, Academy Award winner for Pocahontas
and The Prince of Egypt), and is based on the
best-selling novel by Gregory Maguire. Joe
Mantello, 2003 and 2004 Tony Award winner,
is the Broadway director.
For information, contact NFCC College
Advancement, (850) 973-1653 or email
news@nfcc.edu.


Leslie Smith


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Wednesday, March 28, 2007


8A P Madiison County Carrier


-.Id


Obb*S-


UL"








Wednesday, March 28, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 9A


GIRARDIN
Diamonds an/dine Jewe/ry
( *r I1 iiyou since 1923


3321 N. Valdosta Rd. ) (.
Valdosta, Georgia 31602 (
229-242-8546 ) Member American Gem Society


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MoIn Fn 7:3i..m (6.011 p.m.. S.u. 7.3(-N
229-263-4149
101. Webster St Qutman. GA


Wt& Is A
A wedding is a ceremony that celebrates the
beginning of a marriage or civil union. Wedding
traditions and customs vary greatly between cul-
tures, ethnic groups, religions, countries, and so-
cial classes. In some countries, cultures and reli-
gions, the actual act of marriage begins during the
wedding ceremony. In others, the legal act of mar-
riage occurs at the time of signing a marriage li-
cense or other legal document, and the wedding is
then an opportunity to perform a traditional cere-
mony and celebrate with friends and family.
A destination \wedding is an\ wedding in
which the engaged couple and/or a majority\ of
their guests travel to attend the ceremony Whether


Wedding?
this happens for an intimate beach ceremony in the
Caribbean, extravagant nuptials in Las Vegas or
for a simple ceremony in someone's back yard,
chances are it qualifies as a destination wedding.
A white wedding is a formal or semi-formal
wedding in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Unit-
ed States, as well as Commonwealth, traditions.
There are many more types and many more op-
tions for today's
modem bride.


\* LeGrand and Susan Pickles would like to announce the engagement of
O their daughter, Dorothy Lucile Pickles, to Stephen Daniel Sylvia, the son O
,.. of Tom, and Teri Sylvia, of.Jacksonville. Steph~ n'.tiafkJi'l-QI il both be *
O graduating from Trinity Baptist College, in Jacksonville, with degrees in
Secondary Education.
The wedding will take place at Open Bible Baptist Church, in Valdos-
ta, on Saturday, May 12, 2007, at 1 p.m. The reception will follow in the
0 church fellowship hall. All family and friends re invited to attend.






The Language Of Flowers
Flowers may be combined and arranged so as to express even the nicest shades of sentiment.
If a flower is offered "reversed", its direct signification is likewise reversed, so that the flower now
means the opposite. A rosebud divested of its thorns, but retaining its leaves, convays the senti-
ment, "I fear no longer; I hope." Stripped of leaves and thorns, it signifies, "There is nothing to
hope or fear." A full-blown rose places over two buds, signifies "Secrecy." "Yes", is implied by
touching the flower given to the lips; "No," by pinching off a petal and casting it away. "I am", is
expressed by a laurel leaf twined around the bouquet; "I have", "by an ivy leaf folded together; "I
offer you", by a leaf of Virginia creeper.
Roses also have their own language;
Rose (Austrian) You are all that is lovely
Rose (bridal) Happy love
Rose (burgundy) Unconscious beauty
Rose (cabbage) Ambassador
of love
SRose (Carolina) Love is dan-
gerous
Rose (China) Beauty always Photography
new
Rose (damask) Beauty ever
new; Young and brilliant
Rose (deep red) Bashful
shame
Rose (deep-red) Admiration;
Bashful; Embarrassment
Rose (full-blown) Engage- ,,
ment '
Rose (guilder) Age; Winter We Bak
Rose (half-blown) Timid eBa
love M t


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:386 -33 0-2488 -Store







10A Madison County Carrier
ll NINE 1.3m ll


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, March 28, 2007


r-
LE


Town Springs To Life For

Lee Homecoming Day
By Jacob Bembry Heart, Teddy McMullen as "Elvis," Robert McClosky,
Greene Publishing, Inc. Darrell Meadows and Randy and the Honky-Tonks.
In the musical Brigadoon, the mythical village comes There will be a quilt auction, smoked sausage by
to life once every 500 years. The Town of Lee is not myth- L&W, tours of the McMullen Homestead, a model plane
ical and is not in a deep sleep, but the town does spring to show, a dunking booth fundraiser with the Lee Pageant
life with vibrancy once a year for Lee Homecoming Day. Queens, a senior citizens booth, creative works on display
Come spend a fun-filled day, full of all-day entertain- in City Hall, as well as a children's corner on display in
ment. Arts and crafts booths, food booths, a pet contest city hall.
and other things are part of a delightful fun-filled day. Everyone is welcome to go out and attend Lee Home-
Special entertainers will include Lee Ellison, Heart to coming Day, in the "Little But Proud" Town of Lee.

Lee Pageant Girls

Holding Fundraiser
The Lee pageant winners are selling tickets for a fundraiser for Jonathan Goaly, who is suffering from
a disease, which affects his face.
Jonathan has to go to Boston, Mass. for treatment. Tickets are being sold on
chances to win two gift baskets for two dollars each, or for two differ-
ent fishing trips (for two people) for five dollars each.
The drawing will be held at the Lee
Homecoming Pageant.
The girls
will also have a 1
dunking booth o C O
at Lee Day to ,0
help raise moneyrida p
for Jonathan. w ltLeeA \
... _proud
i3ut


First-Ever
Lee Homecoming Day

Sock Hop
Set For Saturday Night
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
You can rock and
you can roll and you can
really lose control at the -
first-ever Lee Home-
coming Day Sock Hop
set for Saturday, March
31.
Music from the '50s
and '60s will waft Ie
through the air as people li "
enjoy
dancing
to the
oldies
but
goodies.
Dawn's Kinder Academy will be pro-
viding childcare and a nursery during the
sock hop for a nominal charge.
%e The dance begins at 7 p.m. at the Old
Lee School Gym, so go out and strut your
stuff, doing the Twist, the Mashed Potato,
the Cool Jerk, the Locomotion and the
% 0 0Bunny Hop.


7








Wednesday, March 28, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 11A


007


LE


.MINEODEOMIND
- A ^^^ss -ssmsii- wH ^^u


Oh, little town, of thee I sing -
From forest green to bustling town,
From wilderness to 'Haven' safe
You grew to mean most everything
To your sturdy pioneers.
The fellowship, the peaceful air,
The friendliness, the convivial flair,
Small churches with real warmth were there
And stores for every need were near;
On Saturday from miles around


Johnson 0

a Johnson
Serving the good people of Madison since 1935
1607 US Hwy. 90 Madison, FL
850-973-2277
Johnson & Jonson Store #6
Hwy. 255 South Lee, FL Shell


Farmers with families came to town
To gin their cotton, grind their corn,
To smith their mules and to expound
On politics, on crops and more,
While wives were going store to store
To sell their butter and eggs before
Treating the kids to an ice cream cone;
Disaster struck when the boll weevil came
But the pioneer spirit overcame.
And so today, we still remain


Scoo oad ebeDisrc5
Proud Supporter

ofLe a


The little town where community thrives
Where fellowship and love still lives
And heaven smiles upon earth.


Thelma Thompson

The Town of Lee's roots began to grow in the 20th century
around the War Between The States, but Greenbury Haven is
credited as its founder.


The City of Madison
Is A Proud Supportei of

d Lee Day
and The Surrounding Cities of Madison
BEir w -, ag --J


Lee Community Volunteer Fire Department Named Citizens Of The Year


As Citizens of the eastern part of Madison County, an elite group has joined to form
the LEE COMMUNITY VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. People
who dreamed of a safer place to live formed this De-
partment years ago. It is not just the ac-
tive fire personnel that make
up this organization, but the i .
citizens, parents, neighbors,
schoolchildren, family and
friends. With safety in mind,
they are training and drilling to
perform at a moment's notice to
serve in a time of need, whether
it is fire, weather or other life-
threatening issues. As with most
organizations, not all personnel
could be available for a photo
shoot. Several of our members are
at iturcpdgin our Sunday after-
noon drn,l. ; L, :
The department was originally
started in the late 50's or early 60's.
The original fire truck was acquired
from Division of Forestry and was
parked under a pecan tree near the .
U.S. 90 and C. R. 255 intersection.
From there,the truck was staged at the


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homes of members available to respond to fire calls. City
Hall was then built and the addition completed to stage
the fire truck in the mid to late 70's. In 2000, the new
7000 square foot public safety building was built. From
a shade-tree fire department, they have grown to a full-
service department. The department now has three
Class A pumper trucks, one 6,200 gallon tanker, one
brush attack truck, and one brush tanker truck.
The department is comprised of men, women, and
teens from all walks of life. They started a Junior
Firefighter Program in 1980. Junior members have
advanced to become professional firefighters, emer-
gency medical technicians, paramedics, and special
law enforcement officers. In 2006, an Honor
Guard was formed to represent the fire department
in special community services. In mid-2006, the
Ladies Auxiliary was reorganized to assist in oth-
,.er support activities within the community and,
,the daertmenr..-nqrNi
Through dedication and determination this
department has grown in the ability to serve the
surrounding community. Each person that has
been involved in this effort has made the Lee
Community Volunteer Fire Department the outstanding
organization it is today.


Bill And Shirley Yeager Chosen


Grand Marshals For Lee Day


Bill and Shirley Yeager have been
chosen Grand Marshals for this year's
Lee Day parade.
A teacher, pastor, husband, father,
and grandfather describe Bill in a nut-
shell. Along by his side is his wife,
Shirley. She is best described as wife,
mother, and grandmother.
Bill was born May 30,1944 in San
Francisco, California to Wayne Yeager
and Julia Bowman Yeager.
Shirley was born September
17,1944 in Live Oak to Raymond and
Lillie Mae Jackson.
They met while attending North
Florida Community College. After they
graduated, they married June 26,1965.
Bill continued his education at Valdosta
State College. He earned his BS in Biol-
ogy and Master of Education.
After planning a Navy career, God
had a different plan for their lives. He
brought them to Lee in 1968 where Bill
taught and coached basketball for thirty


years. Shirley first began working
away from home when her youngest
child was five. She worked for Waring
Wyche & Sons and the Madison Educa-
tion Association Credit Union. She re-
cently retired after serving as Manager
for the Credit Union for the past 10
years.
Both are active in school, commu-
nity, and church activities. They attend-
ed and worked in the Lee United
Methodist Church for seventeen years.
In August 1986, God moved them to
Lee First Baptist Church. Bill surren-
dered to God's call to the ministry in
1996. He was later ordained in 1998. He
served the Moseley Hall Baptist Church
from 1998 to 2004. Presently, he is a
supply pastor.
Shirley has served on the Lee Town
Council since 2002. She enjoys her
work on the Council and hopes to make
Lee a better place to live for all.
Bill and Shirley have two children


and three grandchildren. Ray and
wife Michele have one child, Victo-
ria. They live in Jacksonville, Ill.
Ben and wife Sonya have two chil-
dren, Elizabeth and Mitchell.
They live in Valdosta, Ga.
Bill and Shirley are thankful
to God for bringing them to Lee
to live and to raise their family
here. It was the loving, caring
people and small town atmos-
phere that made them stay.
In their retirement years,
their prayer is that they can
continue caring and touching .
people's lives and to further
God's kingdom on earth.
"We are honored this year
to be able to represent our
Town of Lee. We sincere- *.
ly thank the members of
the Lee Day Committee
for honoring us," Bill
and Shirley said.








12A Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, March 28, 2007


LE



LIE
& *


Bobby Williams Chosen
Bobby Williams has been
chosen the Founding Forefa-
ther for this year's Lee Home-
coming Day celebration.
Robert Lewis Williams,
son of R.L. and Marie Drig-
gers Williams, was born at
home in Lee on June 26,
1929. His grandparents were
the late Sessions and Ethel
Hicks Williams and Hunter
and Alice Driggers.
He is the oldest of seven
children, including four
brothers, Howard, Archie,
Richard and Gary, and two sis- ,
ters, Carolyn and Rada.
Bobby married Jackie Smith in 1950.
They have four children: Dale Williams, Jan
McHargue and Laura Oxendine, as well as
five grandchildren and three great-grandchil-
dren.
As a child, Bobby attended Lee, Junior
High School until it burned in 1943. He grad-
uated from Madison High School in 1947. As
an eleventh grader, he enlisted in the Navy Re-
serves for three years.
After graduation, Bobby ran the family
farm and dairy for a year before he enrolled in
the Student Telegraph Operator Program. The
Seaboard Air Line Railroad hired him' as a
telegraph operator in 1949, paying him $80 a
week. Later, he re-enlisted in the U.S. Navy
for four more years (1951-1955). He was a
member of VF Fighter Squadron #172 and


Lee Founding Forefather
served on the USS Coral
Sea Aircraft Carrier. At the
end of his tour of duty, he
moved back to Driggers
Crossing in Lee, where he
worked in the insurance
business for 18 years. He
began working at the Madi-
son Post Office in 1974. He
retired from the post office
in 1994.
Bobby has been a
member of Lee United
Methodist Church for 65
years. He has served as
Sunday School teacher,
trustee and Chairman of -the Administrative
Board for many of those years. He also served
as treasurer for the Masonic Lodge for 26
years and as a member of the Madison Lions
Club for 33 years. He was appointed to the Se-
lective Service Board and was chairman when
it was abolished. With the help of his friend,
Joe McCain, the first North Florida Junior
College Athletic Booster Club was formed.
They raised enough funds to purchase an ath-
letic dorm and housing for Coach Richard
Brown and his family.
Bobby and his wife, Jackie, are living in
the same house he began building in May
1950. He believes that we live in the best
county in the best state in this country. The
Driggers family descendants have lived at
Driggers Crossing for seven generations.
Needless to say, they like the area.


Ellison, Wirick, Edgar


Win Miss Lee Pageant


BJ Jacob
Bembry
Greene
PIu li s h -
iffg. Inc.
Robin
Ellison
w a s
crow ned
Miss Lee
on Satur-
d a y
evening.
February y
24, at the
pageant
held at
Lee Ele-
mentary


School. She received the
crown from last year's Miss
Lee, Heather Murphy, who
was on hand to crown all of
the pageant winners.
Unique Gnann was
crowned the first runner-up in
the Miss Lee portion of the
pageant.
An opening production
number featured the contes-
tants who came out in sports-
wear and introduced them-
selves.
Following the opening
production number, emcee
Heather Douglas introduced
Honorary Miss Lee Ina
Moore, as well as the pageant
judges.
The Pre-Teen Miss. Lee
contestants came out and in-
troduce themselves, while
dressed in their sportswear.
The contestants included:
Siera Gay, Shayla Rhymes,
Nicole Davis and Bethany
Edgar.
The Junior Miss Lee con-
testants were next, with their
sportswear. Contestants in-
cluded: Brittney Hudson, Vic-
toria Wirick, Ashleigh
Williams, Allison Gnann and


'7'


Heathe
Dougla
and th
M ad'i s o
Cou nt
H i g
School Ke
Club.
Miss Le
200
Heathe
Murphy re
turned fo
h e
farewell
walk an
then th
winners o
each ag


division were announced.
Bethany Edgar wa
crowned Pre-Teen Miss Le
2007, Victoria Wirick wo:
Junior Miss Lee 2007 an
Robin Ellison was crowne
Miss Lee 2007.
All three young ladie
also won the Miss Photo
genic portion of their divi
sions.


I- ii






AR


Elaine Terry.
The sportswear competi-
tion finished with Robin Elli-
son and Unique Gnann
dressed in their casual clothes.
Jacqueline Ratliff and
Brian Norris entertained the
crowd with their rendition of
"A Whole New World."
Ratliff and Norris perform in
Pigeon Forge, Tn., and also
travel with a gospel trio
named Trinity.
The Pre-Teen contestants
returned to the stage, wearing
their evening gowns. They
were followed by the Junior
Miss and Miss Contestants.
The Miss Lee contestants
had to answer an impromptu
question.
Jessica Pickles sang "The
Rose" for the crowd.
Charlene Rye came out
and made special announce-
ments, thanking all of the
sponsors and everyone who
helped make the pageant a
success. Assisting her with the
pageant were Summer Hicks,
Magan Rye, Lynn Ratliff,
Judy Ritter, Jacqueline
Ratliff, Heather Murphy,
Sammy Hicks, April Herring,


Nestld Waters salutes our

neighbors and friends in the

Town of Lee. We appreciate the

warm welcome you've given us

and look forward to sharing an

even brighter future together.


all's Tire &


fler Center
1064 E. US 90 Madison, FL
(Beside Clover Farzm)

850-973-3026

Owners: Daryl & Lee Anne Hall


7


--

Robin Ellison, center, was crowned Miss Lee 2007. She is
flanked by Victoria Wirick, Junior Miss Lee, left, and Pre-Teen
Miss Lee Bethany Edgar, right. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo
by Jacob Bembry, February 24, 2007)


MIND -

Ina Moore Named Honorary Miss Lee
Ina Mae Littleton Webb us all in line and love us, re-
S Moore was bor July 21, gardless of what we tried to do.
1924 to Ruby Davenport She was and still is an amazing
Littleton and William Cut- man."
ler Littleton. In June of 1964 Clifford
Her maternal grandpar- died at age 45, leaving Ina to
ents were Mary Jane Calhoun finish raising the two younger
and Wilber Hodges Daven- : children. By this time John'c
port. Her paternal grandpar- ., F .. lhad married Marlene Kay
ents were William Arthur Lit- ., Plain and they had two
tleton and Lula Ann Dixon Lit- young sons. JoeAnn was
tleton. alsoo married and had one
Ina's father, Cutler, was a ,*.P-" son. John'c lived just
well driller in the Madison . around the comer and took
area until his death in 1955. over the farming activi-
Her mother, Ruby, died in ties. In the late 60's Ina
1981. began taking college
S The oldest of seven chil- credit classes at North
dren, Ina was born at home, cult Florida Community College.
about halfway between Hicko- turn for Ina and Clif- On July 29, 1972, Ina graduat-
ry Grove and Hanson. She has ford as he was declared dis- ed from nursing program and
three sisters, Florence New- abled in 1945 and was given for the next 17 years, she
berry and her husband Jim, an honorable medical dis- would work the evening shift
Marion Anderson, and Judy charge from the United States at the Madison County Memo-
Littleton and two brothers, Army. rial Hospital.
Henry, Eugene. A third broth- Ina and Clifford came After 11 1/2 years of wid-
er, William Cittler Littleton, home to Madison County and owhood, Ina developed a close
Jr., is deceased. by 1946 they were farming friendship with a widower and
Ina attended public acreage about five miles south former patient who was recov-
schools in Pinetta. When asked of Lee. Clifford's parents, ering from a broken arm. Ina
about one of her favorite Lewis and Alice Deloach and Mellous Moore eloped to
things to do, she said, "Swim- Webb, and Clifford's siblings Folkston, Ga. and were mar-
ming in Blue Springs." (Amanda, Newt, Etha and Car- ried on December 13,1975.
The family was also very men) provided Ina with plenty She laughingly recalls that she
active in the Hanson United of company. During this time even paid the justice of the
Methodist Church and Ina Clifford also worked a short peace to perform the ceremony
states she accepted Christ there time for Independent Life In- because Mellous did not bring
at age 10. Ina also took piano surance Company. This too any money with him. Ina's
lessons from Willie Clare would not last long as Clif- children now included Mellous
Copeland. ford's health would continue to and his late wife Adel's daugh-
Ina graduated from Pinetta decline. During these early ter, Hilda Humphrey. Mel-
School on May 26, 1941. She years Ina recalls the hard work lous's sisters were also part of
r then attended two semesters at she encountered, caring for the new family. In 1990, Ina
s Pineland College in Deland. children, her home and farm- retired from the Madison Hos-
e Ina would return to col- ing. pital, and became a full-time
n. lege many years later. The She remembers,. ',The ., wife,. mother, grandmother,.
y summer after she returned biggest cash crop was tobacco,' great-grandmother, gardener,
h home from college, Ina met about two acres. Everything church worker and recorder of
Y her future husband and father was done by hand, setting out history. During this time Ina
of her children at a peanut the plant, watering and replant- created, volumes of albums
e shelling party. Per Ina, "John ing, cropping, cooking, pack- containing snapshots (that she
6 Clifford Webb, Sr. was a ing and selling. The first tobac- would take) and clippings of
r young widower and a good- co setter we ever owned was events in the lives of her fami-
e- looking soldier." also owned by three other ly members.
r On her 18th birthday (July farmers and that was in the Mellous died in July 1995,
r 21,1942), Ina worked in tobac- early 60's." and shortly thereafter, Ina built.
1 co all morning and in the after- Over the next eight years, Ina a new and smaller home next
d noon she and Clifford went to and Clifford had two more to her oldest son, John'c. Coye
e Russell Williams's house and children. Coye Franklin was Frank and his wife Judy live
'f got married. born August 1, 1950 and Juani- nearby on the "old" Webb
e Inarelates that during the ta Maxine was born October home site. JoeAnn, her hus-
early years of their marriage, 24, 1953. band Dave Wiggins and Nita,
a she and Clifford rented a single Ina and Clifford continued along with her husband Tom
e room to live in while Clifford to farm. Ina recalls the long Fico live in Madison.
n was stationed at Columbus and days gardening, canning veg- Though her health has de-
d then Ft. Benning, Ga. Their tables, cooking for tobacco coined some, Ina still enjoys
d first two children, JoeAnn help, and picking up pecans, as the annual Littleton family re-
(July 26, 1943) and John C. Jr. well as caring for the Webb union, visiting her sisters, hav-
s (September 22, 1944) were children and attending to all ing friends and family visit her,
- born in Columbus, Ga., and Ft. the activities that accompany and outings with her friends
- Benning, Ga., respectively, running a household. and family. She continues to
Life was soon to take a diffi- The Webb children re- enjoy her activities at the First
member how hard times were, United Methodist Church in
/) especially on their mama. Clif- Lee, weekly Bible study, read-
_/J// (/ ( ford's health continued to de- ing, her garden and her flow-
son Count) Piopert) Appraiser cline and that meat extra ers. She receives special enjoy-
850.973.6133 chores and responsibilities for ment from her cat "Tiger." Ina
everyone. Ina would stay at the still records "history" as it is
hospital with Clifford for related to her "church family"
& V1ery Prould long periods of time, then and her descendants. And
ruor/'t r ofP care for him at home as his even now, she still worries
illness had paralyzed him and and frets over wasting time
Lee Druy he required continual nursing and not getting done every-
care. Ina continued to work thing she needs to get done.
hard, day in and day out. "God has been good to
Through her example, Ina's me," Ina wrote. "I have a
i children also learned valuable good measure of health for
S. lessons about hard work. my age. My children are all
They all agree that "even alive and well as are my 12
though mama was confronted grown grandchildren and 23
with the most difficult of cir- great-grandchildren. I can
cumstances, she remained walk, talk, think and work
strong in her faith in some. I have a comfortable
God, courageous beyond all home here and an eternal home
belief, and determined to keep reserved for me in Heaven."


.Ik .;,
mt *' -


~~-*~ '::~1










Wednesday, March 28, 2007 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 13A




HEALTH & NUT'RITIION


* Fv nd s a


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc
"You can only be sure of two things in life- death and tax-
es," or so says the old adage, but this Spring- it's allergy season!
And to compound on the clouds of pollen released into the air,
Hay Fever and Asthma rates are on the rise. A combination of
common allergens, such as pollen and pet dander, air pollutants,
heat waves, and unhealthy air masses- all associated with chang-
ing climates- cause damage to respiratory systems.
Hay Fever, otherwise known as allergic rhinitis, is a typical
spring-time reaction experienced by over 40 million people in
the United States. The symptoms, contrary to the name, do not
include fever- they do however include a runny nose, scratchy
eyes, and chronic sneezing.
Not to worry, those of you who only
have trouble with Hay Fever each Spring-
this too shall pass.
A more serious problem affecting al-
.most nine percent of the US population is
asthma. Caused by allergens and pollution,
asthma attacks are responsible for one in
six of all pediatric emergency room visits.
Recent studies suggest that by the year
2020, over 28 million people in the United
States alone will suffer from this debilitat-
ing illness. .
According to leading experts, the cli-
mactic changes that the earth is undergoing
have a direct effect on the length of allergy
season. Global warming, due to human in- '
terference, is the leading cause of the pro-
longed suffering. As the atmosphere grows
warmer, the season for allergens, such as
ragweed, grows longer. Carbon dioxide, a
greenhouse gas, also works on its own to increase pollen output-
it increases plant productivity. It's to be expected. Unless peo-
ple manage to somehow maintain stability in the climate, some
allergy sufferers might be sneezing, wheezing, and dripping all
year round.
The United States contributes 25 percent of the world's an-
nual carbon emissions, but only houses about five percent of the
world's population. This is the main reason doctors have seen a
100% increase in the amount of people diagnosed as having
asthma in the last decade- in the United States alone. As people
grow older, allergies and asthma get worse. The human body
slows down with age, and neuro-humoral pathways are more
sensitive to change. This nieaiis that one's body can't "De-tox"
as rapidly in the inireasingy ifiorejpdllute'd world.
Allergy sufferers typically show higher levels of stress and
malnutrition, immune system dysfunction, liver metabolism and
lymphatic filtration impairment. Many people aren't even
aware that these too are serious sign of allergies or asthma. It is
important to eat a diet of foods naturally rich with vitamins and
minerals. Oranges and orange juice are high in Vitamin C,
while apples and bananas are high in both Vitamins A and B.
Vegetables such as broccoli, leeks, green and red peppers,
radishes, cabbage, and potatoes are extremely high in Vitamin C
and folic acid- but lose some nutritional value if cooked. How-
ever, there are ways to serve both fruits and vegetables raw that
are equally delicious.



No Time

To See A

^r Doctor?
Tri-County Family Health Care is
open Tuesday evenings until 7 PM
Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician

You may save $ on your prescriptions
from us, when filled at Jackson's Drugs

Please call 850-948-2840
for more information

Tri-County Family Health Care
193 NW US 221
Greenville, Florida 32331
North Florida Medical Centers, Ind.


Ten ways to combat allergies include:
1. Choose chicken over beef. Eating a diet that is predomi-
nately composed of red meat and dairy products increases the
susceptibility to Hay Fever.
2. Eat kiwi fruit. Kiwis are rich in Vitamin C, an antihista-
mine.
3. Turn on the AC! It dries out the moisture in the walls,
which causes those unfriendly mold spores to grow and in turn
wage war on your allergies.
4. Take a fish-oil supplement. Studies suggest that fish oil
combats leukotrienes, which are a cause of allergic asthma.
5. Steam clean your carpet with a DOT solution- which re-
duces dust mite population.
6. Use very hot water to wash your
bedding at least once a week. It will kill
dust mites.
7. Clean the defrost tray under the
fridge with bleach and sprinkle it with salt.
The salt will soak up any moisture thereby
reducing the amount of moldy growth.
8. Even though wicker or fabric door-
mats are pretty, use synthetic ones. If the
natural mats get wet, sometimes they begin
to decompose- a veritable breeding ground
for mold, fungus, and other nasties.
9. Clean out your,gutters regularly. If
they are clogged, water can actually seep
into your house exacerbating the growth of
mold.
ld 10. Take 250 milligrams of quercetin
Si three times a day. Widely used in natural
medicine, this supplement will help your
body block allergies.
Donna Putnal, RN, says to "Keep
your environment as clean as possible. Eat a diet that has lots
of Vitamin C. A healthy diet with will balanced meals and lots
of exercise is key." The effects of Hay Fever and asthma can be
treated by some simple in home solutions- such as the purchase
of a HEPA Filter or a dehumidifier. Even taking such precau-
tions as to not venture outside on extremely dry or windy days
and running the air conditioner instead of opening windows can
greatly improve the quality of life. When all else fails, consult a
family physician, who can prescribe pharmaceuticals that will
ease the symptoms- in the very least making them bearable. Ac-
cording to W.J..Bibb, in practice for 51 years, "Most people take
medicine rather than going through immunotherapy... which
builds up a resistance to an allergen. Atihistanines, cortisone
nal spidys, a'd'SingUlair, (ah'ihlleFgy arid'asthmua prescription),
all help fight the symptoms."
Readers all hope that this year's allergy season will soon
end. However, the pecan trees haven't bloomed yet, so there'll
probably be a little more pollen.


Exercise, Diet, And Supplements


Play A Role In Good Health


Lowering cholesterol with-
out medications
When it's time to rein in
cholesterol, the go-to prescrip-
tion is usually stations. These
medications can re-
duce low-density
lipoprotein (LDL) I
cholesterol the bad ,j
cholesterol from 25
percent to 50 percent.
But for a variety of
reasons, stations aren't
an option for everyone.
The March issue of Mayo
Clinic Women's HealthSource
outlines other ways to lower
cholesterol levels.
Weight loss and exer-
cise: Losing even 5 to 10
pounds of excess weight can
help lower total cholesterol
levels. And exercising 30 to 60
minutes a day can help lower
triglyceride levels and boost
high-density lipoprotein
(HDL) the good choles-
terol.
Diet: Experts say it's im-
portant to limit daily calories
from saturated fats to 7 per-
cent to 10 percent of the daily
total. Cholesterol intake
should be limited to 200 to
300 milligrams a day. People
who eat 5 to' 10 grams of solu-
ble fiber a day decrease LDL
cholesterol by about 5 percent.
Consuming food products
containing sterols or stands,


healthy substances found in
certain plants, is another op-
tion. Using certain margarine-
like spreads and certain brands


of






2;


orange juice can reduce
LDL cholesterol by up
to 14 percent.
Diet Supplements:
Supplements and oth-
er natural products
may help lower cho-
lesterol, too. Some are
more effective than


others; some have side effects.
Studies have shown niacin (vi-
tamin B-3) can reduce LDL
levels by as much as 20 per-
cent and raise HDL levels up
to 35 percent. Possible side ef-
fects include flushing, hot
flashes, as well as nausea,
vomiting and diarrhea. A
dosage of '5 grams of blond
psyllium seed husks a day may
lower levels of total choles-
terol by 3 percent to 14 per-
cent. Other cholesterol-lower-
ing options include flaxseed
and garlic.
For most people with high
cholesterol, prescription med-
ications are safe and effective.
The best nonprescription ther-
apy a heart-healthy diet -
can benefit nearly everyone.
For those who try other dp-
tions to reduce cholesterol, it's
important to work closely with
a doctor to monitor safety and
effectiveness.


RNs and LPNs

All Shifts


CNAs for

3-11 Shifts


IA


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Heria-d Dsc Scatia,
Degeneraive Disc
Freerepot reealsaSneSFD

aproe nnsuria olto6o
serousandchrnicnec an lo
back pan.Fr Sou re-rprto









14A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, March 28, 2007




SCHOOL & EDUCATION


St. Leo Students Named To Dean's List


The following students %were named to
the Dean's List at Saint Leo Unilersitr for
the fall 2006 semester.
Linda Jones. of Green dile. Jones is a
graduate student human serx ices w th a spe-
cialization in adminirsration major at Saint
Leo Uni'ersii
Jeffre \Veilleux, of Greenmille.
Veilleux is a seruor elementary education
major at Saint Leo Uni\ers'r
Cierra Adans. of Jennings. Adams is
a junior element;rn education major at
Saint Leo Uninersirt.
Joarue Brow\n, of Lee. Brown is a ju-
nior human ser\ ices \ ith a speciaization in
administration major at Saint Leo Uniu\ersi-
ty.
Margie Philhps. of Lee. Phillips is .1
senior human senrices with a specialization
in administration major at Saint Leo Uni-
versit.
Shalonda Brinson, of Madison. Bnn-
son is a junior human services with a spe-
cialization in administration major at Saint
Leo University.
Tamisha Ealy, of Madison. Ealy is a


juror elemental education major at Saint
Leo Lniersit.
Sharon Ortega. of Madison. Ortega is
a junior elemental education major at
Saint Leo ULniersi\.
Lori Pleasant, of Madison. Pleasant is
a sernor business adrrunistrauon \with a spe-
cializaton n management major at Saint
Leo Uniruersitl.
Chastir. Siplin. of Madison. Siplin is a
senior human sermces with a specialization
in administration major at Saint Leo Univer-
sir\.
hhchael Tolar. of Madison. Tolar is a
junior elementary' education major at Saint
Leo Unilersity.
Deborah Williams of Madison.
\Wilamns is a junior elemental education
maior at Saint Leo ULniersitr.
Leslie Greenlee. of Pinerta. Greenlee is
a senior elementary education major at Saint
Leo University.
Carol Griffin, of Pinetta. Griffin is a se-
nior elementary education major at Saint Leo
University.
Patricia Wynn, of Pinetta. Wynn is aju-


nior elementarN education major at Saint Leo
Urunersity.
Students \who ha'e earned at least 12
ne\w credits with a term grade point average
of 3.05 or higher are recognized on the
Dean's List. w which is announced at the end of
each semester.
"One of our core values at Saint Leo
ir\nersity is excellence, and we are dehght-
ed to see these students work so hard to
achieve so much and aspire to lhe out our
values. said Maribeth Durst. Ph.D. \ice
president of academic affairs
Saint Leo Uni\ersity's core falues are
deeply rooted in the Benedictine tradiuon
and are interwoven into the curricula. The\
are excellence, community. respect. personal
development, responsible ste\\ardship. and
integrity.
Chartered in 1889, Saint Leo Uni\ersirt
is one of the largest and most innoati\e
Catholic universities in the United States.
Students enrolled at Saint Leo may choose
from 41 academic programs, including bach-
elor's degrees, master's degrees, pre-profes-
sional and accelerated-learning programs.


Ashley Parrish preparing to cheer in her routine.
(Photo Submitted)


Ashley Parrish

Shines As A University Of

Miami Cheerleader
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Ashley Parrish, a former Madison County High School
cheerleader, has metamorphosed into a member of the Miami
Hurricanes All-Girl-Cheerleading Squad, ranked 6th in the na-
tion. During her senior year in high school, Ashley asked her
mother to drive her to Miamifor tryouts. Cheerleading has been
her passion since she was three years old. She says she's done
both cheerleading and gymnastics, and she enjoys them both im-
mensely.
Ashley is the daughter of Renetta and Leroy Parrish. Renet-
ta Parrish runs Honey's Day Care and is a board member for sev-
eral local organizations. Leroy is a trucker for a company out of
Missouri. Ashley's maternal grandparents, Rosetta and
Theodore Warren, are from Madison- her grandfather owns War-
ren Taxi. Hailing from New Jersey, Ashley's paternal grandpar-
ents are Marie and Jerry Parrish.
Once she made it to Miami, Ashley was competing for two
days with over 100 girls from aql,pyer- there were only fifteen
spots available on the squad She says that the tryouts were
tough- and nothing like high school. Ashley had toiearn a cheer,
a chant, a dance, and stunts to make the squad, all of which she
did flawlessly.
Finally, past the tryouts, the real work began for Ashley.
She has had to balance her schoolwork and her cheerleading.
Four days of practice a week can take a toll on her brain, but
"Somehow I always figure it out. I have great time management
skills,, and that has really helped me out," she says. "School
comes first. I love cheerleading, but I'm going to school for
school, not cheering." And boy is she going to school -- Pre-
Med in fact.
Cheerleading isn't all about showing up to football games,
Ashley explained. "We go to all the games -- football, basket-
ball, everything. And then we have competitions." In addition
to that, the squad participates in many promotional activities.
Ashley has worked with Big Brothers and Big Sisters and plen-
ty of other volunteer organizations, and hopes to be able to con-
tinue doing so.
Ashley has tryouts coming up again in April, and she hopes
to once more be a member of the squad. When asked if she'd
continue somehow working with cheerleading, Ashley said, "Oh
yeah. I'd love to do it on the side, maybe coach or something.
It opens up lots of o-portunities."


iasniy wurKs a I wIul nI r squau ou mul
team, the Miami Hurricanes. (Photo Submitted)


Ashley Parrish is getting the crowd fired up v
rest of her squad. (Photo Submitted)


Pol

Breade

,.Safo


Redivw an Gil

11 -- --- -- -- --- --- -- -- --- -- -


Lunrh: SAt & SLIII 12 p.m.
Dinner Weekdays: 4 p.m. 10 p.m.
Ftiday: 4 p.m. 11 p.m.
Saturday: 12 p.m. 11 p.m.
I Sunday: 12 p.m. 10 p.m. I






Wednesday, March 28, 2007
A' '"


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Complete line of BioGuard Pool and Spa Chemicals
Free "Alex" Computerized Water Analysis
Weekly Pool Service Pool & Spa Repair
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Garden Bioguard
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Monday Friday 9-6 Saturday 9-4
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UjUner Weekdays: 4 p.m. 10 p.m.

Lunch: Sat & Sun 12 p.m.
Friday: 4 p.m. 11 p.m.
Saturday: 12 p.m. 11 p.m.
Sunday: 12 p.m. 10 p.m. I


Madison County Camrer e 15A







16A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, March 28, 2007




SPORTS




Madison Academy Holds Golf Tournament


The Madison Academy
Parents and Teachers Club
(PAT) held their second annu-
al golf tournament in con-
junction with their dinner and
auction on Saturday, Febru-
ary 24th at the Madison
Country Club.
The golf tournament be-
gan at 12:30 with 14 teams
competing. The weather was
beautiful and competitors had
a wonderful time.
First place went to the
team of Gary Henderson,
Mike Ragans, Larue Tipette,
and Wes Kelley; 2nd Place:
Billy and Dianne Sullivan


and Rev. & Mrs. Bob Laid-
law; 3rd Place: Gareth &
Travis Smith, Larry Olive and
John Haire.
This year, prizes were
also awarded to the team with
the overall best score (exclud-
ing handicaps). The team
with the best score was the
Capital City Team, consisting
of Sammy Hicks, Curt Wom-
ack, Bill Gunnells, and Scott
Cassels. In addition, Billy
Sullivan hit a hole in one on
number 12!
Golfers were treated with
goodie bags and hors d'oeu-
vres and invited to stay for
'NNI -.- _I


the steak dinner and auction.
The silent auction includ-
ed gift baskets prepared by
several of the classes at the
school. The live auction be-
gan at 6 p.m. with the always
entertaining John Lewis as
master of ceremonies and
Ron Smoak as auctioneer. As
a special treat, Willis Philips
provided musical entertain-
ment during the event.
The Madison Academy
eighth grade class, along with
some of the Beta Club mem-
bers served food to the diners.
They did a wonderful job of
keeping guests' glasses and


plates full! Both events were
a tremendous success.
The Academy would like
to thank all of the businesses
and individuals who donated
items for the day's events.
In addition they would
like to thank all of the partic-
ipants and workers who
helped make this day an en-
joyable experience for all.
If anyone missed out this
year, make plans to attend
next year. The Academy will
be celebrating its 40th An-
niversary and plans are cur-
rently underway to make next
year an event to remember!


Jackson's
Drug Store
1308 SW Grand Street
Greenville, FL
850-948-3011

Emergency: 850-997-3977
Dannv Jaek.I n. R.Ph


Glenda Gordon, Lee Gordon, Barbara Barfield and
Sara Henderson were teammates during the Madison
Academy Golf Tournament. (Photo submitted)


r? `...'




Bailey Browning putts the ball during the golf tour-
nament. (Photo submitted)


Jacob Whitaker, Trent Ragans, Jordan Tippette and
Brian Sanderson made up Team Extreme in the Madison
Academy Golf Tournament. (Photo submitted)

T0UP Ut-< i 1 "



On @l G o U ats -

Ken Strickland Golf Carts
We Sell The Best And Service The Rest!
Most Major Makes/Models
EZ 6o Club Car Chuck Wagon* Yamaba
Repairs, Batteries, Tires, Parts \- Jim Flournoy welcomes

80U-O OU4 rules for the Madisor
1184 NE Capital Circle Tallahassee. FL Academy Golf Tournament
(Photo submitted)


PUBLIC NOTICE
ATTENTION ALL RESIDENTS Of THE GEORGETOWN SERVICE AREA
OF MADISON COUNTY'S COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK
GRANT FOR DRAINAGE AND ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS

As most of you may already be aware, Madison County has been awarded Community Development
Block Grant monies for constructing drainage and roadway improvements within the Georgetown
community located south of the Madison City Limits and west of SR 14 (see vicinity map below).
The projected starting date for construction is Monday, April 2, 2007. Traffic safety and informa-
tional signs have already been put in place within the project area for the benefit of the driving pub-
lic, and anyone traveling within the service area is urged to drive safely and to be aware at all times
of the construction in progress. Daytime road closures and/or detours may be a possibility, so please
travel with caution and drive more slowly than normally permitted. Madison County is pleased with
the improvements planned for the Georgetown area, but the safety of our residents and the driving
public are of primary importance.

If anyone should have questions concerning the Georgetown Drainage and Roadway Improvements
project, please feel free to contact the Madison County Public Works/Road Department office at
850-973-2156. Madison County looks forward to the completion of this proposed construction and
thanks all residents and those driving in this service area for their patience and cooperation.


I iv sto k Show andS ai I


Go GORDON
HU TRACTOR, INC.
COME SEE US FOR SALES AND SERVICE
OF NEW HOLLAND EQUIPMENT
.491 SW Range Avenue Madison, FL 850-973-2245
1722 S. Ohio Avenue '*Live Oak, FL 386-362-1887
Congratulations To All Winners
At The Academy Golf Tournament








Wednesday, March 28, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com



SPORTS


Madison County Carrier 17A


MCHS Tennis Teams Serve It Up


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Led by Coach Bill Bunting, the girls' and boys' tennis teams
are improving. Coach Bunting has said that both teams are still
young, and there is much room for growth. In fact, the vast ma-
jority of Bunting's tennis players have never competed.
Despite odds obviously against them, the girls' team is cur-
rently 2-3, having beaten Taylor County's girl's team twice. Un-
fortunately, Suwannee County and Rickards defeated Madison's
girls once and twice, respectively.
The boys' team isn't faring quite as well currently their sta-
tistics are 0-4. They've faced, and been defeated by, Rickards
(twice), Suwannee (once), and Wakulla (once).
Once back from Spring Break, both teams traveled to God-
by on Tuesday, March 27. On Wednesday, March 28, only the
girls will face off against Wakulla.


Cowboy
Girls Team
1. Amber Cooper
2. Courtney Cote
3. Brittany Bezick
4. Brooke Bezick
5. Jeanie Martin


Tennis
Boys Team
1. Daniel Sanders
2. Joseph Lowe
3. Vigo Juodelis
4. Shane Blodgett
5. Jordan Tippette
6. Zacc Salsgiver
7.. Joey Walker


... ..i -. ,- -4-
inS .. .

W -

.- 'f 4I"1





The girls tennis team, pictured left to right Brittany Bezick, Brooke Bezick, Courtney Cote, and Amber Cooper.
(Not pictured Jeanie Martin) (Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo by Emerald Greene Kinsley, March 8, 2007)


* A

a


The boys' tennis team, back row left to right: Daniel Sanders, Joseph Lowe, Shane Blodgett, and Vigo Juodelis.
Front row, left to right: Jordan Tippette, Zacc Salsgiver, and Joey Walker. (Greene Publishing, Inc., Photo by Emer-
ald Greene Kinsley, March 8, 2007)

FIRST WINNERS OF THE REC BALL SEASON


Madison's State Farm Insurance Girls'
On March 17, a group of parents, family and friends joined
a group of young ladies as they took their first road trip of their
softball session.
Everyone traveled to Mayo, to participate in Mayo's Open-
ing Day festivities.
This group of 12 & Under softball players, proudly wear-
ing their State Farm Insurance t-shirts, took the field at lla.m.
against the Mayo 12 & Under team.
Several of these girls had not played ball in four or five
years. Despite their nervousness, they had a determined attitude
.41
NOR. 4 r~v_


Softball Team Wins Against Mayo Girls
to win and represent Madison's CAN DO attitude.
Mayo jumped ahead early but the Madison team rallied to
win the game with a victory score of 14-11. Even though it was
a cold and windy day, the excitement of these young ladies
spilled over to all who attended. Their excitement was conta-
gious.
Madison can be proud to have these young ladies repre-
senting them as they travel to other counties in the future. When
you see these young ladies, give them a pat on the back and let
them know how proud you are of them.
TiiiMMOM'TWiirNi T-r irm


Your ..-
Your:


legacy

profit

growth

future

opportunity

refuge

home

duty


YOUR


The State Farm Insurance team, back row, left to right; Coach Mike Morris, Katilyn Henderson, Jakria Bellamy,
Logan Groover, Taylor Hudson, Savannah Bailey, Mikayla Alien, and Coach Alfred Allen. Front row, left to right; Hope
Coates, Savannah Richardsonr, Jordan Hughes, Mary Bryant, Whitney Stevens, and Kailee Morris. (Photo Submitted)


for more information, contact your
local County Forester or visit
www.yourforestmanaged.com r
Depadmeni of Aqrculture iand C.onsumeer Services
Charles H. Bronson, CorrCniission
Division of Forestrv
Mike Long, Dilrecto


FOREST. MANAGED.


- t
~
'~ i


'


*
'38~-
r,
" ::~ 9
~1


Arff(""e









18A Madison County Carrier Wednesday, March 28, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com


iDEADLE F ASDss0DA


Home Care for Seniors
Will assist with activities of daily
living, NFCC Patient Care Techni-
cian Certificate. CPR & CNA Cer-
tified Available now. Call Beverly
at 850-973-2264

Shavings & Sawdust De-
livered
Call Steve 850-393-3443


I Clean For You!
Rentals Offices Homes
$10 hour References Available
Pet care available in your home.
850-971-5684

I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window and door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342

Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326

Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848

Fill Dirt; Limerock; Debris
Hauling; Driveway Repair; Cul-
verts Installed; Tree & Stump
Removal; Land Clearing
For A Job Done Right Call:
Steve 850-393-3443







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Publishing, Inc. -2W

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Just Pick Up The Phone
And Dial

973-4141
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AUTO11N1

EVERY SATURDAY
6:30 p.m.
1693 SW Mosley Hall Rd.
(CR360) Madison, Florida
Phone: 850-973-2959
M/C, VISA & DEBIT CARDS
FOOD FUN & GIVE-A-WAYS
Heated /AC /Comfy seats
5 p.m. Preview
Food starts at 5:30 p.m.
Directions From 1-10: Take SR14
SW to stop sign. Turn right on
SR14/360. AT fork in road. Bear
right onto SW Mosley Hall Rd.
(CR360).Past fire house, on left.
AU691-Col.Ron Cox-AB2490





ESTATE SALE
MARCH 31- 8AM-3PM
E. SEMINOLE ST., MONTI-
CELLO
(Follow signs from Courthouse)
Delightful items from 2 family es-
tates. Vintage glassware, porcelain,
decorative accessories, original art-
work, upscale costume jewelry,
bric-a-brac, collectibles & a few
antiques. Proceeds go to mission
work in Guatemala.


Beautiful puppies
Loving and responsible pet
owners only, please!
These abandoned fuzzy bundles of
love are in need of good homes.
They appear as pure Lab and so
will be med/large adult dogs.
Call local 464-1071 or 253-0056
No Calls After 8 p.m. Please





SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh bed -
BRAND NEW in box, $275 (850)
545-7112
Queen Pillow-Top Mattress Set.
Brand new in plastic with warranty.
$150 850-222-9879
Sofa/loveseat. New micro fiber set,
$475, must move, delivery avail-
able. 850-222-7783
BEDROOM; New 6 piece set still
boxed, $599, can deliver (850) 425-
8374

SOFA & LOVESEAT. Brand NEW
LEATHER, still wrapped, lifetime
warranty, sacrifice $795. (delivery
available) (850) 425-8374
25 lbs of Clean Newspapers
Just $2
Kennels Welcome, 973-4141





OH BOY! Do we have KOI!
Decorative Koi and Butterfly Koi.
Large Comets, Sarassas, Shubunk-
ins and Wakins too!
Fill your pond with Beautiful Fish
from Creatures Featured, Madison
FL 850-973-3488





Lake House
Accepting applications now.
2 bed, 2 bath, no pets, lawn mainte-
nance and water included. $800
month, $800 deposit. Available in
May '07 850-973-3025

Studio Apartment
Quiet Country Setting
4 miles North of Madison.
Heating & A/C
Professional/Retired Person
850-973-8548



f Greenville Pointe
OO 0
Apartments D

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. HUD vouchers accept-
ed. Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Lake House for Rent
Now accepting applications
Lake front, 2 bed, 2 bath, furnished,
includes utilities and lawn mainte-
nance. No Pets, $1,200 per month,
$1,000 deposit. 850-973-3025
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms,
HUD vouchers accepted Call 850-
973-3786 TTY Acs 711 "This in-
stitution is an equal opportunity
provider and employer."

outhem rn llas of

C/adison O/partments

HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, &
3 BR, HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582/TDDTTY
711. 200 Southern Villas Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity.


$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385

Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage-23
acres, Corer lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Drive and High-
way 53 South. Natural gas line,
8 inch water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build to
suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141


Pioneer
Excavating & Tractor
Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump
Removal, Demolition, Roads,
Mowing, Discing, Box-Blading,
and Tilling.
No Job Too Small
Free Estimates
Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326







House For Sale
4. Br, 1 1/2 Bth, Block
Home.House must be moved.
Price is negotiable. Call 850-
929-4616

LOG HOMES
With as little as
$500.00 Down
Prestige Home Center
Lake City, Florida.
1-800-355-9385
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995.00
Factory Direct
Home Prestige Center
352-752-7751






$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995.00
Factory Direct
Home Prestige Center
352-752-7751






2 Therapist & 1 Case Manager,
are needed to work with at risk
youths and their families implanti-
ng evidence based model program
Functional Family Therapy. BA re-
quired Masters preferred for Thera-
pist. 386-755-1172 fax 386-755-
1486
Southeast Regional
Home Weekends
Allen Freight Services is now offer-
ing southeast regional runs for. class
A drivers who need to be home
weekends. We offer a comprehen-
sive benefit package, late model
equipment and 95% no touch
freight. For more information, ex-
perienced divers may call Randy at
800-632-8769. Inexperienced dri-
vers call Lavonna at 877-440-7890
or you can go to our website for ba-
sic requirements www.ptsi-
online.com. EOE


City Of Madison
The City of Madison has one open-
ing in the Street Department for a
heavy equipment operator. Appli-
cants must possess a valid Florida
Class B Commercial Driver's Li-
cense or obtain the same within six
months after being employed.
Applicants must read and write the
English Language, be able to com-
municate orally and be able to fol-
low oral and written instructions.
This position requires a lot of medi-
um to heavy physical labor.
Applicants should have experience
with back-hoe/front-end loader
construction equipment. It is pre-
ferred that applicants have a high
school diploma or GED certificate.
The person hired for this position
must pass a physical examination,
background check and drug test.
Applications may be picked up and
returned to City Hall from March
19th, 2007 through April 5th, 2007.
The City of Madison is an equal op-
portunity employer, a drug free
workplace and recognizes veteran's
preference.
Dietary Aide- Part-time for a.m. &
p.m. shifts. Cook- PRN -both
shifts. We are small, but are a part
of a wonderful company with car-
ing individuals who have a desire to
improve the lives of our Residents
and Staff. Call 850-973-4880 ask
for Theresa Patterson, Dietary
Manager, Madison Nursing Center.
Auto Mechanic Needed
I have several old 80' vintage auto-
mobiles that need minor repair
done at my home. Work can be
done in your spare time, will pay
cash. Call 973-8394 after 6 p.m.
Hughey Memorial Personal Care
Center, is hiring a 3-11 p.m. posi-
tion, for a caregiver at a wonderful
& loving assisted living facility.
Experience preferred but not nes-
sassary. Applications are being tak-
en Mon-Thur from 10-12. For more
information please call Jenny
Hendry at 973-6892
Denny's Diner
Career Opportunity
Now Hiring Managers.
Must have 2 years experience. Also
hiring Cooks and Servets: Apply
within, no phone calfsple'ase.


LPN or RN needed
7P 7A
WITH BENEFITS!!!
Suwannee Health Care Center
S1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact Angela Akins or
Amelia Tompkins at 386-362-7860
WANTED...
SUBSTITUTE BUS DRIVERS
FREE TRAINING FLEXIBLE
SCHEDULE FRIENDLY
WORKING CONDITIONS
REWARDING WORK
CALL IVAN JOHNSON WITH
MADISON COUNTY
SCHOOLS
850-973-5022
Registration/Scheduling
Specialist
Busy practice seeks articulate, ma-
ture, highly organized profession-
al, w/HS diploma, and mandatory;
2-yrs work exp. in a medical office,
excellent phone, computer, & peo-
ple skills.
* Verify Insurance Benefits
* Load Patient Demographics
* Schedule Appointments
* Medical Record Maitenance
* Greet Patients & Visitors
* Patient Sign-In & Other Docu-
mentation
Nature Coast EyeCare
Institute Perry, Florida
Fax Resume to (850) 838-3937 or
call Human Resources
(850)584-2778, Ext. 639
Faith Global Transportation is
seeking a part-time shuttle driver,
with a Class A CDL, minimum 2
yrs truck driving experience, to
move trailers in and out of Nestle
Waters. hourly pay, estimated 30
hrs per week. Please call 866-449-
5085 ext 113 Jon


Cracker Barrel
Now Hiring
Full and part time experienced;
Hiring All Positions Flexible
schedules, weekly paychecks,
health insurance and other great
benefits.

-I


Apply in person at the Lake Park
location, 4914 Timber Drive. EOE
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
NEEDED TO RUN DEDICATED
ROUND TRIPS FROM MADI-
SON PAID HOURLY 17.19 BASE
+3.12 BENEFIT 1 MOVING
,MIN. 25 YRS AGE -CALL LEE-
WAY-800-223-1508
Local CDL driver needed; must
have 3-5 years of experience; home
daily; off most weekends. Call
Tommy.or Debbie Davis 971-5456.
If no answer leave a message.

$ AVON $
In 2007 Start Your Own Business
Start Up Kit $10
Call Dorothy
973-3153


Johnson & Johnson Transport, Inc.
2 Drivers needed to work Tues-Sat
PM shift. Benefits include: 401K,
health insurance, uniforms, paid
vacation. CDL Class A is required.
Apply in person at 1607 W. US
Hwy 90, Madison, FL between
8:00 AM and 5:00 PM Mon-Fri.
850-973-2277

Part-time Sales Clerk
850-973-6701


Bsiness
Opotnt


Coffee Shop
Fully equipped, established for six
years, Turn-key Operation, located
in Downtown Monticello, High
traffic area, 190 N. Jefferson. Call
850-997-9996


iNOW Hiring FL Ilasei Driversi
Southeast Dedicated Regional Runs
TOP $$$ PAY PACKAGE!!
WEEKLY HOMETIME
CLEAN & NEW EQUIPMENT!!
Class-A CDL Required
Limited Availability! Call Today!!

877-838-2378 ext. 270
www.gotdt.com

Attention
Madison County Residents

Are You 55+ and having
difficulty finding a job?


If you qualify, Experience Works will pay
your training costs
AND
pay your wages while you learn to be a
Certified Nurse Aide (CNA).


For more information, call Lana at
850-922-0023 ext. 242

A national nonprofit organization. EEO/AA

"This U.S. Small Business Administration' (SBA) Grant Award, #SBAHQ-#2-1-
0034 is funded by the SBA. SBA's funding is not an endorsement of any products,
opinions, or services. All SBA funded programs are extended to the public on a
non discriminatory basis."


Get In The Swing Of Things,
Stay Current On
Your Local News, Church,
Business and Area Growth.
Subscription Rates:
In County $28
Out Of County $35
Includes;
The Madison County Carrier
&
The Enterprise Recorder.
-Major Credit Cards Accepted-
Order Your Paper Today!
(850) 973-4141


Deadline For Classified Advertising
Is At 3:30 p.m. On
The Monday Of The Week
You Want Your Ad To Run.


A Whole Lot Of Banis For Your Buck!!!
Classified Ads Are $12 For 196 characters
(including spaces). Your Ad Will Be Published
In Both The Madison County Carrier And The
Enterprise Recorder As Well As Being Placed
On The World Wide Web!


m m


e nI
And-g u


U-s~te


www.greenepublishing.com


wnarTS olng in e... ied






Classifieds


..._











www. reeneDublishin. com


Madison County Carrier Wednesday, March 28, 2007 19A


NOTICE E OF %FI F PtIRL'%NT TO 4( H l'Tt R si. PPRT IN


L'nd tr Ihr \ulhori I il sj i ll. s lrn cinr. Slor.,g, Fai lin \l. _icli.,n 8- I.s 11 iln d
,,ribrd below ha. titn .rield for n.npaminil iI ronl and ,thor accrued e pnis .'
Property consists primanly of household goods in units rented by: Lugene McQuay,
Carl Sparkman, & Emily Spencer. The property will be sold at auction to the highest
bidder as provided by the Self-Storage Facility Act, Section 83.806. The sale will be held
Friday, April 13, 2007, at 9:00 A.M., at the Madison Mini Storage, 1098 East U.S. 90,
in Madison, Florida. For further information call 971-5744.

3/28. 4/4


Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 83, Part IV
Under the Authority of Self-Storage Facility Act, section 83.805 the described below has
been seized for nonpayment of rent and other accrued expenses.


Names
Kama Washington
Keicha Gates
Dorothy Coffie
Pamela Brooks
Howard Bennett


. Housedhold Items


The contents of these units will be sold during a yard sale April 7th at Wells Mini Stor-
age early Sat morning on Hwy 145 North (Valdosta Hwy) Madison, FL. For further
information call 973-6875

3/28, 4/4






NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Pursuant to SS 336.09 and 336.10, Florida Statutes, the Board of County
Commissioners of Madison County, Florida hereby gives notice that at 9:00 a.m. dur-
ing its regular meeting held April 4, 2007 at the Board of County Commissioner's
Room, Room No. 107, Madison County Courthouse Annex, 229 SW Pinckney Street,
Madison, Florida, the Board will hold a public hearing to consider vacating, abandon-
ing, discontinuing and closing certain roads located in Northeast Madison County,
Florida, more specifically described as follows:

NE Whippet Trail: Portion of NE Whippet Trail, commencing at
the West property line of Parcel No. 10-1N-06-1662-000-000, proceeding
West through said parcel then North into the Southeast corner of Parcel
No. 03-1N-06-1643-000-000, continuing East and ending in the Southeast
corner of Parcel No 02-1N-06-1640-000-000.

YOU WILL PLEASE BE GOVEREND ACCORDINGLY.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect
to any matter considered at such meeting he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.

Dated this 16th day of March .2007.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

BY: Alien Cherry, Interim County Coordinator.

All interested parties may appear at this hearing and be heard regarding this matter.



3/21.3/28





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

IEVERBANK,

Plaintiff,

vs. CASE NO.: 07-008-CA
DIVISION:

DARRELL G. PLAIN, JR., et al,

Defendantss.

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated

March 22, 2007, and entered in Case No. 07-008-CA of the Circuit Court of the Third
Judicial Circuit in and for Madison County, Florida in which EverBank, is the Plain-

tiff and Darrell G. Plain, Jr., Patricia L. Plain, Warehouse Home Furnishings Distrib-
utors, Inc. D/B/A Farmers Home Furniture, are defendants, I will sell to the highest

and best bidder for cash at the West Front Doorsteps of the Madison County Court-

house, 101 South Range.Street, Madison, Florida 32340, Madison County, Florida at

11:00 AM on the 25th day of April, 2007, the following described property as set

forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 10
EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA,AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE

NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTH SIDE OF A 30 FOOT
COUNTY MAINTAINED GRADED ROAD, THENCE LEAVING SAID ROAD,
SOUTH 00 DEG, 07'31" WEST 688.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEG 34'52" EAST 632.90 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEG
08'14" EAST, 688.04 FEET TO THE SOUTH SIDE OF A 30 FOOT COUNTY MAIN-
TAINED GRADED ROAD; THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 34'52" EAST ALONG SAID
ROAD 30.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID ROAD SOUTH 00 DEG. 08'14"
WEST .
985.28 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG 34'52" WEST 662.84 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 00 DEG. 07'31" EAST 297.24 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A 268 NE HEARTEASE WAY LEE, FL 32509

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.


Dated in Madison County, Florida this 22nd day of March, 2007.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
Madison County, Florida


By: Christy Richardson
Deputy Clerk

Albertelli & Halsema, P.L.
Attorney for Plaintiff
777 S. Harbour Island Blvd. Suite 940
Tampa, FL 33602
(813)221-4743

3/28. 4/4








STOP LEG CRAMPS s

BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. C. lce|

Calcet's*triple calcium formula is designed to help no~ Clc
stop low calcium leg cramps.Just ask your pharmacist

Icucac


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 2006-498 CA

| CITIMORTGAGE, INC.

S PLAINTIFF

VS.


SPAULENE RICHARDSON; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF PAULENE RICHARDSON, IF
ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORA-
TION F/K/A FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE
AGENCY; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION.

DEFENDANTS)

NOTICE OF FORECLOSE


URE SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure

dated MARCH 22, 2007 entered in Civil Case No. 2006-498 CA of the Circuit Court
of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for MADISON County, MADISON, Florida, I will

sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE FRONT DOOR at the MADISON

County Courthouse located at 101 SOUTH RANGE, 2ND FLOOR in MADISON.

Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 22nd day of May 2007 the following described property)

as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit:

START AT SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW1/2) OF.
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 9
EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN'RIGHT OF WAY OF SR S-360-A OP-
POSITE STATION 171+64.5; THENCE RUN NORTH 0 04.7' EAST 1 FOOT TO :..
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 880 24' 22" '1
WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE 50 FEET TO WEST SIDE OF A.
STREET; THENCE NORTH 0 04.7' EAST 651.1 FEET; THENCE WEST 360 FEET: K
THENCE SOUTH 0 04.7 WEST 560.7 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING OF LOT
17; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 0' 04.7' WEST 29.6 FEET TO CHURCH:
THENCE NORTH 870
EAST ALONG CHURCH 23.6 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 30' WEST 71.5 FEET TO
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE SR 5 -360A; THENCE NORTH 880 24' 22" EAST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE 76.8 FEET TO A 50 FOOT STREET:
THENCE NORTH 0 04.7' EAST ALONG STREET 98.11 FEET; THENCE NORTH
89' 55.3' WEST 100 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other
than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens. must file a claim within 60
days after the sale

Dated this 22nd day of March,2007.

TIM SANDERS


(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)


Christy Richardson
Deputy Clerk


THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, P.A., ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
801 S. University Drive Suite 500
Plantation, FL 33324
(954)233-8000

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons
with disabilities needing a special accommodation should contact COURT ADMINIS-
TRATION,,atthe MADISON County Courthouse at, 1-800-955-8771 '(TDD) or
1'-800~-5;77.,i via Florida Relay'Service. '

3/28. 4/4


IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 3rd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY


HSBC Bank USA, N.A., as Indenture
Trustee foe the registered Noteholders of
Renaissance Home Equity Loan Trust 2005-
4, Renaissance Home Equity Loan Asset-
Backed Notes, Series 2005-4,

Plaintiff,

-vs.-

Pedro Ayala; Arthur G. Smith; Florida D.
Smith; Steven E. Fongeailaz;


Case #: 2006-516CA
Division #:


UNC:


Defendantss.

NOTICE OF SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure

dated March 22, 2007 entered in Civil Case No. 2006-516CA of the Circuit Court of the

3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Madison County, Florida, wherein HSBC Bank USA,

N.A., as Indenture Trustee for the registered Noteholders of Renaissance Home Equi-

ty Loan Trust 2005-4, Renaissance Home Equity Loan Asset-Backed Notes, Series

2005-4, Plaintiff and Pedro Ayala are defendantss, I will sell to the highest and best

bidder for cash, AT THE WEST SIDE OF THE MADISON COUNTY COURT-

HOUSE, LOCATED AT 101 SOUTH RANGE, MADISON, MADISON COUNTY,

FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on May 22, 2007 the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgjment, to-wit:

COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 132, CHER-
RY LAKE FARMS SUBDIVISION NO. 4, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK ONE, PAGE "C", OF
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, PUBLIC RECORDS, SAID POINT
ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG THE NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY OF RIDGE ROAD ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE SOUTHEAST HAVING A CHORD OF SOUTH 63 DEGREES, 29
MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST, 167.30 FEET, THENCE LEAVING
SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 11
SECONDS WEST, 283.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 04
MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST, 148.96 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 18
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST, 268.86 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMO-
DATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTI-
TLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
PLEASE CONTACT MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 101 SOUTH RANGE
STREET, MADISON, FL 32340 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT
OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-
955-8771; IF YOU ARE VOICE IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955-8770

DATED at MADISON, Florida, this 22nd day of March, 2007.


TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Madison County, Florida


ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
10004 N. Dale Mabry Highway
Suite 112
Tampa, FL 33618
(813) 880-8888


3/28. 4/4

ii -.^ ..- ... .. ... .-'--,


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NO:


IVY FINANCIAL CORPORATION,
2007-149-CA

Plaintiff,

vs.

CARLOS G. PICART; ERMELINDA PICART;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO. 2; and UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS
ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN
THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED,

Defendants.


NOTICE OF ACTION

To: All Above Named Unknown Defendants, including Unknown Ten-
ant No.1 and Unknown Tenant No. 2,
Addresses Unknown


YOU, ALL ABOVE NAMED UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS, INCLUDING UNKNOWN

TENANT NO. 1 AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2, ARE NOTIFIED that an action
seeking foreclosure and other relief on the following property in Madison County,
Florida:

Lot 75, Norton Creek Subdivision, according to the plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 31 through 33, of the Public Records of
Madison County, Florida

has been filed against you, and each of you, are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Scot B. Copeland, the plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
174 East Base Street, Madison, Florida 32340 on or before April 28, 2007, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.

Dated this 21st day of March 2007.

TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

3/28, 04/4

^E~pR~xaSa^^!K'ifia-- ---nrm



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN


AND

DA


DAISY G. NORMAN,

Plaintiff,

vs.

ANDREW ADAMS and VERNA ADAMS
Husband and Wife,


FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORI-


CASE NO. 2007-121-CA


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: VERNA ADAMS AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THAT DEFENDANT, AND ALL CLAIMANTS,
PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LE-
GAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE NAMED OR DE-
SCRIBED DEFENDANTS;


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following proper-

ty in Madison County, Florida:


The following parcel is in the SE 1/4 of SW 1/2 of Section 21, all being
West of SR53, and north of the E/W section line Public Road.

Start at SW Corner of SE 1/4 of SW 1/2 of Section 21, Township 2 North,
Range 9 East and run East along section line and Public Road 315 feet
to Point of Beginning and SW corner of Lot 1.

Start at above mentioned Point of Beginning of Lot 1 and continue East
210 feet along section line Vnd Public Road to Point of Beginning and
SW corner of Lot 2; thence continue East 117.6 feet to Oliver Pearson,
O.R. Book 55, page 700; thence North 210 feet; thence West 117.6 feet;
thence South 210 feet to Point of Beginning containing 0.57 acres, more
or less, subject to Public Road use Easement along south side.

TOGETHER WITH a 1995 Eagle Mobile Home, ID Nos.
GAFLR54A75695ET and GAFLR54B75695ET, which said mobile
home is attached to and is a part of the above described property.


has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-

fenses, if any, to it on Guy W. Norris, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Norris &

Foreman, P.A., 253 N. W. Main Boulevard, Post Office Drawer 2349, Lake City, Flori-

da 32056-2349, on or before thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice,

which is March 21, 2007, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before

service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be

entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.

DATED ON March 16, 2007.

TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of the Court

By: /s/ Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk


3/28. 4/4















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20A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


.www.greenepubiishing.comn


Friday, March 28, 2007


Long Distance


cont from page 1A
I


Croft said that the card machines were back up that afternoon. He said that he had called the credit card company, who had told
him that the problem was a long distance communication error.
Bank of America employees said that they had been having computer problems all day. The computers were back up and work-
ing in the afternoon.
"It was Sprint (that was the problem)," one employee said, referring to Embarq's former name.
The Madison County Tax Collector's Office also reported having problems with the phone lines and the computers.
"I was on the phone, trying to report it and I was cut off twice," Robin Hart, a Deputy Tax Collector said.
Hart said that the system was back up and everything was fine.
"It affected our phone lines and not so much our computer programs," said Judy Webb, Deputy Clerk of the Court.
Webb said that some people who called were cut off, not by any employees in the Clerk's Office, but because of the problems
with the phone system.
Webb and Hart said that the problems had gone on for about two hours'.
"It affected the Internet, the phone and the fax," Cathy Reams, an administrative assistant with the Madison County Sheriff's
Office said. "It was terrible. We had issues."


Coal Plant


cont from page 1A


A system is set up at the Aucilla Regional Landfill to monitor the amount of waste
fishing, Inc. Photo by Jessica Higginbotham, March 26, 2007)


in each cell. (Greene Pub-


SRefuse is shown at the Aucilla Regional Landfill. The extra burden that coal could
place on the landfill concerns some citizens. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessi-


ca Higginbotham, March 26,:
samples are taken, to make
sure that it is an area safe for
disposal of wastes. A three-
foot layer of clay is laid down,
and then a "select clay" sheet
is laid on top of that. Next, a
four-layer HDPE barrier is put
down. This barrier consists of
a 60-millimeter thick sheet of
high-density polyethylene
(HDPE), a leak detection
mesh layer, another layer of
HDPE, and a net for leachate
water. The Florida Department
of Environmental Protection
minimum standard for HDPE
is 60 millimeters.
According to the Environ-
mental Protection Agency, all
landfills will eventually leak
into the environment. It is un-
avoidable, as leacherous
wastes will break down the
"impermeable" layers of a
sanitary landfill.
The regional landfill is
highly monitored. Brooks
says that every morning he
personally takes readings from
gauges and monitors and notes
any changes in log books. If
there happened to be a leak,
and in 14 years there hasn't
been one, it would be well
documented and steps would
I &. &


be taken to remedy the prob-
lem.
As for the proposed pow-'
er plant, the future is unsure.
Power generated by the plant
will be routed to Jacksonville,
Disney, Tallahassee, and the
Florida Municipal Power
Agency, which encompasses
at least twenty cities and
towns.
Prevailing winds will
blow coal dust straight for
Madison proper, and trains
transporting the coal are likely
to leave a blanket of thick
black haze over the town. The
Environmental Protection
Agency has issued mercury
advisories on every lake,
pond, and river in the state,
and the entire coast is in a "hot
zone-" with unsafe levels of
mercury present. Mercury is a
heavy metal found in coal fire
emissions and ash waste from
power plants- and is detrimen-
tal to fish and wildlife, and hu-
mans.
Brooks assures that the
proposal has to be brought be-
fore the County Commission
before anyone can even con-
sider dumping ash waste into
the landfill. Should the Com-


missioners decide to proceed
with the proposal, the process
could be stalled once more
once it reaches the board of di-
rectors for the landfill, who re-
quire a three out of four vote
to allow or veto the plan.


FORD C1

COME (
OUR PROD1
2007 F-150 REG. CAB 4x2

















Buddy Yow CAR TRUCK C
Sales Associate
215 W. MAGNOLIA ST.
www.langdaleford.com -33

O All 2007


HALTRENGE

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UCTS & PRICES




MSRP .......... 21,710
Savings........... -4,723

Price....... 16,987


:ENTER GregPo
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