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Madison County carrier
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00029
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Portion of title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: October 25, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID: UF00067855:00029

Full Text






VOL 43 I. 1 WenesayOctber25 I200


F - I I -r,


t


Hickory Grove
Founder's Day
Page 8A


THE SPIRIT OF MADISON COUNTY


www~reenpubishig. om Mdisn Contys Awrd-innig Nws~aerI,904


Greenville Hills

Academy Under

Investigation
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Department of Juve-
nile Justice, the Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement
and the Madison County Sher-
iff's Office are all working on
a case involving abuse allega-
tions at Greenville Hills Acad-
emy.
None of the agencies
could comment on the investi-
gation, since it is ongoing.
Benji and Donnie Read,
who work with Twin Oaks Ju-
venile Development, which
operates the Greenville juve-
nile detention facility, could
not comment because they.
have been told not to speak to
the press by their attorney.
Benji and Donnie Read
are the sons of the late Butler
and Harriett Read, of
Greenville.
Local board members, in-
clu ding
business-

Carol Day
and Sher-
iff's Inv.
Mark Joost,
spoke of
the Reads'
Mark Joost
sincerity
and their Christian ethics. Both
indikt d that the Reads
wished to speak with the press
and tell their side of the story,
but couldn't because of their
Pleas' See Investigation,
Page.12A

County's Crime

Rate Remains

About The

Same
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Madison County's Uni-
form Crime Index (UCR) fell,
by 1.4 percent for the first six
months of 2006, but violent
crimes still plagued this rural
area.
Last year, the total crime
index for January through June
was 347, compared to 342 for
this year.
There was one murder
committed during the first six
months of 2006, compared to
two during the same time last
year. The 2006 murder was of
a Lee woman named Geraldine
Konan, The two murders last
year happened at Madison
Heights on Father's Day.
Arrests were made in both
cases. The cases have yet to go
before the Third District Judi-
cial Court.
A total of five forcible
rapes were reported during the
same time span in Madison
Please See Crime Rate, Page
12A





-=





-
-----


Questions Arise Over Half-Cent Hospital Tax







R!"





6 1_









Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell
The Madison County Memorial Hospital building will be replaced by a $21 mil-
lion ($21,000,000.00) facility if the half-cent hospital tax is passed. Some local res-'
idents are questioning giving taxpayer dollars to the facility, when the hospital, al-
though receiving government funding, sometimes chooses to operate outside of
the Sunshine Laws.
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Each man, woman and child in Madison County will have to pay an extra penny on every
dollar of items that they buy on taxable items purchased at local stores if the hospital tax pass-
es on November 7. The hospital board says the tax will go towards construction of a new hos-
pital in Madison County. It is estimated that the tax will generate approximately $500,000 per
year if it passes.
The hospital operates under two different boards, which are, in fact, the same board. One
board can operate outside of the Sunshine and close meetings. This reporter, and a former re-
porter for this newspaper (Mike Moore) were turned\ a) trom meetings held outside of the
Sunshine Law, while both reporters were acting as the eyes and ears of the public. Other mem-
bers of the public were also turned away at the meetings. Why should any tax money be giv-
en to a hospital, or anything else, which operates in the shade and not completely under the
Sunshine Law? Taxpayers should have the right to know where, and how, their money is be-
ing spent.
One prominent local businessman said that the half-million dollars generated would go
nowhere near retiring the debt for the hospital and that it would pay only two months' inter-
est on the debt per year, with nothing on the principal.
The estimated cost for the proposed new hospital construction is approximately $21 mil-
lion ($21,000,000.00). At an annual six-percent interest rate, a 15-year payback would be
$2,124,000 per year. The $500,000 tax collected would only pay for four-and-one-quarter
months, or 18 weeks. How will they pay on the balance the rest of the year?
The referendum where the hospital is requesting the money comes in the wake of the hos-
pital recently attempting to borrow $300,000 to go towards accounts payable of over half a
million dollars ($500,000.00).
Tommy Greene, a local businessman, offered to GIVE 15 acres for construction of a new
eight million dollar hospital. Greene also offered, to build doctors' offices, adjacent to the hos-
pital. The hospital board refused the proposal.
The hospital has pointed out that the current facility is 52 years old and is past its use. At
the same time, the hospital points out how many lives it has saved and the need for it in the
community, which prompts some local citizens to ask, "Isn't that what the hospital's 'use' is
all about?"
Other local citizens question that if Madison County had a brand new shiny medical fa-
cility, if it would really improve things? They point to the terminations of former employees,
including some physicians and wonder what the hospital could offer to justify the half-cent
sales tax. A $'21,000,000 hospital would be far more costly to operate after it was equipped
and staffed than a smaller one.
Another question raised by local citizens is about the hospital's board, which is appoint-
Please See Hospital Tax, Page 12A


Woman Arrested For Stealing Car


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Madison woman was
arrested for grand theft, and
for driving without a valid
driver's license on Saturday,
October 14.
According to a Madison
Police Department report,
Bernice Davis took a family
member's car and left with
it. Another family member

-IP


3 Sections, 30 Pages
Around Madison Co........5-9A
Classifieds....................... 8B
Community Calendar......... 5A
Editorial......................... 2-3A
H ealth............................... llA
Hickory Grove..................8A
Legals...............................9B
Obituaries........................ 5A
Outdoors...........................10B
School............................ 6-7B
Sports............................... -3B


told Patrolman David Jarvis
that the suspect had left and
had, taken, the car down
County Camp Road.
Jarvis caught up with
Bernice Davis, 54, at County
Camp Road and Byrd Streets
and initiated a. traffic stop.
During the traffic stop, he
discovered that Davis did not
have a valid driver's license.
Jarvis spoke with the
owner of the car, who said
she wanted to press charges


Bernice Davis
against Davis for stealing the
car.


How Other Counties Operate Their Tourism
And Economic Development Councils
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A few months ago, this newspaper ran a story on how the
Madison County Development Council (MCDC) and the Tourist
Development Council (TDC) operate.
The MCDC is not appointed by county commissioners but
the TDC is. Because of Stephen Pike's resignation from the
Chamber of Commerce board, and because one man (Ed Meg-
gs) serves on both boards, as well as the Chamber's board, this
newspaper decided to take a survey of surrounding counties and
Please See Councils, Page 12A


Bob Pugh Announces

Candidacy For

County Commissioner
Bob Pugh of Cherry Lake has
announced his candidacy for
County Commissioner for Dis-
trict Two. "Lower Taxes!
working g from a budget! Creat-
ing new jobs! Managing re-
sources and expenditures prop-
.s. : e erl Treating all citizens with
i respect and courtesy! Doing the
.job better and doing it now!
That'< py hat I stand for!"
e ae Aren't taxes already too
high' I think so and do not be-
Sliee that our citizens can con-
Bob Pugh tinue to carry an ever-increasing
tax burden. Recently the coun-
ty has lost 500 jobs. Economic development and the creation of
jobs for our citizens must be our top priority. We've got enough
taxes. What we need are jobs which will provide income to our
citizens. We need to stop raising taxes and start increasing
jobs."
"Do you think we get our money's worth from the taxes we
already pay? I don't and better management and oversight of our
resources are badly needed. I have the experience and demon-
strated leadership to ensure our county's resources are properly
budgeted and expended for the greatest possible benefit of all
concerned."
"I feel that a County Commissioner is a servant of the peo-
ple he or she represents. Every citizen deserves the right to be
heard and to be treated with respect and courtesy. Therefore, as
your next County Commissioner from District Two, I want to
hear from you. What are your needs and opinions? What do you
think we can do better? I pledge to listen to each and every citi-
zen and do my best to ensure that our county government func-
tions fairly and efficiently to the benefit of all citizens, riot just a
favored few."
"Thankyou for your support and God's richest blessing be
with each of you. If you'd like to contact me to discuss any is-
sue, please call me at 929-4270."
Political announcement paid for and approved by Bob
Pugh, Republican, for County Commissioner, District 2.


Chamber Chairman


Resigns
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
,- Stephen Pike submitted his letter of
resignation as Chairman of the Madison
Chamber of Commerce Board of Direc-
tors last week.
In his resignation letter Pike expressed
.. disgruntlement over the direction that
the Chamber has taken. He wrote about
people coming up to him and telling
Stephen Pike him that the Chamber office was closed
during normal business hours, or worse,
that they had been treated "rudely" or "coldly" when they went
into the office.
Pike also said that he had been told within a week of the let-
ter being written, that the Chamber office had told a visitor that
there were NO bed and breakfasts in Madison. Pike is the co-
owner of Four Freedoms Bed and Breakfast, along with his wife,
Rae. The bed and breakfast is located 100 yards up Range Street
from the Chamber office.
Pike said that he had been "bullied" during board meetings
every time he has tried to make some positive issue effort to
bring the issues to light. He cites the
case of his proposal of a performance
review for staff.
Ed Meggs, who sits on the board of
the Madison County Development
Council and the Chamber board, is re-
portedly the one who put a halt to Pike's
input on the proposals Pike brings be- .
fore the board, concerning the perfor-
mance reviews for staff. .
Pike said in the letter that he didn't
think that the Chamber was fulfilling its Ed Meggs
mission statement.
The full text of Pike's letter follows:
Fellow Board Members,
I have HOPE for the future of Madison County.
I have HOPE that we will adopt a vision that will make both
multi-generational Madisonians and Newcomers alike beam
with pride as we take positive steps toward that vision.
I have HOPE that we will ALL work TOGETHER to achieve
that vision.
It is because I hold these hopes that I hereby RESIGN my
position as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Greater
Madison County Chamber of Commerce.
Over my past two years tenure, first as Vice-Choo, man then
as Chairman I have tried to remain positive, neutral and open
on the ideas and controversies that have mired the Chamber I
Please See Chamber, Page 12A


Jake Sullivan Golf
Tournament Held
Pages 4-5B


............. *ALL FOR ADC 320
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARY
DEPT. OF SPECIAL COLL. FLA HISTORY 20
210 SMATHERS LIBRARY
GAINESVILLE FL 32611
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2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 25, 2006




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS






Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


Where Is The Funding?
I read with great interest the letters to this newspaper writ-
ten by Kathy Fleming and Marianne Green concerning the ben-
efits of a new hospital that is to be built if the sales tax increase
is approved. I believe they are leaving something out of the fi-
nancial scenario in painting a positive picture. Perhaps they can
enlighten us as to where the additional money is to come from
to provide the inpatient specialty care they appear to be expect-,
ing.
Ms. Green lists the costs of ambulance and life flight to Tal-
lahassee and minivan fees to return to Madison upon the end of
treatment. So it appears that she feels a patient with a stroke,
(her example), would save these expenses by being an inpatient
in a new hospital in Madison. True at first glance but where is
the money coming from to hire a permanent cardiologist plus
someone contracted to cover % weekends and leaves of absence?
I do not question the care the MCMH medical staff give
current patients to stabilize them for transport in the current'sit-
uation. The sales tax increase, if passed, does not cover staffing
so if a new facility is built, after stabilizing a patient there would
still be the need to transport to Tallahassee or Valdosta. So this
transport savings argument in support of the sales tax increase
IS NOT CREDIBLE unless there is money from somewhere to
hire specialists that will be available in Madison 24/7 and 365.
Where is the money for this?
If there is to be credible inpatient facility here that these
folks want, it seems to me that there should need to be at least
these specialists under contract and available: cardiologist, pul-
monary, orthopedic and a neurologist. For Monday through Fri-
day why not include a ophthalmologist and dermatologist: the
need is here. These people do not come cheap nor do the good
ones work for Medicaid assignment. I think this will be the next
demand and financial crisis if this new hospital is built. The
only funding source I see is the county commission slamming
the property tax millage rate right back up against the ten mill
cap so in fact we will end up with both a sales tax increase and
later on a property tax increase. I do not know if the county
commission could come back with a further sales increase to
fund specialty physicians in place of the property tax scenario.
Building a new hospital is not going to solve this need for trans-
port of patients by itself.
I do not believe the voters have been given a true and com-
plete financial picture and plan concerning the INDIGENT
CARE SURTAX in this campaign. The current sales tax cam-
paign is the first: the second campaign will start when the hos-
pital construction is entering the final stages. The campaign
will be: the hospital is built, now we need to staff it for YOU!
We need more money. If the INDIGENT CARE SURTAX
passes, later on look for increased property taxes to pay for spe-
cialty physicians.
If there is a revenue source for specialty physician staffing
that does not require more taxes, I think we would all like to
know where and what that is!
The plain, negative fact is that rural counties, be they south,
north, east or west cannot afford and have healthcare compara-
ble to a place like Tallahassee or even Valdosta. That is a neg-
ative I feel rural residents have to accept.

Warren Irwin

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Greene Publishing, Inc. On The Web Brings


Readers Home A Little Each Week


Dear Editor;
I was raised in the Greenville and moved out of the area in
1985. (My parents still live in Sirmans.) Can you believe that
even after all these years I still miss living in my beloved North
Florida?
Here in Wisconsin Winter began in September this year, al-
though it usually waits until the end of October or early No-
vember to get truly cold. I can't stress enough how much I hate
the cold and snow!
I am so happy that the Madison newspaper is published on


the internet. Of course I don't have a clue who half of the peo-
ple mentioned are, but it brings me home a little each week and
that gets me through the week here, especially when I get to see
someone I went to school with in a picture or an article.
I just wanted to thank you for publishing online for people
like me who are so far away and excessively homesick.


Sincerely,
Lynn Hickerson
(a/k/a Stormy Greene)


Reader Applauds Alfred Martin's Commitment


I am writing this letter to express my appreciation.to Mr.
Martin for his commitment and support of educational opportu-
nities for students of African-American decent. Given our com-
munities' efforts to increase the enrollment of African Ameri-
cans at N.F.C.C.,.I find Mr. Martins' actions to be forward think-
ing and most appropriate for the circumstances in which we find
oursel\es.Moreo\ er.hi contribution will provide a meaI-ure of
hope for those of us \\ ith little and inspiration to those of us who
can and should do more.
For those of our community who yell and scream "discnmn-
ination" without understanding or having experienced it's ef-
fects over time, I caution and remind you that your perspective
lacks authenticity and credibility. History well documents and


our current experience continues to validate the case that since
our arrival in Mad ion County, slaves and their descendants cur-
rently referred to as African Americans have been and continue
to be victims of discrimination rather than beneficiaries as erro-
neously suggested.
Mr. Martin continues the long legacy of personal sacrifice
to help others that is the cornerstone of our collective develop-
ment.Indeed Mr. Martin not only honors his ancestors but to all
who have made similar sacrifices in the past.
As for me, I believe I am fortunate to have Mr. Martin as
my county commissioner and friend.

Stanley James


Lee Couple Writes Of Problems With Town Council


We moved into town about 4 years ago. The one with the
motto WHERE HEAVEN SMILES DOWN ON EARTH and
AWAY FROM THE STRESS OF THE BIG CITY, and all was
well and good, we have great neighbors and everyone in town
were nice and friendly and we loved it here. Then we asked if
we could put a mobile home on our 5 acres for our son to rent
and was told yes so we happily invested all our nest egg and bor-
rowed on our home the total of over $30,000 to put a very nice
one owner,96 doublewide, 980 feet to the back of our property
with all permits and it passed all inspections with flying colors.
Then during the length of time it took us to do 11 thit our sons
situation drastically changed and he couldn't move into it so we
thought we were doing'the proper thing and went over and
ASKED the city manager of Lee if we could rent it to a good
family and were told NO but we could get it surveyed off from
our property and rezoned to residential and it would probably be
ok, so we had that done at another $1,000 expense only to be
told that now we have to move this 3 bedroom 2 bath home off
our land and stipulated that it be replaced with a brand new one
to rent. We went to town meetings after meetings to no avail.
Heaven just quit smiling down on us and all hell broke loose.
First of all we were told we were issued a temporary permit
which don't seem quite right for a 3 bedroom doublewide home.
They turned the water off.uand falsely accused us of tampering
with the water meter by the toa n manager. I had to go home and
get the receipt to PROVE her wrong. WE HAVE ENDURED
MORE STRESS IN THE LAST YEAR THAN WE HAVE
HAD IN OUR WHOLE LIFETIME. The President of the town
council has told them over and over that this is NOT RIGHT '
also to no avail. The Mayor told us if our son had moved into
the home for 2 weeks we wouldn't have all these problems, well
what's the big deal here, our niece lived there for almost 5
months so we thought it would be ok to rent it out to a nice fam-
ily after she moved out, going on what the Mayor had told us.
So I ran an add in the paper and rented it to an exceptionally nice
family who took excellent care of it. Now we get our third reg-
istered letter telling us we have. to move the mobile home off the
property. One of the three registered letters concerned us sell-
ing some of our garden vegetables, it said we were operating a
business without a business license, so I went over and paid for
a business license and when I went back to pick it up was told I
didn't need one after all and was given my money back. We
know of an older singlewide being moved into town and being
rented out with no problems and when I asked about that was
told it was grandfathered in. I'm no lawyer but I thought that
when something was grandfathered in and moves off the prop-
erty that cancels it out. We know the man, respect him, and it
don't bother us a bit what he does with his property. Our own
property had a home on it that was rented when we bought the
property and the previous owners told us it was put on for Moth-
er-In-Law and the day of the funeral as they were moving her
things out the unrelated renter was moving in, no problems there
either. We were even told we couldn't move into the dou-
blewide ourselves and rent our own home out. Our daughter
and family now live in the rental home and we were told that she
could move into the mobile home and we could rent her home.
We just don't understand what they're making such a big deal
over this very nice doublewide that is an asset to the communi-
ty and is not hurting the welfare or safety of the community. I
know it can't be right how we have been treated. I went to the
town manager and asked to apply for a hardship variance and
she told me point blank, as God as my witness "I'm just going
to charge you $150 for the application because you'll just be


throwing more money down the drain". So she was telling me
she knew the outcome beforehand? And at one of the town
meetings I asked to ask the council a question and was told by
the town's attorney that I couldn't ask a question. I feel several
of our constitutional rights have been violated. And last but not
/ least we feel SELECTIVE ENFORCEMENT and ENFORCE-
MENT DISCRETION have been practiced on us. I think this
should be illegal. I ask is there no kind of regulations on what
this handful of uncaring and maybe incompetent people can do
to ruin peoples lives and get away with it? Who has the author-
ity to stop it? I \o44jile.-t.o-kno\% \ho. I feel the\ paid big
money for all these'etit'uiation '-and interpret them as they
choose. One more timg. the single', ide across from City Hall
without underskirting that was put there for Grandmother is now
being rented I wonder if they are family. I feel that there are
probably more instances that we haven't heard about and we
would like to hear of, any as we have only lived here a few years
and try not to get into other peoples business; We worked
HARD all our lives to get what little we have and don't appre-
ciate anyone trying to take it away. We invite anyone to drive
all through Lee and let us know what you think if this mobile
home in any way harms the community. We appreciate your in-
put or any kind of help we can get. We have spent all our mon-
ey and now we depend on the rent income to PUT FOOD ON
THE TABLE. I think that is what I told Shirley Yeager at the
September meeting when she asked why I ran the ad in the pa-
per to rent the mobile home out-SO RUDELY. If we could have
bought a brand new doublewide we would have gotten one to
-"r'gin with.' This is America we live in isn't it? You can go to
leefla.org and get an idea of what we've been through since
Aug. 2005. Also check out ordinance 2004-01 which states AN
ORDINANCE REQUIRING MOVE-ON. PERMIT BEFORE
ANY MOBILE/MANUFACTURED HOME SHALL BE
MOVED ONTO ANY RESIDENTIAL LOT WITHIN THE
TOWN OF LEE; REQUIRING RECERTIFICATION OF ANY
USED MOBILE/MANUFACTURED HOME; SPECIFYING
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR RECERTIFICATION;
AND PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION OF THE ORDINANCE
AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. And here is the
wording of a so called regulation that has caused all this trouble;
4.17.35 PROVISIONS FOR RESIDENTIAL DESIGN MANU-
FACTURED HOMES 1. Must be built in accordance with the
Department of Housing and Urban Development code (i.e. must
be built since June 15, 1976) 2. Must have permanent founda-
tion 3. Must have underfloor permanently enclosed. 4. Must
have all transportation equipment removed. 5. Must measure 22
feet in width (requiring at least a double section home) 6. Must
have minimum roof pitch 7. Minimum roof hang 6" 8. Must
have all transportation equipment removed 9. Must not have
been inhabited prior to the time and placement on property. This
#9, last on the list is what they are going by, not #1. The regu-
lations are conflicting. We feel that if they would put forth as
much energy on amending the unconstitutional, and conflicting
regulations as they have in harassing good tax paying senior cit-
izens who don't mean no harm to anyone, things wouldn't be
like this. The government is supposed to be for the people,
right? Thanks for reading and thank you Doug for standing up
for what you believe in. And thanks to all our good neighbors
and friends for their support.


Sincerely,
Sherman and Cleo Vasvary


CALL








Wednesday, October 25, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Slorida Press Associ.4

2 Q006 'Wandering
Lee Limelight Award Winning Newspaper With The Publisher
Jacob Bembry '- Mary Ellen Greene


Columnist

,. ,4 6 .I



The Lee Elementary School Fall Festival will be held Fri-
day, October 27, from 5-7 p.m. at the school. Everyone is invit-
ed to come out and support the Lee Elementary School PTO.
Tickets are available in the office at the school.
Midway Church of God will host a hobo supper, a hayride
and a trunk and treat on Tuesday evening, October 31. The hobo
supper will begin at 6:30 p.m. The hayride will follow and, im-
mediately after the hayride, children will visit the cars of each'
adult church member at the event and fill their bags up with can-
dy. The event is an alternative to Halloween. Children are en-
couraged to come dressed as cowboys or cowgirls. Everyone is
invited to attend.
A peanut boil and political rally, will be held at Lee City
Hall on Saturday, November 5, under the pavilion. The Lee Vol-
unteer Fire Department will be sponsoring the event will begin
at 5 p.m.
It was good to see the balloons tied to the mailbox at Crys-
tal Farnell's home. She returned home last week after having,
her kidney transplant at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville.
Happy birthday wishes are extended to Jason Phillips, who
will celebrate his birthday on Wednesday, October 25, and to
Becky Keeler, who will celebrate her birthday on Tuesday, Oc-
tober 31.
Happy anniversary wishes go out to George and Margaret
Rutherford, who will celebrate their big day on Saturday, Octo-
ber 28.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week and a
beautiful forever! May God bless each and every one. of you!


P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
Website: www.greenepublishing.com
E-mail Information:
News
greenepubC@greenepublishing.com
Sports
janet@'greenepublishing.com
Advertisement
ads @greenepublishing.com
Classifieds / Legals
susan @'greenepublishing.com


Emerald Greene Kinsley
Publisher.-Edicor
PRoDLItTION' tNTINGER
Lii N1M cci
S T kn WRI I IRS
ju r. I ho'1 0hdor
GRAPHIc DESIGNERS
Cirli Rjrriiu. ifl FPiirk,
,r,.i Li.i M N O
T~F% ESE1f ER
-XNTRFTISINu SALES, REPRES.EN-1ATI ES-
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CL ASMIFIED .APD LECAL AD,


CIRCULATioN D EPARTNIFNT
Sut-cripI uo Fie
iir, I. o m , *". ,i-Ow I't,',-i.'


Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express
reading pleasures of the people of its circulation area, be they past, pre-
sent or future residents.
Published weekly by Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695 South State
Road 53, Madison, Florida 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post
Office in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY
CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject' any advertisement, news
matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not
be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper,
and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing, Inc. for publication in this
newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are
dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos
beyond said deadline.


Salvador Daniel Sanchez -v- Daniel Arturo Portillo-Other
Domestic
Nicole Denise Cobb -v- Lakisha Brinson Robinson-Repeat
Domestic Injunction
Tammie Straughter -v- Gregory Donaldson-Domestic In-
junction
Gwendolyn N. Sheffield -v- James G. Sheffield, Jr.-Disso-


lution of Marriage
Matthew G. Webb -v- Tika J. Wetherington-Dissolution of
Marriage
In Re: Catherine Brown-Other Domestic
Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance -v- John and Pamela
Vann-Mortgage Foreclosure
Candace Roberts -v- Clayton Louis Roberts- Dissolution of


Marriage
Green Tree Servicing -v- Rosemary Johnson Oliver-Con-
tract
Bali and Albert Thigpen -v- Madison County School
Board-Other Neg.
Cleveland Frazer, Jr. -v- Yvonne Alexander-Domestic In-
junction.


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'All prices and payments are with approved credit.


Civil News


Clrl f
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4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 25, 2006



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Question of the Week


"Have
you/do you
intend to
get a flu
shot this
year?"


Ia~14%
~ifr.


National Security
Joe Boyles
Guest Columnist


" '." .'. < ". -
.o .
.. ,.- .:... .. .
., ...~~.,i. .


57 .. .


0 20 40 60
Log onto www.greenepublishing.com to answer this week's question...
"Do you celebrate/decorate for Halloween?"
Voting for this question will end on October 30 at 9 a.m.


Madison
County Crime
Report



Wanted


Person


MEET YOUR

NEIGHBOR

VOary[ ' Family: Two children, Joshua
Michael and Rebecca Marie
Reside: Madison
Spare time: Read mainly Christ-
ian fiction books
Favorite season: Fall
Favorite book: Bodie and
Thoene books
Church: Madison Church of
God
Favorite college football team: .
Florida State Seminoles


Sta

All

Su
The I

$3

L NEW
iName
.Address

City /State/Zi]
Phone#

Mail To: Greent
or


ly In Touch V

The Local N

bscribe Toda
Price For Both Papers
$28 per Year ln-Count
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SPubishing, Inc,, P.,O, Draer 772,
bring by the Enterprise-Recorder


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Madison, FL3341
ffe,


Madison County


CRIME BEAT
ALL SUSPECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED INNOCENT
UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY IN A COURT OF LAW

Man Arrested For

Battery And Trespass
A Madison man was arrested for battery
and trespass after warning on Friday, October
20.
According to a Madison Police Department
report, Sgt. Jimbo Roebuck responded to Madi-
son Heights Apartments and spoke with a vic-
tim who said that Jason Duwayne McDaniel,
22, had come into her apartment and began hit-
ting her on the head and on the arms.
Roebuck spoke with the maintenance man
at the apartment building, who told Roebuck
that he had seen McDaniel kick in the door and
heard an altercation inside. The maintenance
man heard the victim calling for help and he
went to call the police.
Roebuck checked the trespass list for Madi-
son Heights and discovered that a trespass
warning had been issued against McDaniel.
Roebuck arrested McDaniel and carried
him to the Madison County Jail.


NOTICE FROM ELECTIONS OFFICE

The following dates and times have been scheduled for the meetings of the
Madison County Canvassing Board for the General Election, November 7, 2006.


Orientation Meeting

Canvass of Absentee Ballots

Continue Canvass of
Absentee Ballots

View Provisional .Ballots


Monday, October 30, 2006

Monday, November 6, 2006


Tuesday, November 7, 2006

Tuesday, November 7, 2006


4:30 pm

9:00 am


4:00 pm

8:30 pm


Members of Canvassing Board:
Linda T. Howell, Supervisor of Elections
Ronnie L. Moore, Chairman, Board of County Commissioners
Harriet H. Maultsby, Appointee to replace County Judge

All meetings are open to the public.


Gregory
Markquese
Donaldson
D.O.B. 10/11/75
*Height; 6'02" -Weight: 223
* Sex: Male Race: Black
Hair Color: Black
Eye Color: Brown
Wanted For:
FTA
Worthless Checks
(3 counts)
The Crime report is pub-
lished every Wednesday. It
also includes an individual
from Madison County's ac-
tive warrant list or a wanted
person believed to be in
Madison County.
If you have any infor-
mation concerning the. sus-
pect, or know his/her where-
abouts, please contact one of
the following agencies.
Madison County Sheriff's
Department--973-4001,
Madison Police Department-
973-5077, or Your MADI-
SON COUNTY CARRIER-
973-4141. All information
will remain confidential.
You need not give your
name.
Information on these in-
dividuals is printed as given
each week by the Madison
County Sheriff's Department
or other law enforcement
agency. The person or per-
sons featured was chosen by
the agency making the re-
quest for him/her to be run in
this feature. Neither this
newspaper, nor any members
of its staff, determines which
individuals) will be fea-
tured. The appearance of an
individual in this feature rep-
resents an open warrant for
their arrest by local, area,
state, and/or federal law en-
forcement authorities, and it
in no way is an assumption
or insinuation of guilt by this
newspaper or its staff. All
persons are assumed inno-
cent until proven guilty in a
court of law.
Brought to you as a pub-
lic service by Your MADI-
SON COUNTY CARRIER.


Democrats Achilles Heel
I'm uncomfortable with party politics; issues are more im-
portant to me. Although I've been a registered Republican since
turning 21, I've voted for more than a few Democrats. If a Lib-
ertarian or Democrat has a credible solution to a vexing prob-
lem, I'm all ears.
Having said that, when it comes to my stock-in-trade Na-
tional Security, I haven't heard much from Democrat leaders
that would convince me that they have any understanding about
what it takes to protect our nation and interests. Unfortunately,
it has been that way for a long time.
Many political historians point to the influence of former
Senator George McGovern as most responsible for this long-
term trend dating back to his 1968 and 1972 presidential candi-
dacies. I think the problems began earlier when John Kennedy
discounted military advice and Lyndon Johnson decided to per-
sonally micromanage the Vietnam War during Tuesday lunches
at the White House. Regardless of when it started, it has been
going on a long time.
In case you missed this, the warning signals- have been
flashing red for a long time. In the upcoming 2006 mid-term
elections, Democrats hope to reverse this long-term trend by ex-
ploiting America's dissatisfaction with the war in Iraq. Unfor-
tunately, they have little to offer in place other than. the tired
"Bush lied, people died" mantra. Still, it may work well enough
in the short-run to hand the Democrats narrow control of at least
one house of Congress.. What then?
In my 27 years of active military duty, I served in two De-
mocratic administrations. In' 1976, Jimmy Carter was elected
president. His one-term presidency was a disaster for the mili-
tary. From the opening salvo of pardoning draft evaders to the
disastrous Iranian hostage rescue attempt that left eight service-
men including my friend Rick Bakke dead, national security
suffered mightily during this 4-year period. Readiness levels of
military units were abysmal as we experienced one budget-gut-
ting after another. It was during this period that Democrats in
Congress, over-reacting to the abuse of Watergate, began to
eviscerate our intelligence services. The nation would pay a
heavy price for this later against the threat of terrorism.
Much later near the end of my career, I served during the
first half of Bill Clinton's twvo-term presidency. It wtas m"iagini-
ally better than the Carter years, but Clinton's inexperience
showed. The 1993 Black Hawk Down debacle in Somalia was
a clear signal that the Clinton Administration was not ready for
prime-time. National security problems such as the growing
threat of terrorism were deferred.. Base closings designed to
save defense dollars were instead used to bolster his 1996 re-
election bid in Texas and California.
I was commissioned in 1970 during the Nixon Administra-
tion. Eighteen of my 27 years on active duty were under Re-
publican administrations including Ford, Reagan, and the first
President Bush. The difference between these administrations
and those of Democrats was like night and day. While the pres-
ident and his ideas make a difference, the meat and potatoes of
a national security structure are the appointments he makes.
When a Republican enters the oval office, he brings a full bench
of people with outstanding defense qualifications. Such is not
the case with Democrats who look amateurish by comparison.
It wasn't always that way. Franklin Roosevelt was a strong
commander-in-chief during World War II and his successor,
Harry Truman who had served as a battery commander in the
First World War was equally credible. Truman did have prob-
lems with MacArthur in Korea ... but who didn't. Both men
made excellent appointments throughout the national security
structure.
A prime example of the difference between the parties con-
cerns missile defense. Born during the first Reagan Adminis-
tration, the idea of intercepting ballistic missiles has been
ridiculed and gutted repeatedly by Democratic Administrations
and Congressional maneuvers. Republicans have managed to
keep the program alive. In the face of growing threat from
North Korean nuclear-tipped missiles, our fledgling missile de-
fense capability is solely the result of Republicans doggedly
pursuing this defensive strategy.
The ranks of national Democrats who are considered strong
on defense have been winnowed. Gone are the likes of leg-
endary senators like Henry "Scoop" Jackson. About the only
one left is Connecticut's Joe Lieberman who was rejected dur-
ing his party's August primary. Lieberman may win the No-
vember general election as an independent; if so, it will be Re-
publicans who appreciate his moderation and national security
credentials that will return him to Washington.
Please believe that I am sincere when I say that I find no
satisfaction in this long-brewing problem. The Democratic Par-
ty has-a great tradition and will take the reigns of office once
again. I would be much more sanguine if I had confidence in
their ability to guard our nation and interests around the world.










Wednesday, October 25, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A




AROUND MADISON COUNTY



*MILITARY NEWS


OBITUARIES

Mary Chiugouris

Bevon
Mary Chiagouris Bevan
passed away on Sunday, Octo-
ber 15, 2006 at the age of 80 in
Madison. She, grew up in
Chicago, Illinois, one of three
children, born to parents
William and Bessie, who emi-
grated there from Greece.
Even though she was a
resident of Madison County
for a few short months, her
love of the area began in the
1960s, when she married
Madison native Steve Bevan in
New York City. Prior to com-
ing to Madison, Mary lived in
Delray Beach for four years.
She ,is survived by a
daughter, Kelly Evan Spirer,
her husband Peter and grand-
children named Samuel Peter
Spirer and Rachel Bevan Spir-
er, of Los Angeles, California;
a brother, Ernest Chiagouris of
Valparaiso, Indiana, and friend
and caregiver, Linda Postell,
of Madison.
Mary had a deep love for
her family, jazz, animals, and
was a voracious reader. She
was a member of Park Avenue
United Methodist Church in
New York City. The family re-
spectfully requests that in lieu
of flowers, donations be given
to: The Oaks School Vision
Fund, 6817 Franklin Avenue,
Hollywood, California, 90028


W0NVIT CN0A


October 26
Gold City, America's #1
Southern Gospel quartet, re-
turns to Madison on October
26, 2006, at Yogi Bear's Jelly-
stone Park. Also appearing,
The Singing Reflectsons from
Trenton, Florida. Concert
starts at 7 p.m. Admission is
$6.00 at the door. A free-will
offering will also be received.
Reserved seating available for
large groups. For more infor-
mation, please call Bryant
Thigpen at 973-4622.
October 26
David Abercrombie from
the Madison County Memori-
al Hospital will speak at the
Senior Citizens' Council, 486
SW Rutledge St. at 10:30 a.m.
The public is invited to come.
October 27
Lee Elementary School
(LES) will be hosting their an-
nual Fall Festival from 5-7
p.m. LES will be featuring
booths, basket raffles and a
delicious cake auction.
October 28
Faith Baptist Church will
be hosting their Fall Festival
from 4 p.m., until? There will
be fun, food and fellowship
for everyone!
October 28
American Legion Auxil-
iary is having a Halloween
party at Cherry Lake Post 224
from 4:00 6:00 p.m. Kids
from age 0 12, wear your


You may save $
on your prescriptions
as a patient of
S.Tri-County Family
Health Care and our
partnership with
Jackson's Drugs

Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician

Open Tuesday evenings until 7 PM
Please call 850-948-2840
for more information

Tri-County Family Health Care
193 NW US 221
Greenville, Florida 32331
North .Florida Medical Centers, Inc.


costumes & come join the fun,
games, and prizes.
October 28
Come get your Spiritual
and physical food at the 2nd
annual BackYard Feast 2006.
in the back yard of Deacon
Lemmie and Evangelist Von-
cycle Wilson from 4 p.m. un-
til? The word of God will, be
preached! Music will be pro-
vided by Elder Carl Joseph
and the Gospel TruTones.
Food will be provided.
October 28
Join us for a night of
Praise and Drama! A night
you don't want to miss!. 7
p.m., Madison Church of God.
For movie information call
973-3339.
October 31
Midway Church of God
will hold a Dare to Be Differ-
ent event at the church, locat-
ed at 2485 SE Midway Church
Rd. in Lee. Each child is en-
couraged to come dressed as a
cowgirl or cowboy and partic-
ipate in Trunk or Treat, a safe
alternative to trick or treating
on Halloween.
November 3
Madison Academy will be
holding their Fall Festival
from 6-8 p.m. There will be
plenty of food, booths, games
and fellowship for everyone to
have an outstanding time.
November 4
There will be a Turkey
Shoot at Wally Davis's Farm
on Rocky Ford Rd. starting at
9 a.m. Shells will be provided.
This is a Sirmans Baptist
Church building fund
fundraiser.
November 4
Bluegrass Gospel Sing
with the Howell Family start-
ing at 6 p.m. at Sirmans Bap-
tist Church, 221 South.
November 4
Pinetta Elementary
School will be having their
Fall Festival from 2-4 p.m.
Their Fall Festival will have
basket raffles, a free dinner
giveaway, games, food and
terrific treats.
November 5
Central Baptist Church in
Aucilla will celebrate their
99th year as a church. Wor-


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ship Service will be at 10:30
a.m. There will be no Sunday
School. Rev. Rick Rowell,
Pastor, will be the speaker. A
covered dish dinner will be
served in the Fellowship Hall
at noon. All members, former
members, and visitors are in-
vited to attend the celebration.
November 5
Damascus Baptist Church
is celebrating it's annual Fam-
ily and Friends day at 3 p.m. at
Thessalonia Missionary Bap-
tist Church in Hyde Park. pas-
tor Frederick Bell will conduct
the service. Everyone is invit-
ed. Dinner will be served.


TRAVIS D. SPARKS
Army Pfc. Travis D. Sparks has graduated from basic com-
bat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
.During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fit-
ness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training,
drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy,
military justice system, basic first aid, foot' marches, and field
training exercises.
He is the son of Robin and Thomissa Sparks of S. W. Olympic
Point Way, Greenville, Fla.
Sparks is a 2006 graduate of Madison County High School,
Madison.

VINCENT M. CARTER
Army National Guard Pfc..Vincent M. Carter has graduated
from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia; S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fit-
ness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training,
drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy,
military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches, and field
training exercises. ,
He is the son of Ron Hollie of Oakwood Lane, Greenville,


Why get just a part
when you can get it all?
/i Aladiso** Coii,, Carrier
. .u fn .. I :.: : n nI u Ir: .. r .l.u -: l
I u t .: . .:r i.. l ,r.:, Ril . o.. i '.i-A


oi) t tlt taion _4 't wl i 'hal n io wnm-
all ,l'Iht f w>s.'

The Madison Country Carrier
& Enterprise Recorder
I, H -},S..u -F, P, i rj', :r -'.I ,...r FL .41
.5.91-73-4141


COME ONE! COME ALL!

TO THE HEALTHIEST

SHOW IN TOWN.


I

LT~di31~
4,

C C C C C C). ci)


Under the big top of the Shands Live Oak Health Fair
you'll find a three-ring circus of refreshments.
health information and screenings including:
FREE Cholesterol screening 1l2-hour last recommended)
FREE Balance testing
FREE Blood sugar screening
FREE Blood pressure screening
FREE Body fat analysis
FREE Bone density screening
FREE Grip and strength testing
FREE Pulmonary function screening
FREE Flu shots while they last
And much more

Thursday. November 2. 2006 7:00 am 11:00 am
Shands Live Oak cafeteria 1100 SW 11th Street


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(386) 362-0800
1 100 SW I11h Streel
Shands org
Shands Live Oak is certified as a Critical Access Hospital which recognizes
Ihe valuable role rural hospitals play in the delivery of healthcare services


IT


^-









6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 25, 2006



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Thank You!
Perhaps you sent a lovely card,
Or sat quietly in a chair.
Perhaps you sent a funeral spray,
If so we saw it there. V
Perhaps you spoke the kindest words,
As any friend could say, K
Perhaps you were not there at all,
Just thought of us that day,
Whatever you did to console our hearts,
We thank you so much whatever the part.

By the family of Scott Thomas.
Thank you,
Reese, Cindy, Chad, and Jamie


IRISH TIMES OCT. 26

PERFORMANCE FEATURES IRISH STORIES, DANCE AND MUSIC


The North Florida
Community College Artist
Series welcomes native
Irish storyteller Tomiseen
Foley to the Van H. Priest J I,
Auditorium stage on ~S --
Thursday, Oct. 26 for a
night full of Irish stories,
music and dance. The
show, IRISH TIMES, be-
gins at 7 p.m. and features
Foley's authentic remem-
brance of away of life that
is, alas, no longer with us 1-. .
- a unique window into
the extraordinarily rich "
cultural life of the ordi-
nary people of the remote 7...... '
parish of Teampall an Gh- ;:
leanndin, Tominseen's '
birthplace . in the days bef re lthe motor car, the television
and the telephone.
''A rousing success. . a magnificent performance," said
Arizona's West Valley Fine Arts Council.
In rural Ireland of the 1940s and 50s, neighbors would gath-
er with their fiddles, tin whistles, flutes, bodhrans and uilleann
pipes to raise the rafters with a night of fiery traditional music,
song, dances and storytelling. It .was in such places and on such
nights that the delightful treasury of Irish culture was created,


communal traditions.
And who better to tell
q the story than Tomiseen
Foley who was born and
raised in a big family on
a small farm in the re-
Sa mote parish of Teampall
an ,Ghleanniin in the
S ..' .', West of Ireland in the
.1940s. He also brings
Sa to the stage some of the
finest exponents of the
traditional Celtic arts
i performing today; world
k champion Irish dancer
Niall O'Leary, music director and Grammy-award winning gui-
tarist William Coulter, uilleann piper Brian Bigley and award-
winning Irish fiddler Devin Shepherd.
"Of all the storytellers I have heard, he is the best . rur-
al Ireland comes alive in To,:irieen' stories," said Caitlin
Quinn of Queens University, Belfast, Ireland.
Tickets are on sale now. Contact the NFCC Artist Series at
(850) 973-1613, email ArtistSeries@nfcc.edu or visit
www.nfcc.edu, keyword Artist Series.


S.. ON NOVEMBER 7, ELECT









County ConIlnissioner
District Two
If you are looking for a change from the way
things have always been done, a commissioner
who is not a politician, but just an everyday,
working business owner, give me four years to
work for the tax-paying citizens of Madison
County. Together we can achieve great things!

"I WILL NEVER VOTE TO
RAISE YOUR TAXES!"
Political Advertisement Paid For and Approved by Mack Primm, NPA Campaign for County Commissioner, District II.


William & Sue Goza Donate


Portraits To The Mansion


William and Sue Goza,
former owners of the Wardlaw-
Smith-Goza Conference Cen-
ter in Madison, donated their
portraits for permanent display
during an unveiling ceremony
Wednesday, October 11. The
portraits, which originally
hung in the downstairs main.
hall of the Mansion, pay tribute
to the Gozas who owned the
antebellum residence from
1978 until 1982 and conducted
an extensive restoration of the
house and grounds. The build-
ing is the formal conference
center of North Florida Com-
munity College.
NFCC Foundation chair-
person Elouise Green and
NFCC president, Morris G.
Steen, Jr. were official hosts for
the event. A resolution, adopted


by the Mansion advisory
board, acknowledged the long-
standing support of the Man-.
sion by the Gozas. .
Goza shared memories of
the couple's time in the resi-
dence and the enotfmity' of the"
restoration project coni duted
in conjunction with the Univer-
sity of Florida.
The Wardlaw-Smith-Goza
Conference Center was built in
1860 and is listed in the His-


toric American Building Sur-
vey and the National Register
of Historic Places. The resi-
dence is considered one of the
finest examples of classic re-
vival style architecture in the
state. Maria Greene is, coordi-
nator of the Mansion.
Visitors to the Mansion are
welcome by appointment. For
information contact Maria
Greene at 850/973-9432 or
email greeneM@nfcc.edu.


COL4,ONI AL

M A L L



ND REOPENING

Saturday, October 28

yncage, New Options, New You!


* Free Spa Kits for
the first 200 customers

* Local entertainment
from 1 lam-4pm

* Radio Remote with
The Mix 1:30-3:30pm

* Drawing for a $500
mall shopping spree


Come see what's new at

Colonial Mall Valdosta


Visit the Customer Service Desk for Details


N'


K.
~j I..


* "P7


64 tJ~


Portrait unveiling ceremony at the Mansion: (1-r)
Elouise Green, chair of the NFCC Foundation; Morris
G. Steen, Jr., NFCC president; William Goza and Sue
Goza pose in front of Goza portraits now on perma-
nent display at the Mansion. (Photo Submitted)



Federal Lifeline Notice

Alltel customers may be eligible to
receive monthly reduced rate
telecommunications service under the
Federal Lifeline and Link-Up programs if
they satisfy federal eligibility criteria.

If you think you qualify,
please visit your local retail store or
alltel.com/lifeline for further information.





C lltel
wireless


I1::~ LI ~


IOHA'JY
'V
'I


I


.^li .H...: *..--,. ..fW


', ,:,, .


NFCC ARTIST SERIES PRESENTS









Wednesday, October 25, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


BECOME A FOSTER PARENT TODAY


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
In Madison County, there
are 4,739 children .and 6,629
families who live and work in
the community.
In comparison to Taylor
and Jefferson Counties, Madi-
son has the highest rate of
children in need of a foster
home. In Madison County 55
children are in need of a foster
home and 77 children, and
their families, who are active-
ly working on behaviors, and
conditions, that place them at
risk of experiencing child
abuse and neglect.
In Taylor County, there
are 24 children in need of a
foster home and 45 children
and their families who are ac-
tively working on behaviors
and conditions that place them
at risk of experiencing child
abuse and neglect.
In Jefferson County, there
are 13 children in need of a
foster home and 38 children
and their families who are ac-
tively working on behaviors
and conditions that place them
at risk of experiencing child
abuse and neglect.
There are several reasons
why biological parents cannot
care for their children such as
financial difficulties, emotion-
al problems, drug or alcohol
abuse and more. Many chil-
dren come into foster care be-
cause their parents either died
or abandoned them and some
are removed from their homes
because of abuse and neglect.
There are several require-,
ments to ,obtain a licensing as
a foster parent such as law en-
forcement checks, training,
home study, a health depart-
ment inspection and a few ad-
ditional requirements.
Hopeful foster parents are
required by Florida law ,to
have a background screening,
a fingerprinting for clearance
through the Florida Depart-


ment of Law Enforce
ment (FDLE), a local
law check release from
the Madison Count\
Sheriff's office. a
notarized Affidai it
of Good Moral
Character and
a clearance
from the
Abuse Reg-
istry. Also, .
all adults
18 years of
age and
over who
reside, in
the home
must partic-
ipate in the
screening
process.-
There are
two types of
training that
potential fos-
ter parents
must go
through. One.
type of train-
ing is a "pre-
service train-
ing" which
requires the
completion
of. a 30-hour
"MAPP" (Model
Approach to Part-
nership. in Parent-
ing) class, before
obtaining licen-
sure. This course
is offered numer-
ous times
throughout the
year and the *.-an
times offered
vary. : ;... . .


The second type of train-
ing for traditional foster par-
ents is ongoing training which
requires eight additional hours
of training each year.
There will be several vis-
its. to the home made before
and after MAPP training. The
Licensing and Recruiting Co-


ordinator of Madi-
son County of
Camelot Com-
unity Care.
Inc Mlaria Zorn
/ v ,ill inter iei
;, parents and
Smemniber' of
the fanmil
that [%ill in-
clude se\.-
era! dis-
-= 1 cutl sions
S on a ide
\iarie\ of


t 0 p i C S
.' These
to pi c
i n -
i elude
Sd J -' !' n 1 LC ',

, parents'
c [ i I d -
childJ -
h o o d .
\\ oi k
h I h t o-
rN. pre-
Senit and
p pre\ IoN'.


i m i r -


r h .
i Pi- pa r-

I \i 1 1 -

:1 1.'
i I






values, philosophies, finances
and problems or concerns. All
participants need to share
openly and honestly with
Zorn.
Prior to licensing, all fos-
ter care homes must pass a
Madison County Health De-
partment inspection by Envi-
ronmental Health Director Liz
Miller. The inspection in-
cludes a variety of different
areas that include an approved
source of heat, the home must
have a working telephone,
each anticipated foster child
must have his/her own bed, all
plumbing must be operational
and in good repair, garbage
cans need to be leak-proof
with lids that fit and all pets


need to have current immu-
nizations.
Additionally, the inspec-
tion makes sure that the home'
is free from roaches and ro-
dents, that all cleaning sup-
plies, toxic substances and
medications need to be kept in
a locked cabinet and out of the
reach of children, the home
must be equipped with a type
2A10BC fire extinguisher and
smoke alarms in all sleeping
areas, a first aid kit, an evacu-
ation plan in case of emergen-
cies and thermometer in the
refrigerator and freezer. Also,
if the home has a swimming
pool, there are safety require-
ments that must be met.
Other requirements are
submission of employment
history, proof of current em-
ployment and income, person-
al references, local school ref-
erences for parents of school-
age children, medical releases
and a family self-study pack-
et. If potential traditional fos-
ter parents desire to be li-
censed for children up to two
years old, they are required to
have appropriate bedding and
car seats.
There are so many bene-
.fits that come with being a
foster parent. Foster children
are covered for medical ex-
penses through Medicaid.
Respite care is provided
when, or if parents, need a
break, a monthly stipend to
cover financial needs of the
child is provided and each
child has a Dependency
Case Manager assigned to
assist with decisions and
needed services.
In addition, parents have
the opportunity to help chil-
dren and give back to the
Madison community and they


have the chance to know. that
they are making a difference
in the life of a child. Plus, fos-
ter parents have several sup-
port systems available to them
including Foster Parent Asso-
ciation, Foster Parent Train-
ing, Licensing Coordinators,
Dependency Case Managers
and an on-call emergency
phone list.
The initial process to be-
come a foster parent demands
your time, patience and ener-
gy. All information disclosed
to the Licensing and Recruit-
ing Coordinator Marla Zorn is
private, and will only be-
shared with Camelot Licens-
ing team, appropriate Big
Bend Community Based Care
(BBCBC) placement staff and
the Department of Children
and Family Services (DCF)
Licensing staff, who issues
the actual foster care licenses.
It's worth more than your
thoughts. It's worth your ac-


Apply Now
* Take Entry Test
* Get Financial Aid

Start lan. 8
* Finish in 3 Semesters
* Day Classes
North Fbrida Community Colbge Raj
WWW.NFCC.EDU til


ing impact on a child's life to-


Dowling House &
Carter House Apartments
Efficiency and One Bedroom
Kitchen with Appliances
Cable & Phone Hookups
Secure and Comforting Atmosphere
Walk to Cafeteria, Library, Activities
Senior Housing for Ages 62+
HUJD Approved Rents Based on Applicant Income




ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
AT DOWLING PARK
County Rd. 136, 16 miles west of Live Oak, Florida
(386) 658-5291 Toll Free (800) 647-3353
ww.acvillage.net

Call Karen Thomas today and arrange a personal tour.
tions to make a lifelong last- day.


Mrs.


Collins


Spiritualist


Healer, Reader, Advisor
All who are unsuccessful, unlucky, dissatisfied, let the
woman who knows help you. She removes all evil
influence. If husband or wife is unfaithful, see her now.
She settles lovers' quarrels, helps you gain the lost love
and affection of the one you love and shows you the way
to happiness. She names friends and enemies and tells you
if friends are true or false.
She locates lost and stolen property.
She does not claim to be God. She is just a servant of the
Lord who was brought here to help humanity. If you have
any problem concerning the past, present, future, love,
marriage, business, lawsuits, finances, health; if you are in
trouble, sick, or in love, there's no problem so great that
she cannot solve.
Guarantees to Remove Evil Influence amu Bad
Luck from your Home &' Body in 3 Days.



386-362-1255

1823 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak Hwy. 129 South


I


NOTICE

The Madison County Property
Appraiser's Office has certified the
2006 Tax Roll to the Madison County
Tax Collector's Office as of
October 19, 2006.


Become an
tme an]

Adminisirative

A Slant
SSISIBRI


Ilk,








Wednesday, October 25, 2006


2006 HICKORY GROVE FOUNDERS DAY


"Congratulations On Your

16th Rnnual Founder's Day"
.- -


^"_~- ,


LIVE ORK GaS
973- 2256- Madison, FL


I
A. *'.:


Serving Madison,
Jefferson &
Taylor Counties


Freddy Pitts Jimmy King
Agency Manager Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071
Doug Helms, Agent
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213
Lauren Lilliott, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371

f61 ul 44",al de5a b a


.

. r- .. *"se.


A'; At'


Department of Forestry officer Elijah Terrell, left, and duty officer Wendy
Raulerson exhibited their log cabin display. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Carl
Painter, October 21, 2006)


Founder's Day showed Madison residents how a mule and a machine make
cane syrup. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Carl Painter, October 21, 2006)


SHEA'S

REPAIR SHOP





971-7246,;:
6 Miles East Of Madison Highway 90
Lee, Florida


Lynn Waller ran the sewing room, giving lessons
on how to sew with an assortment of fabrics. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Carl Painter, October 21,
2006)


By Sandra Ulm
The folks at Hickory
Grove United Methodist
Church extend a big thank you
to all of you who spent Satur-
day with us at our 16th
Founder's Day Celebration.
The weather was beautiful,-the
food was plentiful, and there
were activities galore to keep


everyone busy.
It is with great pride that
we were able to continue this
celebration and recognition of
the way of life of our forefa-
thers. Relatives of some of
our church members came
from as far away as Hawaii,
California, and Pennsylvania
just to help us work. Many of
you in our local community
also pitched in, and we are
most appreciative of every-
one's contribution to help us
have a successful day.
Everybody was tired
when it was all over, even the
mule at the syrup making, but
all the smiles and kind words
from the attendees made it all
worthwhile. We at Hickory
Grove had a great day, thanks
to all of you. We look forward
to seeing you again next year.


Hilda Dickinson showed people how to make a quilt at the Hickory Grove
Founder's Day. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Carl Painter, October 21, 2006)


200 W. Base St."
Madison, FL


850-973-8700


WACHOVIA

Proudly Supporting Hickory

Grove's Founder's Day


Hickory Grove
Founder's Day had an
Elvis impersonator for en-
tertainment.


y Bochnia

Auto

Care
(850) 973-2676
Reg.# MV10818

We Support

Hickory Qrove Founders Day!


Reverend Brian Wilcox carried on the Founder's
Day tradition by riding a mule up to the event. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Carl Painter, October 21,
2006)


Fla. Lic.#CAC058672


Owners:
Dan & Cindi Perron
8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Mon Fri


S 118 SE Bennett St
Madison, FL 32340
850-973-8543


A'A4~.


V~'
LA


C


, ;.


. www.greenepublishing.com


FARM
BUREAU,
INSURANCE


I


8A Madison County Carrier


Jill FORM








Wednesday, October 25, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 9A


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Madison County's Senior Citizens Center Holds Talent Show


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Friday, October 20, the Madison
County Senior Citizens Center held a tal-
ent show.
Pastor Jose Maldonaeo opened up the
event in prayer. The master of ceremony.
for the talent show was Pastor Oliver
Bradley.
There was an assortment of outstand-
ing talent, such as the playing on musical
instruments, singing, poetry reading, testi-
mony of seniors' lives, demonstration of
plastics canvas art work, and plenty more.
Madison County Senior Citizens Cen-
ter's Older American Act Coordinator
Joan Beck and Alpha Kappa Alpha mem-
ber Deloris Jones organized the talent
show.


C sAs low as
PACKAbGEADEL!$4995

-Diesel Tractor
*Rotary Culeri .
-Top Link
*Pins & Hookups
*16ft DualAxle Traier B q |ER i....ANT '-M
includes s Warranty : "
'Other Packages Avail.

LASTINGER TRACTORS PLACE"
Exit 11 off -75 1/4 Mile West Then Turn eft on White Water Road- Vldos, GA
877-249-8885 229-249-8484


Seniors entertained their peers by performing
many of their talents for each other. Pictured left to
right: Meanuion Lawson, art instructor for 40 years;
Sue Foland; Rosemary Parker; and Argatha Williams.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, Oc-
tober 20, 2006)


--I
0?

I


Searching for services offered locally?
Look no further.
This


t4 BUSINESS CARD

DIRECTORY
has local businesses ready to help!


Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) member, Deloris Jones,
(left) and Pastor Oliver Bradley helped put on the se-
nior's talent show. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Jessalyn Covell, October 20, 2006)



-Ark 4A0t


**&' &.I. U$ I 1
Seniors John W. Alexander (left) and Robert Mc-
Colskey enjoy a talent filled show. (Greene Publish-
ing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, October 20, 2006)


Si; .i)-. SEAMLESS
I' ~ r ~i~u:- PANEL
REPAIR.

AVE EESTIMATESL
A.LM BA SSAW D 0WR


QUICK
TURNAROUND
STATE-OF-THE-
ART MATERIALS &
CRAFTSMANSHIP
THE BEST PRICES
IN THE INDUSTRY


PAINT SERVICE


$249t5


(850) 575-7124
Tallahassee
431 7 W.. Ptensacola St.
PMaaco Aiuo Painting & IBiodyworks Centers are independent franchises ofl
. '' 3 MAACO EI-nterprises. inc. Prices. hours arid services may vary.


Tired Of
Crazy
Neighbors?


Find A New Home
In Our Monthly
Real Estate Guide.


Northside Mower
And Small Engine Repair
For Snapper, Poulan, Iomelite, MTD, Murrary, and More.
Warranty Repairs For All Makes And Models
Free Pickup And Delivery (10 Mile Radius)
3320 N. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida
(850) 562-2962


Live Oak

Pest Control Inc.

17856 Hwy 129 S. McAlpin, FL 32062
Roy Crain, Jr.. (386) 362-3887 Sales Representative 1-800-771-3887.


Igg Metal Roofing
o $ $$$$SAVE$$$$$
Oualy Metal Roofilng Accessories At Discount Prices!
3' wide galvalume 3' wide painted
Cut to your desired lengths!
Steel Buildings Available Delivery Service Available
Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg., Inc.
Toll Free 1-888-393-0335

Burnette Plumbing &
Well Service gs
Family Owned Since 1902 .
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled
Fixtures-Faucets Pumps Replaced
Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs
125 SW Shelby Ave. Drilling Carlton Burnette
Madison, FL 32340 & Master Plunmber
RF 0058445 Repairs 850-973-1404

Cantey Lawn Services
& Stump Grinding
eBlake Cantey Owner/Operator
PBus. (850) 973-4785
Mobile (850) 673-7052
Shop (850) 973-9052
Commercial Residential Fertilization Weed Control Edging
Trimming Shrub Maintenance Stump Grinding Tree Removal


E NATUF EES^
FINEST J
Termnite and Pest Control
Termite and Pest Control
Certified Pest Control Operator
Termite & Pest Control Specialist


a. L : .-
Jay Lee


850-973-9910 850-673-7590


Summer Systems
Full Service Internet Provider
Computer Repair
(850) 975-8855
883 Hwy. 90 West Madison
Between Pizza Hut & Brenda's Styles

DAY'S TREE SERVICE
The Tree Spedalist
Free Estimates *Aerial Device
Tree Trimming *Tree Removal
Clean Up Debris Bush Hogging
*Stump Grinding
Call GENE DAY 850-948-4757
S6425 NW Loett Rd. Greenville, FL 32331
"A'IomIIIAI|AI |||AIrIY"
LEWIS WALKER
ROOFING
Repairs Shingle Roofing Flat Roofing
Residential & Commerical Metal Roofing
RC0067442 Senior Citizens Discount
FREE Estimates Office: 386-497-1419
License & Insured Toll Free 866-9LW-ROOF
BONDED/WORKERS COMP NO SUBCONTRACTORS USED FAX: 386-497-1452

Bell Mobile Home
Transport & Setup
Relevel Tie-downs *
Permits
Call For FREE Estimates
Kevin Bell
850-948-3372

HUGH'S LAWN CARE
and TREE SERVICE, LLC
Hugh Sherrod
238 NE Brickyard Pond Ave. Madison, Florida
Business: 850-445-3321 -Home: 850-973-6601 email: hughsl@earthlink.net
Lawn Mowing WE PLANT
Edging Call t0 & MAINTAIN
Weed Eating stoa1' GAMEFED
Tree Trimming GAME FEED
Bush Hogging Roads PLOTS
11 accept A7TA & Dbit Cards


Get Your

Business Card in our

Business Card Directory Today!!!

850-973-4141


I


I


-


I









10A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 25, 2006



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


i OGID

1i1


Tl*-STEAKS'-

CHAPARRAL
S-T-E-A-K H-O.-U-SES-Ev
Now Open for BREAKFAST
6:30 am 10:30 am all week
Breakfast Buffet only $4.99
Lunch Buffet $5.99
Mon.-Thurs. 11 am-3 pm .
2135 South Byron Butler Parkway Perry, FL 32348
850.584.3431


UIV, I
wrick


-w

w


Hours:
Sun. Thurs. 11-10
Fri. Sat. 11-11


Ashley Bowling, Manager
855 W. Base St. Madison, FL

(850) 973-3333


Where the Locals Eatt




Feciturins Pruiwc Rib. StoLnks Grilled Sefictuod
uSDAL Choiefi Be, t t'Ift ~nfrs'h daili, on premises
raio _.i_- p r fit, tl f Gret t 1. v'ir't'
E.Xt''n-r'."i l e' t i/ S .tLctfi n : thi ,'i 1 i offe*ve- by.l -s
PrImnsurn tcll tlapp Iihour 4 p 7p -I Spt, ot' .r a
229-259-9333 w
tkE u' '-rt r a ., lj
,iit.i Open 7 davs a wve k tor lunch and dinner ,.r':.
I IlIla.m-l prpn Dnt.,1 0 1 hut .,. ]l' ,-l i ,T i-,da -Salurd l













...ofer. eas e


$5.95 Lunch Specials Daily
Monday thru Wednesday
is Family Night All You Can Eat Spaghetti or
Ziti w/ meatsauce, salad, dessert & beverage
$6.95
We Make Fresh Pizza's
From 4-9 Daily


Ii.ted Bi t Pizza
In Tlie Gtargia
1101ountains
Home of the
Bucket of
Spaghetti &
Bucket of
Salad.
Feeds 6-7!
$18.95


Tired of free breadsticks & sodas?
Order any 2 large pizzas and
Spaghetti House will give you a
Ziti Parmesan, salad and bread!
"Wow! What a deal!" -Food critic, Hime
","" ''Oppnfot'Lnch &'Dinner'
Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 to 9:00 Fri. & Sat 11:30 to 10:00
Spaghetti House claims to have the biggest
Grinders in town. We call them Grinders,
some call them subs or heroes.




Ole Tmes Country Buffet
Soup, Salad & Fruit Bar With Lunch Buffet
Hand Cut Top Sirloin Steaks On Buffet Nightly!
Banquet Facilities Available : -

(229) 253-1600
1193 N. St. Augustine Road, Valdosta, GA
MasterCard/Visa/American Express/Discover

Enjoy some great home style cooking!

Rpd Onion Grill
1-10 & Exit 262 Lee, Florida 850-971-4240
Sunday Special 57.99
Choice of --
Fried Chicken or Baked Ham
Choice of
Cornbread Dressing or Rice & Gravy
Choice of 2 Veggies T--
Steamed Cabbage, Candied Yams, Blackeyed Peas
-Served with Cornbread!-
Add a trip to our Salad Bar $1.99-
H..tdir a Fri.-. 2 ji Enjo. Our
Ha b.urg=r Fr-no, ,r.' Salad Bar Every Day! 4-


h F


[SH DAY

4-6" Channel Catfish $30 per 100
6-8" Channel Catfish $50 per 100
Largemouth Bass Black Crappie (if avail.)
Bluegill (Coppernose & Hybrid) Redear
8-11" Grass Carp Fathead Minnows


Mullet Grouper Catfish Shrimp
Scallops Clams Swamp Cabbage
OYSTERS RAW OR FRIED
Hwy. 98 West Perry, FL
850-584-4966


...Throtow Your Heart Wide Oper
..and Give ItAwaVy!"


Friday, January 19, 2007 7pm
Tallahassee-Leon County Civic Center
Tallahassee, FL


ir
&S


Tickets are available at the Tallahassee-Leon County Civic Center Box Office, Sam
Goody, Tallahassee Mall, the Albany Civic Center or online at www.Ticketmaster.com.
Charge by phone at 850-222-0400 or 300-322-3602. Group tickets may be pur-
chased by calling 888-217-0301 or 850-222-0400. TICKETS ON SALE NOW !
All seats reserved. Questions: Call 850-222-0400 or 800-322-3602 or go to
Gaither.com All Artists, Dates & Venues are subject to change.


We will service you at:
Farmers Supply Co. in Valdosta, GA
WED., Nov. 1 From: 8-9 AM
or To Pre-Order, call Arkansas Pondstockers,
1-800-843-4748 Walk-ups Welcome
Calling All Furry Friends To A

"Howl-o- Ween Contest"
Sat, Oct. 28th
NFCC Students Raise Funds To Help Animals
Do you think you have the cutest, handsomest, best-looking
pet in the world? Here's your chance to prove it! C.L.A.W.S., the
animal welfare club at NFCC, is hosting a HOWL-O-WEEN
costume contest for pets and owners, Saturday, Oct. 28, 10 a.m.
until 4 p.m. at the Madison County Court House. This is a fun
event for the entire family. Don't be shy... why not dress to
match your four-legged friend?
All pets are eligible to enter. For a $3.00 donation,
C.L.A.W.S will take your pet's photo and later post it on the
club's web site
http://www.nfcc.edu/stu/activities/clubs/claws/homepage.html.
First, second, and third place prizes will be awarded.
C.L.A.W.S is a student group at North Florida Community
College whose aim is to raise awareness about animal welfare
issues. The club promotes respect and compassion for animals
through education and advocacy. Club members assist humane
societies and shelters in the area. Funds raised from this and oth-
er events go to support spay/neuter programs in local communi-
ties.
Sponsor Susan Taylor and club members invite you to come
join the fun and have a "howling" good time!
For information; telephone Susan Taylor at 973-1679 or
email TaylorS @nfcc.edu.


City of Madison

NATURAL GAS
A gas leak could be dangerous
but gas itself has no odor. So, for your
safety, a smell like rotten eggs is
added. If you smell such an odor:

1. Don't use the telephone.
2. Don't turn lights on or off, or use
anything electrical.
3. Go outside right away.
4. Ask a neighbor to call the gas
company. 973-5081 during working
hours 8-5 and 973-5075 after hours.
5. Don't go back into the house until the
gas company says it is safe.


101 Dade Street


101 Dade Street
\Madison, FL
ThellC 850-253-8096
4 TeSpaghetti

os House


(tusimaS

(;allf e


1874 Clubhouse Dr.
Valdosta, GA
229-242-7700


"%,am FA FATV 1-9 0". m R-A lsrlx











Wednesday, October 25, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 11A




HEALTH




Madison County Recruiting Doulas


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Tuesday, October 24,
at 1 p.m. at the Madison
County Public Library, there


The most difficult subject
to discuss in and out of the
nursing home is dying and
death. We all need to under-
stand that the experience of
death is universal, and none of
us can avoid it. Death is a
very personal and intimate ex-
perience. While we cannot,
control the dying process, it is
possible to die well, with dig-
nity.
Most- of us think we
would prefer to die suddenly,
when actually a sudden death
robs the person and family of
many issues left undone. Dy-
ing of a progressive illness of-
fers the person and their fami-
ly the opportunity to complete
unfinished issues and relation-
ships.
So often, we believe there
will always be tomorrow, and
put off the chance to reconcile
with ourselves, or a loved one.
Very often, we think of end of
life in terms of business.
The words inheritance,
wills, and power of attorney
are very familiar to us. How-
ever, the real work of death
with dignity is not in the attor-
ney's office. As Dr. Ira. By7
ock discovered, the real work
of dying is within us.
The first step of complet-
ing relationships is to forgive.
Saying to our loved ones, "I
forgive you." The ones that are
left behind need to know that
they are forgiven for any and
all past mistakes. The free-
dom of forgiveness is a gift not
only to our loved ones, but a
release for us as well.






y.lart ailv
[ICLI 180-92-66
IlForFreosltaio


will be a doula, recruitment
party for Madison and the.
surrounding areas.
Many people may ask,
what is a doula? A birth


The next step is to ask for
forgiveness. This is the tough
one. Asking our loved ones
to "forgive me" requires us to
look deep within ourselves
and acknowledge our mis-
takes. Being honest with our-
selves, and our loved ones,
while asking to be forgiven,
gives us the opportunity of re-
newed relationships.
Another step toward clo-
sure is to remember to say
"thank you." We often take
the ones closest to us for
granted. We all have expecta-
tions of our loved ones, as they
have of us. However, a thank
you gives us the chance to re-
ally let the ones close to us
know how important they are
to us, and how grateful we are
to have them in our life.
Most importantly, is to let
our loved ones know we love
them. Say it. Look them
right in the eyes and say, "I
love you."
Of course, we've heard
actions speak louder than
words, and we do the loving
things for our precious ones.
Yet, those three words carry
such an emotional impact, the
ones we love need to hear that
from us.
Finally, the time comes to
say, "goodbye." Goodbyes are
difficult for all of us. Going
to the unknown is uncomfort-
able. Being left behind is sor-
rowful.
Working through the steps
is rewarding not only for the
one leaving, it is beneficial to
the ones left behind. Dr. Ira
Byock believes the work of
'letting go' is the completion
of life.
"I look upon life as a gift
from God, I did nothing to
earn it. Now that the time is
coming to give it back, I have
no right to complain."
-Joyce Cary


I 0 '
ADVIL-NT Cr-l -TIAN VILLAGE


Active Single
Family Home
S,,nununvt


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doula is a woman trained
and experienced in child-
birth that provides continu-
ous physical, emotional, and
informational support to a
woman during labor, birth,
and the immediate postpar-
tum period.
A postpartum doula is a
woman trained to care for
new families in the first
weeks after birth providing
household help, advice with
newborn care and infant
feeding, and emotional sup-
port.
An average doula salary
range is anywhere from 75-
350 dollars per service
,whether it be childbirth or


series of postpartum visits.
Eleven, studies showed
the following effects of
Doula support; and better ef-
fects on birth outcomes;
labors are shorter, there are
fewer 'complications; Ce-
sarean rates are reduced;
there are no less need for
oxytocin to speed up labor;
the need for forceps is re-
duced; and women request
less pain medication and
epidurals.
The effects on the moth-
er include greater satisfac-
tion with their birth experi-
ence, most positive assess-
ments of their babies and
less postpartum depression.


The effects on' the baby
include: babies have shorter
hospital stays with fewer ad-
missions to special care
nurseries; babies breastfeed
more easily; and mothers are
more affectionate to their
babies'. postpartum.
The effects on the health
care system are that the cost
of obstetrical care is dramat-
ically reduced.
Women are pleased with
the personalized care doulas
offer. The benefit of continu-
ous support in labor is rec-
ognized by the World Health
Organization, the Medical
Leadership Council and the.
Society of Obstetricians and


Gynecologists of Canada, an
organization of over 1200
U.S. hospitals.
The True Blue Doula
Program, sponsored by the
Ounce of Prevention through
the Healthy Start Coalition
of 'Madison, Jefferson, and
Taylor counties, has a dedi-
cated staff willing to provide
the training and technical as-
sistance for women interest-
ed in this field to achieve
certification. A three-day
training will be offered, with
limited scholarships avail-
able. If you are interested, or
know someone who is,
please contact Cetta Barn-
hart at 948-2741.


Whooping Cough Rates Higher In States Where

Vaccination Exemptions Easily Obtained


Whooping cough is re-
emerging nationwide and
youngsters in states that permit
parents to easily opt out of vac-
cinating their children are at in-
creased risk from the disease,
researchers from Johns Hopkins
University and the University of
Florida report today (October
11) in the Journal of the Ameri-
can MedicalAssociation.
States that readily grant ex-
emptions or offer personal, be-
lief exemptions have about 50
percent higher rates of pertussis,
more commonly known as
whooping cough, after adjusting
for a large number of demo-
graphic variables.
"By demonstrating an asso-
ciation between state policies
and pertussis, we highlight the
very real consequences of relax-
ing school immunization re-
quirements," said Saad Omer,
M.B.B.S., M.P.H., an assistant
scientist of international health
at the Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public
Health and the study's first au-
thor.
All states require documen-
tation that children entering
school have met the require-
ments, which include vaccines
to protect against diseases such
as diphtheria, measles, polio
and pertussis.
But all states also permit
medical exemptions to immu-
nization requirements, and most
allow exemptions based on reli-
gious beliefs. Many offer a
broader exemption based on
personal belief that may be
granted for religious, philosoph-
ical or other nonmedical rea-
sons.
"This really adds a new
piece of information in our ef-
fort to control pertussis," said
Daniel Salmon, Ph.D., an asso-
ciate professor of epidemiology
in the University of Florida Col-
lege of Medicine and the
study's senior author.
Recently, several states
also have sought to expand non-
medical exemptions.
"Our study shows an in-
crease in the number of children
exempted in states that make
exemptions widely available,"
Omer said.
Researchers at the two aca-
demic health c enters and at the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention examined long-term
data on state-level exemption
rates at school entry and the in-
cidence of pertussis for individ-
uals 18 years or younger. They
found that nonmedical exemp-
tion rates were higher and in-


creasing in states that permitted
exemptions based on personal
belief and in states where ex-
emption processes were less ar-'
duous. Those states also were
strongly associated with higher
incidence of pertussis.
Pertussis a highly conta-
gious but preventable disease -
is endemic in the United States.
According to the CDC, the inci-
dence of the disease has in-
creased nationwide in the last
20 years, with 25,827 cases re-
ported in 2004, the most recent
data available.
Pertussis is caused by a
bacterial toxin that is spread
easily through person-to-per-
son contact, coughing and'
sneezing. It is more severe in
infants and young children,
who consequently have a
greater risk of pneumonia,
seizures, encephalopathy (a
brain disorder) and other po-
tentially deadly complications.
In a study published last
year, the researchers found the
No. 1 reason why parents


SHE'LL

LIKE A


Ii'


it 6 -


refuse vaccines.and claim ex-
emptions are concerns about
vaccine safety, despite strong
scientific evidence that vac-
cines are extremely safe.
"There are also differ-
ences between parents of vac-
cinated and unvaccinated chil-
dren in perceived susceptibili-
ty to and severity of (vaccine-
preventable) diseases, per-
ceived efficacy of vaccination
and trust in their government,"
Salmon said.
Children who are not vac-
cinated are at increased risk of
contracting disease and pass-
ing it on to others. Among
those vulnerable are children
too young to be vaccinated,
those with a valid medical rea-
son for not vaccinating or
those who are vaccinated but
have not had a sufficient im-
munological response to fight
off the disease. Protection in
people who are vaccinated de-
creases over time, in what
health experts call "waning im-
munity."


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October is National Physical Therapy Month!
To celebrate, Allied Therapy is conducting
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12A Madison County Carrier


HINT #11
Packing material
for moving


>4'


'2~


.54


Once you have finished reading
the newspaper. don't throw it
away. Find another use for it.
Newspaper makes great filler for
packing household goods when
. moving. As soon as everything is
. unpacked, take the used newspa-
Sper to a recycling center near you.
v ; -ead,
F-% u~


SNam


'2-'


l ecycLe

GREENE
Publishing, Inc.,


e


Address
. City ST_
Zip
Phone
S Mail To: $28
P.O. Drawer 772 I-35ny
SMadison, FL 32341-0772 out Ot County
II^,%: ,- ;:..:;:. 4*"x -
' A.::
< : '. ..', ,:',.


www.greenepublishing.com

Got news
straight from
the horse's mouth?

We Do.

The Madison County Carrier
& Madison Enterprise Recorder


Investigation


cont from page 1A


attorney.
The three state agencies are investigating whether caretak-
ers used banned, excessive and harmful restraints at a camp for
delinquent boys, some of whom are mentally retarded or have
other special needs.
At least one youth might have suffered a broken collarbone
at the Greenville Hills Academy in Greenville just last week.
One 16-year-old claimed he was choked.
And in another episode, guards also reported using a tech-
nique called a wristlock that was banned two years ago by An-
thony Schembri, secretary of the DJJ.
The DJJ is investigating Greenville Hills, along with the
Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the Department of
Children & Families. The agencies declined to give any details
other than to confirm the investigation into the academy, which
has been the subject of 30 verified abuse or neglect claims made
to a state telephone hot line in two years.
"Certainly, the agency takes these allegations very serious-
ly," said DJJ chief of staff Cynthia Lorenzo. "Our top priority is
the safety of youth in our care. Unfortunately, with open inves-
tigations we are unable to provide details. Once we do have all
of the facts, we will take swift and appropriate action as needed,
if any of our staff was involved in any Wrongdoing."


Councils


cont from page 1A


see how each of them operates its different economic and tourist
development councils.
Madison County gives its Tourism Development Council
over $78,000 each year. The Madison County Development
Council is given $31,750 a year. Both councils give money to.
the Chamber of Commerce.
The TDC and MCDC each give the Chamber approximate-
ly $16,000 each to operate as administrator for both boards.
Dawn Taylor, Director of the Taylor County Chamber of
Commerce, said that' her county has both an economic develop-
ment board and a tourist development council. One member
serves on both the TDC-and the Chamber boards. He is a local
motel owner.
Suwannee County said that they have no one serving on all
three boards, citing that it could be a conflict of interest.
.County Coordinator Johnny Wooley said that one retired
person in the financial industry did serve on the economic de-
velopment council and the Chamber board and said that all 'of
the TDC's board members do serve in the tourism industry, such
as at motels or at the Spirit of the Suwannee campground.
Jefferson County does not have a bed tax yet (it is on the
November ballot there) to fund the TDC, but they' do have an
economic development council. None of their members serve on
the Chamber board.


Crime Rate


cont from page 1A


County. The rapes were the same number as they were last year.
Armed robberies were down from 11 in January to June
2005, to five from January to June this year.
A total of 47 aggravated assault cases were reported the first
six months of this year, compared to 51 cases reported during the
same time frame a year ago.
Burglaries reported were up to 101 from 89 a year ago in the
six-month reporting period.
Larcenies dropped from 182 to 175.
Motor vehicles-thefts reported remained the same with eight
vehicles stolen.'
Of the cases, only 22.2 percent have been cleared.
The UCR released by the Florida Department of Law En-
forcement (FDLE) last week reflects only crimes reported out-
side the. city limits of Madison.


7-'~1


,$489


Labor & Materials


EARNHARDT & SONS
U P H O L S T E R Y

Highway 14 Madison, FL *850.973.6006


If you have children or grandchildren born in
"Generation X" loosely defined as those people born
between 1965 and 1980 they still have quite a ways to
go before retirement. But that doesn't'mean they should-
n't be thinking about retirement and saving for it.
Unfortunately, many members of the Gen-X cohort
are doing a poor job of retirement planning. About half of,
all workers born between 1965 and 1972 are "at risk" of
having too little money to maintain their standard of liv-
ing during retirement, according to the National
Retirement Risk Index created by the Center for
Retirement Research at Boston College. (This study did-
n't include the younger Gen-Xers because their financial
histories are not considered long enough to yield mean-
ingful interpretations of future behavior.)
The.Retirement Risk Index uses a variety of variables
to come up with its projections, but they pretty much boil
down to one conclusion: Older Gen-Xers aren't saving
enough to pay for the type of retirement they'd like to
have.
If you think your child or grandchild let's call her
"Jen" might be' in the low-savings group, what changes
can you encourage her to make to reach a different and
more favorable destination? Here are a few suggestions:

*Don't panic. Gen-Xers have got one really good
asset on their side: time. Even the first wave of
Generation X members have got roughly 25 years until
reaching the "typical" retirement age of 65. That means
Jen still has time to make some moves that can help her
make good progress toward her retirement goals if she
doesn't wait too long.
*Take advantage of retirement savings opportuni-
ties. If Jen has a 401(k) where she works, encourage her
to take full advantage of it. Her money will have an
opportunity to grow on a tax-deferred basis, and her con-
tributions are typically made with pre-tax dollars, which
means the more she puts in, the lower her adjustable gross
income. Ideally, Jen should contribute as much as she can
afford, increase her contributions whenever she gets a
raise, and spread her money among the range of invest-
ments available in her plan. Also, if Jen can afford it, she
should contribute to a Roth or traditional IRA every year.
Both offer tax advantages and can be funded with money
going into virtually any investment stocks, bonds, gov-
ernment securities, etc.
*Identify retirement goals. We all have different
visions of the ideal retirement. While Jen might want to
work until 65 and then open a small business, her friend
might want to retire early and travel the world.
Consequently, the amount Jen will need to save and
even the investment philosophy she follows should be
based on her individual retirement goals.
*Get professional help. It's not always so easy to
create and maintain long-term investment strategies.
Which investments are right for Jen's individual needs?
How aggressive should she be? When should she make
changes to her portfolio? A financial professional can
help Jen answer these and many other questions that will
arise over the years.

For people in Jen's age group, retirement may seem
like a distant vision. But it's moving closer every day -
and she'll want to be ready when it finally arrives.
Encourage her to take the steps necessary to prepare her-
self.

Brad Bashaw EdwardJones
Investment Representative
114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
ww.edwardjones.comr
Serving Individual Investors Since 187 1d,


Wednesday, October 25, 2006


Hospital Tax


cont from page 1A


ed by the Governor. They say that as long as the Governor ap-
points the board, there will never be any assurance of a board
filled with good businessminded people, with the ability to run
a multi-million dollar business. A new building, they point out,
will not make the difference.
The questions raised by local citizens have led many citi-
zens to say that they will vote AGAINST the half-cent sales tax
when they vote on November 7 or in early voting.
Once the tax is voted in, we will always have it. Local busi-
nesses are currently struggling to make it and will have the bur-
den of an extra penny placed on every dollar of taxable goods
sold in the county.


Chammber


cont from page 1A


feel an obligation to its members and potential members to dis-
close some of the reasons for my departure at this time.
First, however, I would like to remind you of our mission
statement;
"The Madison County Chamber of Commerce is to be an
ADVOCATE for its MEMBERS and BUSINESS COMMUNITY,
working to IMPROVE the QUALITY of LIFE through STRATE-
GIC ALLIANCE and PARTNERSHIP, (emphasis added)
We go on to define "Who we are" as:
"The Madison County Chamber of Commerce is a non-prof-
it organization which takes.a LEADERSHIP ROLE in SERVING
the NEEDS of the greater Madison County area as an ADVO-
CATE and CATALYST in its PROMOTION. GROWTH and
QUALITY of LIFE." (again, emphasis added)
I have been approached many times over the past year by
people wanting to talk to me about the Chamber Unfortunately
most of them to voice their disapproval over how the Chamber
is being run. Also, unfortunately most of them have chosen to ei-
ther voice their opinion only to me or register their disapproval
by not renewing their membership.
As a businessperson who owns one.business and has an of-
fice at another, both in close proximity to the Chamber office, I
have found myself on several occasions apologizing to visitors
because they had found the Chamber office closed during nor-
mal business hours or worse, found the office open and had been
treated "COLDLY" or "RUDELY".
Others have called me personally to complain of the same
treatment. The first couple of times this happened I tried to ap-
proach the staff about the incidents only to be told that "that's
not what happened at all" and "1 was not rude to them".
I will remind you of two things. First and foremost, percep-
tion .is reality and if someone perceives to have been treated with
disrespect or rudely, they in fact have been. Second, I have no-
ticed a pattern in the comments of these people and there have
been too many independent reports for there not to be an issue
here.
I. have also had people, as recently as this week, walk up to
my place of business and say that they were told at the Chamber
that "there are NO bed & breakfasts in Madison"!!!
What do 1 say to that visitor who is telling me this as we
stand 100 yards up the street from the Ch,,ii," r office in front of
my B&B sign?
Regretably, every time I tried to make some positive effort to
bring issues to light, I have been bullied into dropping the issue
at hand. Case in point, performance reviews of staff. I find it in-
conceivable that we would.employ someone for a two-year term
without any.standard of measure for performance. NO review at
six months or one year
You may say that this is only MY opinion, I would invite you
to do a couple of things before you dismiss this letter.
First, look around the table and ask yourselves these ques-
tions. Are we living up to our mission statement?
If 'not, WHY NOT? What are our barriers? Are we DOING
(not talking about) the things we can do to support our mission.
If not WHY NOT? Then, go out and talk to our members;find out
what they feel and why. Find out how long it has been since they
were visited by someone from the Chamber? Who is/are the
chambers "AMBASSADORS". How so?
Are they sending the message you want sent? Next, do an
exit survey of the three administrative assistants that have come
and gone-in thelrrsttwo years and find out what their observa-
tions are.
It is my hope that the action I have taken will trigger an
HONEST and OPEN dialogUE aboutthe direction of the cham-
ber among-yotuand with your membership. Only then will you
obtain the thriving chamber that I hope we all seek. My fear is
that you will do nothing and continue to operate as you have
with the same few "running" the show the way they want it to be
and the chamber will continue to die the slow death it has been
suffering for some time now.
I will be happy to make myself available to any member who
wishes to discuss these and other issues open and honestly.
Respectfully,.
Stephen H. Pike
C. C. Chamber funding sources:
City of Madison Commissioners, (Mayor Judy McGhee)
Board of County Commissioners, Madison County
(Chairman Ronnie Moore)
Chamber membership Via email (if available)


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Gen-Xers Face
Retirement Challenge


Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones


"' ,,. e "" ...:


-p..Tby & Daughter, Lorle -Owf"rs i



FIIK EE: L,,R ,

&^^R' PICK.-U


i


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Karacke Contest












Section

Wednesday, Octoberl
Inside:


The Spirit Of Madison County


Sports
Jake Sullivan Golf Tournament
School


1-3B Classifieds 8B
4-5B Legals 9B
6-7B "Midnight Sun" Horse Show 10B


Friday Night Lights High School Football Scoreboard ,


Wakulla 21
East Gadsden 6


South Sumter
Jones


Nease
Columbia


27 Trinity Christian
0 Hamilton County


Bolles
West Nassau

\ Apopka
\ East Ridge


Fort White
Stanton Prep


Trinity Catholic
Gulf


Lafayette
Jefferson


Lincoln
Chiles


Suwannee
Bishop Kenny


FAMU
Walton


P.K. Yonge
Union County


Godby
Arnold


14 ItA
44 ,,rI


ACA Cross Country Does Well At Bobcat Classic


VOTE


MARGIE


FOITST
FOR{


Supervisor


of ElectioIs.


0 ., .1-I1...


Aucilla Christian Academy 2006 Cross Country Team: Front row I to r: Michaela Roccanti, Michaela Metcalf,
Gatlin Nennstiel and Angela McCune. Back row I to r: Sarah Sorenson, Courtney Connell, Olivia Sorenson, Tris-
tan Sorenson, Anna Finlayson, Elizabeth Riley, Jessica Hagen, Rikki Roccanti, Taylor Pridgeon and Coach Dan
Nennstiel. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader, October 19, 2006)


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Aucilla Christian
Academy cross-country team
traveled to Santa Fe Saturday,
October 14, to participate in
the Bobcat Classic cross-
country race. Coach Dan
Nennstiel said his girls did
-great. "They did better than I
thought they would,'" said
Nennstiel. "They did better
than last year, and last year we
had the best team ever."
Sarah Sorenson had the
fastest time for ACA. Sarah
hit a 21.50, placing 32nd over-
all. Sarah's sister Olivia
Sorenson had the second
fastest time with a 22 flat.
Olivia came in 36th. The third
sister, Tristan, had the third


fastest time with a 22:27 in
43rd place.
After the three sisters, the
fourth best ACA time went to
Michaela Roccanti with a
23:11. Anna Finlayson, an
eighth grader, was fifth with a
23:46. Elizabeth Riley was
sixth fastest on the ACA team
with a 24:34. Michaela Met-
calf, a sixth grader, had the
seventh fastest. time with a
24:42. Courtney Brasington,
another eighth grader, had a
time of 24:44. Angela Mc-
Cune had a 25:36. Jessica Ha-
gan had a 26:32. Taylor Baez
had a 30:29 and Rikki Roc-
canti ran a 32:47.
This Saturday, the girls go
to the City Championships in
Tallahassee.


Big Win For The ACA Warriors

Against Carrabelle, 27-22


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing Inc.
"I feel like our team is
coming together," Coach Joe
Striplin said after Friday
night's victory over Carra-
belle. "Our team stepped up."
The Warriors were down
at the half 14-13. At halftime
Striplin said he and his
coaches had a heart-to-heart
with the players. It worked.
The Warriors were able
to hold on through a goal-line
stand in the second half, get
the ball back on downs on the
one-yard line and mount a
99-yard drive for a score.
"Coach Vause made
some adjustments at half-
time," Striplin said. "We
were able to slow the rush."
Striplin said Carrabelle
has the biggest offensive line
the team has had to face all
year. He said the average of-
fensive lineman for Carra-
belle runs 270 pounds. "I
knew Carrabelle would run
the ball right at us," Striplin
said. "I knew they would try
to pound us. The defense bent
a little but it didn't break."
In the first half, Daniel
Greene scored off a two-yard
rush for six points and Kyle
Barnwell made an intercep-


tion and ran it 45 yards into
the endzone for a touchdown.
The Warriors were down
14-13 at the half but came
back to score off a 5-yard re-
ception by Reggie Walker. In
the last minutes of the game,
Aucilla's defense held on the
goal line, got the ball back
and scored off a 70-yard re-
ception by Barnwell. Carra-
belle got the ball back with
just under three minutes left
in the game. Aucilla held and
the final score was 27-22.
Friday, Aucilla faces
their most important game of
the season. The Warriors
travel to Tallahassee to play
John Paul II for the confer-
ence championship and a
three-way tie for second in
the district.
"You can feel the excite-
ment building already,"
Striplin said. "The players
are getting excited about the
upcoming game."
Aucilla is currently 4-4
for the season.
Offensive Player of the
Week went to Matt Bishop
with 17 rushes for 167 yards.
Defensive Player of the
Week went to Wade Scarber-
ry with 11 tackles and five
assists.


Aucilla
Carrabelle


42
6


m


,d


ffi-


L w
55. rN








2B Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 25, 2006




SPORTS



Cowgirl Volleyball Clinches Spot In Regionals


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison Cowgirl
volleyball team has officially
clinched a spot in the regional
playoffs with a tough-fought
win over Hamilton County.
Cowgirl volleyball took the
Hamilton Lady Trojans in four
games, two of which had
Madison fans on the edge of
their seats.
In the first game the Cow-
girls got off to a bad start,
down by five points. The girls
fought back to tie the score at
10-10. Madison surged ahead
13-10, but Hamilton tied it at
14. The Cowgirls finally took
off winning with a huge Ash-
ley Haynes kill 25-18.
The second game was
scary. The two teams fought
right until the bitter end.
Madison took an early lead
but Hamilton fought back and
tied the match at 8-8. The


Cowgirls moved back into the
lead off some power kills by
Haynes, who had a heck of a
night.
The score went to 20-18
with Madison holding on to a
slim lead. Hamilton closed the
gap and went ahead 22-21,
then the Cowgirls came back
to tie it at 22-22. Madison got
the serve back and went up
23-22, but Hamilton broke the
serve tying the game 23-23.
Hamilton went up 24-23 and
Madison broke their serve to
tie the game again.
Hamilton broke the serve
and went up 25-24 and ended
up with the 26-24 win.
The Hamilton win tied the
teams at' one game each. The
next game was a nerve-rack-
ing chiller for all Madison
fans. Hamilton got the early
lead in game three. Madison
tied it at 4. Caitlyn Griffin got
two aces to send Madison into


a 6-4 lead. But Hamilton went
ahead. The score was tied at 8-
8 and again at 12-12. Then
Hamilton rallied and went on
a run, scoring six unanswered
points.
The Cowgirls were down
22-14. The crowd was hysteri-
cal. But the plucky Cowgirls
did not give up. The girls ral-
lied and came back with a
vengeance, taking the' Lady
Trojans in another down-to-
the-wire game 26-24.
A key factor in the win
was Caitlyn Griffin's nine
straight points earned from the
service line.
The final game was an.
easier win. Madison took the
fourth game of the night and
the match 25-19. The win puts
the girls in the regional play-
offs to be played October 24.
Ashley Haynes had a
great night at the net-leading
the team in kills with 18.


Haynes also had two assists,
one ace and seven blocks.
Megan Jackson had 14
kills, 13 assists, six serving
aces, two digs and.two blocks.
Lauren Maultsby had 53


assists and an ace.
Alexis Stalnaker had three
kills.
Caitlyn Griffin had four
assists, four aces and one dig.
Alexis Sowell had one kill


I


and two blocks.
Emily Hentges had three
assists, one ace and three digs.
Look for more Cowgirl
volleyball in future issues of
your Madison County Carrier.


,: -*';* : q " i -
. ,.. -.' *. '*y : '
... *' "'.:" *"* 71 ..s.' .


#17 Alexis Stalnaker goes up at the net against Hamilton. Left #2 Caitlyn Griffin
and right of Stalnaker #3 Megan Jackson. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet
Schrader, October 17, 2006)


j..


#14 Lauren Maultsby sets up the ball for #22 Alexis
,.Sowell (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrad-
er, October 17, 2006)
!I
Al


CC Players

---Of The, Week,

Offensive Defensive


I


return. #14 Lauren


Dig Safely.

If you plan to dig, call SUNSHINE 1-800-432-4770 at least two days
before digging so they can contact your local utility companies to come out
and mark underground utility lines. If you do not call and you hit an under-
ground line, you could be hurt or killed. You may also be held liable for cost-
ly damages.

Here are some simple excavation safety steps:
Survey and Mark Survey proposed excavation areas and mark the dig
sites in white paint
Call Before Your Dig It is the law! At least two, working days prior to
starting work 1-800-432-4770.
Wait the Required Time Allow the utility companies the time to locate
and mark the lines.
Respect the Marks Maintain visibility of the marks and safely follow
them when digging.
Dig with Care Hand excavate within 24-inches of each side of the lines.

In a natural gas emergency, call 911, then the City of Madison Natural
Gas Department, 850-973-5081 during office hours 8-5 and the Madison Fire
Department after hours at 850-973-5075.

A Message from the City of Madison's Natural Gas Department.


s the


- _rm


#22 Alexis Sowell getE
Maultsby is in the fore-
ground and #3 Megan Jack-
son is on the far side of the
court. (Greene Publishing,
Inc. Photo by Janet Schrad-
er, October 17, 2006)


7
#3 Megan Jackson goes, high to make the kill. Jack-
son had 14 kills against Hamilton. (Greene Publishing,
Inc. Photo by Janet Sthrader, October 17, 2006)


... ........
#21 Ashley Haynes had a killer night against Hamil-
ton hitting 18 kills and blocking seven Hamilton kills at
the net. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrad-
er, October 17, 2006)


AA


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Madison County Carrier 3B


www.greenepublishing.com


ArbN's For a Delicious
& Cheddar Combo.


973-9872


Penn State vs. Purdue


IT'S EASY! Just pick the winners
of this week's games featured in each ad
and send us your entry!
Each ,%eek. the entry with the most
correct picks (and the closest to the game
score in the tie breaker) \%ill win a Beef
and Cheddar Combo Meal from Arby's
and their choice of a $20.00 check from
Greene Publishing. Inc. or 2 tickets to
Wild Adventures Theme Park. The
Second Place winner will receive 4 movie
passes and the Third Place winner will
receive 2 movie passes from Greene
Publishing, Inc.
This Week's Winners

1. Kay Milner

2. Dorman McCarver

3. Pat Brooks

Prizes can be picked up at
Greene Publishing, Inc.
1695 South SR 53
Mladison, Florida 32340

Official Football Mania Rules
One entrr per person. All entries must be on 1n
official entr) blank. No photocopies accepted.
Entries must be complete\ filled out. legible
and dropped off at Greene Publishing. Inc..
1695 South SR 53, Nladison. no later than 5 pm
on Friday or mailed to P.O. Dra\\er 772.
Madison, Florida 32341: postmarked b\ Frida\.
Judges decisions are final
Winners \ ill be announced each \\ednesda\ in
the Mudison Counn Canci,:
Employ ees of the nevw paper and their famriil\
members are not eligible for the Football Mania
contest.
Must be ten (10) years old, or older to play.
In the Georgia vs. Florida, write down
what you think the final score will be. This will
be used to break a tie, if needed.



Official Entry Form
Name:
| Address:
I City:
I State: ZIP:
Phone:
Fill in the name of the team you think will win.
11.
2.
13.
4.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
110.
L ----.---- -- JI


is Proud To Be A Part of
The Madison, Community and
Supports The Cowboys!

X, Mladison
Bottling /



Notre Dame vs. Americas Propane Company
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Vanderbilt
vs. Duke


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Come See L s For Sales &- Serv'ice
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.491 SW Range Ave. Madison, F[
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Tennessee
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Give us a call today.


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10
MCHS vs. Dixie County


1606 NE Colin Kelly Highway
Madison, Florida .
Miami850) 973-221vs. GA Tech


Miami vs. GA Tech


t-FlACKSON HE NWI-
*rwB TAM. X SER ICE
COMING SOON
W\e \\ill be located in the Winn-Dixie
Shopping Center next to Mlovie Gallern.
Holiday Loans start November 13th. '
Call 850-973-8829
tor1 morein formation.


Georgia vs. Florida




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FSU vsL e. .Maryland-
FSU vs. Maryland


BYU vs. Air Force


Wednesday, October 25, 2006


Is


ed",








4B Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 25, 2006



SPORTS



Jake Suthianu Qtj4 owawent 3)auw 84 (olfes"


Back row, left to right: Judson Beggs, Kevin Haire, Brian Bibb, Gareth Smith,
John Haire and Travis Smith. Front, left to right: Chad Smith and Rodney Stalvey.
Chad Smith placed second gross. The team of Haire and Gareth Smith placed sixth


net. (Photo submitted)
By Janet Schrader,
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The annual Jake Sullivan
Golf Tournament was Saturday
and Sunday, October 14 15 at
the Madison Country Club. It
drew a crowd of 84 golfers,
with 25 of them making the trip
from Fernandina Beach. Some
came from Bainbridge, Ga.,
and Cairo, Ga., as well as all the
local golfers.
Some of the proceeds will
be donated to the American
Cancer Society in Jake Sulli-.
van's name. Jake is the late son
of Jimmy and Liz Sullivan.
A Best-Ball Tournament
was held Saturday. Jarrod Sulli-


van, Jake Sullivan's younger
brother, teamed up with Mike
Deese to take the gross win Sat-
urday with a score of 64. Bailey
Browning and Chad Smith'
took second place gross with a
64. D. Tyre and Clay Canty
took third with a 68. Billy Sul-
livan and Gard. Gardner took
fourth with a 69. Mike and Eric
Norfleet took fifth place gross
with a 69. Kevin Sheppard and
Trip Coefield took sixth place
gross with a 70 and the team of
Rick and Trey Spencer took
seventh place gross with a 70.
Saturday's net winner was
the team of Gene Rutherford
and Larry Olive with a 59. Jar-


rod Sullivan and Mike Deese
took second net with a 60.
Chad Wells and H. Phelps
'took third net with a 60. Matt
Replogle and David Stephens
placed fourth net with a 61. T.
Smith and Roger Meeks placed
fifth gross with a 63. Sixth
gross went to Rex French and
Gary Davis with a 63. Seventh
gross went to Kevin Sheppard
and Trip Coefield with a 63.
And, there was a prize awarded
for eighth gross. It went to
Mike and Eric Norfleet with a
63.
Sunday's tournament was
the biggie. It was a Super-Ball
Handicap. D. Tyre and Clay


Mike Norfleet, Eric Norfleet and Ashley Smith are enjoying the golf tournament.
The Norfleets placed fourth gross with a score of 135. (Photo submitted)


Canty took first place gross
with a 126. They took a $600
prize home. First place net
went to Jarrod Sullivan and
Mike Deese with a 121.6. They
also split $600.
Results
Gross
First: D. Tyre and Clay
Canty- 126-$600
Second: Bailey Browning
and Chad Smith-126 $450
Third Billy Sullivan and
Gard Gardner-134 $350
Fourth: Mike and Eric
Norfleet-135 $250
Fifth: Rick and Trey
Spencer-137 $200
Sixth: Keith Gibson and


Robin Heath-138 $150
Seventh: Tommy Haynes
and Colin Howerton $100
Net
First: Jarrod Sullivan and
Mike Deese-121.6 $600
Second: Gene Rutherford
and Larry Olive-124.3 $450
Third: Chip Wells and H.
Phelps-125.2 $350
Fourth: Kevin Sheppard
and Trip Coefield-127.5 -
$250
Fifth: Matt Replogle and
David Stephens-128.1 $200
Sixth: John Haire and
Gareth Smith-130.7 $150
Seventh: Rex French and
Gary Davis-130.8 $100


There were two drawings.
One was sponsored by the
MCHS Golf. A golf package
weekend trip to Amelia Island
was won by Diane Sullivan.
The other drawing for a
bag and driver was won by
Gene Rutherford.
Closest to the pin on Sun-
day for hole #3 went' to Clay
Canty. Closest to. the 'hole #8
went to Mike Deese. Closest to
the hole #12 went to Jason
Rinehart. Closest to the hole #
17 went to Chip Wells.
Longest drive on hole #5
or 14 went to Trey Spencer.
Longest putt on hole #9 or
18 went to Larry Olive.


We Proudly Support The
'Jake Sullivan Golf
Tounament ti

855 W. Base St. Madison. FL
(850) 973-3333
Hours:
Sun.-Thurs. 11-10 Fri.-Sat. 11-11


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Rex French, left, was one of the original organizers
of the Jake Sullivan tournament. French teamed up with
Gary Davis to take seventh net with a score of 130.8.
(Photo submitted)





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Gareth Smith, left, and John Haire placed sixth net
with a score of 130.7. (Photo submitted)


C.E. "Bill" Russell
850.973.6458



SEnjoyfie

Ease Off...


".5


1






~. .;~) ~
:~ ~


P.O. Box 996
Madison, FL 32341





^.. t 17T


( I t/h 0 (-1t II.
hk Ct I /1 CC


a
&


* /1t/hI.NIiv cart.
I, lhnIIIn


w


Larry Olive, left, and Gene Rutherford teamed up to
place second net with a score of 124.3. (Photo submit-
ted)

Congratulations to all

the winners of the

Jake Sullivan

Tournament

j ... .. -,:. *- ,-
',, '* \ ,^' - ^ ^ *-


The team of Tommy Hayes and Colin Howerton,
right, placed seventh gross with a score of 140. (Photo
submitted)


..' ,~'


S .., ....


Dil A Ac FL








Wednesday, October 25, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5B



SPORTS



action iound (It Ja&e Sui.wa ewwnent

, .- .. . ,I :.-. 0.. . ?,.., ~ :
i,.. ... i.' ,,


David Fletcher, left, and David Ballanger are enjoying the Jake Sullivan Annual
Tournament at the Madison Country Club. (Photo submitted)


New Course G L F. Homesite
18 Holes w/Cart $20

Claybank -olf Club
6300 Madison Highway
(FI. SR 53 Ga. SR 333)
8 Miles N. of Fla. line 6 Miles S. Quitman, GA
Tues Sun 8:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M. IRTM


4


Brian Vaughn, Rodney Stalvey and Brian Bibb, are pictured left to right at the
Jake Sullivan Golf Tournament. (Photo submitted)

If Ycu Are A Member Of
The Madisc.n Ccunti iv Club,
You're Welccnme At Ours!

SPerry
Golf& Country Club
4991 Golf Course Road Perryv. FL 323
850-584-3590


- The Name Behind The Tournament


Jake Sullivan


Jake Sullivan


The late-Jake Sullivan, center, enjoys a break during
golfing with friends Bill Hembree, right, and Rex
French, left. (Photo submitted)


Jackson's
Drug Store
130,_ \V Grjrd \~l.re.rt
(Irri-iI\ille. FL
850-948-3011

EDanny ic \: 50-9son, R.Ph
Danny Jackson, R.Ph


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Jake Sullivan was a larger
than life, colorful character that
died too young of melanoma, he
was just 30.,
At 6'5", Sullivan was filled
with the joy of living. His moth-
er. Liz Sullivan, said he loved to
hunt,, fish and play golf. He was
always out in the sun. Fair-
skinned, it was the love of the
outdoors that got him. He con-
tracted melanoma and died less
than a year after diagnosis.
His mother said she noticed
a mole on his chest when they
were at the beach. "Jake, you
need to get that thing taken off,"
she told him.
"Momma, you worry too
much," he said.
Sullivan's friends, and
there were many, started a golf
tournament in his memory the
very year he died. Sullivan died
on January 15, 1990, and the
first tournament for Sullivan
was held that fall.
Jarrod Sullivan, Jake's
younger brother, played in that
very first tournament. It is now
still held every fall. The net di-
vision of this .year's tournament
was won by Jarrod Sullivan,
teamed up with Mike Deese.
Jarrod was only 19 when his
older brother died. Liz Sullivan
.said it affected everyone terri-
bly, especially Jarrod.
Jarrod has been playing
golf since he was a little boy.
"When he was a tiny boy he
used to walk over to the golf
course every day pulling his lit-
tle golf cart," Mother Liz said.
Jarrod now lives in Jack-
sonville, where he is a mortgage
broker.
Jake left behind two broth-
ers, Jarrod and Johnnie, and two
sisters, Leslie and Adrienne.
Jake didn't have any children,
but was about to be married to.
Gina Louis when he died.
Some of the major orga-
nizers of that first tournament
and every tournament are Rex
French, Mark Schnitker,
Gene and Randy Rutherford
and Bart Latner.
Jake is remembered
every year at the Jake Sulli-
van Golf Tournament. "He
had more friends than any
other person on this planet,"
Liz Sullivan said. This year
84 golfers entered and played
in the two-day event. Every
year, some of the proceeds
are donated to the American
Cancer Society.


Nestle Waters Is Proud To Be
A Part Of The
Madison Community.
Congratulations, Golfers!


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6B Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, October 25, 2006




SCHOOL



FCCLA Reaches Out To The Madison Community
** .1.-. .. ** :.-* .::]t~iaft'ag~etianfe.-ai3> ,- -- "- '" *iiin 1111 -i j i ~ MGM & SSK, :'f:

L


14

.I


FCCLA members are dedicated to helping out in the Madison Community bound to make a positive impact. Front row, pictured left to right: Ariel Blanton, Chelsea
Stevens, Kristy Blalock, Samantha Hall,-Jessica Billy and Sebastain Harris. Middle row, pictured left to right: Dara Howell, Jessica Hall, Amanda Gordon, Olivia Dickey, Laney
Dowdy, Katie Burke, Chelsea Bouley, Ashley Collis and Cody Belinski. Back row, pictured left to right: Ashley Norwood, Melissa Bass and NoraBeth Agner. Not pictured:
Leeanne Brooks. (Greene Publishing, Inc, Photo by Jessalyn Covell, October 20, 2006) 4


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Madison County High
School's Family Career and
Community Leaders of
America (FCCLA) have
kicked off another good
year of not only being the
largest club in the high
school, but a very produc-
tive one too. This particular
high school club is Tmhde tip
of 60 students.-who'are pas-
sionate about improving
Madison County by ex-


pressing bold leadership
skills.
Recently, FCCLA
served at the Farm Bureau
dinner and worked at the
expo-in Moultrie, GA in
conjunction with the local
Farm Bureau of Madison.
. FCCLA members start-
ed selling frozen cookies on
Friday, October 20, so get
your yummy'-treaft' from
any of.these members today.
Also, beginning Friday,
October 27, club members


If it's a romantic moment, not t
problem does the same thing. it s
care The medical staff of Sha
pulmonologists who specialize in
wide range of lung and breathing pr

Asthma Empt
Chronic Bronchitis


1100 SW 11th St
Live Oak. FL 32064
386.362.0800
Shands org


will be selling raffle tickets
for a chance to win an auto-
graphed football from the
2006-2007 Cowboy football
players and an afghan.
FCCLA members will
be bagging groceries at the
local Winn-Dixie for dona-
tions. All of the funds raised
for these three fundraisers
will help support communi-
ty h'eri ice and school"pro-
jects 'and help send FCCLA
members to the state con-
vention in April 2007.


to worry. But if a he
important to get the r
hands Live Oak inclu
diagnosing and treating
oblems including:

hysema
Allergies



Shands


There are plenty of up-
coming events marked on
the calendars of FCCLA
members, such as making
blankets for children who
are involved with the
Refuge House in Madison.
They will be holding a food


By Elaine Doyle, Principal
New Testament Christian Cen- .


The students and staff of
NTCS have been adjusting to
many great changes in our
school program and facility
this year. Moving into a new
9,000 sq. ft building, located
directly behind New Testament
f Christian Center on Highway
90, was a long-awaited and
much needed event. Our stu-
dents, faculty, and members of
the church worked long and
hard hours in preparation for
the beginning of the school
year. We are maintaining the
"new" look and gradually mak-
ing additional improvements to
our facility. In addition to our
new Break Room used for our
breaks and lunches, we have
now completed a large covered
shelter under the shade tree on
the back of our property. There
students can eat and gather for
conversation as they watch oth-
ers playing ball, etc.
Our new facility has
helped us adjust to our growth.
We now have around 90 stu-
dents who attend K4 through
12th grades. In preparation for
this new year, the elders of
NTCC, who serve as the board
of our school, made a number
of changes in our administra-
tive structure. In addition to
my placement as principal of
the school, Mickey Starling
?alth was named the Director of
right NTCS. As a youth pastor, Mr.
ides Starling is well aware of the
spiritual as well as the academ-
ig a ic needs of our young people.
He serves our high school stu-
dents as a teacher of History,
Bible, Algebra I, and Life Man-
agement Skills. Other full-
time and part-time high school,
junior high, and middle school
teachers include Debbie Star-
ling, Johnny Taylor, Tonia
Foust, Elaine Doyle, Glenda
Hale, Jane McClung, jenny
Starling, and Justin Kinsey. In
the lower grades we have
Nicole Kinsey who teaches
K4/5, Nancy Taylor and Teri
J Adams, who team teach 1st


Elaine Doyle is the
Principal at New Testa-
ment Christian Center.
and 2nd grades, and Christine
Peters who teaches the 3rd/4th
grade class. We also have
some excellent teacher aides,
some help in teaching these
classes and others help prepare
lunches. They include Donna
Waters, Kim Norris, Robbie
Scott and Jane McClung. An-


drive in the first week of
November and they will be
hosting a family night in the
first week of November at
the high school.
In December, FCCLA
students will be decorating
the children's room in the


Wardlaw-Smith-Goza Man-
sion for Christmas. The club
members will be throwing a
Christmas party for the
Greenwood School in
Jasper. Also, FCCLA will be
having a district meeting in
December.


other essential worker at NTCS
is our school secretary, Jenny
Starling.
Our goal at NTCS has al-
ways been to provide academic
excellence in a spiritual atmos-
phere where Godly principles
and truths are taught. We have
found that one of the best ways
to lead a student in the ways of
the Lord is by example. We, as
staff members, work diligently
in all areas of our lives to pro-
vide that example for our stu-
dents. One biblical truth that
we try to instill in our students
is that of "doing everything as
unto the Lord." We work hard
to teach our students to be ex-
cellent in every area of their
lives, a character trait much
needed in today's society. We,
,at NTCS, will endeavor to
maintain and improve our
goals of academic excellence
and our spiritual atmosphere.


1-75 Exit 13, Valdosta, GA 229.219.7080 wildadventures.net


J& wSchool efBffe
A ivee ~kIhcolumnitrittii IlelbY
the chioolteachrsIuiof Iadismi Count-r


SOMETHING TAKIN(

YOUR BREATH AWAY


if









Wednesday, October 25, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7B




SCHOOL



NFCC Wins FACC Region II Chapter of the Year


The NFCC chapter of
the Florida Association of
Community Colleges is the
"Region II Chapter of the
Year." NFCC competed
with other community col-
lege members in the north
Florida area. NFCC is in
contention for statewide
"Chapter of the Year." The
winner will be announced at
the 57th annual FACC con-
ference in Tampa, Nov. 1-3.
NFCC won the regional
award by submitting a chap-


ter book chronicling 2005-
2006 activities, meeting
pre-set criteria andc by re-
ceiving the most vote's from
community colleges in
FACC .Region II, which in-
cludes Florida Community
College at Jacksonville,
Lake City Community Col-
lege, Santa Fe Community
College, St. John's River
Community College and.
NFCC.
"It is exciting to have
our FACC chapter selected
as the Region II Chapter of
the Year," said Debbie Bass,
NFCC chapter president.
"The Chapter book is
just the -end product of a
year filled with activities. It
could not have happened
without everyone's hard
work and willingness to
participate," she added.
NFCC's local chapter
works throughout the year
to facilitate communication
among its members, NFCC
and other Florida communi-
ty .colleges. The local chap-
ter was host to a variety of


college and community
events, as well as communi-
ty service projects.
NFCC/FACC officers
are Debbie Bass and Jessica
B. Webb, co-presidents;
Kay Boatright, vice presi-
dent; Wendy Webb, secre-
tary; Carolyn Thigpen, trea-
surer; and Gerri Bucher,
legislative liaison.
FACC is the profession-
al association for Florida's
28 public community col-
leges', their boards, employ-
ees, retirees and associates.
The mission of the
group is to actively pro-
mote, democratically repre-
sent, support and serve the
individual members and in-
stitutions in their endeavors
to. provide their students
and the citizens of Florida
with the best possible com-
prehensive community col-
lege educational system.
For more information
about the' FACC chapter at
NFCC, contact Debbie Bass
at (850) 973-1664 or e-mail
BassD@nfcc.edu.


Winning NFCC chapter book for FACC Chapter of the Year, Region II.


MCCS Appoints Stone As Special Ed Teacher NFcc Nominates Bobby Scott As
X 'X' f'.__.-._j.__- J. C'j.,...J ^.- A 4. A r -nta


Moak


The 2006-2007 school year at MCCS marks Amy
Stone's seventeenth year teaching altogether. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, October 17,
2006)
By Jessalyn Covell ough County as a teacher and
Greene Publishing, Inc. worked for the Department of
Think you're busy? Try Education for a year too be-
handling 17 students in spe- fore being appointed the new
cial education reading and special education teacher.
math and eight students in Since the school year has
special education social stud- started, Stone has worked
ies and science. That's what with aher children and their
Amy Stone of Madison does character skills including
each day at the Madison honesty, responsibility, work
County Central School ethics and respecting other's
(MCCS). feelings.
She has been doing it for "Every child is a puzzle
a total of 17 years. She decid-
ed, to follow in her family's
footsteps and become a
teacher along with the 14 oth-
er teachers in the family.
Stone has a Bachelor of
Science in psychology, a doc- NorthW
tor of philosophy (Ph.D.), a Florda3 YO
master's of science in special Sul
education and is currently
working on a Doctrite of Edu- at v
cation in leadership.
She worked in Hillsbor- COUNTY Of
New Testament 1. On a scale of 1
Christian Center 1 THE RE
To Hold 2. NFCC'S
Hallelujah Night 3 THEQU
4. THE VA
By Jessalyn Covell 5. THE FRI
Greene Publishing, Inc.
New Testament Christian
Center (NTCC) will be host- 2. What addition
ing a Hallelujah night on 1.
Sunday, October 22 and Sun-
day, October 29 from 4 p.m. 3. Have you or a
7 p.m.
NTCC will also be host- 4. What is the nu
ing their Hallelujah night on ___ Locati
Monday, October 30 from 5 ___ Instrut
p.m. 9 p.m. and Tuesday,
October 31 from 5 p.m un- 5. What is your n
til. It will be held at 231 SW __ Media
Ruthledge Street, the big Electr
white house next to the Madi-
son Dry Cleaners. For further
information, please contact
NTCC at 973-8547 or There-
sa Williams at 929-2830.


'in Special Ed and you have to
figure out what works," stated
Stone.
She considers herself to
be patient, persistent and pas-
sive, which all helps her be a
successful teacher.
"The best part about my'
job is when a child succeeds,
the look in their eyes when
the) ha\ e learned what I have
been teaching them. You have
to celebrate e'ery little thing
the', do better." she said.
Stone has 20 acres in
NMadison County. The fist
'hial is property in Madis6n
and the second half of her
piopeity is in Lee.
Her family includes her
husband Roger; her daughter
who is in eleventh grade at
MCHS, Amber, three grown
children and three grand chil-
dren.
She doesn't just help stu-
dents learn in school, but
outside of school too. Last
year and this year, beginning
in January, she tutors chil-
dren at the Madison County
Public Library for free. Ad-
ditionally, she is a co-leader
of a Brownie troop and per-
forms the Children's Church
at the Lee United Methodist
('C hr, rh


LuutstaninU1I bruuenL uvocawL


Each Near ihe National Re-
source Center for the First Year
Experience sponsored b\
Houghton-Nlifhn CompanN.
publishers, calls for nonuina-
tions to recognize mdijiduals
or college and unie\rsiry cam-
puses who serxe as outstanding
advocates for undergraduate
first-vear students. In seventeen
\ ears, the Center has recognized
181 aiaid recipients. Finals
\till be announced Februar,.
2007. This Near. the nomnmee
from NTCC, will be Bobb',
RSott. .oordJinti' of high
school and college relations.
The nominaLion packet de-
scribed Scott as a member of a
highly successful recnutment
and ad\msing team ait the col-
lege w which has set a standard of
njaxIuim access and high en-
ei2\ that translates into a niu-
tunng environment across the
NFCC campus.
Scott. employed by NFCC
since 1994,. resides in Valdosta.
Ga. and serves as a sports re-
porter of the \':ddosta \\ildcja
football games for \VAAC and
WGOV radio.
FOi more Information.
contact ,VFCC Neu 'i-ni/cc.
cd, or telephone 850-973-
1653.


Bobby Scott is the
coordinator of high
school and college rela-
tions at NFCC.


For October 25 & 26
October 25
Fish Fillei
Macoroni & Cheese
Cole Slail
Fruit
Corn Bread
Milk
October 26
Oven Baked Chicken
Rice \v/Gra\,y
Green Beans
Fruit Salad
Yeast Roll
Milk


Experience
Vote ,Leadership
SVot Commitment
Dedicated to
and Improving Our
School System
Elect


,SEAN


AlDERMAN

Madison County School Board, District 5
PaJ hIu Jin Aj .r. i ,,.'i.p. u,- . L II I..r i.i i: ., S r, DI..1 LI D ,


I

























VADD ORCASSFIDS 85) 7-441 33IPM.EVR


L)IN1INUJI 1UUIV1 D .1 INTNW
Cherry Table, 6 Chippendale
Chairs, Lighted China Cabinet.
$850. Can Deliver. Call 850-222-
9879


EDWARDS INSULATION
Covering all your insulation needs
Specializing in Fiberglass Blown
Insulation. FREE ESTIMATES
Ricky Edwards 850-253-3732
Cell: 850-673-9897
Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326


I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window and door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342

Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848


Yard sale October 20, 21, 22 and
weekend of October 27, 28, 29,
6537 NW 40th Way, Jennings. FL.
From Madison, SR.6 eaiJ ti:o Hanjil-
ton County Road 141 N, appx. 3.6
miles, follow the yellow signs. '93
Dodge Spirit, '91 Aerostar Van, '84
Ford Pickup, '88 Cougar, shotgun,
3 rifles, 3 pistols; 3 boats and mo-
tors, 100 silver dollars, Peace set,
Morgan set, complete American
Eagle, 1400 books and book tapes,
western, scifi, and mystery, 5 com-
puters, bicycles, guri cabinet, table
saw, 2 freezers, dryer, generator, air
compressor, waterless cleaner,
home and auto by Envirotec, gas
cook stove. Five families, too much
to list.





1950-52 Spartan
Looking for the person who
bought a two bedroom Spartan
about 30 miles from Tallahassee
around 1 1/2 years ago.
Call 386-755-0737

2003 ALpha See Ya
Motorhome
23,000 miles, 2 slide outs, 7 foot
ceilings, washer /dryer combo
Stand up Shower, 4 TV's and'
DVD Players, Basement Air
Conditioning Back Up Camera,
Dual Refrigator, Leather Couch
and J Lounge, Automatic Front
Shades
$120,000
Still has some warranty
386-316-8054


1998 Ford Explorer Sport
2 Door; Tires in Excellent Con-
dition; Low Miles $5,800.
850-929-7541

81' Ford Stepside
Last year of the full size Ranger.
Runs Great! $2,500 Call 929-2897





QUEEN ORTHOPEDIC PILLOW-
TOP MATTRESS SET. New ,in
plastic, warranty $275. 850-222-
2113

Washer and Dryer
$125 each. Call 973-4459


3 Piece Living Room New Micro
Fiber Sofa, Loveseat, Chair. $650,
still wrapped, stain resist. 850-222-
9879
Bedroom Set: New King Bed, TV
Armoire, chest, 2 nightstands. Re-
tail $3,200, sacrifice $1,000 850-
222-21.13
6 piece bedroom set, new in boxes,
must sell, $550 Call 850-545-7112.


Packing???
25 lbs. of Clean
Newspapers
just $2
973-4141

ALL NEW. KING PLUSH TOP
ORTHOPEDIC mattress set. Still
in plastic with warranty, can deliver
- $395. 850-222-7783


2' PC LEATHER sofa & loveseat.
Brand new, hardwood frames -
$795, can deliver, 850-425-8374.
Cherry sleigh bed, $250, solid
wood, still boxed 850-425-8374





Wanted peafowl. Need one ma-
ture male now before spring, but
will buy pairs if needed. Call 850-
973-6131 or 850-464-1165. Also
want guineas.






Greenville Pointe

Apartments

1. 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. HUD vouchers accept-
ed. Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity


HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, &
3 .BR, HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582/ TDDTTY
711. 200 Southern Villas Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms,
HUD vouchers accepted Call 850-
973-3786 TTY Acs 711 "This in-
stitution is an equal opportunity
provider and employer."






Commercial
Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage-23
acres, Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Drive and High-'
way 53 South, Natural gas line,
8 inch water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build to
suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141


Sweet Potatoes


414 per bushel already picked




SCall


Tanya




Call First To Make A "Pick-Up" Appointment
Directions: Take Hwy. 53 South 3.5 miles past 1-10, to
Midway Church Road and take a left. Tn. a's ,I.T Pick will be down
the first dirt road on the left (Gunsmoke). Look for the signs.
Mon. Fri. 9:00 1:00 and after 4:00 &
all day Saturday and Sunday Afternoon


315 Leggette Ave, Greenville Fl, 3
bedroom 1 bath home in quiet'area,
hardwood floors, paneling, separate
dining room, separate living room,
eat-in kitchen, recent insulated win-
dows and central heat/ AC. Utility
'building in rear with washed/dryer
hookups, carport. Offered at
$83,500.
Alan A. Levin Broker-Associate
McClellan Realty 850:570-0742

Pioneer
Excavating &
Tractor Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump
Removal, Demolition, Roads,
Mowing, Discing, Box-Blading,
and Tilling.
No Job Too Small
Free Estimates
Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326
.


Madison Rent Sell or Lease Op-
tion Remodeled 3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath, dbublewide on appx. 1/2 acre.
New carpet, paneling,.range, refrig-
erator, front porch, cabinets and
more. CAC lowest price on market.
$55,000, 386-963-1551.
192 ACRES OF
PRIME HUNTING PROPERTY
(Madison County)
Four Star Hunt Camp, Virgin Tim-
ber, 8 Cabins, Huge Cookhouse,
Fully Equipped Workshop w/3
Bays, Tractor, Four Wheeler, Com-
pletely Furnished, HVAC, I/M,
Washer/Dryer, Satellite TV, No
Expense Spared. For sale by owner
$1.75, 863-634-3340
Cottage style house for sale
within walking distance to NFCC.
Two or three bedroom, sunroom,
inside laundry room, completely
renovated, brand new appliances,
heat & air. $98,000 850-869-0135.





5 Mobile Homes For Less
Than $30,000 Each, Deliv-
ered And Set Up On Your Land!
Call Mike At:
(386) 364-1340.


I


Cracker Barrel
Now Hiring
Full and part time experienced; Re-,
tail, Grill Cooks, Cashiers and
Servers. Flexible schedules, weekly
paychecks, health insurance. and,
other great benefits.




Apply in person at the Lake Park
location, 4914 Timber Drive.. EOE
Monticello Christian Academy is
now accepting .applications for
teachers pre-k thru 12th grade and
teachers aide. No college required.
For more information call 997-
6048

POSITION AVAILABLE
CITY MANAGER
OF MADISON, FLORIDA

The City of Madison, Florida is
seeking a full time City Manag-
er. The City of Madison, has a
population of 3,063, an annual
budget of $8.5 million, and 53'
full time employees, and oper-
ates a natural .gas department, a
water and sewer department, a
police department, a fire depart-
ment, a sanitation department,
and a public works department.
The City Manager oversees the
day to day operations of the City,
and reports to a five member
City Commission, who are elect-
ed on a non-partisan basis for
four year terms. The ideal can-
didate will be skilled and experi-
enced in communication, com-
munity relations, administrative
leadership, organizational devel-
opment, personnel management,
municipal accounting, economic
development, and strategic plan-
ning. A degree in public admin-
istration or related field, and/or a
minimum of five years of public
administration experience is de-
sirable.' If interested, please
send letter and resume of no
more than five (5) pages, with
references (but no letters of rec-
ommendation), to the City
Clerk, City of Madison, 321 SW
Rutledge Street Madison, Flori-
da (fax no. 850-973-5084, no
later than December 31, 2006, in
envelope or behind cover sheet
clearly marked as "City Manag-
er Position". Letter and resumes
are subject to disclosure under
Florida's public records laws.
Salary negotiable depending on
qualifications.


1XpLUIiA'k; "".....LLV Advent Christian Village
A Behavioral Health Care Center Advent Christian age
. currently seeking: call 850-658-5627
www.acvillage.net


MASTER'S LEVEL
THERAPIST #1981
A MINIMUM OF A MASTER'S
DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IIN
COUNSELING, SOCIAL WORK,
PSYCHOLOGY, NURSING, RE-
HABILITATION, SPECIAL EDU-
CATION, HEALTH EDUCATION,
OR A RELATED HUMAN. SER-
VICES FIELD AND TWO YEARS
OF PROFESSIONAL EXPERI-
ENCE IN PROVIDING SER-
VICES TO PERSONS WITH BE-
HAVIORAL ILLNESS. SOME
LOCAL TRAVEL REQUIRED.

CHILDREN'S CASE
MANAGER #1830
A BACHELOR'S DEGREE
FROM AN ACCREDITED UNI-
VERSITY OR COLLEGE WITH
MAJOR IN COUNSELING, SO-
CIAL WORK, PSYCHOLOGY,
CRIMINAL JUSTICE, NURSING,
REHABILITATION, SPECIAL
EDUCATION, HEALTH EDUCA-
TION, OR RELATED HUMAN
SERVICES FIELD WITH ONE (1)
YEAR OF FULL-TIME OR
EQUIVALENT EXPERIENCE
WORKING WITH CHILDREN
WITH. SEVERE EMOTIONAL
DISTURBANCE; OR OTHER
BACHELOR'S DEGREE FROM
AN ACCREDITED UNIVERSITY
OR COLLEGE WITH THREE (3)
.YEARS FULL-TIME OR EQUIV-
ALENT EXPERIENCE WORK-
ING WITH CHILDREN. WITH
SEVERE EMOTIONAL DISTUR-
BANCE, MASTER'S DEGREE
PREFERRED.
ADULT CASE
MANAGERS #2211
A BACHELOR'S DEGREE
FROM AN ACCREDITED UNI-
\ ERSITY OR COLLEGE WITH
A MAJOR IN COUNSELING, SO-
CIAL WORK, PSYCHOLOGY,
CRIMINAL JUSTICE, NURSING,
REHABILITATION, SPECIAL
EDUCATION, HEALTH EDUCA-
TION. OR A RELATED HUMAN
SERVICES FIELD A RELATED
HUMAN SERVICES FIELD IS
ONE IN WHICH' MAJOR
COURSE WORK INCLUDES
THE STUDY OF HUMAN BE-
HAVIOR AND DEVELOPMENT)
AND HAVE A MINIMUM OF
ONE YEAR OF FULL TIME OR
EQUIVALENT EXPERIENCE
WORKING WITHADULTS EX-
PERIENCING SERIOUS MEN-
TAL ILLNESS OR A BACHE-
LOR'S DEGREE FROM AN AC-
CREDITED UNIVERSITY OR
COLLEGE AND THREE YEARS
FULL TIME OR EQUIVALENT
EXPERIENCE WORKING WITH
ADULTS EXPERIENCING SE-
RIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS.
For more information and a
complete listing of available po-
sitions:
www.apalacheecenter.org
(850)523-3218 or (800)226-2931
x2218
Human Resources
2634-J Capital Circle N.E.,
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check An Equal Op-
portunity /Affirmative Action Em-
ployer Drug-Free Workplace.

Lead Singer Needed
Looking for an experienced,
dedicated, flexible singer for
a local rock band. Must have
experience. Call Dan at 850-'
973-2933 after 5 p.m.


Tractor and
Loader Operators
Are wanted in the Lee area.
Please call (800) 447-3304 ask
for Chad or Mas.


100 TALENT SCOUTS NEED-
ED! WORK FOR HOLLYWOOD
FROM YOUR HOME. NO EXPE-
RIENCE REQUIRED. WWW.JIM-
BROWNSCOUTS. COM
$$ AVON REPS $$
NEEDED NOW
50% COM.
Could Win $1,000
HURRY CALL
Dorothy
973-3153

Kountry Kitchen
Now Hiring
Full-Time Servers
(850) 971-0024


Deadline For Classified Advertising

Is At 5:30 p.m. On

The Monday Of The Week

You Want Your Ad To Run.


m___m______-


A Whole Lot Of Bang For Your Buck!!!
Classified Ads Are $12 For 196 characters
(including spaces). Your Ad Will Be Published
In Both The Madison County Carrier And The
Enterprise Recorder As Well As Being Placed
On The World Wide Web!


I


We're Online

And Your

Passified,

is Too!.-!!.


www.greenepublishing.com

































































The Jobing.com Career Expo is accessible to those with disabilities. 1 J

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4 FREE Adhlis iic'ri
4 FREE Resume Review
>* FREE Career Workshops


Bring a copy of your resume
on CD-ROM and make the
suggested changes from your
Resume Review on-site!


..annu.~ ~us1usrr -.- -




'' ii


HOP HOP HOP




HOP ON THE PHONE AND



ORDER YOUR HOMETOWN


) PAPER TODAK!



$28 Within Madison County


$35 Outside Madison County



850-973-4141





All In One Travel Mug
My wife has Rheumatoid Arthritis and small handled mugs
hurt her hands. So, I designed the "All In One Travel Mug" to
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I dean restaurant vent hoods for a living which puts me on
the road driving several hundred miles per day. En route to a
job, I'll typically stop for gas and a beverage. Using my "All In
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will only charge a small "refll price for my drink and my mug
is designed so that the beverage wilrlast for hours.
| The "All In One Travel Mug" comes with its own, specially de-
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rSlr~t u lenic O F eMlPIde~lDv*1t lu.B lak8r4il. 327


I AIXJNJ TV TV I


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
In The Matter Of The Adoption Of
R.H.F., a minor,


Case No.: 2006-433-DR
CIVIL DIVISION


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: EMMERSON H. FERRIS
c/o Alonzo Ferris
9941 Shoredale Drive
Santee, CA 92071-1625
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to adopt a male child, born on January
1, 1991 at St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, Florida, has been filed, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on Cary A. Hardee, II, Petitioner's attorney,
whose address is Post Office Drawer 450, Madison, Florida 32341 on or before November
10, 2006, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Petitioner's
attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court on this 5"h day of October, A.D. 2006.
\ TIM SANDERS
Clerk of the Court
By: April Herring, As Deputy Clerk
10/11,10/18,10/25,11/1






8,500 ACRES SELLING ABSOLUTE IN PARCELS
GUNNISON, COLORADO Prime land for
grazing and hunting
4 homes
Large hunting lodge
SWater rights

For more information contact: 800.558.5464

WW I) P.K [N G WWBW.JB P i* SKC5 BM


'AN CA *IIAD


Huntim fR ~ -s iha A F .I' Eo ma n g! ErsceoJu t o af aesi!Lan Greene at 5 0-7-4141. r M r DetaI.JiZJ.LflJJ X.J sI


Adoption
ADOPTION A nurturing family
seeks to adopt an infant to love and
cherish, We are financially secure to
provide a promising future. Please
call Christine and David at (888)322-
0924. #1704154

Announcements
What Destroys Relationships? 'An-
swer pg 446 Buy and Read Dianetics
by L. Ron Hubbard Send $8.00 to:
Hubbard Dianetics Foundation, 3102
N. Habana Ave., Tampa FL 33607
(813)872-0722.

Auctions
Estate Auction- November 3, 10am.
487+/- acres-divided. November 4,
10am, brick home & personal prop-
erty. Rowell Auctions, Inc. (800)323-
8388. 10% buyer's premium. GAL
AU-C002594
www. rowellauctions. coin.

Auction- November 4, 10am, Sylva-
nia, GA. Prop 1- 15 Res. Bldg lots &
8+/- acres. Prop 2-52+/- acres di-
vided. Rowell Auctions, Inc.
(800)323-8388.. 10% buyer's premi-
um. GAL AU-C002594
www. rowellauctions. com.

SELLING 182+/- ACRES AND
HOME at Auction, (SCHLEY CO.
GA. NOV. 4) Offered in Parcels,
Pond, Two Creeks, Pasture land,
Timber, Wildlife and Equipment
(866)300-7653 WWW.LAND2AUC-
TION.COM.

Building Supplies
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy
Direct From Manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available
(352)498-0778 Toll Free (888)393-
0335.

Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do
you earn $800/day? 30 Machines,
Free Candy All for $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033. CALL
US: We will not be undersold!

VENDING ROUTE: Snacks,
Drinks, Energy Drinks Too! All
Brands. All Sizes. Professional
Equipment, Professional Support. Fi-
nancing w/ $7,500 Down. (877)843-
8726, Local. BO#2002-037.

YOU WON'T SLEEP TONIGHT!


The "Ultimate Juice" money-making
opportunity is coming 12/01/06. Pre-
view at: *wwwi.JuicePerfect.com.
Don't miss this tremendous nutrition-
al technology breakthrough! FREE
Pre-registration!!


No Bull! I earn $500 daily just by
placing tiny little ads... You can too!
No Selling. Find out how..
www. lstepmaximizer.com/18140

A Chance of a Lifetime to own a'
Palms Weight Loss distributorship.
Work from anywhere. No Inventory.
Complete training. $41 billion indus-
try. Call (800)695-5380. info@Palm-
sWeightLoss.com.

Learn to buy Foreclosures, tax liens,
and rehabs for pennies on the dollar.
Mentor walks you through each deal
A-Z to ensure SUCCESS (800)433-
4556.

Help Wanted
$2,900 Weekly Guaranteed! Ad-
dressing letters in'your spare time.
Free postage/supplies. No experi- ,
ence necessary!! Start immediately,
write A&G Publications, 2370-G
Hillcrest Rd. #147-H, Mobile, AL
36695.


DRIVER: YOU WANT IT, WE
HAVE IT! Solo, teams, owner opera-
tors, company drivers, students, re-
cent grads, regional, dedicated, long
haul. Van, flatbed. Must be 21. CRST
Career Center. (800)940-2778,
www.driveforcrst.com.

OTR drivers deserve more pay and
more hometime! $.48/mi. 1 year
experience. More experience makes
more! Home weekends! Run our
Florida Region! Heartland Express
(800)441-4953 www.heartlandex-
press.com.

AMERICA'S DRIVING ACADE-
MY Start your driving career today!
Offering courses in CDL A. Low tu-
ition fee! Many payment options! No
registration fee! (866)889-0210
info @aamericasdrivingacademrv.com.

Driver- ACT NOW...Hiring OTR &
Local Drivers *Earn $4,000 in
bonuses your 1st year *New Equip-
ment *Premium Pay Package *No
HazMat Required -Call (877)882-
6537-Oakley Transport, We care


about our drivers!


TEAMS NEEDED. Home weekly.
Class A-CDL w/HAZMAT. TOP
PAY & BENEFITS. (800)428-0678.
www.Armellini.com.

Driver-HIRING QUALIFIED DRI-
VERS for Central Florida Local &
National OTR positions. Food grade
tanker, no hazmat, no pumps, great
benefits, competitive pay & new
equipment. Need 2 years experience.
Call Bynum Transport for your op-
portunity today. (800)741-7950.

Homes For Sale
FOR SALE BY OWNER 2BR
condo, St. Petersburg. 1 mile from
Gulf of Mexico/Don Cesar. On Isla
Del Sol golf course. Completely fur-
nished. $370,000. Call (859)608-
2213.

$0 DOWN HOMES Gov't & Bank
Foreclosures! Low or no down! No
credit OK! Call Now! (800)749-
2905.

Instruction
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR EMPLOYMENT:
Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders,
Dump Trucks, Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators; National Certification,
Job Placement Assistance; Associat-
ed Training Services (800)251-3274
www.equipmentoperator.com.


Heavy Equipment Operator CERTI-
FIED. Hands on Training. Job Place-
ment Assistance. Call Toll Free
(866)933-1575. ASSOCIATED
TRAINING SERVICES, 5177 Ho-
mosassa Trail, Lecanto, Florida,
34461.

Utility Job Training Certification
Training and Job Placement Program
Train in as little as 10 days Jobs
Available NOW! Contact UTA at
(918)225-0825 visit
www.utasearch. coin.

Land For Sale
40 acres with pond Near State &
Nat'1 Parks. Camp, Fish, Hunt.
$149,900 owner fin. $7995 down
(800)352-5263 Florida Woodland
Group, Inc. Lic RE Broker.

SW Georgia 203 Acres of planted
pines. 170 Acres,. 17 years old locat-
ed 4 miles west of Pelham. Excellent


Hunting! Prcea to selln Canl
(229)890-2589.

N. Fla 80 Ac $6200 per acre. Pines,
. hardwoods & creek. Homesites, hunt
or recreation. (800)294-2313 Ext
1185 A Bar Sales, Inc. 7 days 7am-
7pm.

Medical Supplies
FREE DIABETIC SUPPLIES!
MEDICARE PATIENTS! Call Us
* Toll Free (866)294-3476 and receive
a FREE METER! Am-Med Quality
Diabetic Supplies.

.Miscellaneous
DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS
children, etc. Only one signature re-
quired! *Excludes govt. fees! Call
weekdays (800)462-2000, ext.600.
(8am-6pm) Alta Divorce, LLC. Es-
tablished 1977.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from
Home. *Medical, *Business, *Para-
legal, *Computers *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance. Computer
provided. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121 www.onlineTide-
waterTech.com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified Job place-
ment assistance. CALL Aviation In-
stitute of Maintenance (888)349-
5387.


WOLFF TANNING BEDS Buy Di-
rect and Save! Full Body units from
$22 a month! FREE Color Catalog
CALL TODAY! (800)842-1305
www.np. etstan. coin.

Pools/Miscellaneous
2006 MODEL BLOWOUT!!! Ware-
house Clearance Sale on the New
Kayak Pool. SAVE $ thousands on
selected models limited supply!
FREE ESTIMATES Easy Finance
Fast Installation. Call (866)348-7560
www. kavakpoolsflorida. coin.

Real Estate
BEAUTIFUL N. CAROLINA. ES-
CAPE THE HEAT IN THE BEAU-
TIFUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS
OF WESTERN NC Homes, Cabins,
Acreage & INVESTMENTS.
CHEROKEE MOUNTAIN GMAC
REAL 'ESTATE. cherokeemountain-
realt:conm Call for free brochure


Dockable waterfront & deeded boat
slip water-access homesites. Below
appraisal! Lake Chatuge, GA/NC
Mountains! Excellent Financing!
Two-Day Sale Nov.. 4th & 5th! Ap-
pointment Only! (877)234-8850
ext. 102.

A LAND BARGAIN WYOMING
35 acres $49,900; 50 acres -
$59,900. Located 90 minutes east of
Salt Lake in the foothills of the Uin-
ta Mountains. Snow-capped moun-
tain views. Surrounded by gov't land.
Recreational paradise. EZ Terms.
Call Utah Ranches, LLC. (888)541-
5263.

BEAUTIFUL BLUE RIDGE, NC
Mountain Views. 8+ Acre Mountain
Estate. Heavily Wooded with
Stream. EZ Financing- $49,900.
(800)230-6380, ext. 120.

East Tennessee- Norris Lake 5.6 acre
wooded LAKEFRONT lot- $66,500
5.1 ACRE WOODED view lot-
$28,900 Call Lakeside Realty @
(423)626-5820 Or Visit
www. lakesiderealtv-mn.coin.

View Western North Carolina, North,
Georgia, Eastern TN, Real Estate.
Excellent retirement area. Very af-
fordable homes, cabins, land. Low
taxes. Good paying jobs available.
www.mtlakesreguide.com.

Gulf front lots $595k. Homes start-
ing mid $300k. New master planned
ocean front community on beautiful
Mustang Island, near Corpus Christi,
TX. www.cinnamonshore.cornm,
(866)891-5163.

Franklin, NC NEW Timber Frame
Home, Rustic Elegance, 2.7 ac, Cap-
tivating mtn. views, stream, ponds,
porch w/outdoor fireplace, 3BR,
3BA, Loft & Unfin. Basement
(770)998-0856, wwivw.ThePondat-
Featherstone.com.

MURPHY, NORTH CAROLINA
Affordable Homes in the Mountains.
Affordable Homes, Mountain Cabins
and Land. CALL FOR FREE
BROCHURE (877)837-2288 EXIT
REALTY MOUNTAIN VIEW
P R O P E R T I E S
www. exitmurphyi coim.


From $49,900, with boat slip. Call it:
(877)293-5253 or Click it:
www.GrandeVistaBav.com. Waters-
Edge Properties, Inc./Broker.

LAKE LOT CLOSE OUT SALE
Saturday, November 11. We'll make
your payments for the 1st year! Lake
Access Bargain $34,900. FREE
BOAT SLIPS! ,On spectacular
34,000 acre recreational lake in East-
ern Tennessee, Surrounded by state
forest. Limited # available. Call to-
day for early appointment (800)704-
3154 X 880, TN Land Partners, LLC
10% down, balance financed 1 year
@ 7.25% fixed, 1 year balloon,
OAC, payment $189.77/month.

VA MOUNTAIN LOG CABIN un-
finished inside, view, trees, private,
large creek and river nearby,
$139,500 owner (866)789-8535.

New, Pre-Construction Golf Com-
munity- Coastal Georgia. Large lots
w/ deepwater, marsh, golf, nature
views. Gated, Golf, Fitness Center,
Tennis, Trails. Oak Park, Docks.
$70k's $300K (877)266-7376
www. cooperspoint. coin.

NC Gated Lakefront Community.
Pleasantly mild climate 1.5 acres, 90
miles of shoreline. Never offered be-
fore with 20% pre-development dis-
counts, 90% financing. Call
(800)709-5253.

Steel Buildings
STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory Deals.
Save $$$. 40 x 60' to 100 x 200'. Ex:
50 x 100 x 12' = $3.60/sq ft.
(800)658-2885.
www. rigidbuilding. com.

PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL
BUILDINGS. 30x40 was $13,200
now $6,800. 40x60 $21,860 now
$10,520. 60x80 $36,120 now
$17,740. Other sizes up to 100,000
sf. Erection Available. (800)720-
6857.

SPECIAL BUILDING SALE...
"DON'T MISS IT!" Fall delivery or
deposit holds till spring. 25'x40'xl4'
$5800. 40'x60'xl6' $12,800. Front
end optional. Other sizes available.
Pioneer. (800)668-5422.


Advertising Network Of FforitdJ


.VCUI ZII 19 J. LVVU1


Orfnher 9.- 9006


vv ecaUIIuayv


Madison County Carrier 9B







NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the intention of the Town Council of the Town of Lee,
Florida, pursuant to Section 166.041, Florida Statutes, to consider the adoption of a pro-
posed ordinance at the regular meeting of said Town Council to be held on November 7,
2006 at 7 p.m. at the Town Hall, the title to which is as follows:
Ordinance 2006-09
An Ordinance of the Town of Lee, Florida to annex certain property contiguous to the
Town of Lee and redefine the boundary lines of the Town of Lee to include said proper-
ty; providing for severability; providing for repeal of conflicting ordinances; and pro-
viding an effective date. 15-1S-10-1257-001 & 15-1S-10-1257-001
Ordinance 2006-10
An Ordinance of the Town of Lee, Florida to annex certain property contiguous to the
Town of Lee and redefine the boundary lines of the Town of Lee to include said proper-
ty; providing for severability; providing for repeal of conflicting ordinances; providing
an effective date. 22-1S-10-1297

The ordinance will be effective upon adoption.
The proposed ordinance may be inspected by the public at the Town Hall, 286 N.E. Coun-
ty Road 255, Lee, Florida, All interested persons may appear at the said meeting to be
held on November 7, 2006 to be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance.
YOU WILL PLEASE BE GOVERNED ACCORDINGLY.
ANY PERSON who decided to appeal any decision made by the Town Council with re-
spect to any matter considered at such meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and
that, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the ap-
peal is to be based.

10/25,11/3


1.11


(8OUU0)i-6ooo.







10B Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, October 25, 2006


Located In Northern Madison County...


3RD ANNUAL


"MIDNIGHT SUN" HORSE SHOW


Sof Qcuitmanv Supports the/
"M d*iht suv Hcre S w"



The Citizens National
Bank of Quitman

100 East Stevens Street Quitman, GA
229-263-7575
FpiC Telephone Banking 229-263-9719


This is the life-size bronze statue of Midnight Sun. This
statue is the onl3 life-size statue of a Tennessee Walking
Horse in existence.


Excavation
Demolition
Dumptrucks
Pond & Lake
Construction
Top Soil Fill Dirt
Said Clay LueJI.frdi
Burned Structures
Sitework
Clearing


& olition Specialist
,. For ": ,,.
Professional
Service and
Quality Work
GALL
ZAC WHITE
or .. ,,,
R BERT WHITE

41


SQuality


Dry


Cleaners


101 N. \Vebster St.
Quitiman, GA.
229-263-4149


The Quitman/Brooks
County Museum & Cultural
Center proudly presents the
3rd Annual "Midnight Sun"
Charity Horse Show & Festi-
val. This show won
TWBEA'S Emerald Award
for "Best New Show" in its
first year.
The horse show and fes-
tival has something for
everyone!! The arena built
two years ago is situated near
the Plantation Mansion and
overlooks hayfields, orchards
and forest. The location is a
natural for the beautiful Ten-
nessee Walking horses who
perform there.
* There will be active artL
exhibitions as well as tours1,in
the Mansion. On Wednesday,
there is a luncheon and fash-
ion show and on Thursday
evening there is a cocktail
-party, banquet, and dancing
under the stars. Tickets for
these two events must be or-
dered in advance.
The horse shows are on
Friday and Saturday nights,
with a free "thank-you" BBQ
and live music on Friday af-
ternoon preceding the show
for all the owners, exhibitors,
trainers, grooms, and volun-
teer workers. On Saturday
night,, after the show, there
will be a free full country
breakfast in the mansion.
There is ample parking,
including favorable sites with
water for campers. Food &
craft vendors, carriage rides,
conducted nature rides and
live music are all on site.
Box seats including 6 chairs
& surrounding the arena are
available for both nights for
$100.00. Hors d'oeuvres will
be provided for. Box Seat
Holders.
Over $29,000 in prize
money will be a\ arded in 28
classes on Friday night and
28 classes on Saturday night.
Ribbons will be awarded
in all classes and floral horse
shoes will be awarded in
Championship Classes.
Our first two years have
been very. successful with
thousands of attendees and a
great competition.
The 14,000 square foot
mansion, not counting the
third floor servants' quarters,
the basement and other ser-
vice areas is located miles
from any paved highway and
looms impressively on a
knoll surrounded by the
beauty of its natural environ-
ment. Its very isolation en-
hances the uniqueness of
this neo-classical mansion.
The house was designed
by internationally renowned
architect John Russell Pope.
Mr. Pope, known in the ar-
chitectural world as "the last
of the Romans", set the clas-
sic style for architecture in
Washington, D.C., with his
design for the Jefferson


f "O t' r"



C tL-f FS1. FSB

602 E. Screven Street Quitman, GA
229-263-7538


Proudly Supports

The Quitman Brooks County Museum

And Cultural Center's

3rd Annual


"Midnight Sun" Charity


Horse Show & Festival


Memorial, the National
Archives, the National
Gallery of Art, as well as
other Washington momnu-
ments. His influence helped
to make the Nation's Capitol
one of the world's most clas-
sic cities.
The mansion at Dixie,
begun in 1938 and complet-
ed in 1940, is one of the only
two residences of his design
in the south. He also de-
signed one for "millionaires
row" on Jekyll Island, Geor-
gia.
This year's event will
start on Tuesday, October
31st and.run through Sun-
day, November 5th. The
mansion will be the scene of
a Ladies Luncheon and
Show on Wednesday, No-
vember 1 and on Thursday,
November 2nd, a gala can-
dlelight dinner, cocktail hour
and dance will begin at 6:00.
Friday, November 3rd begin-
ning at 3:30 a BBQ meal
will be served at the arena
with live country band free
to all horse people, and vol-
unteers, tickets will be avail-.
able.
The Tennessee Walking
Horse Show will begin at the
Horse Show Arena at 5:00
p.m. Beginning Saturday,
November 4th at 9:00 a.m.,
a guided .trail ride for plea-
sure horse riders of all ages
(bring your own horse).
Have lunch and shop with
area vendors.. Beginning at
5:00 p.m. the second night
of the Horse Show opens
with a costume parade by
area 4-H Horse Clubs.
Box seats are available
for the horse show. Break-
fast is served in the Mansion
after the Horse Show for
Horse People and Volun-
teers.
On Saturday morning,
9:00 am, there will be a guid-
ed trail ride for pleasure
horse riders of all ages. Rid-
ers must provide their own
mounts. Lunch break on
your own back at the arena
and then continue the trail
ride.
An Entertaining Cultur-
al Event with History, Art,
Music and Activities for
everyone. A revival of a
Plantation that is a part of
our History. One Major
Fundraiser to raise the, fi-
nances to support the Muse-
um and Cultural for the
year.
The event is located on
the Dixie Plantation about
15 miles out of Quitman,on
*the Monticello Highway,
Once you turn in at the Plan-
tation entrance, there is a
three mile stretch of dirt
road before you come to the
Mansion, Horse Show Arena
and Stables. Primitive
Camping sites are available
(generators welcome). We
have plenty of outdoor light-
ing. RV's and campers are
welcome.
Each year the M & CC
holds a charity event for
raising the necessary funds
to carry out our mission.
For the third year in a row,
they feel proud that the
Geraldine C.M. Livingston
Foundation has again given
us a special opportunity to
host a horse show and festi-
val at the famous Dixie
Plantation in Greenville,
Florida. The Livingston
family owned Midnight
Sun, perhaps the most pres-
tigious Tennessee Walking
Horse to have ever lived.


To order tickets, box
seats, or make stall reserva-
tions, please call the M &
CC at (229) 263-6000 or
(229) 263-3333. Orders
may be paid for by credit
card or check and may be
mailed or picked up upon
arrival at the show.


The entrance to the Livingston Mansion, located in
Greenville, is impressive.


Monticello

Milling Company

Open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday & Saturdays 8 a.m. until 12 noon
Benny Rishop, Owner
700 E. York St Monticello, FL 32345
850-997-5521 850-997-5525
Feed Seed Fertilizer
Farm Livestock Supplies
Pre Bulk Feed Delivery


Veterinary Associates Monticello
J.L. Spencer, DVM
Laitir and Small Animal Medicine & Surgery* Lameness
HcidL Health* Indoor Boodii,,, Dentistry
Prescription Diets Flea Control Products f^..
24 Hour Emergency Service Available '
Hours:
Mon. Fri. 7am 6pm r
Sat. 8am 12pm
.Appointments Preftr r\d

1599 N. Jefferson St. -
'Ionticello. Florida
Call After Hours/Emergencies .
l(850) 997-2506 (850) 997-0229 -\


The entrance to the Dixie Plantation, the site for the
Midnight Sun Horse Show and Festival, north of Greenville,
is ready to open to guests.

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ADEL


FEED 8 SEED
804 W. Mitchell St. Adel, GA
800-772-9946

We Have Bermuda

Hay & Southern State

Horse Feed






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