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Madison County carrier
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00011
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Portion of title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: June 14, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID: UF00067855:00011

Full Text
























Two Injured;

One Arrested
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A two-car accident ended
with both cars totaled and both
drivers sustaining injuries.
One of the drivers was charged
with DUI and taken to the
Madison County Jail.
According to a Florida
Highway Patrol report, the
crash occurred Saturday, June
10, at approximately 10:50
p.m. at U.S. 90 and U.S. 221 in
Greenville.
Herman Eugene English.
li, of Greem'lle, as eist-
bounud on U.S 91) and v. as
Please See Arrest. Page 4A

Celebrating


Flag Day


Veanesda\. June 1-. 1_
Flag Day. The holiday \as puti
into effect by President
Woodrow Wilson on June 14,
1916. The date was chosen be-
cause the flag was commis-
sioned on June 14, 1777.
Sentimental writers and
orators sometimes ascribe
meanings to the colors in the
flag. The practice is erroneous
as are statements on this stub-
ject attributed to George Wash-
ington and other founders of
the country.
From the book Our Flag
published in 1989 by the
House of Representatives:
"On July 4, 1776, the Con-
tinental Congress passed a res-
olution authorizing a commit-
tee to devise a seal for the
United States of America. This
mission, designed to reflect the
Founding Fathers' beliefs, val-
ues, and sovereignty of the
Please See Flag Day, Page 4A


3 Sections, 36 Pages
Around Madison Co........ 5-8A
Church...................Section C
Classifieds........................6B
Community Calendar..........5A
Health.......................10-11A
Hurricane Preparedness......2B
Legals.............................. 7B
Obituaries...........................5A
Outdoors.......................... 4B
School............................ 1& 3B
Viewpoints ......................2-3A








S"Copyrighted Material
S Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers'


s-c is.'


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison Police De-
partment made four drug busts
last week.
According to the MPD,
one arrest came on Thursday,
June 8, when Patrolman Jim-
my Fletcher arrested 17-year-
old Ryshaad Robinson for
possession of marijuana with


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A teenager was seriously
injured in a one-car auto acci-
dent on Friday, June 2.
-.-Ac.cordin.g 'to ..a. Florida,


intent to sell, trespass after
warning and introduction of
contraband into a detention fa-
cility.
Fletcher was on foot pa-
trol inside Madison Heights
Apartments when he noticed
Robinson sitting on the steps
of the "J" building. Fletcher
placed Robinson under arrest
for trespass after warning.


Highway Patrol report, Delay-
na J. Benton, 17, was headed
east on Interstate 10 when she
ran off onto the south shoulder
and traveled 110 feet. The
1994 Acura she was driving


Fletcher had issued a tres-
pass warning against Robin-
son on March 30.
Fletcher asked Robinson
if he had anything illegal on
him. Robinson answered that
he did not.
In the search incident to
the arrest, Fletcher found bag-
gy containing marijuana in
Robinson's blue backpack.


then continued 180 feet, as it
went into and through the me-
diant.,
Benton's car then traveled
60 feet across the westbound
Please See Wreck, Page 4A


Graffiti Sprayed in Skate Park

The Madison Police
"a-sa; t-."" + -Department is looking for
a guy named "Josh" who
*- .-.- may be responsible for
the graffiti left here at the
skate park at Lanier Field
S *.r -;. in Madison. Estimated
r.. ---'"o' "- 1 damage where the graffiti
,(-, '" ^. was left was $250. If you
S-have any information on
this crime, please call the
-_^ MPD at 973-5077. (Greene
'Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Jesse Covell, June 12,
2006)
te- *


Fletcher found the rest of the
backpack was empty.
At the jail, the correction
officer found three more bag-
gies containing marijuana on
Robinson's person.
After Fletcher charged
Robinson, with the three
crimes listed above, the De-
Please See Drug Busts, Page
4A


Mario Howard


Pridgeon Retires


Because Of DROP


George Pridgeon
By Jacob Bemibry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
George Pridgeon will re-
tire as principal at Greenville
Elementary School in a few
weeks.
Pridgeon will be missed
by not only his colleagues at
Greenville Elementary, but b\
his students and their parents
at Greenville.
A number of teachers and
staff from Greenville called
this newspaper.' They in-
formed this reporter that Prid-
geon would stay if he were al-


lowed to under the state's De-
ferred Retirement Option'Pro-
gram (DROP).
Teachers and other staff
members may defer their
DROP for three years, if they
have both the principal and
the superintendent's recom-
mendation. Barbara Robin-
son, a second grade teacher at
Lee Elementary School. is
one of the employees who has
decided to do this before.
Principals and adminis-
trative staff at the School
Board. Office cannot defer
their DROP.
Pridgeon did say that one
thing that can be done is to re-
tire and sit out a month. The
retiree. can then return to
work after drawing one reLire-
ment check, but he would
have to wait another year to
draw another retirement
check. The retiree would have
to return to the first step on
: the pay scale in his division:


Ernest M. Page, Jr. Dies


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Ernest M. Page, Jr., local
attorney at law, died Sunday,
June 11, 2006, in Madison.
Born in Jasper on Septem-
ber 18, 1922, he was the son of
the late Ernest Maloney Page
and Bessie Prince Page.
Page grew up in
Greenville and graduated from
Greenville High School. Page
has lived in Madison since
1948 after receiving his law
degree from the University of
Florida in Gainesville.
Page -was a veteran of
World War II, serving in the
U.S. Army Air Corps in the
29th Bomb Group. He retired
as a lieutenant colonel and was


Ernest M. Page, Jr.
chosen to attend the National
War College in 1963.
Page was a member of the
First Baptist Church in Madi-
son and was chairman of the
Building Committee in 1956.
Please See Page Dies, Page
4A


EMS Passes State Inspection


, Headlines In Review
"Smiihfield Ti Close MNadison Plant." :lUi, Eii[, AiE Rn -R/.riii. JIune I Y..
"- 2 si. mirlthI J Food . a i:\. iiii.a-aed mn j-proicess coni'l erat'i e a nnourI J d
i the C lI.I 're >t Its iladiscrn plant ,ri Thuirtda, IlThe l u- re '. ill ittciffe C 4Sh Cn-ifl, eemse
S Tinm Scel',. 'ent.i ice-prict derit of Smithfield Pa.CLIa '. nd that. .-h Sni i r liel-l
had puricha \Viin-Do,.e in 2i i4. the pl.a1t 1' .1- nt1 luri- inrIg at lull LapajctL \ it had been Snith-
tield N pli, i' t,- be jable to !il' '[ Ia t'ull l. paJ l;, 111 ei ht-I- Hur _h ttt f'.e ..,r -. ,. dJ ,.
a ee ', .
"It '.' is not I able [t., '"pe Iat- c I t ih t ,. .. h,:'.e. cr." Seel', id. "becc.uiC e ,'t a 'I t
in pit-'eonl in the v.''rild' ide mnarker
The M.liadsi-'o Countm, Del'elopm'ireni Co 'uiKtil had a meeLinn2 plamied fir Tue'dal,
June 13. t. J.discu s Sn'iith'ie-lds cl-in bhut it .a- .caii'celled because i:t iclenmrentr
ilt.ejther cL..ied b', Trii'pical .Storm A.\ erto The lieetin2 t', ill ibe ri-ichedulcd .1t ltat-
Please See headlines, Page 4\


Juan Botino
By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Tuesday, May 23,
Madison County Emergency
Medical Services (EMS) re-
ceived an unannounced Com-
pliance Monitoring site sur-
vey/inspection conducted by
the Department of Health, Bu-
reau of EMS.
According to Madison
County EMS Director, Juan
Botino, the State Inspector re-


viewed the department's Ad-
ministrative Records, Train-
ing Records, EMS Manage-
ment practices, run reports, all
vehicles, equipment, crew
members and proctols.
The only deficiency not-
ed that was corrected during
the inspection was a missing
fire extinguisher.
The Madison County
EMS department is proud to
announce that they received a
"no deficiencies" rating,
which is the highest score
awarded for any state inspec-
tions.
Additionally, the previous
inspections have all been ex-
cellent with no deficiencies.
Botino commented, "I
would like to congratulate all
the members of Madison
County EMS for the excellent
inspection."


MPD Makes Four Drug Busts


Teenager Injured In Wreck


Firefighters and EMS personnel help Delayna J. Benton to the ambulance. Benton
was injured when she left the eastbound lane, traveled across the 'median and went
into the woods on the westbound lane side of 1-10. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Jacob Bembry, June 2, 2006)







2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 14, 2006



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.

Drivers Need To "Slow Down" For Fire Trucks


Wandering
With The Publisher
Mary Ellen Greene



May Each And Every Father Have A
Wonderful Day Sunday, June 18th
This Sunday is Father's Day, a day dedicated to the men in
the world, and all the ones who have shaped so many lives.
It was Shakespeare, in The Merchant of Venice, who
said... "It is a wise father that knows his own child."
And, it was Robert Frost who said, "You don't have to.de-
serve your mother's love. You have. to deserve your father's.
He's more particular."
I am fortunate to have a loving and kind father who loved
our mother dearly, and all five of his children. My Dad, William
Buford Selman, is still living today, and at 95 years old, he has
left us so many examples of how a Christian father should be.
And, by his example, he has children who have been able to car-
ry that love into their lives, their children's, and their families.
I was lucky to marry a man who also had that deep, abiding
love for his mother and father, his children, and his grandchil-
dren, and they, too, have carried it into their lives.
So, today....I wish all Fathers a Happy Father's' Day, and to
my father, my husband, our two sons, our son-in-law,' and my
two brothers, I wish them a special and happy day Sunday. I
also remember, fondly, Tommy's father, Thomas Harvey
Greene, Sr., who was such a big influence on us both, as were
all of my uncles, and my Grandfather Jonah Selman.
Fathers, everywhere, I salute you today!
You deserve our praise, and we applaud you.
"No other success in life -- not, being President, or being
wealthy, or going to college, or writing ,a book, or anything else
-- comes up to the success of the man or woman who can feel
that they have done their duty and that their children and grand-
children rise up and call them blessed."


How do you
feel about the
push for a
gay marriage
ban?


Thomas Harvey Greene


Dear Editor,
Hopefully you will consider printing this. While I was vis-
iting family in Duval and Clay last week something occurred in-
volving a Duval fire truck which also happens to our fire de-
partment in Lee quite often.
My daughter and I were approaching a green traffic signal
at the intersection on Normandy, Lenox and Lakeshore when
we heard sirens and, of course stopped immediately upon real-
izing a fire truck was racing west on Normandy-we were on
Lenox.
To our amazement, two drivers in white cars, determined to
make the green light, raced across in front of the truck. The first
one barely made it, the second one only by the alertness and
quick action of the fire truck driver who managed somehow to
slow down just enough to save both that driver and us..
My daughter had thrown her hands before her face for, if
the truck had hit the white car, it would have been catapulted


right into us. I do hope the other fireman managed to get the li-
cense number he was certainly trying to.
This same thing happens frequently to our men who com-
prise one of the very best volunteer fire departments anywhere.
One of them, in a recent monthly report to our town council (of
which I am a member) told us that he often has to slow on our
main street when approaching U.S. 90 with lights flashing and
sirens blaring because so seldom do drivers even slow down,
much less stop for them. And so many times they are trying to
reach a wreck on nearby Interstate 10 where lives may depend
on their expertise (they also carry EMTS) or their jaws of life
equipment.
These selfish people should be made to equip their vehicles
with huge signs stating, "Me, Me, Me-I'm the only one who
matters."
Thank you,
Thelma Thompson


Children's Lives Are At Risk!


These children's lives are at risk! Every time I see the red
Jeep riding around the town of Madison, or at the school I see
usually about three children in the jeep with this driver. The
children are crawling all over the jeep, standing up, climbing
over seats, and none are apparently in their seatbelts. The safe-
ty of the children are at risk with this driver. Does this driver
think themself above the law? Why hasn't something been done


to stop this driver before now? If I have noticed it, I know there
are many others who have. If this person sees this letter in the
paper, maybe the person will begin to use seatbelts when riding
with those children. My purpose is not to hurt any individual
but to save the lives of those innocent children.
A Concerned Citizen in Madison


Online Question of the WeekResults,


', V


El --j'
:1 MA

42 j: I. ,


In today's column, I would
also like to wish our little
granddaughter, Jade, a very
happy birthday.
Jade Coralee Greene is a big
"6 years old" today, June 14th.
Jade was born on a very spe-
cial day, "Flag Day." We will
delight in getting the family
together to celebrate "her
day."
"Nuff said...Bye for now...
See 'ya.."


Family: Husband, Jim
Reside: Bellville
Occupation: Works at the Madison County Li-
brary; helps run the front desk, performs clerical tasks
and decorating.
Spare time: I enjoy riding my horses and my
four-wheeler.
Favorite Football Team: The Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers.
If you could visit any place in the world: Alas-
ka, because its "God's Country." "It is beautiful
there!"


a 20 30 40 so

Go onlie to www.greenepublishing.com to answer this week's question..
How do you feel about the U.S, presence in Iraq?
tg eds m ay, June 191h at 9 a.m.* One vote per m er, pa.upiate votes ae rem )


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Wednesday, June 14, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com


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Miadison Lounty carrier Od


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee Limelight
Jacob Bembry
Columnist




VBS At Macedonia And

Lee First Baptist Churches
Vacation Bible School will run through Wednesday evening
at Macedonia Baptist Church and will begin Sunday evening at
Lee First Baptist Church. I hope everyone is able to get their
children out to enjoy the services at these churches.
/On Sunday, June 18, my father, as well as all the other fa-
thers in the congregation will be recognized at Midway Church
of God during a special Father's Day service, beginning at 11
a.m. (Sunday School is at 10 a.m.). Lee Worship Center will
also recognize its fathers during the morning worship service
and gospel sing, which will begin at 10 a.m.
Happy birthday wishes go out to Cody Cline, who cele-7
brates his big day on Friday, June 16. Cary Phillips will cele-
brate his birthday on Saturday, June 17. Da%\ n Phillips will cel-
ebrate her birthday on Sunday, June 18. Margie Phillips will cel-
ebrate her birthday on Monday, June 19. My first cousin. Jamie
Wilson, will'celebrate his 32nd birthday on Tuesday, June 20.
Donn Bonebreak will celebrate his birthday the same day.
I would like to extend a happy 43rd anniversary wish to
Gene and Geraldine Stokes on Thursday, June 15, and a happy
50th anniversary wish to Elvoye and Betty Thomas on Friday,
June 16. I hope there are many more happy ones for all of you!
That's all the news for this week. Have a great week and a
beautiful forever! May God bless each and every one of you!




.Madison Gatepost

Ginger Jarvis
Columnist



Madison Is Relaxing

Into Summer
Eveyt.hin g is quiet on the MNladisln n-rfrl. Olr Di opl arie but
in boats, off at Grandma's, or just generally kicking back. With
summer, the populace has found time to rest and relax.:
Our landscape is certainly changing. What with one house
being moved to the bed and breakfast place, another being de-
molished, and the new bank foundation starting to take shape,
we're getting a different skyline. All this activity is certainly en-
couraging.
Discouraging indeed was'the news that Smithfield is closing
our local plant. Many people will be seeking employment, and
we offer words of hope to them and their families.
We don't know who they were, but a big. bunch of folks
were out on Pickle Lane installing a gleaming white fence near
St. Luke Church. It surely does look good, y'all.
We wish a happy birthday this week to Stephanie DePriest,
June 15; Hilda Dixon and Bill McCain,. June 16; Jarod Johnson,
Linda Cherry, Georgia Salls, and Jeff Bloodworth, June 18;.
Josh Siekbert, Meghan Maultsby, Brian Snowhill, and Amy
Hutcheson, June 20; and Nicole Choice, June 21. May you all
have a joyful natal day.
David and Cathy Studstill will mark their wedding anniver-
sary on June 15, and Roy and Alicia Hibbs observe theirs on
June 19. We wish both couples a blessed day of celebration.
Picket Fence Pride: the brilliant hydrangeas in the lot beside
Hall's Tire, in the yard across Hwy. 90 from there, and in Jim
and Ikathy Sale's yard. Blue, white, pink -- what marvelous col-
ors in our scenery.
Let's add VeEtta Hagan-Smith to our prayer list. She is re-
covering from knee surgery.
We extend our condolences to the family of Evelyn Pulliam
in their time of mourning. This active, caring lady will certainly
be missed in her church and community.
We send our sympathies to the family of Ernest Page as they
mourn his passing. This elegant gentleman was an integral part
of our civic community for many years.
As ; ou look io\ ard the weekend, remember that Sunday is
Father's Da. Buy a card and plan a steak cookout to show your
love for the man who has meant so much to you.
Send your news to Gatepost at javvag@hotmail.com, leave
a message at (850) 973-4141, or drop a note by the Greene Pub-
lishing Building on S Hwy. 53.
Meet you at the gatepost next week.




Chosen one of Florida's Three Outstanding Newspapers


Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express read-
ing pleasures of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or
future residents. .
Published weekly by Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695 South State Road
53, Madison, Florida 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Office
in Madison, Florida 32340.


POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY
CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news'
matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be
for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and
to investigate any advertisement submitted.


Subscribe Today!


Call Carla At: 973-4141


Kathy Fleming
Family: Husband, Robert; three children and three
grandchildren.
Residence: Ma)o o
Title: Phlebotomist
Main responsibility: To see that the
hospital's patients are given efficient
and compassionate care. ,
Spare time: Raises African Boar
goats and enjoys fostering five rodeo
horses.

David Abercrombie
Family: Wife, Cheryl and four chil-
dren. .
Residence: Madison
Title: Administrator ..
Main responsibility: Manage every-
day activities of the hospital.
Spare time: .Local ti a eling and:visit-
inc with relatives.

Eleanor Aranda
Family : Husband. Bob of 44 years f
marriage! Also, they have three chil-
dren, five grandchildren and one great
S. .grandchild!
Residence: Madison
Title: Administrator's assistant.
Main responsibility: To assist the ad-
ministrator in. all venues, coordinate
all meetings, liaison with the hospital
and the board and ciedentialing for phyxsiias for. all
m e ai-.l- a - ,,:' ', I ,
Spare time: Spendhmg,4it0#% vvitif L f1 4 W"
house, cooking, attending church., reading and %watching
movies!

Barbara Lee
Family: Four kids; Darrell, Aysha,
Chris and David.
Residence: Madison
Title: Housekeeping .
Main responsibility: Keeping the .
hospital clean!
Spare time: Cooking, cleaning and
church! '


Velma Andrews vs. William A. Bailey, et al-mortgage fore-
closure
Lashea Davis and DOR vs. Curtis Johnson, Jr.-support
Nancy Williams and DOR vs. Jo Powell-support
Peachtrina Thompkins and DOR vs. Shawn Livingston-
support
Grace Anderson and DOR vs. Luther Fleming-support
Tiffany Surles and DOR vs. Norman Rogers-support
Diamond Boatman and DOR vs. Jeremy Irvine-support
Jamie Williams and DOR vs. ,Willie Glee-support
Shemata Walker and DOR vs. Andjuan McIntyre-support
Robin Hart and DOR vs. Gene Russell III-support
Alberta Harris and DOR vs. Angela Young-support
Julia Wilson and DOR vs. Constance Jay-support
Shannon Harper and DOR vs. Louis Anderson-support
i Sophia Bruton and DOR vs. Shawn Davis-support
Diinyt Pla and DOR vs. Pedro Ayala-support
Jaime C. Tanner vs. Patrick James McCarthy, Jr.-domestic
injunction
Lesa Gardner vs. Corine Murray-support
21st Century Mortgage Group vs. John F. McBride-mort-
gage foreclosure
Charlie Lamar Martin vs. Sarah Frances Martin-simple dis-
solution
Lakoshia Powell and DOR vs. Joseph Jackson-support
Midfirst Bank vs. Jamie L. Griffin and Steve Harmon-mort-
gage foreclosure
Jerry Miller for Millie B. Miller, Tameka Wright vs. John-
ny Williams-repeat domestic injunction
Rachel D. Gee vs. Marion Gee-domestic injunction
Camarra N. Crumitie vs. Billy R. Crumitie-dissolution of
marriage


S973 -



-N


Vietnam: A Tragedy Of Errors
I confess to having a preoccupation with the Vietnam War
for understandable reasons. First, it was to date the only war in
our nation's history where we lost. Secondly, it is arguably our
greatest foreign policy disaster of the 20th Century. And third,
this is the war I participated in as a young man. I lost a lot of
good friends over there, and I am determined to understand why
that happened so we don't repeat the mistake.
"Dereliction of Duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara,
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies that led to Vietnam" is a
1997 history by H. R. McMaster. When McMaster wrote the
book, he was an Army major working on his PhD dissertation.
Today, he is a colonel and armor commander, recently returned
from a tour of duty in Iraq. The book is well researched and doc-
umented and his perspective is important.
"Dereliction of Duty" focuses on the time period of No-
vember 1963 to July 1965 when decisions were made by the
Johnson Administration that slowly but inextricably entangled
our nation into conflict in Southeast Asia. What I want to do in
this article is not regurgitate the history but rather, focus on the
major mistakes that led to greater involvement in the fortunes of
Vietnam and eventually, to the deaths of more than 58 thousand
young Americans and countless Vietnamese.
Beginning with the Kennedy Administration, there was a
deep-seated mistrust of the professional military. Advice from
military professionals beginning with the Joint Chiefs was usu-
ally not sought and frequently circumvented. The Vietnam War
was largely run by a handful of Pentagon and State Department
civilians ten thousand miles from the action who were primari-
ly lawyers and academics by .trade. Dissenting voices among
the Joint Chiefs were muzzled and then replaced by more com-
pliant officers. There was no unified military authority for con-
duct of the war. Parochial interests divided the ser\ ices so they
could not speak w ith a central % oice.
In the fall of 1963. the Kennedy Adnmnistration approved a
military coup against South Vietnam's president Diem and his
brother which led to both of their deaths. At that point, the Unit-
ed States assumed control of South Vietnam's overnmment.
Over the next twelve years. no less than 15 separate go\em-
ments formed a revolving door among Saigon's leadership. e
-,mnese people i t'ih t. ot
Secre r of Defense f oerr sevv lessons tronm
the October 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis which he thought could
be applied to Vietnam. His theory of "gradual response" was
based on the assumption that the two issues were similar al-
though their differences are both significant and obvious.
The theory behind gradual response x as to "send a message
to the leaders of North Vietnam" that %we would oppose their
support for the Viet Cong's insurgency.- That strategy ceded ini-
tiative to the enemy: the United States v\as al% ay s in a position
to respond to enemrn provocation by matching "tit for tat It
also assumed that there %w as a direct relationship berteen,the
north's support and the level of \ violence in the south.
The objective for the w ar w~as ne er clear and'as such.
changed with time; First it was to ensure a free and democratic
ally in South Vietnam by containing Communism. Over time,
the mission morphed from protecting American prestige, to
achieving a political stalemate. Since the objective changed
over time, the military strategy never matched the goals of the
Administration. In early 1965, the admonition from the presi-
dent was to "kill more Viet Cong" which resulted in the infa-
mous body-counts of a war of attrition.
In 1964, LBJ deferred decisions on Vietnam in favor of his
upcoming election. Following his landslide victory, he again
deferred major decisions to not derail his legislative priority, the
Great Society. By always choosing a middle ground and failing
to focus the strategic view, the U.S. was led inexorably into a
war it chose by default.
LBJ made purposeful decisions in early 1965 that kept Con-
gress from debating the issue. First, he avoided a supplemental
appropriation for the war's cost and then decided against re-
serve mobilization. In the process of bypassing Congressional
debate, he avoided tough questions that would likely have chal-
lenged his approach and assumptions. These decisions, partic-
ularly the failure to call up Reserves, delivered a long-term
wrecking ball to the military, and the army in particular, that
would not be overcome for 15 years.
The decision to put "boots on the ground" and change their
mission from defensive to offensive violated the counsel to
avoid a ground war in Asia. Among other things, this caused the
North Vietnamese to step up their support for the war. The ad-
dition of ground forces were not accompanied with any change
in strategy other than "keep from losing."
In the epilogue, McMaster observes: "The imperative to
contain Communism was an important factor in Vietnam policy,
but neither American entry into the war nor the manner in which
the war was conducted was inevitable. The United States went
to war in Vietnam in a manner unique in American history.
Vietnam was not forced on the United States by a tidal wave of
Cold War ideology. It slunk in on cat's feet."
If you are a Vietnam veteran, or interested in the history of
this period, or question political opportunists who try to make
the comparison of Vietnam and Iraq, I highly recommend you
read "Dereliction of Duty."








4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 14, 2006




LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER



SBank Robber ArrestedMadison CountyCrime Report
Bank .... o.


Man Arrested For Violation

Of Injunction


A Madison man was ar-
rested for violation of an in-
junction on Thursday, June 8.
According to a Madison
Police Department report, the
person who had filed the in-
junction against Sherard Bay-
nard, 22, entered the police
station at approximately 4
p.m. that day.
She said that Baynard had
called her cell phone several
times and left messages on it.
While the victim was at the
police department, Baynard
called her.
The injunction filed
against Baynard said that Bay-
nard was riot to have any con-
tact with the victim.
Cpl. Chris Cooks made
contact with Baynard on


Snerard Bayhard


Haynes Street and transported
him to the Madison County
Jail.
Baynard had reportedly
beaten the victim two weeks
earlier.


A Madison man was ar-
rested for trespass after warn-
ing on Thursday, June 8.
According to a Madison
Police Department report, .Pa-
trolman Jimmy Fletcher was
on patrol at Gibson Trailer
Park when noticed Willie
Davis, 32, sitting outside' of a
hiI'use that he had been issued
i trespass warning against by
.k-C.C-s Coks on Ma\ 29.
Daxis reportedly rin tromi
Fletchei and a brief folot chase
ensued, with Davis giving up.
Davis was arrested and
:Iansported to the Madison


County Jail.


Willie Davis


Crist Hails Signing Of

False Witness Law
TALLAHASSEE Attorney General Charlie Crist today
commended Governor Jeb Bush for sighing the "False Witness"
bill into law. The new law, which was among Crist's legislative
priorities' this year, makes it a criminal offense for anyone to
knowingly provide false or misleading information to law en-
forcement officers as they conduct felony or missing person in-
vestigations.
The legislation, sponsored by Senator Jeff Atwater and
Representatives Michael Grant and Charlie Dean, was prompted
by the investigation into the disappearance of Jessica Lunsford,
whose body was found not far from her home. As law enforce-
ment officers investigated, acquaintances and a relative of the
man eventually charged with the brutal murder were not forth-
coming with authorities regarding his whereabouts. Prosecutors
concluded they had no avenue to charge the relatives under ex-
isting Florida law.
The new law gives prosecutors the means to charge those
who stand in the way of investigations and subjects violators to
up to a year in jail and a $1,000 fine.


Wreck


Cont'd from Page 1A


lanes before it ran off onto the north shoulder. The car traveled
another 76 feet and struck two trees and came to rest, headed
east 35 north of the roadway.
Benton was charged with careless driving and driving with-
out a license.
FHP Trooper David Sellers was the investigating officer.



Si0 Mk


Green Butter. Beans
Speckled Butter Beans
Fresh Acre Peas
Zipper Peas
Blackeye Peas

Locally Grown:
Tomatoes, Cantaloupes
& Watermelons


- J-
>-j


E CRABS ON FRIDAY!


559 E. Base St. Madison
973-8464


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Kenneth Scott "Speedy"
Raulerson was arrested on
June 1 for the May 18,-1998
robbery, of a bank -in Dowling
Park.
Raulerson allegedly went
into the bank that day and told
the people inside that he had a
bomb strapped to his chest.
Those inside the bank that
day included Barbara. Drig-
gers, who now works at Madi-
son County Community Bank.
Law officers in Putnam Kenneth Scott
County apprehended Rauler- "Speedy" Raulerson
son after a police dog named
Saber held Raulerson on the ground, biting him while law offi-
cers attempted to subdue the suspect.
Raulerson was arrested by the Putnam County Sheriff's Of-,
fice Drug and Vice Unit, the U.S. Marshals Service and the Levy
County Sheriff's Office on a % warrant from Suwannee County.


Drug Busts


Cont'd from Page 1A


apartment of Juvenile Justice was notified and advised Fletcher to"
release Robinson into the cIustodN of his parents.
Another arrest came on Saturdav. June 11, at approximately
4:05 p.m.
According to MPD reports, Patrolman Brandon Abbott ob-
served a car traveling east on Base Street with a cracked front
windshield.
Abbott conducted a traffic stop and made contact with the
dri\ er. who informed him that his name was Marlo Howard and
that he did not have his driver's license.
The name \\ as run through dispatch and it was learned that
Howard's license was suspended and that Howard also had a
warrant for his arrest out of Taylor County.
Abbott observed Howard lput his hand below the driver's
seat and pull it out again in an effort to conceal something.
Howard. was placed under arrest for driving while his license
was suspended,
Abbott walked to the hood of the car and looked into the ve-
hicle, where he saw a plastic bag under the driver's seat. Once
Abbott retrieved it, he saw that it was a green leafy substance,
which appeared and smelt like marijuana.
* Howard was transported to the Madison County Jail, where
he was charged with possession of marijuana less than 20 grams
with intent to sell.
Anothierarrest \as made on Thursda.i. June 8, at approxi-
mately 5:09 a.m.
According to MPD reports, Patrolman Doug Haskell
stopped Calvin James Bruton, 27, for a traffic violation.
When asked for his.driver's license, Haskell told Bruton that
he had forgotten it.
When Haskell asked Bruton for his name, Bruton told him
his brother's name "Cedrick Bruton" and also gave him two dif-
ferent dates of birth.
In the search incident to Bruton's arrest, a plastic bag con-
taining several smaller plastic bags of marijuana fell out of Bru-
ton's pants.
Haskell also located an identification card, which gave him
Bruton's true identity.
Bruton was transported to the county' jail, where he was
charged with possession of marijuana with intent to sell and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
Patrolman Reggie Alexander assisted with the arrest.
A fourth arrest was made during the week when Haskell ar-
rested a juvenile on a misdemeanor for possession of marijuana
less.than 20 grams.

Page Cont'd from Page 1A
He was a Sunday School teacher and a deacon emeritus.
Page served as an attorney at law for 58 years in Madison
County and served as attorney for Madison County for over 30
years, for Tri-County Electric Cooperative from 1949 to 1996,
North Florida Community College and the Town of Greenville.
Page' was a member of the American Bar Association and
the Florida Bar Association. He was also a member of the Phi
Delta Phil Legal Fraternity and was past president of the Third
Judicial Circuit Bar Association.
Page served as the prosecuting attorney for Madison Coun-
ty for 20 years. He was a charter member of the Madison Coun-
try Club and the Madison Rotary Club, of which he was past
president.
Page was a member of the Madison County Gator Club and
the Madison County Historical Society and Greenville Masonic
Lodge #28.
Funeral services will be held Wednesday, June 14, at 2 p.m.
at the First Baptist Church in Madison. Burial will follow in Oak
Ridge Cemetery in Madison.
For full obituary information, please see page 5A.


Cont'd from Page 1A


making a left turn onto U.S. 221 North into the direct oncoming
path of Tametra Nicole Barnes, 22, of Monticello, who was
westbound on U.S. 90. English was driving a 1997 Ford pickup
truck. Barnes was driving a 2003 Nissan.
English failed to yield the right-of-way to Barnes and
Barnes' vehicle struck English's truck in the right side with its
front.
After the collision, the pickup spun one-quarter of a turn and
came to rest, facing west on U.S. 221.
Barnes' Nissan traveled westward came to a final rest in the
westbound traffic lane of U.S. 90.
There were no skid marks.
English was charged with DUI and taken to the Madison
County Jail. Barnes was taken to Madison County Memorial
Hospital.
FHP Trooper Bill Grubbs was the investigating officer.


Thomas Hill

SHicks
A ll D.O.B.01/17/59
*Height: 5'01" -Weight: 175
Sex: Male Race: Black
'-', Hair Color: Black Eye Color: Brown
Wanted For:
VOP/Disorderly Intox.
The Crime report is published every Wednesday. It also in-
cludes an individual from Madison County's active warrant list
or a wanted person believed to be in Madison County.
If you have .any information concerning the suspect, or
know his/her whereabouts, please contact one of the following
agencies. Madison County Sheriff's Department--973-4001,
Madison Policei Department-973-5077, or Your MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER-973-4141. All information will remain
confidential.' You need not give your name.
Information on these individuals is printed as given each
week by the Madison County Sheriff's Department or other law
enforcement agency. The person 'or persons featured was cho-
sen by the' agency making the request for him/her to be run in
this feature. Neither this newspaper, nor any members of its'
staff, determines which individuals) will be featured. The ap-
pearance of an individual in this feature represents an open war-
rant for their arrest by local, area, state, and/or federal law en-
forcement authorities, and it in no way is an assumption or in-
sinuation of guilt by this newspaper or its staff. All persons are
assumed innocent until proven guilty.in a court of law.
Brought to you as a public service by Your MADISON
COUNTY CARRIER.


Flag Day


Cont'd from Page 1A


new nation, did not become a reality until June 20, 1782. In
heraldic devices, such as seals, each element has a specific
meaning. Even colors have specific meanings. The colors red.
white, and blue did not have meanings for The Stars and Stripes
when it was adopted in 1777. However, the colors in the Great
Seal did have specific meanings. Charles Thoinpson. Secretary
of the Continental Congress, reporting to Congress on the Seal,
stated:
"The colors of the pales (the vertical stripes) are dhose used
in the flag of the United States of America; White signifies pu-
rity and innoeehce ,Red, hardiness &, valour. andBlae, the col-
or of the Chief (the broad band above the stripes) signifies igi-
lance; perseverance & justice."
Also this from a book about the flag published in 1977 by
the House of Representatives...
"The star is a symbol of the heavens and the divine goal to
which man has aspired from time immemorial; the stripe is sym-
bolic of the rays of light emanating from the sun."
The quote below concerning gold fringe on the Flag is from
the book So Proudly We Hail, The History of the United States
Flag Smithsonian Institute Press 1981, by Wiliam R. Furlong
and Byron McCandless.:"The placing of a fringe on Our Flag is
optional with the person of organization, and no Act of Congress
or Executive Order either prohibits the practice, according to the
Institute of Hearaldry. Fringe is used on indoor flags only, as
fringe on flags on outdoor flags would deteriorate rapidly. The
fringe on a Flag is considered and 'honorable enrichment only',
and its official use by the US Army dates from 1895.. A 1925 At-
torney General's Opinion states: 'the fringe does not appear to
be regarded as an integral part of the Flag, and its presence can-
not be said to constitute an unauthorized addition to the design
prescribed by statute. An external fringe is to be distinguished
from letters, words, or emblematic designs printed or superim-
posed upon the body of the flag itself. Under law, such additions
might be open to objection as unauthorized; but the same is not
necessarily true of the fringe.'"
The gold trim is generally used on ceremonial indoor flags
that are used for special services and is believed to have been
first used in a military setting. It has no specific significance that
I have ever run across, and its (gold trim) use is in compliance
with applicable flag codes and laws.
For more our special Flag Day page, please see page 12A.


Headlines


Cont'd from Page 1A


er date.
"Man Arrested At Lee Bar For Drug Possession," Madi-
son County Carrier, May 31, 2006. John "Doobie" Sheffield,
who was arrested at the Waterin' Hole in Lee for the possession
of illegal drugs and on weapons remains in jail in Monticello.
Sheffield, who had also been sought for robbery and had report-
edly been a suspect in a stalking case, had reportedly taken a
sign from Tom and Nikki Nerrin, a couple who were selling bar-
becue at the bar that day. The Nerrins said that they could not
stop Sheffield, who they said they knew had weapons on him.
Deputy Sheriff Josh Harris, Deputy Chris Andrews and Sgt. Art
Deno made the arrest of Sheffield.
"Man Splashed With Chlorine," Madison County Carrier,
May 24, 2006. Brian Martinez, who was burnt after being
splashed with chlorine, on Friday, May 19, has fully recovered
from his minor injuries. Martinez was on his job at Mike's Pump
Repair when a nozzle came off a chlorine tank and the chlorine
began spraying on him, burning him. He was transported to
Madison County Memorial Hospital by Madison County EMS
where he was treated and released.
"Allen Cherry Named Interim County Coordinator,"
Madison Enterprise-Recorder, April 21, 2006. Allen Cherry,
who is Madison County's current Solid Waste Director, was
named as interim County Coordinator, to replace Joe Miranti,
who resigned for personal reasons. The County Commission de-
cided at a May meeting to allow Cherry to continue on in both
positions at a salary of approximately $56,000, until the issue is
brought on the table again by a county commissioner.


Man Arrested For Trespass,

After Warning


Arrest


t, I MW SP








Wednesday, June 14, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A




AROUND MADISON COUNTY


OBITUARIES


Miranda Dallas
Collinsworth


-v-

Miranda Dallas
Collinsworth, died Wednes-
day, June 7, in Valdosta, Geor-
gia. She was the infant daugh-
ter of Dallas and Connie
Collinsworth.
Graveside services were
held Saturday, June 10, 2006,.
at Mt. Horeb Cemetery, Madi-
son.
Other survivors include
one sister, Kallie Collinsworth
of Madison, and maternal
grandparents Donald and Vera,
Johnson of Madison.
Earleen Gentry
Johnson
Earleen Gentry Johnson,
age 77, passed away Saturday,
June 10, in Tallahassee.
Funeral, Services will be.
Tuesday,' June 13, 2006, at
11:00 a.m. at Beggs Funeral
Home Madison Chapel, Madi-
son. Burial will be in Pine
Grove Cemetery, Madison.
The family will receive friends
at Beggs Chapel on Monday,
June 12, from 6 to 8 p.m.
She was born in
Fruithurst, Alabama, on June
4, 1929, the daughter of the
late Joe Lee Gentry and Ora
Womack Gentry. She had lived
in Jasper since 1971 and-was a
niembid of-',IminornyO Baptist
Church- She \as a Restaurant
Manager.
She is survived by one
son: Donald Goodman and
wife Marsha of Yatesville, Ga.;
two daughters, Nadine Roe-
buck and husband Bobby of
Hanson and Fonda Messer and
husband Jeff of Lake Park; two
brothers: Floyd Gentry of
Franklin, Ga., and Bobby Ted
Gentry of Jacksonville; two
sisters: Betty Shelnutt of
Franklin, Ga., and Carolyn
Adams of Lake City; seven
grandchildren; 10 great grand-
children, 15 nieces and
nephews and a host of other
relatives and friends.

Murrel Nolan
Johnson
Murrel Nolan Johnson,
age 69 died Monday, June 12,
in Lee.
Funeral Services will be
Saturday, June 17, 2006 at
2:00 p.m. at Beggs Funeral
Home, Madison Chapel, with
burial to follow at Lee Memo-
rial Cemetery, Lee. The fami-
ly will receive friends Friday,
June 16, from 6-8 p.m. at Beg-
gs Funeral Home.
He was born in Madison
County, where he lived all his
life, and was a member of
Macedonia Baptist Church,
Madison. He was a Carpenter
and Painter.
He is survived by his wife,
Beulah Webb Johnson of Lee;
three Step-sons: Ricky Albrit-
ton of Lee, Tony Albritton of
Tampa, and Ronnie Albritton
of Live Oak; five Brothers:
Charles and Claude Johnson of
Lee. Hayward Johnson of
Hendersonville, NC., Malcolm
Johnson of Pensacola, and
Joey Johnson of Lake City;
seven grandchildren: Desiree,
Michael, and Jeremy Albrit-
ton of Lee. Michelle Starling
and Travis Albritton of Live
Oak, and Jason and Chad
Albritton of Tampa.
He was preceded in death
by his sister, .Thera Mae Sands
of Lake City.


Ernest M.

Page, Jr.


Ernest M. Page, Jr., At-
torney at Law, age 83, died on
Sunday, June 11, in Madison.
Funeral Services will be.
Wednesday, June 14, 2006 at 2
p.m. at 'the First Baptist
Church, Madison. Burial will
be in Oak Ridge Cemetery,
NMadison. The family will re-
ceive friends at Beggs Chapel
on Tuesday, June 13 from 6 to
8 p.m.
Donations may be made to
the Salvation Army or the First,
Baptist Church Madison
Building Fund.
Mr. Page was' born in
Jasper, September 18. 1922,
the son of the late Ernest Mal-
oney Page and Bessie Prince
Page. He grew up in
Greenville and graduated from
Greenville High School. He
has lived in Madison since
1948, .coming here from
Gainesville, where he had re-
,eive.d his law degree, frtq t h
Uni'erqit of Florida. He was
a Veteran of World War II,
serving in the U.S. Army Air
Corps in the 29th Bomb Group
and retired as Lieutenant
Colonel. He was chosen to at-
tend the National War College
in 1963. He was a member of
the First Baptist Church in
Madison and was Chairman of
the Building Committee in
1956. He was a Sunday School
teacher and a Deacon Emeri-
tus. He was an Attorney at
Law for 58 years in Madison
County'and served as Attorney
for: the County of Madison for
over 30 years; Tri County
Electric Coop. from 1949 to
1996; North Florida Junior
College; and the Town of
Greenville. He was a member
of the American Bar Associa-
tion and the Florida Bar Asso-
ciation; Phi Delta Phi Legal
Fraternity and was past Presi-
dent of the Third Judicial Cir-
cuit Bar Association. He was
the Madison County Prosecut-
ing Attorney for 20 years. He
was a Charter Member of the
Madison Country Club and the
Madison Rotary Club and was
Past President. He was a mem-
ber of the Madison County
Gator Club, the Madison
County Historical Society and
the Greenville Masonic Lodge
#28.
He is survived by his wife
of 60 years, Margaret "Bun-
nie" Page of Madison; a
daughter, Victoria Page Jaus
and husband Harold of Char-
lotte, N. C.; two sons, Ernest
Maloney Page III and wife
Marguerite of Madison and
John Prince Page and wife
Cindy of Valdosta, Ga.; six
grandchildren: Jennifer Page
Jaus and Margaret Jaus Bald-
win, both of Charlotte, N.C.,
and Ernest M. Page IV of
Dowling Park; William Travis
Page of Madison. Johnny Page
and David Andrew Page, both
of Valdosta, Ga.
He was predeceased by a
brother: James Harrison Page,
and two sisters: Virginia Page
Fulford and Evelyn Page.


IONNVNIIY CALM0AI


June 14
The Greenville Library
will be offering Book Fest Fun
every Wednesday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 14
The June meeting of the
55 Plus Club will be held at
United Methodist Cooperative
Ministries at 12:00 noon. The
host will be Hanson United
Methodist Church. The 55
Plus Club is for anyone in the
community 55 years old and
older. The program follows
the luncheon, and is planned
with seniors in mind. The pro-
gram for June will be present-
ed by Diann Douglas, County
Extension Director, Her pro-
giam is entitled ,"Who Gets
Grandmother's Yellow Pie
plate?" This will be about!
transferring personal property.
She will also bring materials
on Disaster Preparedness.
There are no costs of an\ kind
and no reservations are neces-
sary for the luncheon. Also, a
reminder that the 55 Plus Club
takes a break for the summer,
so there \\ ill be no meetings in
July or August. Fopr more in-
formation, please call' Linda
Gaston at 929-4938.
June 14
Doers Club, a Diabetes
Support Group, will meet at
11:00 a.m. at the Senior Citi-
zens Counsel of Madison
County to discuss Understand-
ing the A1C Blood Test for Di-
abetics.
June 15
The Greenville Library
will be offering Preschool Sto-
rytime every Thursday from
10:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
"June15
The Lee Library will be
offering Book Fest Fun every
Thursday from 10:00 a.m. un-
til 11:00 a.m.
June 15
Residents living in and
around the Madison commu-
nity can be screened to reduce
their risk of having a stroke.
Life Line Screening will be at
the Senior Citizens Council of
Madison County on June 15th.
The site is located at 486 SW
Rutledge St. in. Madison. Ap-
pointments will begin at 9:00
a.m.
June 16
The Madison Library will
be offering Preschool Story-
time every Friday from 10:00.
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 18
Allen Chapel A.M.E.
Church in Greenville, Florida
will be celebrating Family and
Friends Day on Sunday, June
18 at 11:Q0 a.m. Rev. Reginald
Daniels will be the Speaker.
We invite everyone to come
worship with us; see special
friends and family; renew old


friendships; and, celebrate
God's LOVE. We have
planned a feast for both the
Soul and the body (Dinner
will be served afterward).'
Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church
is located on North Grand
Street in Greenville.
June 19
The Greenville Library
will be offering Teen Art Fest
.every Monday .from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 19 23
Sirmans Baptist Church
will host a revival. Paster Bro.
Garland Jones and his son Ron
Jones %i ill be preaching. Bro.
Ron will preach on Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday, and
Bro. Garland on Tuesday and,
Thursday. 'There N ill be spe-
cial- music each night. The
church is located 8 miles on,
221 South of Green, ille. in the
community of Sirmans.
June 20
The Madison Library will
be offering Book Feast Fun~
every -Tuesday from 10:00-
a.m. until 11:00 a.m4
June 20
The Madison Library will
be offering extreme, Teens
every Tuesday from 2:00 p.m.
until 3:00 p.m.
June 20 & 21
FCAT Retakes will be
given at Madison. County
High School for seniors and
students who received a Cer-,
tificate of Completion. For
more information or to sign
up, contact Becky Sellers at
973-5061.
June 21
The Greenville Library
will be offering Book Fest Fun
.every Wednesday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 21
Doers ClUhib, a Diabetes
Support Group, Will meet
from 11:00 11:30 a.m. at the
Madison County Health De-
partment. This meeting will
feature Food Pyramid Bingo,
in which you can learn proper
food serving sizes as well as
win a prize. For more infor-
mation, contact Bonnie Math-
is at 342-0170 ext. 1301.
June 22
The Greenville Library
will be offering Preschool Sto-
rytime every Thursday from
10:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. ,
June 22
The Lee Library will be
offering Book Fest Fun every
Thursday from 10:00 a.m. un-'
til 11:00 a.m.
June 22
The New World Genera-
tion youth choir from Hender-
sonville, TN will be present-
ing "One Real Treasure" at
Live Oak First United
Methodist Church at 7:00 p.m.
This concert is a blend of live


contemporary Christian mu-
sic, dialogue, choreography
and interpretive dancing.
Don't miss out on the treasure!
For more information, call
Dennis Resor at 386-362-
2047.
June 23
The Madison Library will
be offering Preschool Story-
time every Friday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.:m.
June 26
The Greenville Library
will be offering Teen Art Fest
every Monday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 27
The Madison Library will
be offering Book Feast Fun
every Tuesday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 27
The Madison Library will
be offering e\trenme Teens
every Tuesday from 2:00 p.m.
until 3:00 p.m. "
June 27 & 28
,The. HSCT (High School
CompetencN Test) will be ad-
ministered for all eligible stu-
dents. To check your eligibil-
ity or sign up for the test, con-
tact Shirley Joseph at 973-
5022. The deadline for sign-
ing up is May 31.
June 28
The Greenville Library
will be offering Book Fest Fun
every Wednesday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 29
The Greenville Library
will be offering Preschool Sto-
rytime every Thursday from
10:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 29
The Lee Library will be
'offering Book Fest Fun e\ery.
Thursday from 10:00 a.m. un-
til 11:00 a.m..
June 30
The Madison Library will
be offering Preschool Story-
time every Friday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.


nouncemen


Daniel Scott

Williams


Lee and Cindy Williams
would like to announce the
birth of their son, Daniel Scott
Williams. Scott was born on
April 20, 2006 at 1:50 p.m. at
Capital Regional Medical
Center. He weighed 7 lbs 1 oz
and was 21 inches long.
Maternal grandparents are
Jimmy and Dot O'Neal and
:great-grandmother Gussie
O'Neal Smith, all of Cherry
Lake. Paternal grandparents
are Christine and the late Jack
Williams of Lee.
Scott as welcomed home
by his brother Josh.
The family would like to
thank everyone who visited,
called and prayed for Scott
during his brief illness follow-
ing his birth.


The office of David W. Frasure, DC, is
Relocating to Tallahassee, FL.

Effective June 16, 2006, the office will be closing in
Madison, FL and will re-open in Tallahassee, FL on
July 16, 2006. Our new office will be located at:

1690 Raymond Diehl Road, Suite B3
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Phone: 850-973-4268
(right behind Osaka Japanese Restaurant)

Patient records will be located at the
Tallahassee office after June 16, 2006.


OF SUMIVIVEE RI Upcoming Concerts!
B wvh Cowbel Troy................ Juy 2 '.
Stuven Cuith; Cluposn A1
.fhSrhK~l.... ....... uy 10
-"FU N $ 30.0l Hiharnia July 21 17
Lerelta Lynn Aug 12
mR inh Park aduinisIon
229.219.7080 a 1-76 Exit 13, Valdosta,LPA uidadvmnlursit



SUMMER

...the perfect time for NFCC




New Classes


Start June 26
Summer Term IIIB
NFCC Campus Madison, Fla



REGISTER NOW. CALL TODAY.


orth850.973.1622
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t-
6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 14, 2006



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


fouz, 2ad4,4apna,& !&


Curves Facility Established And


Opened For Business In Madison


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison Curves is
bringing residents a support-
ive environment, offering a
thirty minute fitness solution
with a common sense weight
loss program that helps break
the weight loss cycle.
To celebrate the location's
opening, the center will offer
the first 100 members a visit
discount of 66 percent off the
regular service fee!
Curves in Madison,
owned and operated by Judi


Wyche, opened. on June 12,
ready for its very first mem-
bers to arrive, get fit and stay
fit!
"We are excited to be-
come a part of the Madison
community," said Wyche.
"Curves offers a comfortable,
welcoming place where real
women workout. Our facility,
which is located on South
Range in the old Ace Hard-
ware building, is designed so
women can encourage and
support one another while
moving around ihe circuit. We


Judi Wyche of Madison has just opened a new
Curves facility in downtown. Madison. (Greene Pub-
lishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, June 6, 2006)


look forward to helping
women in. this community,
reach amazing results, both
physically and emotionally,
through our Curves Workout
program and support net-
work."
The average person gains
three pounds a year. This spe-
cific program offers a reason-
able workout regime that.-fits
into today's busy lifestyle of
work and family
Everyday activity is criti-
cal to combat diabetes, osteo-
porosis, hypertension and oth-
er health risks that women can
face. The Curves Workout
program is designed for all
women of all ages and fitness
levels to perform all five of
the components of a complete
fitness program, combining
strength and cardiovascular
training through hydraulic re-
l cis.h e .
Last year, Wyche joined
the Curves in Periy 'and has
been hooked ever since! She
would workout four times a
week and she saw real results.
She lost 32 inches and 16
pounds!
Madison's Curves offers


Country Buffet 11am-9pm
Special Seafood & Steak
Buffet Every Friday


-STEAKS-


CHAPAaRRAL
S*T* E* AK -HO* U* S E
2135 South Byron Butler Parkway Perry, FL 32348
850.584.3431






lmic'ri Lunch & Dinner
AP 7 Days A Week!

SCat lthe W !

call Aead
I~ovr seatilhn
1874 Clubhouse Dr. Valdosta, GA
229-242-7700
US 90 West at 1-75 Lake City, FL
(386) 758-0074


,( Uitd. tF': ml


eight work out machines and
eight recovery stations. This
particular facility differs from
any other workout program
because it is just for women!
The experienced instruc-
tors at Curves offer one-on-
one training, while members
talk and inspire one another
during a workout. Also, the
comfortable, welcoming at-
mosphere has helped women
of all fitness levels commit to
an ongoing fitness program
and achieve results.
Judi Wyche stated, "Help-
ing say goodbye to unhealthy
lifestyles, unattainable diet
resolutions and unreasonable
fitness regimens gives women
a new outlook on exercise and
feeding their body properly.
We look forward to providing
women in the community a
complete workout in only
thirt\ rinutes that, x ill en-
sure the\ can slick to the pro-
gram and sustain a healthy
weight."
In her spare time, Wyche
spends time with her hus-
band, Benjamin, aid is very
active in her church, the New
Testament Christian Center.


S
S

* B S
OSS


Uen


w Ss


Where the Locals Eat!





*Featuring Prime Rill. Steak-; iy: Grilhgif Se'tfoud
USDA Chizoce' Befeut .&vsI. dt-ili, OH prL it.. 'i

*Preimuapin .'AII -Ifap..: I1-,,,a4I-4Pm pit, -5;-.4 R o ,r
*229-259-9333

A.U~l Open 7 days a w eek for Iiinch .and dinner
li4hI-Mm~ihfpm ..uJa, I hu.-Ja- -11 Om.110r- ~uFid, .0i-ri


All-U-Can-Eat Buffet
Ribeye, Crab legs, Seafood,
Vegetables, Bakery,
& Desserts
All Baked Fresh Daily
Open Ecrv\'da' for Lunch & Dinner
1550 Bavtree Rd *Valdosra. Ga.
229-253-1119
"Let our /r'icndly staff serl'e youH."









Mullet Grouper Catfish Shrimp
Scallops Clams Swamp Cabbage
OYSTERS RAW OR FRIED
Hwy. 98 West Perry, FL

850-584-4966


pay this:

119*


get this:
* Three Nights Accommodations
* Two Tour/Attraction Tickets
for a Carriage Ride,
Bus or Walking Tour


Spend four days and three nights in (C :-: i.: ,, for only $119 when
you tour the historic Church Street Inn. This package includes three
nights lodging at a Charleston hotel and two inI:! to a tour or
attraction of your choice.
This package rate is not per person or per night. $119 is all you pay!
Call early to be assured of reservations.
843-514-4326
.. ,,
,,'t '


''I




I., I I
'''ii


DIN A I


Our Dining Out Guide

is your "menu" of great places to eat!


Enjoy some great home style cooking!


RPd Onion Grill
1-10 & Exit 262 Lee, Florida 850-971-4240
Sunday Special $6.99
Choice of __j
Fried Chicken or Baked Ham
Choice of LJ
Cornbread Dressing or Rice & Gravy ^-
Choice of 2 Veggies
Steamed Cabbage, Candied Yams, Blackeyed Peas
-Served with Cornbread!-
Add a trip to our Salad Bar $1.99-
Hotdog % Fn,. '2 -:un i Enjoy Our
Parbureeitr & nFno S4 ;5'r Salad Bar Every I)ay!


WE
Red iviou ain Grill
r ------------------- 11 ------------- I
:Buy One Dinner & Receive 2nd Dinner,
Of Equal or Lesser Value Free

*Excludes any other discount offer &
T-Bone offer. (Please Present Coupon)
*Red Mountain Grillo
L ------------- m ------------------- j
3460 Madison Hwy. Valdosta, GA. (229) 293-0008


AW


10,








Wednesday, June 14, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 7A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Melissa Bozeman's Spring

Recital Held At
Grace Presbyterian Church
In Madison


Melissa Bozeman's piano students performed a
stunning recital at the Grace Presbyterian Church in
Madison. First row, pictured left to right: Victoria Todd,
Will Bozeman and Hannah Zimmerly. Second row, pic-
tured left to right: Caleb Land, Ryan Glass, Tyler Zim-
merly, Christie Newsome and Mandy Glass. Third row,
pictured left to right: Rachel Miller, Drew Land, Caleb
Tuten, Brooke Kinsley and Rachel Newsome. Fourth
row, pictured left to right: Danny Perez, Yasmin Perez,
Amanda McManaway, and Melissa Bozeman. Instruc-
tor. (Photo submitted)


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Melissa Bozeman's piano students from Madison and Li\e
Oak performed in a Spring Recital on Sunda\ afternoon. Nla\
21st, at Grace Presbyterian Church in Madison.
After playing works by Bach, Beediho en, Kabele\.sk), Rossi-
ni and others, certificates were presented to each participant. Par-
ticipants from Madison included Brooke Kinsley, Victoria Todd,
Caleb Tuten, Hannah Zimmerly and Tyler Zimmerly. Live Oak.
participants were: Will Bozeman, Mandy Glass, Ryan Glass,
Caleb Land, Drew Land, Amanda McManaway, Rachel Miller, ^
Christie Newsome, Rachel Newsome, Danny Perez and Yasmin
Perez.
Recognition was then awarded to those pianists involved in
the Naiionl1 Piano-Playing Auditions by the National Guild of Pi-
ano Teachers held at Lake City Community College on May 6th.
The student's memorized repertoire which was judged based on
individual merit through a non-competitive adjudication. Those
recognized were: Samantha Bozeman, Will Bozeman, Mandy
Glass, Ryan Glass,: Caleb Land, Drew Land, Amanda McMan-
away, Rachel Miller, Christie Newsome, Rachel Newsome all of
Live Oak and Victoria Todd, Caleb Tuten, Hannah Zimmerly and
Tyler Zimmerly all .of Madison.
Next, trophies were awarded to those with perfect attendance
for the piano year. Awarded were: Will Bozeman, Mandy Glass,
Ryan Glass, Rachel Miller, Caleb Land, Drew Land, Amanda Mc-
Manaway, Christie Newsome, Victoria Todd and Caleb Tuten.
The recital was concluded with the announcement of the
"Outstanding Musician Award" honoring those pianists demon-
strating perseverance. self-discipline and a desire for excellence
throtighout the piano year Those awarded were Will Bozeman,
Caleb Land, Dre\\ Land & Rachel Miller all of Live Oak.

Madison County Library


Hosts Book Feast Fun













Judy Smith, Book Feast Fun coordinator for Madison
County Libraries, demonstrates a pop-up book as one of
the activities within the Preschool Storytime program.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, June
9,2006)
By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Friday, June 9,,the Madison County Library held their
Preschool Storytime from 10 a.m. 11 Ia.m.
The Preschool Storytime invites all two five year olds from
Madison and the surrounding area to come and enjoy a wonderful

by Madison County Library staff members, Judy Smith and April
the activities within the Preschool Storytime is a Book Feast Fun program of-
(Gfereened by all Madishion, Inc. Phoamilton, Branford and Suwannee Covell, Junty
Library Jessalyn Covell
The Bookn FridFeast Fun will be offered at these pLibrarticular li-
brarieshool Storytime from 10May 30 July 7.a.m. 11 .m.
TheBook Feast Fun fStrytalls under the Florida Libreary Youth pro-
grams thatMadison and th made possible through a grcome ant funded enjoy the Libraryful
time of music, stories, activities, puppetsand administered programs presentate Li-
brary Madison County Library staff members, Judy Smith and Aprilrda.
The Preschogoal of the Florytime is a Book Feast Funth program encour-
age children to really Madison, Hamilton, Brary resourcnford and Suwannee County to read
This one of the most Fuimportant factors leading to succthese particularly life.
Thbraries from May 30goal of these programs are to help children de-7.
gramsvelop a love of reade possibleng through fun literature experiencesd by the Libraryt ex-
Sepand children's kad Technowledge of the world administered by the State Li-
erary of Florida.


eracy.


.. .Searching for services offered local'
C Look no further.


ISGOSHIN-DO SCHOOL OF KARATE
O-Sensel Thomas H. Hardeman
8" Degree Black Belt 38 Years Experience .Teaching In Valdosta Since 1983
229-247-2799
SEISHIN-RYU SCHOOL OF KARATE
Sensel Jay M. Bainter
6" Degree Black Belt 23 Years Experience Okinawan Weapons Kobudo
229-242-0604
Monday thru Thursday
Kids 6pm-7pm Adults 7pm-8:30pm .
CM [I RII MPM IF i ii,[: M, M'1.^ '
1138-B N. Ashley Street
Old BLDG of Steve Hall Flooring next to Speedee Cash 266920jrv







8A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 14, 2006



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


"I'll Do It Hauling And More"


Opens For Business


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Chris and Portia Neal of
Madison have been constantly,
working around the clock to


prepare for one of the most
needed trades in Madisoni
County. What does it entail?
Well, a little bit of everything!
The Neal's are ready to


perform any job that is rea-
sonable and no job is too
small!
Their business includes
tree renmo\als, hauling, trim-
ming, N feeding. mowing, edg-
ing and, painting (inside of
houses onlhi.
Also, the Neal's perform
clean-outs, whether it be out
of a house, apartments or
.garages.
They 'provide light land-
scaping which includes dig-
ging, planting and mulching.
Unique designs are available.
Further, Portia Neal of-
fers cooking and baking ser-
vices.
The Neal's attend the
Church of God in Madison
and have two adorable daugh-
ters, Jasmine, 2; and.Kimber-
lee, 1.
Some may be wondering
why their family business is
named, "I'll Do It Hauling
and More?". This is because
their two-year-old, Jasmine,
always tells her parents, "I'll
do it, I'll do it!" whenever
there is something to be done,
whether it be a chore or just
helping them out.
To take advantage of the
Neal's services and great spe-
cial, please contact them at
(850)' 929-4027.


Baby Shower Honors



New Mother-to-Be
By Mary Ellen Greene
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Joanna Moran, the wife of i
Juan Carlos Moran of Madi-
son, was honored Friday night,
May 19, with a Baby Shower,
at the home of Fredy and Car-
men Vasquez.
Moran is expected to be
due on June 14, 2006. The ex- h
Spectant spn will be named Juan
Daniel Moran.
Approximately 12 ladies
enjoyed, the delightful everit
Hostesses were. Carmen
Vasquez, Emerald Greene
Kinsley and Mary, Ellen "
Greene. '. I
Guests arrived at 7 p.m., u l g
and enjoyed socializing, and
playing games.One.delightful Joanna Moran, center, was honored with a Baby
pgamewas where gusts were Shower given by Carmen Vasquez, left, and Emerald
given a safety pin to wear, and Kinsley, right. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Mary
every time a guest heard an- Ellen Greene, May 19, 2006)
other guest say the word, "Baby," ,he had to git e up the pin to the one \\ ho had heard her word first. At the end pfthe evening, the lady who had the most pins on won a lovely prize.
Another game had the ladies relating something they had "never" done, and anm ladN who
could not sa\ "never" to the same statement, had to put money into a blue piggy bank. The pig-
gy bank and all tihe imoel was then presented tothe expectant mother. in the jar, when the game
was over.
Delicious refreshiment of Taco Flauta, vegetables and spanish dip, fruits, and punch, were
served to the guests.
Among the ladies present were family members of Joanna: her mother-in-law, Marta Moran,
and her sister-in-law, Glenda.
The honoree received many beautiful and useful gifts for the new soon- to- be- born.baby boy.
The honoree %' ail presented a lovely corsage to wear during the party, and a stroller by her host-
esses.


NN






4 '.


Aod c d diiq Thwi (Wuj

'.1./i el.h Ul ,dilg Alwlivc/aoo/aj
On June 23. Mr. & Mrs. Samuel and E\el\ n Lamb. v. ll celebrate
their 50th wedding annj\ersir\. Mr and Mrs. Lamb are part-\ ear
residents of Nlajdison. and spend the summer lmonlhs at their \\ Iscon-
sin home. An open house reception \\ill be held for them b,, their
fainil\ on Saturda\. June 24th. in Milw aukee. Wisconsin.
Mr. & Mrs. Lamb were married in the First Baptist Church ot El-
gin. Iow\a, a.nd the\ are planning to be in attendance theie for sern ices
on Sunday, June 25.


IMrs. Collins.
".. 1.n...
iSptriualist.

Healer Reader, Advisor
All who are unsuccessful, unlucky, dissatisfied, let the
woman who knows help you. She removes all evil
influence. If husband or wife is unfaithful, see her now.
She settles lovers' quarrels, helps you gain the lost love
and affection of the one you love and shows you the way
to happiness. She names friends and enemies and tells you
if friends are true or false.
She locates lost and stolen property.
She does not claim to be God. She is just a servant of the
Lord who was brought here to help humanity. If you have
any problem concerning the past, present, future, love,
mayrirage, business, lawsuits, finances, health; if you are in
trouble, sick, or in love, there's no problem so great that
she cannot solve.
Guarantees to Remove Evil Influence and Bad
Luck from your Home & Body in 3 Days.


386-362-1255
1823 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak Hwy. 129 South


?ROD.



.4 .. ...
NYI
St


NEW
PROGRAM

starts Aug 10
in Monticello, Fla.
Mandatory Orientation Aug 3

Website: WWW.NFCC.EDU oI
TO REGISTER: Il

ff T; ii w


Many of your fellow Americans just don't think they
are capable of building a reasonable amount of savings
for their retirement years. Should you be equally
gloomy? Not if you save and invest early and often.
Just how pessimistic are people about building their
net worth? Consider these findings from a recent survey
sponsoredLhy-,the Conusner Federation of America and
the Financial Planning Association:
*Only 26 percent of the adults surveyed think they
could accumulate $200,000 in net worth in their life
time.
*A whopping 21 percent of those surveyed said win
ning the lottery would be the most practical strategy
to accumulate several hundred thousand dollars.
In looking at these figures, two things jump out: The
first group may be overly pessimistic and the second
group is totally unrealistic. In fact, a person's chances of
winning huge in the Poterball are about 1 in 120 mil-
lion, give or take a few hundred thousand. So, if you are
doubtful that you'll accumulate enough money to retire,
and you can't count on the lottery, what can you do to
improve your savings outlook? Here are a few sugges-
tions:
*Set some goals. You will find it easier to invest for
your retirement if you know how much money you will
need to reach your goals. Try to visualize the type of
retirement lifestyle you'll want. Will you travel?
Volunteer? Open your own small business? A qualified
financial professional can help you set a general "price
tag" on your goals and show you about how much you
will need to save eact year and what sort of investment
return you will need to achieve to meet your objectives.
*Put time on your side. The earlier you start saving
and investing, the better your chances of building the
resources you'll need to enjoy a comfortable retirement.
You might be surprised at how much you can accumulate
over time. For example, if you can afford to put away
$100 a month in a tax-deferred investment (such as a tra-
ditional IRA) that earned a hypothetical 7 percent a year,
you would accumulate more than $121,000 after 30
years. Even after you pay taxes on your withdrawals,
you'll still have a sizable sum.
*Take advantage of your employer's retirement
plan. If your employer offers a 401(k) or other tax-
advantaged retirement plan, take full advantage of it.
Every time you get a raise, try to increase your annual
contributions. At the very minimum, contribute enough
to earn your employer's match, if one is offered.
*Avoid heavy debt burdens. Debt is one of the
biggest threats to your ability to accumulate, the money
you'll need for retirement. Every dollar you use to pay off
a high-interest credit card is a dollar that could be used
for investing. Of course, it's not easy for many of us to
make ends meet these days, but do whatever you can to
live within your means and avoid racking up a huge debt
load that will take you years to pay off.
By following these suggestions, you should gain
confidence, over time, in your ability to increase your net
worth to levels that once seemed unimaginable to you.
And you can save money on those lottery tickets, too.
Brad Bashaw EdwardJones
Investment Representative
114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341 .'
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596 .'.,, -'
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334 "
ww.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


Don't Underestimate Your Ability
to Build Retirement Savings,


Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones


11
CALL


973-

mIyii








Wednesday, June 14, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 9A


.R 7ATV'
'. - -- 1= --- "" * - ~i" ----- w ^


sor


Ha 'Fahers ayI,


Any man can be a Father,
but it takes a special person
to be called Dad.

The idea for creating a
day for children to honor their
fathers began in Spokane,
Washington. A woman by the
name of Sonora Smart Dodd
thought of the idea for Father's
Day while listening to a Moth-
er's Day sermon in 1909.
Having been raised by her
father, William Jackson Smart,
after her mother died, Sonora
wanted her father to know
how special he was to her. It
was her father that made all
the parental sacrifices, and
was, in the eyes of his daugh-
ter, a courageous, selfless, and
loving man. Sonora's father
was born in June, so she chose
to hold the first Father's Day
celebration in Spokane, Wash-
ington on the 19th of June,
1910.
In 1926, a. National Fa-
ther's Day; Committee was
formed in New York City. Fa-
ther's Day was recognized by


a Joint Resolution of Congress
in 1956. In 1972, 'President
Richard Nixon established a
permanent national obser-
vance of Father's Day to be
held on the third Sunday of
June. So Father'\ Day was
born in memory and gratitude
by a daughter who thought
that her father and all good fa-
thers should be honored with a
spCe ial day just like we honor
our mothers on Mother's Day.
The excert below is from
the Silver Anniversary Book
on Father's day published in
1935. I would like to thank
William Jackson Smart's great
granddaughter, Bonnie, for
sharing this with me.
"This year, 1935, the Sil-
ver Anniversary of Fathers'
Day is being observed. Thirty-
seven years ago, in the Big
Bend hills of Washington, the
day had its nativity in a lonely
farm dwelling. There Sorrow
ministered amid the moaning
of the March winds.
A father sat with bowed
head in his aloneness. About


~No,


^:^;'$", -Ring Sizing & Jewelry Repairs While You Wai :, '.
4. 1302 N. Aihley St. Valdosta, GA I.,-,mtr,,MLbkrLVj.ii Dtl
. 229.247.2178 Hour: M-F 1Oan-6pm & Sat. am.5pn .:


;;=z7i- TV FF-:J,
A 1 DLE

r Du AD
Royal Robbins &
Patagonia Clothing 2748 Capital Circle NE
Teva & Chaco Sandals The Gardens at Espositoq
Native Sunglasses Tallahassee, FL
Gift Certificates 850.531.9001
M-F 10-7 Sat 10-6 Sun 112-5
AND MORE!


jXwAER14AN'S PARAD1.9,c
CAisi HOOK IOU U-P%%1TH -kLL OF I OUR FAVORITE
FRFSFFWATERANDSALTIVATER 2031 B. Bemiss Rd
oLnihinR WU GtL T.%CKLE
# BUT 0 Hour I: NI-indas Saturdas a1dosta, GA 3160.7
can 11 lor ) 6V 8.1111 a m. Oil, parn. 024j.749-0061
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low A U T C# :,3"A
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WE RNANCI.E BUY a SELL. MADE
41
1512


The joy of amorning in

The faith of a mustard seed,
The'patience of eternity
The depth of a family need,
Then God combined these
qualities,
When there was nothing more
to add,
Re knew His masterpiece was
complete;,
And so, He called it.... Dad',

Author is unknown


him clung his, weeping chil-
dren. The winds outside threw
great scarfs of powdered snow
against the window panes,
when suddenly the last born
tore himself froni. tile group
and rushed out into the storm
calling for his mother. `76t
even his baby voice c ould not
penetrate the great silence that
held.1this'niother.
Hurriedly, the, father, gath-
ered him back to his protec-
tion and for more than two
decades, William Jackson
Smart, alone, kept paternal
vigilance over his motherless.
children.
This poignant experience
in the life of Mrs. John Bruce
Dodd of Spokane, Washing-
'ton, who was then Sonora
Louis e Smart, was theiiispira-
tion I for Fathers' Day. which
materialized through the devo-
tion of this father land the fa-
'ther of her own son, John
Bruce Jr.,* born in 1909.
Through the observance of the
love and the sacrifice of fa-,
thers about her everywhere,
her idea of Fathers' Day crys-
tallized in 19 10, through a for-,
mal Fathers'Day petition ask-,
ing I recognition of father-
hood."

What Makes A Pad

God took the stength of a
mountain,
The majesty of a tree,
The wa rrnth of a summer sun,
The calm of -a quiet sea,
The generous soul of nature,
The comforting arm of night,
The wisdom of the ages,
The power of the eagle's
flight,.


API

F IsSh Net


estaurant
7, 6
Steaks Seafood Chicken


Shrimp, Oysters,

Scallops, Sweet Potato Sticks,

Made to Order Steaks,

thicken Dinners & A Full Salad Bar'


*All U Can Eat Fish Dinners*


Nightly Specials & Takemout
:A

Hours: Thursday, Friday 5:00pm 9:30pm
Saturday 4:00 9:30

Sportsman Cove Road Lake Park, Georgiq.
'ust Loch Laurel)


lanning a Party? We Have A.

Banquet Room Available!
Call Us At 229-559-541 GO/


i':
;?
I


FOR DAD


'^f"-.


Father's Day is Sunday, June 18.
Come to Colonial Mall Valdosta where we have just what you're looking for .. from.
books and electronics to sports memorabilia and power tools.
Shop at Belk, JC Penney, Sears or our more than 65 specialty stores and find a truly
unique gift to show Dad how much you care.
Father's Day Gift with Purchase
Spend $100 or -more with mall merchants beginning Monday, June 12 and redeem
your receipts at Customer Service for a $10 Colonial Mall Valdosta Gift Cerficicate.
Offer good while supplies last Limit one per customer Visit Customer Service for details.

CQL'NIAL
IIERWAMPIk*&:aML]d
M A L L
'SOUTH GFO
Sears '' R"L
Belk XPennel ` A`E'D`Sponso,


pp;f

'Alt


cz








10A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 14, 2006



HEALTH



New Physical Activity Set To Take Place At PES


By Jessalyn Covell Madison Correctional Institution Beth Moore, Principal of
Greene Publishing, Inc. inmates will begin preparation for Pinetta Elementary, and-Madison
The field next to Pinetta Ele- a walking trail and exercise sta- County Health Department staff
mentary is empty now school but tions to be used by students for members Kim Barnhill, Adminis-
not for long! physical activity. trator; Bonnie Webb, Director of


OPEN HOUSE FOR

HOME HEALTH NURSES
9 "
Thursday, June 22,2006
7:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 4%
4:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. \ 4
Archbold HomeCare Center Community Room
2"05 E Pinetree Blvd, a1t the intersection of
Pinetre'c Boi'uicvard & Remington Avenue t -
Archbold Homef Heialth Scrices is currently hiring nurses to work
in the following countic', in Georgia Brook, Colquitt, Grady
litchell and Thomas ; and in Florida Jefferson. Leon and NMadison.


) .^ -,t i v^ -,--t-^
7-0~t 1 Come find outI aboltIt ou c.xccllcnt bcncfits, cducanttonal
) "tlor zlppoiTninrs, salaries, \wok schcdulcs, and morel

S* Refreslinents I)mrl Prizes

For more information, call 229-228-2747 or 229-228-2713.


Nurses; Cindy Brown, School
Health Coordinator; Debra Look-
abill, Social Services Director;
Elmire Cantey, Health Informa-
tion Specialist attempted to ob-
tain grant funding through the
CDC School Health Index Mini-
Grant Program, but funding was
limited and, unfortunately, Pinet-
ta was not one of the schools cho-
sen.
However, through Barnhill's
concern for the welfare of the
children and the overwhelming
statistics of obesity in the county
(65% obesity at present) she has
identified a funding source that
will allow Pinetta Elementary to
move forward with the plans for
the activity area and the equip-
ment needed.
"We are committed to the
health of this county's citizens, so
we constantly search for ways to
encourage physical activity. Also,
we hope. our children will adopt
healthy lifestyles that keep them
healthy and happy for the rest of
their lives," Barnhill remarked.
Luckily,. "Pinetta-On-The-
Move". will be a reality and the
children in grades K-5 will partic-
ipate in the "Presidents Challenge
Fitness Program" for the upcom-
ring school year begiinnir'g A.IDui[


2006. There will be a walking
trail in the field next to the school
with exercise equipment spaced
along the trail. Exercise games
will also be provided for use in-
side the gym on days not appro-
priate for outside activities.
As an added bonus for the
teachers and staff, a wellness
room with exercise equipment
will also be provided with this
funding.
Madison County Health
Department's Director of Oper-
ations Shannon Jacobs stated,
"Childhood obesity has become


quite a problem in rural com-
munities, because our children
don't have the proper resources
and facilities for exercise that
the kids in the bigger cities
have. This specific project not
only encourages exercise, it
gives them what they need to do
it."
Public Health. is a passion
for staff at the Madison County
Health Department and all are
on constant vigil for ways to
improve the health and welfare
of our citizens and future gener-
ations.


C
4.


.,, -. "


Madison County Health Department's Office Automa-
tion Specialist II, Fran Tuten, and Pinetta Elementary
School's nurse, Judy Hill, pictured leftto right, demon-
strate the proper ways to use PES's new equipment for
"Pinetta On The Move." (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Jessalyn Covell, May 18, 2006)


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In Madison Since 1978
1 Hour Optical Service Available
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Home Health
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Lic. HHA 21540096
225 SW Smith St. Madison, FL


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7 Memorial Hospital

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194 NE Hancock Ave.
Madison, FL
850-973-8851



Valdosta Medical Clinic
James A. Sinnott, M.D.
Edward J. Fricker, M.D.
Specialist In All Gastrointestinal Disorders
Dr. Sinnott Appointments Only Dr. Fricker
(229) 245-7345 or 1-800-587-0777
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Wednesday, June 14, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com. Madison County Carrier 11A



HEALTH




First-Ever Prostate Cancer Report Cards Released


Florida Gets 'B', Lacks Law Requidng Insurance Coverage For Screenings


Five states failed the first-
ever prostate cancer state-by-
state report card issued by the
National Prostate Cancer
Coalition (NPCC) in time for
June (Do it for Dad! Men's
Health Awareness Month).
"Many states are not do-
ing even the simplest things
when it comes to fighting
prostate cancer," NPCC CEO
Richard N. Atkins,.M.D. said.
"Early detection saves lives
and far too many states don't
encourage men to' know the
risks and to get tested."
The report cards are a re-
sult of a study by NPCC
where each state is graded
based on current prostate can-
cer screening rates, mortality
rates and if each state current-
ly has laws in place guaran-
teeing insurance ,coverage for
testing. Screening and mortal-
ity rates are calculated from
raw data made available by
the Center for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention.
Alabama, Arkansas, Ida-


ho, Mississippi and Wiscon-
sin didn't make the grade
while California, Connecticut
(earning a perfect score of
100), Kansas and New York
earned A's.
Each state that failed does
not have laws in place forcing
insurance companies to cover
prostate exams. Only 28 states
havd insurance mandates
compared to 49 states that re-
quire insurance agencies to
cover breast cancer screen-
ings a disease with a nearly
identical caseload. Utah,
which i as i\ en a "D-", is the
only state in the union not to
offer insurance for both
prostate and breast cancer
screenings.
Two of the failing states,
Mlississippi and Alabama rank
second and fourth respective-
ly in having the highest
prostate cancer death rates'.
Meanwhile, Idaho and Wis-
consin rank fifth and ninth re-
spectively in the lowest
screening rates.


Connecticut is the only Alaska
state to rank in the top 10 in Arizona
highest screening rates and Arkansas
lowest death rates while the California
other three states earned B's Colorado
in other categories. Three oth- Connecticut
er states, Delaware, New Jer- Delaware
sey and Rhode Island, re- DC
ceived grades of an "A-". Florida
Florida would have re- Georgia
ceived a perfect score if it Hawaii
weren't 'for the absence of a Idaho
screening mandate. Illinois
"There are several states Indiana
that could've' scored A's if Iowa
only they had screening man- Kansas
dates," -.aid Arkins. "Screen- Kentucky
ing rates are already starting Louisiana
to im1pio e among the states Maine
that have. recently adopted Maryland
screening mandates like Ore- Massachusetts
gon and Wahi ngitohn." Michigan'
Atkins added that Michi- Minnesota
gan ,. would ihae gotten an 'A' 1Mississippi
while Iowa, MNassachusetts. Missouri
liontana and Nebraska would Moniana
ha\ e received 'B's". Nebraska
Nevada
CON O PLETE LIST New Hampshire
Alabama F Ne%% Jerse\


C+
C-
F
A
B
A
A-
C
B
B
D
F
C
C
c-
C-
A
D
C+
C+


C-


B
C-

D
C-
A-


Eating Less And Often: Does It Help Control .Weight?


Having a hard time resist-
ing the urge to snack between'
meals? Maybe it's time to
give in.
Some studies suggest that
eating smaller, more frequent
meals than the standard three
meals a day may actually help
control weight, according to.
the May issue of Mayo Clinic
Women's HealthSource.
With four to six smaller.
but regularly spaced nmeals.
'you may, keep yourself from
bcLiomT~'iav.enourl. hungry.


and overeating at the next
meal. Eating more often also
helps, give you energy
throughout the day. Athletes
in particular tend to eat fre-
quent high-cairboh_ drate,
low-fat meals to boost their
energy\ Researchers speculate
that e\en for the rest of us,
eating frequent small meals is
more compatible w ith'a ph\ s-
icall\ atc'\e liles(t le than the
habit of skipping earlier
meals and eating a larger one
m the evening. In fact, skip-


ping breakfast is associated
with a greater prei:alence of
obesity.
But the potential down-
fall of frequent meals is that
poor choices and too many
calories may promote weight
gain. If your frequent meals
are. dictated by your mood,
and what's in the ending
machine, you may be
overeating and not getting
the. proper nutrition your
body needs.
While there's no clear


consensus on how timing and
frequency of meals affect
bodyv.eight, one thing iscer-
tain: a calorie is still a calo-
rie. No matter when or what
you eat, your total intake is
the most important factor in
controlling your weight. If
snacking on health\ foods in
sensible portions throughout
the day helps you control
your total calorie intake,
snack away. It may just be
the useful tool you need to
help manage your weight.


New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota.
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia


Wisconsin
Wyoming


States in bold are ones
without an insurance screen-
ing mandate.

About the National Prostate
Cancer Coalition
Celebrating 10 years of
saving lives, the National
Prostate Cancer Coalition
sets the standard for rapidly
reducing the burden of
prostate cancer on American
men and their families
through awareness, outreach
and advocacy.


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i~ips 'eie


Chances are you've expe-
rienced heartburn that un-
comfortable burning sensa-
tion in your chest and throat.
It's a common digestive
response to overindulging in
a big meal or eating spicy
food. It's also a symptom of
gastroesophageal reflux dis-
ease (GERD), a condition in
which digestive acid flows
back (refluxes) into the tube
(esophagus) that connects
your mouth and stomach.


Occasional heartburn is
generally nothing to worry
about, but some people are
bothered by heartburn every
day. Whether your symptoms
are mild or severe, lifestyle
changes can help reduce
heartburn. The May issue of
Mayo Clinic Health Letter of-
fers tips to reduce or elimi-
.nate symptoms:

Eat smaller meals -
Smaller meals reduce pres-


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sure on the lower esophageal
sphincter. This ring of mus-
cles normally keeps digestive
acid in your stomach, helping
prevent acid reflux.
Avoid your "triggers"
- Most people have specific'
heartburn triggers such as fat-
ty or fried foods, alcohol,
chocolate, peppermint, garlic,
onion, tomato-based foods,
spicy foods, citrus foods, caf-
feine or nicotine.
Loosen your belt -
Tightness around your waist
pressures the lower abdomen
and the lower esophageal
sphincter.
Don't lie down after a
meal Wait at least three
hours after eating before go-
ing to bed or lying down.
Give up tobacco -
Smoking can increase stom-
ach acid. Swallowing air dur-
ing smoking may also aggra-
vate acid reflux.
Try to lose weight -
Being overweight is one of
the greatest risk factors for
heartburn.
Raise the head of your
bed Elevating the head of
your bed about six inches
puts gravity to work for you.
Use bricks or blocks under
the feet at the head of your
bed, or insert a wedge be-
tween your mattress and box
springs to elevate your body
from the waist up. Raising
your head with an extra pil-
low doesn't help.
Sleep on your left side
This may help your stom-
ach empty better.

If heartburn bothers you,
talk to your doctor. Over-the-
counter and prescription med-
ications can help when
lifestyle changes aren't
enough. Surgery to tighten
the sphincter muscles to pre-
vent reflux also is an option.


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I"


12A Madison County Carn'er


Wednesday, June 14, 2006




















The Spirit Of Madison County


Section

Wednesday, June 1


Hurricane Awareness
School
Outdoors


Inside:
2B Boating Safety
3B Classifieds
4B Legals


Students Celebrate World Cultures


Sixth grade geography
and critical thinking, skills
students in Mrs. Audrey
James' classes spent the
fourth nine weeks complet-
ing their study of the Eastern
Hemisphere.
Acting as geographers,
students used the five
themes of geography to or-
ganize their study of the
world and its people: loca-
tion, place, human-environ-
ment interaction, movement,
and regions. Students gath-
ered, organized and analyzed
geographic information
about Europe, Africa, Asia
and the Pacific Islands; to
produce reports, projects,
and products.
Each individual or group
made an oral presentation to
their classmates. Projects
were compiled into a mini-
museum. The third, fourth,


and fifth grade students were
invited to "tour" the muse-
um, where student geogra-
phers served as guides
Students culminated
their study by participating
in a drum circle. Drumming
is used in rituals and celebra-
tions, as well as a form of
communication .ii'nongf in-
digenous people around the
world. Paralounge Drum
Circle members, Clint Tifton
and Mac James, fjciliatied
the sessions for six class pe-
riods.
Students learned about.
different drums: where they
are from, how they are made,
when they are used, and how
they are played.
They were guided into
rhythms by beginning with
the "thump" of the hejrtheat
and building into _.. nchro-
nized and varied patterns.


Gary Gazlay and Jym Copeland's band and music classes joined in the drumming fun. Mr. Copeland brought per-
cussion instruments, making it a real jam session. (Photo submitted)


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Amber Wilson, Felicia Hudson, and Gail Lopez, pic-
tured left to right, make an oral presentation on Egypt.
The girls created a unique poster with facts about the
pyramids.The diorama includes hieroglyphics, pyramids,
the Sphinx, and modelsi of the Tuareg. (Photo submitted)


Jalpn Johnson stops at the display of the Samuri, re-
seached and produced by Toby Fox. (Photo submitted)



I I- ,-&


Garrett Allen researched Iraq, where his dad is a civil-
ian worker. Garrett included Iraqi money, as well as a
prayer mat. (Photo submitted)


.. PER MONTH


~ ~ -'a ., 4g .

CALL 866-2EMBAP- O? ~VISYT MiARQOCOMI


Jay Wallace, left, and Blake Webb demonstrate the
shadoff (shaduf), a tool used to irrigate crops growing
along the Nile River. (Photo submitted)


, .,*..* dir.


w~soxcei ~ebf eOtp aeatree e kW,,r,1a 3avavweG~ Me,:pav,,avae tycW4beA ~ vfem tm~nOnmnth AJfav PmmaIw
to enneut= uen z,Tdena fwi com eNoNmumnan ofnie ii alo IgumlaW eiCvlwu mpnny ,uundu unabniauO, asav ubbtmLbion.at leblqu? bybunart bimwom n ubu,3it snuarn nuat aspe-. of
rTVt W ute.au f lti ub* I.M, OM FmNbubbnbe'n bn Caipflyt I r A! TNht MenenueThe nuMaMS FMWQ and fVMoile ea'ni ~ fEbnftfq N H Thi.Cmrny ~hLIC Spdr A t nu h ad:.,n e dmidgie(
tmluwl OSpnuut Geneunienbens CouapanLP, ued nd ea 'lran il


Tavious Poole completes his oral presentation of the
Nederlands (Netherlands) with models of watermills.
(Photo submitted)


68
7B


~#IIJt -


El "flP.-AR-Q.." HIGH-SPEED INTERNET
CO" il I
m AS LL,,PlC- AS YOU HAVE THE 5FRVW_,l-


NSWROMMSME'









2B Madison County Carrier


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 14, 2006


History teaches that a
lack of hurricane awareness
and preparation are common
threads among all major hur-
ricane disasters. By knowing
your vulnerability and what
actions you should take, you
can reduce the effects of a
hurricane disaster.
The goal of this Hurri-
cane Preparedness page is to
inform the public about the
hurricane hazards and pro-
vide knowledge which can
be used. to .take ACTION.
This information can be used
to save lives at work, home,
while on the road, or on the
water.
What is a Hurricane?
A hurricane, is a type of
tropical cyclone, the general
term for all circulating,
weather systems over tropi-
cal waters (counterclockwise
in the Northern Hemi-
sphere). Tropical cyclones
are classified as follows:
Tropical Depre sion:
An organized system of
clouds and thunderstorms
with a defined circulation
and maximum sustained
winds of 38 mph (33 knots)
or less.
Tropical. Storm: An or-
ganized system of strong
thunderstorms with a defined


Look~in't
keep
your iIcol

this urcn
season

Calu n


circulation and maximum
sustained winds of 39 to 73
mph (34-63 knots).
Hurricane: An intense
tropical weather system with
a well defined circulation
and maximum sustained
winds of 74 mph (64 knots)
or higher. In the western Pa-
cific, hurricanes are called
"typhoons," and similar
storms in the Indian Ocean
are called "cyclones."
Hurricanes are. products
of a tropical ocean arid at-
mosphere. Powered by heat
from the sea, they are steered.
by the easterly trade winds
and the temperate westerlies
as well as by their own fero-
cious energy. Around their
core, winds grow with great
velocity,, generating violent
seas. Moving ashore, they
sweep the ocean inward
while spawning tornadoe.
and producing torrential
rains and floods. Each year,
on average, 10 tropical
storms, of which six become
hurricanes, develop over the
Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean
Sea, or Gulf of Mexico.
'Many of these remain over-
the ocean;, however, about
five hurricanes strike the
United States coastline every
three \ears. Of these five,


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Hurricane

Safety Tips


Hurricane Season
is Junel-Nov. 30.



But if you've decided to ride the storm out at home,
take note of these survival tips.
*Monitor water levels in your neighborhood. This is your quickest
signal to move to high point; in your house or to evacuate to
higher ground.
Listen for tornadoes. Tornadoes often lead the way in a tropical
storm. .
Get somerest. Ifai all possible, sleep in shiftn.o ee,-yne ik. reed
if the time comes to evacuate.
If youare in themiddle of a hurricane, STAY PLTruntil the >Iorm
passes. If you must leave your house for an emergency, use a large,
heavy .ehicle. derive sIiu, 1,be alert and don't go ver\ far
!. *.0


two will be major hurricanes,
category 3 or greater'on the
Saffir-Simpson Hurricane
Scale.
Timely warnings, have great-
ly diminished hurricane fa-
talities in the United States.
In spite of this, property
damage continues to mount.
There is little we can do
about the luitricanes them-,
*selves. However, NOAA's
National Hurricane Center
and National Weather Ser-
vice ,
field offices team up with
other Federal. state. and lo-
cal agencies; rescue and, re-
lief organizations; the pri-
vate sector; and the news
media in a huge warning and
preparedness effort.
Breedin-g Grounds
Iri 'the eastern Pacific,'
hurricanes start forming by
mid-May. In the Atlantic,


Caribbean, and Gulf of
Mexico. hurricanes season
starts in June. For the Unit-
ed States, peak hurricane
threat exists from mid-Atu-
gust to late October al-
thIough the official hurricane
season extends through No-
vember. Over other parts of
the world, such as the west-
ern Pacific, hurricanes can
occur year-round.
.Developing hurricanes
gather heat, and energy)
through contact with warm
ocean waters. The addition
of moisture by evaporation
from the sea surface powers
them like giant heat engines.
Storm Structure,
The, process by which a
disturbance forms and sub-
seLJquentlt strengthens into a
hurricane depends on at
least three conditions..Warm
waters and moisture are


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j~T '%PARII)I


What To Do When A Hurricane Hits


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Certified Well Driller

1t, 50 Years in Business
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Madison, FL 32340
(850) 929-4504

! 8FL Lic # 2611


Here's what you can do to
prepare for such an emergency.
Know What Hurricane
WATCH and WARNING
Mean
WATCH: Hurricane con-
ditions are possible in the speci-
fied area of the WATCH, usually
within 30 hours.
WARNING: Hurricane
conditions are expected in the
specified area of the WARN-


ING, usually within 24 hours.
Prepare a Personal
Evacuation Plan
Identify ahead of time
where you could go if you are
told to evacuate. Choose several
places--a friend's home in anoth-
er town, a motel, or a shelter.
Keep handy the telephone
numbers of these places as well
as a road map of your locality.
You may need to take alternative


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or unfamiliar routes if major
roads are closed or clogged..
Listen to NOAA Weaither
Radio or local radio or TV sta-
tions for evacuation instructions.
If advised to evacuate, do so im-r
mediately.
Take these items with you
when evacuating:
Prescription medications
and medical supplies;
Bedding and clothing, in-
cluding sleeping bags ,and pil-.
lows
Bottled water, battery-op-
erated radio and extra batteries,
first aid kit, flashlight
Car keys.and maps
Documents, including dri-
ver's license, Social Security
card, proof of residence, insur-
ance policies, wills, deeds, birth
and marriage certificates, tax
records, etc.
Assemble a Disaster
Supplies Kit Including the
Following Items:
First aid kit and essential
medications.
Canned food and can
opener.
At least three gallons of
water per person.
Protective clothing, rain-
wear, and bedding or sleeping
bags.
Battery-powered radio,
flashlight, and extra batteries.
Special items for infants,
elderly, or disabled family
members.
Written instructions on
how to turn off electricity, gas
and water if authorities advise
you to do so. (Remember, you'll
need a professional to turn them
back on.)
Prepare for High Winds
Install hurricane shutters
or purchase precut 1/2" outdoor
plywood boards for each win-
dow of your home. Install an-
chors for the plywood and


predrill holes in the plywood so.
that you can put it up quickly.
Make trees more wind re-
sistant by removing diseased
and damaged limbs, then strate-
gicall\ removing branches so
that wind can blow through.
Know What to Do When a
Hurricane WATCH
Is Issued
Listen to NOAA Weather
Radio or local radio or TV sta-
tions for up-to-date storm infor-
mation.
Prepare to bring inside
any lawn furniture, outdoor
decorations or ornaments, trash
cans, hanging plants, and any-
thing else that can be picked up
by the wind.
Prepare to cover all win-
dows of your home. If shutters
have not been installed, use
precut plywood as described
above. Note: Tape does not pre-
vent windows from breaking,
so taping windows is not rec-
ommended.
Fill your car's gas tank.
Recheck manufactured
home tie-downs.
Check batteries and stock
up on canned food, first aid
supplies, drinking water, and
medications.
Know What to Do When a
Hurricane WARNING
Is Issued
Listen to the advice of lo-
cal officials, and leave if they
tell you to do so.
Complete preparation ac-
tivities.
If you are not advised to
evacuate, stay indoors, away
from windows.
Be aware that the calm
"eye" is deceptive; the storm is
not over. The worst part of the
storm will happen once the eye
passes over and the winds blow
from the opposite direction.
Trees, shrubs, buildings, and


other object- damaged bN the
first winds can be broken or de-
stroied b\ the s second \ i nd-.
Be alert for tornadoes.
Tornadoes can happen during a
hurricane and after it passes
over. Remain indoors, in the,
center of your home, in a clos-
et or bathroom v, ithotit win-
dows.
Q* Stay away from flood
waters. If you come upon a
flooded road, turn around and
go another way. If you are
caught on a flooded road and
waters are rising rapidly
around you, get out of the car
and climb to higher ground.
Know What to Do After a
Hurricane Is Over
Keep listening to NOAA
Weather Radio or local radio
or TV stations for instructions.
If you evacuated, return
home when local officials tell
you it is safe to do so.
Inspect your home for
damage.
Top Safety Tips
for a Blackout
Only use a flashlight for
emergency lighting. Never
use candles!
Turn off electrical
equipment you were using
when the power went out.


* Avoid opening the re-
frigerator and freezer.
Do not run a ,ener'ator
inside a home or garage.
If you use a generator,
connect, the equipment you
S'want to power directly to the
outlets on the generator. Do,
not connect a generator to a
home's electrical system.
Listen to local radio and
television for updated infor-
mation.
How Can I Prepare Before
a Blackout Happens?
Assemble essential sup-
plies, including:
Flashlight
Batteries
Portable radio
at least one gallon of
water
a small supply of food.
Due to the extreme risk
of fire, do not use candles dur-
ing a power outage.
Keep your car fuel tank at
least half full because gas sta-
tions rely on electricity to
power their pumps.
Follow energy conserva-
tion measures to keep the use
of electricity as low as possi-
ble, which can help power
company(ies) avoid imposing
rolling blackouts.


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mentioned above. The third
condition is a wind pattern
near the ocean surface that
spirals air inward. Bands of
thunderstorms form, allow-
ing the air to warm further
and rise higher into the at-
mosphere. If the winds at
these higher levels are rela-
tively light, this structure
can remain intact and allow
for additional strengthening.
The center, or eye,,of
a hurricane is relatively
calm. The most violent ac-
tivity takes place in the area
immediately around the eye,
called the eyewall. At the
top of the eyewall (about
50,000 feet), most of the air
is propelled outward, in-
creasing ,the air's upward
motion. Some of the air,
however, moves inward and
sinks into the eye, creating a
cloud-free area.
Siorm Surge
Storm surge is a large
dome of water often 50 to
100 miles wide that sweeps
across the coastline near
where a hurricane makes
landfall. The surge of high
water topped by waves is.
'devastating. The sitronger
the hurricane and the shal-
lower the offshore water, the
higher .the surge': will be.
Along the immediate coast,
storm surge is the greatest
threat to life and property.
Winds
Hurricane-force winds,
74 mph or more, can de-
stroy poorly constructed
buildings and mobile
homes,, Debris, such., as
signs, roofing material,
siding, and small items left
outside,, become flying


missiles in hurricanes.
Winds often stay above
hurricane strength well in-
land. Hurricane Hugo
(1989) battered Charlotte,
North Carolina (which is
about 175 miles inland),
with gusts to near 100 mph,
downing trees arid power
lines and causing massive
disruption.
Heavy Rains/Floods
Widespread torrential
rains often in excess of 6
inches can produce deadly
and destructive floods.
This is the major threat to
areas well inland.
Tropical Storm
Claudette (1979) brought
45 inches of rain to an area
near Alvin, Texas, con-
tributing to more than $600
million in damage.
Long after the winds
of Hurricane Diane (1955)
subsided, the storm
brought floods to Pennsyl-
vania, New York, and New
England that contributed to
nearly 200 deaths and $4.2
billion in damage.
Hurricane Agnes
(1972) fused with another
storm system, producing
floods in the Northeast
United States which con-
tributed to 122 deaths and
$6.4 billion in damage.
Tornadoes
Hurricxines also pro-
duce tornadoes, which add
to the hurricane's destruc-
tive power. These torna-
does most often occur in
thunderstorms embedded in
rain blinds well away from
the center of the hurricane.
However, they can also oc-
cur near the eyewall.


[


It









Wednesday, June 14, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 3B



SCHOOL


Gator Gathering 2006

Students Awarded Gator Club Scholarships


Erika Reaves Invited To Become



A Student Ambassador


Gator scholarship winners, left to right: Katie Sanders, Christie Sapp, Brittany
Saunders, and Meghan Harris. (Photo submitted)


President Morris Steen
of North Florida Community
College welcomed a large
group of Florida Gators to
the annual Madison/Taylor
County Gator Gathering in
the Student Center on April
16.
The Gathering included
a deliciously catered meal
and a surprise visit from
Florida's well beloved "Mr.
Two Bits." ,Some Gators
there said that he looked a
lot like Jim Williams, of
Madison, but some said he
was the "real McCoy." Or-
ange and blue table decora-
tions by Lady Gators set the
mood for the evening.
Coach John Hevesy, the
offensive line coach for the
Florida Gator football team,
was the featured speaker.
His remarks were dire[ tcJ
toward the University of
Florida's new, recruits, but
he pointed out that there was
a lot of parity now in Divi-
sion I football teams, partic-
ularly in the SEC.
He also mentioned that







.I







starts July 11
NFCC Madison, Fla

Website: WWW.NFCC.EDU la
TO REGISTER: r'W

80 I312


just two or three injuries at
key positions could affect
the whole season.
The highlight of each
Gator Gathering is always
the presentation of the Gator
Scholarships. Over 80 schol-
arships have been presented
to high school or NFCC
graduates in the Madison
Club alone since 1985.
Thanks to the endeavors
of Madison County's #1
Gator, B. F. Killlingsworth,
who also serves as the
Club's president, each schol-
arship has been raised this
year to $1500 each. This
year $6,000 was given to
four outstanding students.
All have attended Madison
County High School and
North Florida Community
College.
STwo riecipicnt, Meghan'
Harris and Katherine (Katie)
Sanders, were valedictorians
at Madison County High
School. Both were on the All
Florida Academic team and
belonged to Phi Theta Kappa
Honorary Society at WCC.
All four recipients, Meghan
Harris, Katherine Sanders,
Brittany Saunders and
Christie Sapp graduated-
with honors and were ex-
tremely active in extra-cur-
ricular activities and com-
munity service. All. belonged
to the Fellowship of Christ-
ian Athletes.
Meghan Harris wil be
majoring in mathematics
and plans to acquire a Ph.D
in math. She expects one day
to become a "full-time
Christian missionary in an
underdeveloped country." At
NFCC she was voted out-
standing academic student
by the NFCC faculty.
Katherine Sanders will
be majoring in journalism at
the University of Florida.
She has already had experi-


ence at Madison High
School where she was edi-
tor-in-chief of the high
school's yearbook. She
graduated with a 4.00 GPA
and was student body presi-
dent this year. She was a
member of the varsity soft-
ball team and the cheerlead-
ers squad.
Brittany Saunders has
already completed one se-
mester of work at the Uni-
versity of Florida where she
is majoring in nutritional
sciences and will graduate
with a double major that in-
cludes pharmacy. She was a
member of the volleyball
and softball teams at Madi-
son High School. She took
30 semesters hours from
NFCC while still in high
school.
Christie Siipp vwii'be
majoring in pharmacy at U .
F. When she graduated from
Madison High School she
had already completed 30
semester hours at NFCC
through the dual-enrollment
prograni. She has also had
considerable experience as a
pharmacy technician at Cap-
ital Regional Me&lical Center
in Tallahassee and at the
Winn-Dixie Pharmacy in
Madison. Since April of
2003 she has been a mentor
for the SSTRIDE program
(Science Students Together
Reaching Instructional Di-
versity and Excellence) ,
Each year it becomes
more difficult for high
school and community col-
lege students to enter the
University of Florida as en-
trance scores and grade
point averages are continu-
ally raised. Still Madison
County High School and
North Florida Community
College are able to provide
outstanding scholars. This
year was no exception.


By Jessalyn Covell
GrLene Publishing, Inc.
Erika Reaves of Nladi-
son has been invited to be-
come a member of the Flori-
da delegation to Spain.
France and Italy.
As a friend of People to
People. Reaves has been in-
tited to join several other
outstanding students to par-
ticipate in a fascinating edu-
cational journeN. She has
been included as a student
ambassador. which entails
one percent of All-American
students throughout the
United States ( U.S. I.
Reaves \\ill be experi-
encing 20 days of rewarding
activities and meet people
from Spain. France and Italy
all while earning a high
school credit. Her local dele-
gation \kill represent the
U.S. overseas; she i\ll expe-
rience new cultures and


make lifelong friends
She %%ill be learning
mane nev. traits such as con-
fidence. leadership. cultural
understanding. w world av. are-
ness. friendship and meno-
ries!
She \\ill be learning
confidence and leadership
Shile rappelling do%% n a ca -
tie %%all during leadership
training with expert outdoor
guides.
Reaes will receive cul-
tural undei standing while
view ing Michaengelo's
works at the Sistine Chapel.
cook %with Tuscan chefs and
witness ho" bulls are raised
and trained for bullfighting
in Spain.
Also. she \ ill get to ex-
perience world aw areness by
taking a stroll of the ancient
Roman Forum and enter the
once-raucous Roman Colos-
seuIm.


F u -..__ M I.
Erika Reaves
Reaves has been extend-
ed the opportunity\ to stay
\\ith a host family or e\peri-
ence European life during a
sta\ in a traditional guest-
house
The Student Ambas-
sador Promoam hand selects
onl\ the chest of students
% Within the U S. Congrarula-
tions Erika Rea'es!


NFCC Small Business Center Offers


Quickbooks Evening
The Small Business Devel- L
opment Center on the North
Florida Community College
campus in Madison, Fla. is offer- l
ing evening training in the f l B-Ca "
Quickbooks computer program
for business people. Ed Bagley,
NFCC instructor and SBDC co-
ordinator is teaching the courses.
Four summer workshops are
available:. June 20 and 22, July
25,and. 27, August 29: and,31.


............
H~ .~
.. .. .
I'd .1,
..~A ....~'


Workshops
Classes meet from 6 until
8:30 p.m. in the Business Educa-
tion Building (#7), Room 102.
There is a fee for each workshop.
Register in advance by call-
ing Bagley at 973-1631 or email
bagleyE@nfcc.edu.
The SBDC program is a part-
nership with Florida A&M Uni-
versity and funded in part by the
U.S. Small Business Admni'stra-
tion., .


. ,-t
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Adult General Education Programs
* Adult Basic Education (ABE)
* Adult High School
* GED Preparation

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* Early Childhood Education

Health Science Programs
* Radiologic Technology
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Refinishing
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Brick and Block Masonry
Building Construction Technology
Cosmetology
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Great Selection of Home








LB Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 14, 2006




OU DOORS




Seven Graduate From FWC K-9 School


Scofflaws in three states
,,iad better watch out be-
:ause there are seven newly-
trained natural resource ca-
nines and handlers ready to
hit the dirt.
The officers, who hail
trom fish and wildlife and
natural resource agencies in
Blorida, Delaware and
Maryland finished more
than 400 hours of training
ihat began in February and
were awarded their certifi-
cates Friday morning on the
steps of the Old Capitol
Building in Tallahassee.
Four of the handlers and
their partners are from the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC); two are from Mary-
land Natural Resources Po-
lice and one hails from
Delaware Department of
Natural Resources.
Florida's officers in-
clude:
Edward "Eddie" R.
Brown and Grady, who. are
assigned to Hendry County;
Bradley W. Clayton
and Cain, assigned to Polk
County;
Samuel D. Dishman
and Bear, Levy County; and
William E. Giles and
Parker, Columbia County.
Officer 1st Class Curt
W. Dieterle and Blu, and
Cpl. April C. Sharpeta and
Bear, are Ifrom Maryland;
and Cpl. Casey L. Zolper
and Warden are from
Delaware.
The officers were se-
'ected through a process
withintheir own a.eucv to
determine who would re-


ceive a dog. Training began
in February. The seven
dogs, mostly black
Labradors, were donated,
with the majority coming
from animal shelters. One
dog, Grady, was saved from
possible death. She was
beaten with a shotgun and a
shock collar was used on
her, Brown said. Now, the
playful pup *has been
through the rigors of train-
ing.
"I've been amazed
about how far from Day 1 to
now my dog has come," he
said like a proud, new father
would when speaking of his
baby. "She got a perfect
score in tracking."
Eventually, Brown
wants to do public presenta-
tions, especially for chil-
dren.
"I want to show them
what our dogs do," he said.
"I want to show them not all
police dogs are bite dogs."
FWC instructor John.
Snow said the canines are
trained to sniff out illegally
taken wildlife, such as dove,
deer, turkey, lobster, alliga-
tors and ducks. Depending
on where the dogs live and
work, they were trained to'
detect specific %% wildlife.
They also can track hu-
mans and find evidence,
such as guns, shell casings,
knives, handcuffs any-
thing a.human has touched.
Recently, one of FWC's ca-
nines located evidence in a
double-homicide.
"Their main function is
to track humann" he said.'
F\VC now has 14 la%\


An FWC officer and his new partner show off their
skills during a demonstration on Friday morning in
Tallahassee. (FWC photo by Tim Lewis)
enforcement canines., Natural Resources, began
"We have the most. nat- searching for an instruction
ural resource dogs in the program, he was told one
world, as far as I know," name.
Snow said. "John Snow," he said.
Snow has .made his "They all said John Snow
presence known for natural and Florida is the place you
resource canine training. He want to go.
has been employed by FWC "With the program he's
since 1980 and had a blood- put together, pretty much all
hound he, used before the your resource dogs have
agency had a K-9 program. been trained by Florida or a
He Was one of the first offi- state that's been trained by
cers to become a handler for Florida."
FWC something he's done The two officers from
for 18 years and he's been Maryland agreed the train-
an instructor for 15 years. ing was rigorous. Their dogs
When Zolper, who with are the only two trained in
Warden is the first team for wildlife detection from their
De" red'ss Deparrment ot staie. Dieterle said he


Seven FWC officers and their partners graduated
from FWC's K-9 academy June 2. (FWC photo by Tim
Lewis)


learned many things while
attending the training, but
one stood out in his mind.
"Trust your dog," he
said. "The dog knows the
task."
Sharpeta said the train-
ing and dogs are "really go-
ing to change the way we
work in Maryland. It's a bet-
ter way to get things done."
She, along with the oth-
er officers, agreed the %\ork
and training v. as difticulh.


but very rewarding. They all
had to leave their families
and friends to train for two
weeks with a week off and
then back again.
Snow said the officers
and their partners will now
go back to their respective
states, taking along a valu-
able tool.
"These dogs are an asset
to protect natural re-
sources." he said. "They are
trained to do just that.";


wo
AllI


It's that time again. The days are gro\\ing longer, the
weatherr is heating up and the \\ after is calling. To kick off
the fun, June 12-20 has been designated National Fishing
and Boating W\eek.

Don't miss out on dlis' valuable opportunity. to spend
some quality time on the \\ater with your family and
friends. Grab VOLU- gear and head to the after r for some
full in the sun during National Fishing and Boating Week!


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AV





Madison County Carrier 5B


Wednesday, June 14, 2006 wwwA~reeneDUb1ishin1~.cOm


S...'.


'4..


'14 *4~~


to the agricultural industry

Without them, there would be no
cotton for textiles, no milk for ice
cream, no wheat for bread. They are
SAmerica's farmers and all who work
in the agricultural industry. Without


them, we would be lost.


Today, we pay tribute to those in the


agricultural industry and salute them for their hard work.
Please join us in supporting the agricultural industry!


Suwannee


River
R.C. & D. Council, Inc.


S234 SE Court Street Live Oak, Florida
(386) 364-4278
Toll Free: (877) GO-NO-TIL
Email: srred@'atlantic.net


" "
.! :. . . .


We Salute Our
Area Farmers
Live Oak, FL (386) 362-2544


R :h. ,. Fm.


ir1


Ifl giIiIv'i i in mi n i v i r i 'ovrIiur a mo rpjr honi'h iin i.


e~ got it!5


L'Ittleton

Well Drilling
4029 N.E. Dusty Miller Ave.
Madison, FL 32340


40 Farm Credit Of
Northwest Florida, ACA
Specializzhig hi Agficultural &
Comm-Y Home Loam
Jay Novak, Rquionol Manager
925 W. Washington Street
PO Box 429 @ Monticello, FL 32345
850-997-35450 Fax: 850-997-5039


We.Salute Our
Local Farme
748 SW Horry Ave.
Madison, FL
850-973-2269


m OBLEY S

MEAT CUTTING
N -eV do it right ... Everytime!


www.greenepublishin2.com


Wednesday, June 14, 2006


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(850 929-4504


Farmers
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Wednesday, June 14, 2006


It's Not The Lottery...



But Your Chances Are A Whole Lot Better



With A Winning Classified


Learn How
The Mortgage Manager
Can Save You Money

By Jacob Bembn
Greene Publishing. Inc.
Do you want to save mon-
ey on your mortgage' then let
Jesse James kno\%.
Facts about mortgage
lenders include:
*'After paying 15 )ears on
your 30-year mortgage, you'll
still o\\e 90% of the amount
you borrowed'
*After paying nearly 24
years. )ou'll still one over
50%!
"You'll pay o\er three
times the amount you original-
1) borrowed before paying oft'
your mortgage!
#To make masters worse,
the FDIC estimates that one of
e\ery two mortgages are nmis-
calculated overcharging home-
owners $8-10 billion dollars
each and every year.
"On a conventional 30-
year mortgage. you'll make
over 120 unnecessary pay-
ments!
The Mortgage Manager


solves all these problems for
you absolutely free.
James offers free software
(a $395 ,.aluei, which will sa\e
thousands on your home mort-
gage without increasing your
payment. You \%ill eten be able
to shorten \our mortgage by 7-
15 years without refinancing
and you \ ill be able to increase
your net worth dramatically.
If you don't have a com-
puter, then it's no problem! You
can have a computerized Sa\-
ings Analysis of your mortgage
sent to you in the mail.
Please indicate if you
would d like a 3.5" floppy disk
(and include $2 to cover ship-
ping and handling cost) or a
CD-ROM include S3 to cover
slipping and handling cost or
a printed Mortgage Saving
AnalNsis (including $ to cover
shipping and handling cost.
Please sent the money, along
with sour full loan amount, the
term Iyears'. the payment
(PITIi and the interest rate
(fixed or variable), along with
the date of your first pa ment
to Jessie James. 147 SW
Ou endale A' enue, Greenv ille.
FL 32331.


% NOl --
m - .
- -m -M -


Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
S(850) 973-2848


I Clean For You!
Rentals Offices Homes
$10 hour References Available
Pet care available in your home.
850-971-5684


Need Some Help?,
Gardening, housekeeping, rental
cleanup or any odd jobs done
for reasonable prices in Madison
area. Call 850-508-2164.

"HOMEOWNERS $50,000 TO
$150,000 IN SAVINGS IN MORT-
GAGE INTEREST!!! FREE SER-
VICE NO COSTS! Send name
and address for free info to Jessie
James, 147 S.W. Owendale Ave.,
Greenville, Fl. 32331."
Custom embroidery service on
uniforms, golf shirts, T- shirts, hats,
bags, afghans. Free logo digitizing
with order. No minimum. Busi-
ness logo, team logo, personaliza-
tion and monogramming. For in-
formation contact nfcraftand-
stuff@vahoo.com or call 850 948
7042

Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326






Free House
Old House to be dismantled or.re-
moved in Greenville on 221. Call
352-726-0046 ask for Bob or Joan.





2005 Murray Riding Mower. 21 HP
Briggs & Stratton engine with 46"
deck. Like new, runs great. Own-
er's manual included. $600. 850-
973-4972





Wanted peafowl. Need one ma-
ture male now before spring, but
will buy pairs if needed. Call 850-
973-6131 or 850-464-1165. Also
want guineas.






Planted Pines Wanted For Straw
Operation. Call Tippette Farms
971-5495. Minimum 20 acres
please.

LAND WANTED
400 to 600 acres of land in the
vicinity of Madison. Phone
Tommy 850-973-4141


Please He
Our Elderly neighbor
vere stroke and sadly
able to come back I
three medium to sm
were his loyal and lo
ions. These dogs
desperate need of go
all have dogs of our
unable to provide for
you think you would
one of these great do
Debbie at 850-948-6S







2bdrnm/ bath MH


The City of Madison is accept-
i!p ing applications for a Water Main-
has had a se- tenance Technician. Applicants
y will not be must be 18 years of age, possess a
home. He has valid Florida Drivers License, high
aall dogs who school diploma or GED, pass a
)ving compan- drug test, background check. and
are now in physical examination. We would
od homes. We prefer someone with at least one
r own and are year of experience in water facili-
these dogs. If ties maintenance and repair actiyi-.
d like to have ties.
gs pleas to have call Job applications and descriptions of
993 work required may be picked up at,
City Hall between the hours of 8:00
... a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday. We will be accept-
^^ in'm applications fior this position
from Monday June 12, 2006 until
Friday June 23, 2006.
The City of Madison is an Equal
l in parkon Opportunity Employer and recog-
in prk, n nizes veteran's preference.,


Hnlgway Ji n ll IIvauIson,
$135/wk includes electric, ten-
ant to pay for propane.
Call Erin Levin
at 850-570-0459


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Se-
nior's and Disabled. 1 & 2 bed-
rooms, HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 TTY Acs
711
Equal Housing Opportunity

(3) FOR RENT
(1) 2 bedroom doublewide that's 2
miles from the city. No more than
three people. (2) Small 1 bedroom
trailer for single person. (3) Also
have a small house for single per-
son. No calls past 9 p.m. please!
850-973-6991

Q Southem ill1as0of

C\.kadison C'/partments

HUD vouchers accepted. 1,2, & 3
BR, HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call 850-973-8582/ TDDTTY 711.
200 Southern Villas Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity.


Greenille Pointe

SApartments

1,2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-'
sible apts. HUD vouchers, accept-
ed. Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity






Commercial/Industrial
Property

with state highway frontage-23
acres, Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Drive and High-
way 53 South. Natural gas line,
8 inch water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build to
suit tenant.

Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141


The Madison County Solid
Waste/Recycling Department is ac-
cepting applications for two (2)
Part-Time Collection Center Atten'-
dants. Major responsibilities will
include the opening and closing.of
the collection center; assisting res-
idents with proper disposal and re-
cycling techniques, as well aas the
distribution of educational material.
Attendant -must maintain center
grounds in a neat and orderly fash-
ion. Applicants must have the abili-
ty to establish and maintain a posi-
tive working relationship with resi-
dents who use the Drop-Off Center.
Employee must report any prob-
lems and concerns to the office of,
the Solid Waste Coordinator. Other
related duties may be required and
assigned by the Administrative
Staff. A 30-35 work week is re-
quired with flexible hours a must,
to cover week ends and holiday
time schedules.. Salary starts at
$6.53 per hour. The positions will
remain open until positions are
filled. .For additional information
contact the Solid Waste Office at
850-973-2611. A completed Madi-
son County Employment Applica-
tion is required. Madison County is
an equal opportunity employer and
a Drug Free Workplace. All appli-
cations must be submitted to the
following address by Friday, June
16, 2006 at 5:00 p.m.

Madison County Board of Com-
missioners
Att: AllenCherry
Courthouse Annex, Room 219
112 E. Pinckney St.
P.O. Box 539
Madison, Fl. 32341
850-973-3179
Kountry Kitchen
Now Hiring Servers
850-971-0024









FREE prep classes
M-TH: 8:30am-12:30pm @ NFCC
Tues: 5-9pm @ NFCC
T/TiH: 6-9pm @ Madison Rec. Cntr.



973-1629


ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Madison County
Building Department


Classified Deadline is
3:30 p.m. Monday.
Just say charge it!!
850-973-4141


Person Needed For
Advertising Sales at:
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Does a fast-paced career with
a growing newspaper group
spark your interest? Do you


Office Building For Sale by Owner.
Range Ave. Madison, FL. 1168 sf.
0.17 Ac., fenced. $157,655. Shown
By Appointment Only. 850-973-
4353.

192 ACRES OF PRIME
HUNTING PROPERTY
(Madison County)
Four Star Hunt Camp, Virgin
Timber, 8 Cabins, Huge Cook-
house, Fully Equipped Work-
shop w/3 Bays, Tractor, Four
Wheeler, Completely Furnished,
HVAC, I/M, Washer/Dryer,
Satellite TV, No Expense
Spared. For sale by owner
$1.75M. 863-634-3340

Pioneer Excavating
& Tractor Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, Roads, Mow-
ing, Discing, Box-Blading, and
Tilling.
-No Job Too Small-Free Estimates-
Call Paul Kinsley 850-973-6326
Cherry Lake Area
Charming 2br/lbth, all wood interi-
or house, on six lovely acres. This
home has a working fireplace, 2 en-
closed porches, new roof all for
$140,000.
Peggy Ball Realtor 850-228-3721
lEmf-l --y--ent
r~m u^ A ^- a


Faith Baptist Church
Needs;
Lawn Mowing & Hedge Trim-
ming, taking bids.
Please call 973-8200


Full Time position that involves
moderate to difficult general sec-
retarial and office work of a com-
plex nature. Performs a variety of
administrative and support func-
tions to assist in the building de-
partment. This position requires
the ability to type accurately and
efficiently, knowledge of business
English, spelling, and math; abili-
ty to conduct research, collect and
analyze date; prepare written re-
ports; ability to prepare and moni-
tor budgets; knowledge of office
equipment; ability to act indepen-
dently and make responsible deci-
sions; ability to establish and
maintain cooperative working re-
lations with government officials
and other employees as well as the
public; an Associates Degree from
an accredited college or university
and 'four (4) years secretarial or
administrative experience (experi-
ence may be substituted). To ap-
ply for this position please fill out
a Madison County Board of Com-
missioners Employment Applica-
tion, and a Background Check
Form. You can pick up an appli-
cation at the Madison County
Board of County Commissioners
Administrative Office located in
the Court House Annex, 229 SW
Pinckney Street, Room 219,
Madison, Florida. For further
questions please contact Allen
Cherry, Interim County Coordina-
tor at (850) 973-3179: Applica-
tions deadline is Monday, June 26,
2006 @ 5:00 P.M.
Madison County is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer and a Drug
Free Workplace.
DEPARTMENT OF TRANS-,
PORTATION
DISTRICT TWO
POSITION NUMBER:
55004492
OCCUPATION: High-
way Maintenance Workers- L 1
WORKING TITLE:'
Highway Maintenance T,-, Ii i c i In
SBROADBAND-CODE:
47-4051-01
PREVIOUS INCUMBENT:
Mack Gentry
WORK SCHEDULE: Mon.
- Thurs. 7:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
4/10 hr. days
UNIT: Perry Maintenance
CONTACT: Jessica Rucks
TELEPHONE: (850)838-5800
SUNCOM: 287-5800
POSITION LOCATED IN:
Perry, FL /Taylor. County
BIWEEKLY RECRUITMENT
SALARY RANGE: $800.00 -
$960.00 bi-weekly
(Pending reclassification)
"Benefits include: state pension
plan, subsidized 'health/life insur-
ance
plans; paid holidays/paid vacation
and sick leave."

TYPE OF ADVERTISEMENT:
,. Internal X
Open Competitive

Special Requirements: .Posses-
sion of a valid Class "B" Com-
mercial Driver's License

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND
ABILITIES:
1. ABILITY TO OPERATE MO-
TOR VEHICLES AND OTHER
LESS MECHANIZED EQUIP-
MENT
2. SKILL IN USING A VARI-
ETY OF HAND AND POWER
TOOLS
3. ABILITY TO ESTABLISH
AND, MAINTAIN COOPERA-
TIVE WORKING RELATION-
SHIPS
4. ABILITY TO PERFORM MI-
NOR MAINTENANCE ON MO-
TOR VEHICLES AND OTHER
MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT
5. KNOWLEDGE TO PER-
FORM ROUTINE HIGHWAY
MAINTENANCE ACCORDING
TO
GUIDELINES, STANDARDS
AND PROCEDURES
6. KNOWLEDGE OF MAIN-
TENANCE OF TRAFFIC (I.E.
SIGNS, CONES, ARROW
BOARDS,
ETC.)

SPECIAL NOTES: If you need an
accommodation because of a dis-
ability in order to participate in
the application/selection process,
please notify the contact person in
advance. We hire only U.S. citi-
zens and lawfully authorized alien
workers. For applicants claiming
Veterans Preference, please fax
your DD214 to People First @
904/636-2003.

The Department of Transportation
is an Equal Employment Opportu-
nity, Affirmative Action, Drug
Free Workplace employer.


Location: National Beef Packing
Company Moultrie, Georgia


Responsibilities:
The desired candidate is expected
to plan and direct all aspects of fi-
nancial analysis projects and statis-
tical studies and focus on special
projects and business studies that
are assigned to this functional work
group. Duties will include but are
not limited to the following:
* Segment financial statement
preparation and analysis.
* Review and reconciliation of:
General ledger
Accounts payable
Payroll
All Inventories
* Yield and Cost analysis and com-
parison.
* Inventory management.
* Dry Goods Purchasing
* Supervise and develop office
staff.
* Audit and Expenditure control.
* Interaction with plant manager
for analysis and projects.
* Assist in any other duties as as-
signed by Company management.

Education and work experience
requirements:

* Bachelor's degree
* Prior operations accounting expe-
rience
* Experience working with a per-
ishable product
* -Experience working with yield
and cost comparisons
* Working knowledge of PCs
* Posses good analytical, time
management, and process manage-
ment skills
* Must have excellent communica-
tion skills

Must be willing to live in rural SW
Georgia

Send resume to:
.. .l O., r!i. E., ."r.,

An Equal Opportunity Employer


Tractor Work
free estimates
NO JOB TOO SMALL
Mowing, Discing, tilling and box
blading. Call 973-6326.
Need a helping hand?
Gardening, housekeeping, rental
cleanup or any odd jobs done for
reasonable prices in Madison area.
Call 850-508-2164.


etin h wn


thig an ode


U." -iViLaula"ll %-"%-.PLLlILY wwwo rl uu"uFL'u]L]LaJLJLJEILJIG-%.;"AJLJL


enjoy customer contact, both
in. person and over the
phone? Then, it's a safe bet
you will enjoythis job. We're
fun, we're busy and work
best under pressure: If that
sounds like you, please. fax
your resume to Emerald at:
850-973-4121 or apply in
person at the office on Hwy
53 South. Please, if you're
not sure how an alarm clock
works or you average more
than three dramatic incidents
per week in your life, or sim-
ply only work because you're
bored, then PLEASE DO
NOT APPLY.

Drivers & Contractors:
Home through the week!
Drop & Hook Loads!
Great Pay/Benefits!
CDL-A, 3yrs exp.
browntrucking.com
770-344-2028
$$ AVON $$
Be your own Boss!
Earn 50%
Sell $500, earn $250
Starter Kit is only $10
Call Dorothy 973-3153
American Fresh Foods, a
ground beef processing plant locat-
ed in Thomasville, GA is looking
for experienced machine operators.
You must have prior experience
working in a food processing plant
using Formax, Vmag and/or K-pak
equipment. Ability to meet produc-
tion and quality standards a must.
Call 22 -4-Yr4-t4ii4:4 .'" M -nr rI'_uiiic

t... ? R...:c'.-' a, D Th..man.:' ile,
GA 31792. EOE/MFHV
Position:
Plant Accountant


RECEPTIONIST
Part-Time
County Commissioners Office

General office and secretarial
work. Greeting and providing gen-
eral information to the public, filing
and typing. Will be responsible for
answering the telephone and direct-
ing calls appropriately or take
down written messages, greet the
public and answer question of a
general nature or.direct to appropri-
ate person, typing correspondence
and/or reports as needed, filing and
management of filing system, oper-
ation of, office machines and .other
similar duties as requested by su-
pervisor. Requirements for this po-
sition include the following:
Knowledge or ability to learn office
procedures and office equipment,
knowledge of business communi-
cation both verbal and written, abil-
ity to understand and follow verbal
and written instructions, ability to
communicate effectively with vari-
ous individuals, ability to establish
good working relationships and
work as a team with other staff,
ability to type 35 words per minute,
and have a High School Diploma or
GED/equivalent. To apply for this
position please fill out a Madison'
County Board of' Commissioners
Employment Application, and a
Background Check Form. You can
pick up an application at the Madi-
son County Board of County Com-
missioners Administrative Office
located in the Coulrt House Annex,
229 SW Pinckney Street, Room
219, Madison, Florida. For further
questions please contact Allen
Cherry, Interim County Coordina-
tor at (850) 973-3179,. Applications
deadline is Monday, June 19, 2006
.,, Madison 'Cpunly,,iS.a.flu.,q
Opportunity Employer and. a Drug
Free Workplace.

Emp .loyment-Wnte


I


W-ULN











Wednesday, June 14, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 7B


Reach-.. AI 0 fRedrsArssFoida


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV

Under the Authority of the Self-Servicing Storage Facility Act, Section 83.805 the de-
scribed below has been seized for nonpayment of rent and other accrued expenses. Prop-
erty consists primarily of household goods in units rented by: Tanya Butler, and Brian N.
English. The property will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the
Self-Storage Facility Act, Section 83.806. The sale will be held Friday, June 23, 2006 at
10:00 A.M., at the Madison Mini Storage, 1098 East U.S. 90, in Madison, Florida. For
further information call 971-5744.

67. 6/14



Public Notice for Legal Counsel

The North Florida Workforce Development Board, Inc. is issuing an Invitation to Nego-
tiate for legal counsel services. North Florida Workforce Development Board, Inc. is a
non-profit organization, is the administrative entity for certain job training and job
placement provisions of the Social Security Act, Title IV (Excess Temporary Assistance
to Need Families funds) the federal Workforce Investment Act of 1998; Chapter 2000-
165, Laws of Florida; et al. Among other things, North Florida Workforce Development
Board, Inc. is responsible for the operation of the Employment Connections offices in
Suwannee, Taylor and Madison counties.

Instructions:

Parties may apply by submitting a letter of interest which

Describes their qualifications to provide appropriate legal services

Contains a summary of applicable experiences.

Provides appropriate references

Indicates their ability to perform the work; and

Contains a schedule of fees.

Submit'letter of interest to:, North Florida Workforce Development Board, Inc. P.O. Box
267, Madison, FL 32341-0267 by 4:00 p.m. on June 30, 2006. Late submittals will be dis-
qualified. Facsimile or other electronic submittals will not be accepted or considered.
North Florida Workforce Development Board, Inc. reserves the right to reject any or all
submittals in the best interest of the North Florida Workforce Development Board, Inc.
North Florida Workforce Development Board, Inc. is an equal opportunity training
provider/employer.

6/9.6/14.6/16.6/21




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 2006-216-CA
DIVISION:

CHARLIE ARNOLD, JR. and
MAZIE ARNOLD,

Plaintiffs,

vs.

CLAYTON T. MCWILLIAMS, JR. a/k/a C.T.
MCWILLIAMS, JR., if living, and all unknown
parties claiming by, lirouph,. under or and against
the above named defendants who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may
claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, or other claimants; VESS PROPERTIES,
a Florida general partnership; and CREDITHRIFT,
INC., a Florida corporation,

Defendants.



NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: CLAYTON T. Mi \ ILL I'.A .JR. a'La LC.T. AML \ ILLIAMS, JR, ifliving, and all
unknown parties dJniine., b. ihr'.uoh. undir ir and astainst he .above named defen-
dailinWh'6ihrendr knio. n o.) be dear .r alise, "heilhr said unknown parties may claim
an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants, VESS PROPERTIES,
a Florida general partnership, and CREDITHRIFT, INC., a Florida corporation, or any
parties claiming any right title or interest in the property herein


YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to Quiet Title to real prop-
erty in the Circuit Court in Madison, Madison County, Florida styled as Case No.: 2006-
216-CA, Charlie Arnold, Jr. and Mazie Arnold vs. Clayton T. McWilliams, Jr., et al. to
the property described as:


THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND,
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE COUNTY OF MADISON, STATE
OF FLORIDA, TO WIT:

START AT SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF
(SW 1.4) OF NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW) OF SECTION 28, TOWN-
SHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN
RIGHT OF WAY OF SR S-360-A OPPOSITE STATION 171+64.5;
THENCE RUN NORTH 0 DEG. 04.7' EAST 1 FOOT TO NORTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF SAID ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEG. 24' 22" WEST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE 50 FEET TO WEST SIDE OF A
STREET; THENCE NORTH 9 DEG. 04.7' EAST 170.62 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEG. 55.3' WEST 210 FEET TO EAST SIDE OF A 50 FOOT
STREET AT POINT OF BEGINNING OF LOT 14; THENCE NORTH 9
DEG. 04.7' EAST 80 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 55.3' EAST 100
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEG. 04.7' WEST 80 FEET; THENCE NORTH
89 DEG. 55.3 WEST 100 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO
KNOWN AS A LOT NUMBER FOURTEEN (14) OF OAK ESTATES, AN
UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION IN MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO VESS PROPERTIES
BY DEED FROM FREDERICK D.. SMITH RECORDED 12/04/1985 IN
DEED BOOK 156 PAGE 163, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA


has been filed by Charlie Arnold, Jr. and Mazie Arnold, Plaintiffs and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses if any, to it on William S. Frazier, 1919-8 Bland-
ing Boulevard, Jacksonville, Florida 32210, 904-384-1441 on or before July 7. 2006. and
file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on said Plaintiffs or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a judgment will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Petition.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 30 day of May, 2006.

TIM SANDERS -Clerk of the Court
By: Romona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk


6/7.6/14




PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL INFORMATION

Pursuant to Section 324 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act
(EPCRA), the following information is available to the public upon request during nor-
mal working hours by the North Central Florida Local Emergency Planning Committee,
2009 NW 67th Place, Gainesville, FL 32653-1603:

Hazardous Chemical Inventory (Tier Two) Forms

Shelter In Place Training Assistance

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)

Emergency Release Follow-up Reports


Hazards Analyses for Section 302 facilities

LEPC Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Plan

How-to-Comply Information for Hazardous Materials Users

Free Hazardous Materials Response Training for First Responders

Your Telephone Book may contain Hazardous Materials Emergency
Information that you could be asked to follow in an actual emergency


The North Central Florida Local Emergency Planning Committee (Florida District 3
LEPC) serves Alachua, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette,
Madison, Suwannee, Taylor, and Union Counties. To obtain information on the above
items, please contact Dwayne Mundy at (352) 955-2200 x 108, email mundy@ncfrpc. org
or visit www.ncflepc.org


LEGAL NOTICE

The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting of
the Board of Directors on Monday, June 26, 2006, 7:00 P.M. at the Live Oak Church of
God in Live Oak, Florida.

6/14



NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The District Board of Trustees of North Florida
Community College will hold its regular monthly meeting Tuesday, June 20,2006 at 5:30
p.m. in the NFCC Student Center Lakeside Room, NFCC, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr.,
Madison, FL. A copy of the agenda may be obtained by writing: NFCC, Office of the
President, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For disability-related accom-
modations, contact the NFCC Office of College Advancement, 850-973-1653. NFCC is an
equal access/equal opportunity employer.

6/14



Notice of Bid

The City of Madison, Florida will receive sealed bids on the following surplus property
as listed:

One Gas powered 1989 concrete mixer in excellent condition minimum bid $500.00.

One Gas powered 1984 Case Chain Trenche fair condition No minimum bid.

One hot asphalt patcher 1985 pull behind truck heated by LP Gas fair condition -
No minimum bid.

One 16" bush hog mower bat wing poor condition needs some minor repair no min-
imum bid. .

Sealed bids must be submitted to: Jack Sealey, Purchasing Agent, City of Madison 171
SE Rutledge St., Madison, Florida 32340, Phone 850-973-5073, no later than 4:00 p.m.,
03 July 2006. Bids will be opened 05, July 2006, and, successful bidder will be notified.

The City of Madison. Florida rrcts iht righi to accept or refuse all bids.

6/14, 6/16. 6/21. 6/23, 6/28, 6/30



BID NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commissioners of Madison County,
Florida will be accepting sealed bids for the following. .

Furnishinp all needed materials., equipment. labor and supervision to: widen and resur-
.ace- Madi-on Counn Road NE Countn Ruad CR-255 for a diltance of 5.5 miks and
knon a.i Projeci Number 2016 -114; and placing nm" asphalt road snllacts on NE Beti-
lah Church Road for a distance of 3 mills and SE Farm Road for a distance of 1.939 miles
(road base to be prepared by Madison County), and known as Project Number 2006 05.
Pltase noic thai ihose arn two separate projects and bidders may bid one or both.

Sealed bids may be submitted to the Board of County Commissioners by depositing same
at the Board office located in the Madison County Courthouse Annex, Room 219, 112
East Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida 32340, or Post Office Box 539, Madison, Florida
32341, anytime prior to 5:00 PM on Wednesday, June 28, 2006. ANY BIDS RECEIVED
AFTER SUCH DATE AND TIME WILL NOT BE OPENED OR CONSIDERED. Sealed
bids must be clearly marked as a sealed bid and the bid number must be printed on the
outside of the front of each envelope as follows: Resurfacing/Widening NE County Road
CR-255, Project Number 2006 04; and Placing Asphalt Road Surfaces on NE Beulah
Church Road and SE Farm Road, Project Number 2006 05. Each project bid must be
placed in a separate envelope and marked as described above.

BID MUST CONTAIN A COPY OF THE VENDOR'S MADISON COUNTY OCCUPA-
TIONAL LICENSE WHERE APPLICABLE, OR CERTIFIED STATE CONTRACTOR
NUMBER TO BE CONSIDERED FOR AWARD.

Bid Plans and Specifications, as well as other pertinent documents, may be obtained from
the Madison County Public Works/Road Department office located at 2060 NE Rocky
Ford Road i
(C-591), 2 miles north of Madison, telephone # 850-973-2156, beginning June 8, 2006.
Each contractor interested in bidding these projects is strongly urged to obtain copies of
the bid package prior to the pre-bid conference in order to have time to review them and
visit the project locations. Copies of Plans and Specifications will be available for inspec-
tion at the County Commission Office during regular office hours beginning on June 8,
2006.n : .... i ... .**** .... .. ... .

Please be avised' ta`t'a mandatory pre-bid conference will be held on Tuesday, 'June 20,
2006 at 1:00 PM in the County Commission Meeting Room located in the Madison Coun-
ty,Courthouse Annex Building, 112 E. Pinckney Street in Madison, Florida. BIDS WILL
NOT BE CONSIDERED FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT REPRESENTED AT
THIS CONFERENCE. Madison County reserves the right to waive any informality or
to reject any or all bids.

Bids will be opened at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, June 29, 2006, after which all bids will
be available for public inspection. Award by the Board of County Commissioners is
scheduled for Wednesday, July 5, 2006 and all vendors will be notified in writing of the
successful bidder.


6/7. 6/9. 6/14. 6/16



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF


WESLEY MATTHEW SULLIVAN,

Deceased,


File Number: 0622-CP

Division:


NOTICE TO CREDITORS


The administration of the estate of WESLEY MATTHEW SULLIVAN, de-
ceased. File Number 0622-CP pending in the Circuit Court for Madison 'County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, the address of which is P.O. Box 237, Madison, Florida 32341. The
names and address of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. '
The date of the first publication of this Notice is Tune 7, 2006


/s/ EVELYN M. FLETCHER
Attorney for Personal Representative

Florida Bar No. Q162744


/s/ JOHN SULLIVAN
Personal Representative
P. O. Box 92
Pinetta, Florida 32350


6/7.6/14







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/ ANF
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C:F


LESAL$ LE6-AL$ LE6AL$







8B Madison County Carrier


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
If you enjoy working on cars and are not afraid of the
latest technology then a successful career in the automotive
service industry may be for you. Automotive service techni-
cians or mechanics are in demand for a variety of settings
that include gas station garages, car dealerships and govern-
ment agencies. This specific field offers a range of different
possibilities and the opportunity to specialize, particularly
for people who complete technological training and certifi-
cation.
Many people may get confused or baffled by what on
earth an actual automotive service technician, also known as
,mechanic's, nature of work entails. They repair and service
automobiles and occasionally light trucks and. vans with
gasoline engines.
Anyone whose' vehicle has broken down knows the im-
portance of a mechanic's job. The ability to accurately diag-
nose the source of the problem quickly and efficiently, one
of the mechanic's most valuable skills, requires good rea-
soning ability and a thorough knowledge of automobiles. In
fact, many mechanics consider diagnosing "hard to find"
troubles, one of their most challenging and satisfying duties.
Mechanics work with 411 of a car's parts and systems,


Bochnia r

Auto Care
909 E. Base St. Madison, FL
(850) 973-2676
Reg# Iv10818



May's

Automotive Service & Towing
"03 NE Livingston St. Madison, FL
(850) 253-0200

-. Douglas
4 Auto Repair
Foreign & Domestic
405 S. Ohio St.* Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-1225
A/C, Alternator, Brakes, Exhaust, Dual Exhaust,
CV Axles & Tune-Ups

"i -th Tire Co.
Autos Light Trucks RV's Boat Trailers
TRUCK ACCESSORIES & PARTS
INSTANT CREDIT AVAILABLE
90 DAYS SAME AS CASH
800 N Patterson St.* Valdosta, GA
(229) 242-4830
M-F 7:30am-6:00pm Sat 7:30am-12:00pm


FURST
Automotive & Cycle
(386) 364-8310
109 West Duval Live Oak, FL A
Chris Furst
A.S.E. Certified Master Technician, Owner


www.greenepublishing.com


S'Im1UT(





SE








from the brakes and air conditioning to the belts, hoses and
steering.
In smaller garages, a mechanic must be familiar with all
of these systems to diagnose customer's problems.
In larger garages, technicians may specialize in particu-
lar areas.
Automotive service, technicians have to be familiar with
using a broad range of tools, such as jacks, screwdrivers,
electronic diagnostic equipment and much more! Also, me-
chanics must possess strong problem-solving skills to find
repair problems. .
Another common question that many people may won-
der is, how do mechanics know how to diagnose a certain
automotive problem? First off, the mechanic receives a de-
scription of the problem from the owner. Then, the mechan-
ic must take this information, apply their knowledge and ei-
ther test drive the vehicle or use a variety of testing equip-
ment to locate the problem.
Once the problem is found, they must make adjustments
or repairs. If a part is damaged or worn beyond repair, the',
mechanic cannot fix the problem and replace the part until
after appropriate consultation with the customer.
How much does a automotive service technician work?
The majority of mechanics work a 40-hour week, but some
self-employed mechanics work longer hours, working on
the vehicle until it is fixed, 110 percent!
Generally,' most mechanic shops are indoor and well
ventilated; although, some. shops can be extremely noisy.
Mechanics frequently work with dirty and greasy parts and
in awkward positions. Sometimes it is hard to find a good
mechanic because they must be limber, but at the same time,
strong enough to lift heavy parts and tools.
Minor cuts, burns and bruises are common, but serious
accidents are avoided when a shop is kept clean and orderly
and safety practices are observed on a day-to-day basis.
In 1994, automotive service technicians held approxi-
mately 736,000 jobs within the United States. The majority
of mechanics worked for retail and wholesale automotive
dealers, independent automotive repair shops and gasoline
service .stations. Motor vehicle manufacturers employed
some mechanics to test, adjust and repair cars at the end of
assembly lines.
Also, in 1994, over 20 percent of automotive mechanics
were self-employed.
As cars become more technologically advanced, with
complex computer and electronic systems, newly employed
mechanics must keep pace. While there are no mandatbo~y
national certification requirements, most mechanics will
have to complete a good deal of training and education.
Some technicians complete high school level training, while
others go on to earn two-year degrees or certificates in auto
repair. Many community colleges and vocational schools of-
fer these certain types of programs.
The types of training and certification one needs depend
on where you live, what type of repair you may want to spe-
cialize in and how much money you want to make. For ex-
ample, if you want to work with air conditioning systems,
you will need to acquire Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) certification.
Voluntary certification, offered through organizations
like the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), may help
you earn a higher salary. Due to constant changes in tech-
nology, technicians are expected to refresh certifications
every few years.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), me-
chanics earned an average of $14.18 per hour in 2003. Ac-
tual wages vary widely, however, depending on skills and
experience. Mechanics are usually paid hourly. Although,
there are some highly skilled mechanics that are guaranteed
a minimum weekly salary.
Many mechanics work 9 to 5, but some work overtime
and those who own their own business work considerably
more. The BLS report that more than 30 percent of techni-
cians work more than 40 hours a week.
Job opportunities for automotive service technicians are
expected to be good for people who complete automotive
training programs in high schools, vocational and technical
schools, or community colleges.


Mechanic careers are attractive to many people because
extensive training is not required and they afford the oppor-
tunity for good pay and the satisfaction of good skilled work
with one's hands.


Wednesday, June 14, 2006


)MOTIVE





RVICE





ECHNICIAN

In 2005, the employment of automotive mechanics in-
creased as fast as any other occupation.
Additionally, the number of mechanics is expected to
increase because of the expansion of the driving age popu-
lation that is expected to increase the number of motor vehi-
cles on the road.
Most. people who enter the occupation may expect
steady work because changes in economic conditions have
little effect on the automotive repair business. During a de-
cline in business, however, some employersmay be more
reluctant to hire inexperienced workers so obtaining the ap-
propriate training and certification is a must.

A^i Hall s
re & Muffler
1412 East Base St. Madison, FL
(Beside Clover Farm)

(850) 973-3026
Owners: Daryl & Lee Anne Hall


Alexander's
'f o Auto Service
ir Ifyou can't come to us, we'll come to you
/ 24 Hr. Mobile Service
(^Foreign & Domestic Diesel Trucks Brakes Service Engines Rebuilt
Over 15 Years Experience
(850) 464-1305

Wallace Motors
1512 E. Base St. Madison, FL
(850) 973-1230



New & Used Tires Automotive Repairs

STOYOTA ----
WISSAN HONDA |
ACURA MAZDA .o0swRange Ave.
,S Madison, FL
O(850)973-6016 "
J|iPANEE' AUTO l, '0.
A'ANESE ALT0SPECIALIKT,
Randy C. Littleton, Owner
ASE Maosrter Technicion
NOW Ai! BLAE NFON PRFORMANc[ ASSORE



PAINT SERVICE






VALDOSTA

1 ALIGNMENT


229.242.2170
302 E. Hill Ave. Valdosta, GA
Downtown

/


Ow To Become An....


i






Section
Missing
or
Unavailable