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Madison County carrier
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067855/00010
 Material Information
Title: Madison County carrier
Portion of title: Carrier
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tommy Greene
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: June 7, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 5, 1964.
General Note: Co-publisher: Mary Ellen Greene.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 32, no. 15 (Nov. 22, 1995).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33599166
lccn - sn 96027683
System ID: UF00067855:00010

Full Text




VOL 42 N.4 Wensa, Juel. 206MaisoIloida


LKUr U lWN


!RIOA)10


Spotlight On Prentiss
And Hiroko Cherry
Page 7A


Madison Academy
Hosts Graduation


S, .


THE SPIRIT OF ADISON COUNTY


Page 15A


www.greeepubishing. Maiso CutysAwr-WinningNesppeIoo46 -4


In Brief

Madison County,
P&Z Board
To Meet In
Regular Session
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing. Inc.
The Madison County
Planning and Zoning Board,
\\ill meet in its regular ses-'
sion Thursday. June 8, at
5:30 p.m. at the Madison
County Courthouse.
New business on the
agenda %%ill include the
election of a chairman for
Please See P&Z. Page 4A

Lee Volunteer
Fire Department
Hosts Fish Fry
B\ Jacob Bembrn
Greeie Publishing, Inc.
The Lee Volunteer Fire
Department \ ill host a fish fry
fundraiser Saturday. June 10,
from 4-8 p.m. at the fire de-
partment, next to Lee City
Hall.
The price is $7 per dinner.
Each dinner \ill include cat-
fish or talapia,. hush puppies.
colesla%. baked beans. cheese
grits. dessert and iced tea.
Tickets ma\ be purchased
in advance from an\ member
or at the door. You man dine in
or carry out dinners.
All proceeds from the fish
fr\ benefit the Lee Volunteer
Fire Department.
Drugs That
Killed The Most
People In 2005
Last Wednesday, Mlay 31,
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement iFDLEi released
the Florida Medical E\aminers
Commission Report on Drugs
Identified in Deceased Per-
sons. The report contains in-
formation compiled from au-
topsies performed b\ medical
examiners across the state in
2005. During that period there
were approximately\ 172,000
deaths in Florida. Of those,
7.573 individuals were found
to ha-e died. w ith one or more
of the drugs specified in this
Please See Drugs, Page 4A


WEI

2 Sections, 26 Pages
Around Madisoh Co........5-9A
Bridal.................................. 4A
Church.................. Section B
Classifieds..................... 16A
Community Calendar..........5A
Health ...............................12A
Legals .......................... 17A
Obituaries.................. 5A
School.................... ....13-15A
Watermelon Festival........10A
Viewpoints ..................2-3A


e' k


.. "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Jimmy Kent, far left, runs toward the ambulance as Erika Miron Ruiz is taken on
the stretcher to the ambulance by Lucas Williams (at the head of the stretcher) and
Linda McMullen (at the foot). Assisting are Earnie Johnson, right, and Alfred Mar-
tin, left. Deputy Bill Hart checks out the vehicle involved in the crash. (Greene Pub-
lishing, Inc. Photo byJacob Bembry, May 31, 2006)


Woman Airlifted After Crash


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A 21 -year-old woman was
seriously injured in an auto ac-
cident on Wednesday, May 31.
According to a Florida
Highway Patrol report, Erika
Miron Ruiz, 21, of Ruskin,
was eastbound on Interstate 10
in a 1995 Mercury.
.. The : eport. stated that.
Ruiz drove onto the paved


apron and overcorrected, caus-
ing the car to travel south
across both eastbound lanes of
Interstate 10.
Ruiz' vehicle then trav-
eled onto the south shoulder of
1-10 and rotated a half-turn
clockwise and traveled south-
east into the wood line on the
south side of I-10, colliding
ith a pine .:tree and,.an..oak...
tree.


The car came to a final
rest in the wood line on the
south shoulder of the inter-
state.
Ruiz was transported to.
Shands at the University of
Florida by Trauma One heli-
copter to be treated for serious
injuries.
-FIP Trooper James Park-,
Ai was the investigating offi-
cer.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Madison woman acci-
dentally shot herself in the foot
on Thursday, June 1.
According to Madison
County Sheriff's Sgt. Freddie


Register, Sherri Raker, 37, told
authorities that she was standing
on the back deck of her home,
shooting at an armadillo with a
.22 semi-automatic rifle. Not re-
alizing that the semi-automatic
would reload itself automatical-


ly, she accidentally shot her foot.
Register said that the
wound was superficial.
The armadillo escaped.
Raker was. transported to
South Georgia Medical Center
by Madison County EMS.


Students To Get FCAT Break Under New Plan


By Ginger Jarvis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Students in Madison
County schools may breathe a
sigh of relief with a review of
the new Pupil Progression
Plan being considered by the
School Board. At a called
meeting on May 30, the board
approved advertising the plan
with changes related to FCAT
scores and other matters relat-
ed to student progress in the
system.
Students, parents, and


school personnel will take
special notice of changes in
the plan that spring from the
recent passage of Governor
Jeb Bush's A++ Plan. One of
those changes removes the re-
quirement for each student to
have an Academic Improve-
ment Plan, which meant that
parents and students had to
meet with teachers each fall.
AIPs have been deleted from
the PPP. Julia Waldrep, pre-
senting the plan, said, "The
monitoring we are doing is


sufficient."
Another change relates to
Honors Classes at Madison
County High School and dual
enrollment at North Florida
Community College. The state
has removed weights from
those classes, but leaves Ad-
vanced Placement Classes
weighted. Waldrep explained,
"The state questioned the fact
that some Level 2 students
(those who had not passed the
FCAT) were enrolled in and
Please See FCAT, Page 4A


Meth Use Common In

Madison, According To

Medical Professional
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A medical professional, who practices in Madison County,
said that a number of patients, who use methamphetamine, come
into the office where they and another medical professional
practice. She said that-she is very happy that the newspaper is
covering the widespread use of this drug, which encompasses
everyone from high school users to adults in their middle to old-
er years.
A number of meth labs have sprung up in Madison County
and in surrounding counties. The ease, with which the drugs can
be manufactured, the cheapness and availability of the product,
are some of the reasons it has become so popular, along with the
fact that the high induced by meth lasts much longer than a high
induced by cocaine.
The ingredients to make meth can be bought at any grocery
store or drugstore, with the exception of anhydrous ammonia,
which is used by farmers to fertilize crops. This reporter's father
was once working in a field, when a rattlesnake bowed up at
him. He took the nozzle on an anhydrous ammonia take and
sprayed the snake. The rattler writhed around before dying.
Below are some facts about meth. Parents, grandparents and
others should share this information with their children, grand-
children and students.
Meth/Methamphetamine/Crystal Meth Facts
*Methamphetamine is the name of the drug commonly
Please See Meth Use, Page 4A

Man Arrested For Possession

Of Marijuana With Intent To Sell


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
'A Madison man was ar-
rested Saturday, June 3, for
possession of marijuana with
intent to sell.
According to a Madison
Police Department report, Of-
ficer Doug Haskell was pa-
trolling South Orange'Street,
when he observed an unknown
black male, trying to hide
around a residence.
As Haskell went by, he
observed the subject peek
around the corner of the house
and walk inside the back of the
house.
Haskell turned and found
the subject in the front yard.
As Haskell approached him,
he observed the suspect, iden-
tified as Derrick Tyrone Blue,


-.- . . -










Derrick Tyrone Blue
22, reach into his right front.
pocket, remove a plastic bag
and throw it on the ground and
then try to kick it under the
house.
Haskell approached Blue
and secured him, before re-
trieving the plastic bag to find
that it contained eight one-
Please See Arrest, Page 4A


Lee Couple Says That

Sheriff's Office Press Release

Cost Them Business


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Tom and Nikki Nerrin,
who bought Archie's in Lee
five months ago, are upset
about a press release from the
Madison County Sheriff's Of-
fice, which ran in The Madi-
son County Carrier on
Wednesday, May 31.
The release, which ran as
"Man Arrested At Lee Bar For
Drug Possession," detailed the
arrest of John Benjamin
Sheffield, 32, on weapons and
drug charges. The release said
that Sheffield, whose street
name is "Doobie," was stand-
ing in front of the Waterin'
Hole bar, advertising for a bar-
becue sale when he was arrest-
ed by Cpl. Chris Andrews,
Sgt. Art Deno and Deputy
Chris Andrews.
The Nerrins had a barbe-
cue set up that day at the bar,
because they have not been
able to open Archie's yet, due
to some work being done on
the parking lot and redecorat-
ing the interior. They said that
they noticed on Thursday, the
day after the newspaper article
hit the street that business had


fallen off. Someone went up to
them and accused them of
dealing in illegal drugs with
Sheffield, and they told the
Nerrins that they believed the
barbecue was a front.
The Nerrins said that
Sheffield had grabbed one of
their signs advertising the bar-
becue and began running
around, shouting. They asked
him to stop but he wouldn't.
They didn't want to confront
him because they knew that he
had illegal weapons on him.
They said that the sher-
iff's deputy stopped and ar-
rested Sheffield. Nikki said
that, while they were trying to
get Sheffield under control, he
was attempting to reach for
one of his guns. Tom said that
Sheffield threw his keys at
him and told him not to let the
cops have the keys.
Nikki said that she was
the one who allowed the
deputies to walk the dog
around the area and that the
dog had alerted on Sheffield's
vehicle. They also noted that
several other details had been
left out of the press release.
Please See Couple, Page 4A


N


Woman Accidentally



Shoots Herself


. .

Deputies standing and examining the scene, at the home, where Sherri Raker shot
herself are, clockwise from top left: Sgt. Freddie Register, Deputy Jason Whitfield,
Deputy John Sleigher and Deputy Bill Hart. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob
Bembry, June 1, 2006)


**'*









2A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 7, 2006




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Wandering
With The Publisher
Mary EHllen Greene
Columnist


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


China Starts Oil Drilling Off Florida

While America Twiddles Thumbs...Chinese Tap Billions Of Barrells


c7S 7)awzilf Seei*4
I read an interesting column in the Valdosta Daily Times
newspaper recently entitled, "When Did Parenting Become A
Business?" The columnist was Len Robbins of The Clinch
County News.
It seems that some parents are actually going to "other"
sources than themselves to teach their children "how to" do just
about anything.
It's called "outsourcing," and many men and women are be-'
coming accustomed to it. This columnist said that "like a stom-
ach virus in a first-grade classroom, outsourcing is now spread-
ing rapidly into other avenues of our society."
It seems that there is a "real" business in Illinois that teach-
es toddlers to be potty-trained. It is called the "Booty Camp."
Yes, "Booty Camp."
This columnist reports that a five-hour session of Booty
Camp costs $200. Can you imagine that?
Then, there are those who offer "personal shopping" for
others. Mothers actually hire other people for $75.00 an hour to
assist in their daughter's shopping excusions.
I don't know about you, but I enjoyed those years our chil-
dren were babies, and later toddlers, The Husband and I would
sit on the floor and teach the toddlers to walk from one of us to
the other. That was fun.
As far as the "Booty Camp," we worked at that ourselves,
too. I was better at changing the diaper than The Husband, or
that is what he "told" me. (He was no fool.) Back then, we had
cloth diapers, and had to used real safety pins to hold the ends
together on the baby. (That really dates us.)
Probably the funniest "outsourcing" available to me was
about the parents who paid someone $50 an hour to teach their
child how to ride a bicycle. It. seems a man named Aresh Mo-
hit has taught over 1,800 children to ride bikes since he started
the service in New York.
The Husband would say to that, "That couple has more
money than they know what to do with it."
I happily remember us teaching out children to ride tricy-
cles bic cles. and, hen the\ w ere-older, to drive acar.It seems
that the appeal to parents is that .hiring helps avert those nasty
confrontations of child-tearing,'
The Husband was good at teaching other "things" they
needed to know in life. Once, when they were about 6, 10, and
12, he took them trick-a-treating. They went to all the relatives'
homes, then to the businesses still open, and then, he went by
the Madison ,County Jail with them. While there, he ask a
deputy friend to let them go inside one of the cells, and he
closed the door and locked them in. He said, "Wait here on me,
and I'll be right back."
He stayed gone about 30 minutes, and then came back to
.get the three youngsters, after taking pictures of them in the jail
cell. His lesson that night to them was, "Now you know how it
feels to be locked up if you don't obey the law." He later told
them not to ever get in to any kind of trouble that would enable
law men to lock them up, because he would not be coming back
to "bail" them out. They never did.
Isn't that what we are supposed to do? Teach our children?
When you pay someone else to teach your child how to
walk, how to ride a, bike, and how to behave, it's the parent who
is missing out. Now the "Booty Camp" one, I have to admit it
is priceless. ,
The Husband and I used to write notes-to each other years
ago to help us remember things we needed to do the next day.
One night we were both tired, and the three children were rush-
ing madly about the house. We scolded them, and sent them to
bed. The next morning there was a note pinned to our bedroom
door that read: "Be good to your children, and they will be good
to you." Yours truly, God."
A few quotes I've enjoyed about parenting and children in-
clude:
"Remember childhood visions. "...MaryMcLeod Behune

"One of the luckiest things that can happen to you in life is
to have a happy childhood." ....Agatha Christie

"In general, my children refuse to eat anything that hasn't
danced on television." ....Erma Bombeck

"Never help a child with a task at which he feels he can
succeed." ...Maria Montessori


"It's very important to give children a chance."
....Nikki Giovanni


"Give curiosity freedom."


.....Eudora Welty


Have you hugged your child (or grandchild) today? If not,
go home and do it. In the end, it is not what you do for your
children, but what you have taught them to do for themselves.
"Nuff said....Bye for now.... See 'ya.

,Mrs. Ceslie's Cakes
Homemade 10-Layer Cakes
7 Varieties
Chocolate Red Velvet Coconut Pineapple
Caramel Lemon Mayhow Jelly
3889 N. E. Bayberry Street
Pinetta, Florida 32350


Audrey Leslie
850-929-4266


255647sldv


Lynn Hanners
850-929-7568


While Washington and Florida NIMBY "not in my back
yard" dither over exploiting oil and gas reserves off the coast of
Florida, China has seized the'opportunity to gobble up these de-
posits, which run throughout Latin America, the 'Caribbean and
along the U.S. Gulf coast.
The Chinese have forged a deal with Cuban leader Fidel
Castro to explore and tap into massive oil reserves almost with-
in sight of Key West, Florida. At the same time, Venezuelan
President Hugo Chavez, who controls the largest oil reserves in
the Western Hemisphere, is making deals to sell his country's
oil to China, oil that is currently coming to the United States.
Meanwhile, a new left-wing populist regime in Bolivia has
nationalized the natural gas industry, threatening to cut off sup-
plies to the United States.

SLANT DRILLING
There are new reports out circulating that Chinese firms are
planning to slant drill 6ff the Cuban coast near the Florida
Straits, tapping into U.S. oil reserves that are estimated at 4.6
billion to 9.3 billion barrels. This compares with 4 billion to 10
billion barrels believed to .be beneath the Alaska National
Wildlife Refuge,' where drilling is held tip in Congress due to
the objections of environmental groups which warn of endan-
gering caribou. Permission to drill in the refuge. which experts
are certain will not present any environmental hazard. has failed
by just two votes in the Senate.
As Chinese business increases its reach around the world, it
is seeking oil, which it lacks domestically.
After elections in Mexico in early July, when anew regime
hostile to Washington is expected to take power. the United
States might be without supplies of Mexican crude oil. The
United States gets about 40 percent of its imported oil from

Boot Camp -vs- Florida
Dear Editor,
During the past month, news media have provided exten-
sive coverage of the death of a young man at the juvenile boot
camp in Panama City. As the public follows this tragic story,
I have been asked by a number of people if there is any con-
nection between the boot camp and the Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranches. '
The Florida Sheriffs Ytuth Ranches is a private, non-
i i ) i t ,, . ) i ' ,f t t i' , ,f . .. I
profit charitable organization founded in 1957 by Florida's
Sheriffs as a way to prevent juvenile delinquency. With six


campuses around the 'state,
the Youth Ranches reaches
out to at-risk young people
through a variety of counsel-
ing, camping and residential
programs. All of the Youth
Ranches programs are volun-
tary and offer these children
an opportunity to learn the
skills necessary for them to
become lawful arid produc-
tive citizens.
Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranches programs are pri-
marilyfunded through private
contributions and are all na-
tionally accredited through
the Council on Accreditation.
No harsh verbal or physical
treatment of the children are
permitted in these programs:
The juvenile boot camps
were established as a "get
tough" alternative to incar-
ceration for juvenile offend-
ers. The young people in the


Mexico and Venezuela.
China is eager to tap into oil reserves in the Florida Straits
and then make a deal with Castro to control it. The Chinese have
already reopened an abandoned Russian oil refinery in Cuba
formally owned by, Texaco prior to Castro governing Cuba.
Much of the gas refined there is believed to be destined for
Freeport in the Bahamas, where the Chinese, through front com-
pany Hutchison-Whamrpoa. has developed a massive port facil-
ity and airfield.
With the refinery reopened and expanded it will also meet
the needs of Castro.
Sen. Larry Craig (R-Idaho) has introduced legislation to
ease U.S. restrictions that prevent dealing with Cuba to drill in
the Florida Straits. It is hoped that Florida regulations that pre-
vent Li S. oil drilling off the state's coasts could also be eased'.
The irpny is that Chinese drilling could be even more of an
environmental hazard since China is not as concerned about or
equipped to deal %\ ith any potential ecological disaster as a re-
.ult of a spill, said Craig ,
Note that--
China controls both ends of the Panama Canal as canal op-
erations company. China has signed a deal with Canada to buy
it's Oil and Gas. China has deals with most South American na-
tions to bu\ their Oil and Gas and in many cases operate their
Energy and Transportation and Infrastructures
China has a deal with -Iran to buy it's Oil and Gas
China (specifically the Chinese Military) operate ports and/or
import operations in many US ports.
China has already started drilling this past month, accord-
ing to my sources,

George Pouliotte

Sheriffs Youth Ranches
camps are sent by a judge after they have committed criminal
acts. These camps are funded xv ith tax dollars and operate un-
der contract with the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice.
Although both the juvenile boot camps and the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches are sponsored by Sheriffs, there is no
connection between the two programs. The bottom line is that
they are different organizations serving different types of chil-
dren % ith 'toafty'dihferent funding sources.


Sheriff Peter C. Bucher


7IWiEFYYou


IP NEIGHBOR

'WafLfy g aVys
Name: Wally Davis
Family: Wife, Vonnie Davis and two twins, Gina
and Dina -
Reside: Madison
Occupation: Owner of Farm and Supply Company
Spare time: A committee member of the National
Wild Turke\ Federation (NWTF), a volunteer of the
Cherry Lake Fire Rescue, teaches the hunter educa-
tion/fire safety course twice a year at the North Florida
.Community College (NFCC) and he also enjoys gar-
dening.
Favorite Football. Team: The Cowboys!
If you could visit any place in the world: All of
the western states, Arizona, the Dakotas, Colorado,
etc! K


Online Question of the Week Results


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planned for .

this summer?
SNo- 81%




0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90
Percentage
Go online to www.greenepublishing.com to answer this week's question...

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(Voting ends Monday, June 12th at 9 a.m. One vote per computer, please. Duplicate votes are removed.)








Wednesday, June 7, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com / Madison County Carrier 3A




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Lee Limelight t Pou
Jacob Bembry
Columnist


National Security


Lee Volunteer Fire


Department Hosts Fish Fry,

The Lee Volunteer Fire Department will host a. fish fry
fundraiser Saturday, June 10, from 4-8 p.m. at the fire depart-
ment, next to Lee City Hall.
The price is $7 per dinner. Each dinner will include catfish
or talapia, hush puppies, coleslaw, baked beans, cheese grits,
dessert and iced tea.
Tickets may be purchased in advance from any member or
at the door. You may dine in or carry out dinners.
All proceeds from the fish fry benefit the Lee Volunteer Fire
Department.
Lee First Baptist Church will host its Vacation Bible School
June 18-22, from 6-9 p.m. each evening. The theme for the
year's VBS is "Arctic Edge."
Midway Church of God will host its graduation and pro-
motion recognition night on Wednesday, June 7. Each student is
recognized for graduating or' for awards received while in
school.
Celebrating her birthday that night will be Erica Hodge, a
church member, who will be 15 years old.
On Thursday, June 8, Cleve Thomas (another Midway
member) will turn 82 years old. Chase Gurley will turn nine
years old the same day. Drew Fitch and Sean Herring will also
celebrate their birthdays that day.
Crystal Lasseter will celebrate her birthday on Friday, June
9.
A.J. Doyle will celebrate his birthday on Saturday, June 10.
Chad Phillips and Bethany Phillips will celebrate their
birthdays on Sunday, June 11.
Luke Williams will celebrate his fifth birthday on Monday,
June 12..
Maddie Gurley will celebrate her birthday on Tuesday, June
13.
I made a mistake last week in this column. Dion Lasseter's
birthday is on June 3, instead of June 5.
Kent and Amy Lasseter will celebrate their anniversary on
Thursday, June 8. ,, .
Allen and Brenda McCormick will celebrate their anniver-
sary on Tuesday, June 13.
That's all the news for this week! Have a great week and a
beautiful forever! May God bless each and every one of you!


Maidison CGateDOSt


Fairyland Saturday

Not everyone in Madison, but a large portion of our resi-
dents, were present at Van H. Priest Auditorum Saturday night
for the annual spring recital of students from Becky's Dance
Studio. What a receptive audience, and what a fantastic show of
talent and training. With tiaras and tutus, the place was a fairy-
land of lovely young ladies. Congratulations to you all on a
wonderful show.
Paul and Clara Barrett (Gatepost's parents) had a big dinner
celebrating their 66th anniversary. Their son, Mira Barrett, and
his wife Donnie came from Portal, Ga., and their daughter, Su-
san Dunn, and her husband Buddy came from Columbus, Ga.,
for the occasion. We all entertained the residents of Lake Park
Nursing Center with an impromptu sing.
Bill and Margaret Throgmorton had their son from South
Florida visiting for the weekend. '
Ila Willis was delighted to bring her son Edwin and his fam-
ily to church Sunday. They stopped to visit while traveling.
Sometime this week, give birthday hugs to these people.
Kristi Ferrell (she'll be 12), Wil Culpepper, and Kayla Haire, on
June 10; Travis Jones, Kaila Hardee, Julie Klein, and Christian
Griffin, June 12; and the non-stop Robin Smith, June 13. May
you all have a tasty cake and lovely candles. ,
We wish Darryl and Missy Cherry a blessed wedding an-
niversary on June 8. May you enjoy many more of these occa-
sions.
Picket Fence Pride: that gorgeous grape-ish heather beside
the Courthouse Annex and along the fence at the corner of Han-
cock and Livingston. It certainly perks up the scenery.
Let's add Paul Rowell to our prayer list; he had surgery this
week.
Those who attend 55 Plus Club Wednesday, June 14, will
get a delicious lunch prepared by the Hanson Methodist Church
and a program on the topic "Who Gets Grandmother's Yellow
Pie Plate?" brought by Diann Douglas. Lunch is served at noon
at the Cooperative Ministries Center on Hwy. 145 near Hanson.
Let Gatepost know of your guests, engagements, and neigh-
borhood happenings at javvag@hotmail.com, (850) 973-4141
or 567-3073, or leave a note at the Greene Publishing Building
on S. Hwy. 53.
Meet you at the gatepost next week.


Name: Juanita Gallon
Family: Husband, Willie and eight
..children
Residence: Madison
Title: Supervisor of Environmental
Service
Main responsibility: Making sure
that all areas of the hospital are ster-
S. ile, organized and accurate.


Name: Rutha Thompkins
Family. Husband, Lester and four
children
Residence: Madison
Title: House Keeping
AMain responsibility:. To keep the
hospital clean and germ free! _%

Name: Lucilla Strickland
Family: Husband, Dan and two
children
Residence: Madison
S Title: Nurse Practitioner since 2003
and a nurse for 21 years!
Main responsibility: Evaluate and
treat patients in the emergency de-
Spartment.
Name: Mary Stephens
Family: Two .children; Alicia and i
Christopher
Residence: Lee
Title: Registered Nurse for 32 years!
Main responsibility: Work in the
emergency room and care for pa-
.tients.







Louis D Skinner vs. Tina L. Skjnner-di solution of mar-
nriage
Nat Harrison Bland vs. Dorothy J.C. Bland-dissolution of
marriage
Charlie Arnold,. Jr. vs. Clayton R. McWilliams, Jr.-other
civil
Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance vs. Jeffrey S. Sadler-
mortgage foreclosure


lorida Press Assoc4i





Award Winning Newspaper
F s : ". .. .


Chosen onOofnee r ui rrnilul l.idl-INt -ppi, r.
P.O. Drawer 772
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 973-4141
Fax: (850) 973-4121
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Emerald Greene Kinilei'
Pubii,hvr/Editc'r
PRODUCT'LION NhNAI.LIR


jacu'b Bminir., judid .k'Co .-.11
GRAPHIc DESIGNER-s
Fi.,n u i l a i crI
TI~PCsrIIER
kor, .Aa
ILDERTI' ANC SUB E REPRESENTATIVES
Mars Ellcn 'r'.j r, ,1 [nd Nh I~Kin.
CL ;S'1D ND In. %L ADS

fI a .r r. o... L IN' H
CICUtL3J ION DEPARTMENT


Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS 324 800] designed for the express
reading pleasures of the people of its circulation area, be they past, pre-
sent or future residents.
Published weekly by Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695 South State
Road 53, Madison, Florida 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post
Office in Madison, Florida 32340.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MADISON COUNTY
CARRIER, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news
matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not
be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper,
and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing, Inc. for publication in this
newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are
dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos
beyond said deadline.


Tupelo
(While this column usually addresses national security af-
fairs, this particular piece is about economic development.)

Last Thursday, I went to hear a speaker at the NFCC Stu-
dent Center, hosted by the college and Madison County Devel-
opment Council. The speaker was Larry Otis, former mayor of
Tupelo, Mississippi. Otis was invited here to speak by NFCC
president Morris Steen who thought there might be an important
message for our community about economic development. A
little more than 100 local citizens attended.
It seems that Tupelo has really blossomed over the past six
decades, going from impoverished to a real economic engine.
Today Tupelo has about 35 thousand residents in a county of
about 75' thousand and is, a regional hub for a lot of economic
activities in Northeast Mississippi, including a newspaper (dai-
ly circulation of 40,000), shopping mall (serving 12 million cus-
tomers annually), and a 627-bed medical center.
I went to hear what Mr. Otis had to say, primarily to look
for differences and similarities between Tupelo and Madison, as
well as likely challenges for our community. This is what I
learned.
First, here are some demographic facts. About 69 percent
of the city's population is white, while 28 percent is black. The
community is better educated than we are: 81 percent of adults
have a high school degree: 27 percent have at least a college de-
gree while 9 percent of the population has graduate or profes-
sional status.
Otis touts that Tupelo has created 59 thousand jobs since
the economic resurgence began. Now that may seem strange
when the job base exceeds the population by a good amount, but
it makes sense when you think about the dynamics of an econ-
omy. Employment changes over time and jobs are in flux. For
example, for years, a staple in the Tupelo economy was the gar-
ment industry, but as these jobs began to move overseas to a
cheaper labor market, the city reinNented itself as a center for
'the manufacture of upholstered furniture. No'\. the handwriting
is on the wall that this industry will be moving offshore, so Tu-
pelo will need to change its' core industry to keep pace with the
fluctuating economy. Today, about 24 percent of Tupelo's job
base. isin,,.mnufacturing .2.1 percentt in .education, health and
service industries; and: 14,percent in.'retail.
Transportation is a key in the development of any commu-
nity. Although Tupelo does not have an interstate highway in
close proximity, U.S. Highway 78 is a limited access highway
through the city connecting important regional centers of Birm-
ingham to Memphis.
One of the most important themes that Otis emphasized was
the importance of education. Tupelo has taken great pride in
their educational achievement and the literacy of their citizens,
nearly all of which has occurred within the public school sys-
tem. Incidentally, they have no local college in the community,
but they do have a leadership development program to introduce
young adults into leadership roles and responsibilities.
Another key theme is what Larry Otis termed "racial rec-
onciliation." By his account, a key to Tupelo's achievement is
their purposeful intent to include all citizens, black and white,
in their march to success. He chided us that we did not have
enough black citizens in attendance to be, representative of our
community. "Everyone must have a seat at the table," he says.
A theme he repeated often was "you cannot have economic de-
velopment without community development." Another key
concept: they do not look for grant money or other funding
sources until an idea is completely developed.
Although Tupelo is every bit as historic as Madison, their
vision is not anchored in the past. They teamed with five other
regional communities to build a competing broadband internet
access network that greatly reduced cost. This theme of team-
ing with surrounding communities has carried forward into their
latest vision of 'partnering with two surrounding counties to
form a 1700 acre industrial park. The first priority of this joint
venture is to lure an automobile manufacturer.
As I listened to Larry Otis' entertaining presentation, it ap-
peared to me that, while some of the things that Tupelo has
achieved may seem beyond our immediate reach, Madison has
a lot to learn from this example. Let me suggest a few: educa-
tional improvement; small business incubator; leadership devel-
opment; racial reconciliation; partnering with neighboring rural
counties; and modern communications development all wor-
thy goals.




















(850) 973-6326 Paul Kinsley


Ginger Jarvis Ec .W S
Columnist w




Dancing Created A
The iOldobn Coaitv. Carrilwr- Entertpiise Recorder









4A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 7, 2006




LOCAL REGIONAL CRIME BLOTITER



a Cot hNorth Florida Dentist Arrested On


Man, Ioman Arrested For Battery


Raymond.Ghent Sandra Gee
A Madison woman and man were arrested for battery, fol-
lowing an altercation on Saturday, June 3.
According to a Madison Police Department report, Cpl.
Chris Cooks was dispatched to a residence in reference to the al-
tercation.
Upon arrival, he made contact with Sandra Gee, 35, who
said that Raymond Ghent, 50, had hit her in the mouth.
Cooks made contact with Ghent on County Camp Road.
Ghent said that Gee had hit him. He had a small knot on the, left
side of his head.
Cooks noticed a small cut on Gee's lip.
Both Ghent and Gee were arrested and transported to the
Madison County Jail where they were both charged with battery.

Two Men Charged With

Drug Trafficking


Deputy Cecil Brownfield and Deputy Keith Jack-
son show Sheriff Bill Gootee three large bundles of
marijuana confiscated after a traffic stop on Interstate
75 Wednesday afternoon.
Columbia County Two Tallahassee men were arrested
Wednesday by members of the Multi-Jurisdictional Drug Task
Force on charges of trafficking marijuana through Columbia
County.
Markus Emerson, 26 and David McDonald, 28, were each
charged with trafficking marijuana, possession of, marijuana
with intent to sell and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Emerson, who was driving McDonald's 2003 white Chevro-
let Impala, was stopped for traveling too closely behind another
vehicle on Interstate 75 north of State Road 47. Inside the trunk,
detectives found three large bundles of marijuana weighing
about 57 pounds:
"This is a huge amount of high quality marijuana and we
were successful in getting it off the street," said Sheriff Bill
Gootee.- "It's a step in the right direction in the fight against
drugs. The estimated street value is between $1000 and $1500
per pound."
Both men were booked into the Columbia County Jail and
were each being held on a $281,000 bond.
The Multi-Jurisdictional Drug Task Force is made up of mem-
bers of the Columbia County Sheriff's Office, the Lake City Po-
lice Department, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement
and the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Lake City Man Arrested For

Aggravated Stalking
Lake City (05/27/06) -
On Saturday, May 27th,
Suwannee County Sheriff's
Deputy Bobby Akey arrest-
ed Richard Floyd Watkins,
43, 22862 43rd Drive, Lake
City, FL. Watkins was.
charged with violation of an
injunction and aggravated
stalking. h
At approximately 8:00
a.m. on Friday, Deputy
Akey was dispatched to a
residence on 43rd Drive in
reference to a violation of an Richard Floyd Watkins
injunction. After talking to
the lady there he was able to determine that she had taken out an
injunction against Watkins. He allegedly was calling her resi-
dence and had been following her whenever she left home. She
told the deputy she feared for her life as he had threatened to
harm her.
Deputy Akey went to Watkins residence the next day and ar-
rested him. After he was transported to the Suwannee County
Jail his bond was set at $10,000.00.


Multiple
A Florida dentist with
practices in Live Oak and
Lake City has been arrested
following a three-month in-
vestigation by the North Flori-
'da Drug Diversion Response
Team (DRT) into allegations
of prescription fraud. John
Craig, 43, was arrested Thurs-
day afternoon at his home in
Lake City and taken to the Co-
lumbia County Jail under a
$50,000 bond.
The investigation began
in March 2006 when the DRT
started looking into suspicious
prescription practices by
Craig. Information obtained
from pharmacies in Live Oak
and Lake City revealed that
over the past several years
Craig had called in excessive
numbers of prescriptions for
drugs such as H)drocodone.
Demerol, Oxycodone and Val-
ium for several members of
his family.
On May 4, DRT agents
served search warrants'on


P&Z


Prescription Fraud Charges
Craig's two offices and seized include Florida Department of and the U.S. Drug Enforce-
patient records and other items Law Enforcement, Florida ment Administration. Special
of evidence. Information Department of Health, Attor- agents from FDLE's Live Oak
gained from patient and phar- ney General Charlie Crist's field office also assisted in the
macy records led to warrants Medicaid Fraud Control Unit investigation.
being issued charging Craig
with 209 criminal counts. He M et h U se Cont'd from Page 1A


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the P&Z Board. Former Chair Pa
from the board, citing that she di
devote to the position.
A Verizon Wireless. Tower ai
viewed at the meeting.
Members of the P&Z Boar
vice-chair; Ruth Hutto; Daniel P
Alternate members include
Stephen Pike.
DeWayne O'Quinn is the sch



rc J in r TTrVn. ro li' "


;es 29 counts of obtaining
strolled substance by fraud, known on the street as NMeth, Cr3 stal Meth, Crystal, rce, Crank,
8 counts of prescribing con- Crunk, Speed, Glass, & Chalk.
flled substances with no *Methamphetamine comes in many forms and can .be
-dical necessity, one count smoked, snorted, orally ingested, or injected.
practicing medicine without NIet h is odorless, making it difficult to detect.
license and one count of *In the 1980's. "ice," a smokable form of methampheta-
acticing, a pharmacy without mine, came into use.
icenge. All the charges are' *Acute lead poisoning is a potential risk for methampheta-
rd-degree felonies, mine abusers.
e Drug Diversion Response *Even small amounts of meth can produce serious negative
am is a task force made up effects on your body such as hyperthermia and convulsions,
state and federal agencies which sometimes result in death to the user.
it have' authority to investi- Meth is a stimulant on the central nervous system and has
te criminal misuse of pre- a high potential for abuse and addiction.
ibed medications. This can *Meth stimulation on the central nervous system, causing
;lude doctors who illegally chemical reactions' in the brain which trick the body into think-
escribe, pharmacists who il- ing it has unlimited energy supplies and drains energy reserves
'ally distribute, and indi\ id- needed in other parts of the body.
ls who illegally obtain pre- *Meth effects the user in similar ways as cocaine, but with
ription drugs. DRT agencies more power, more amps to the body so to speak.
olved in this investigation 7'NMeth looks like white crystalline powder, soluble in water
or alcohol and bitter-tasting.
"Research sho%%s that damage to neurons containing
Dopanmine and Serotonin occurs to the nerve endings "termi-
nals" which appear to have limited ability to re-2ro%, thus

aula Arnold stepped down Putting the user at risk for conditions such as Parkinsons &
didn't have enough time to Alzheimers in later years.
*Meth users can stay awake for long periods of time and
then eventually crash, feeling tired and depressed, worse off
then than before they took the drug.
d include James Brown, *Chemical imbalances in the brain combined with sleep de-
d include James Brown,
l ain; and Jeanne Bass. privation commonly associated with continued use of meth
SDebbie Copeland and cause the user to experience hallucinations, extreme paranoia
and bizarre, violent behavior.
ool board representative. *Women are more likely to use meth than cocaine due to the
fact that is offers quick weight loss. What many of the women
don't realize is that it also kills their facial features and gives
Co ...- 'them a grotesque skeletal appearance after sustained nieth
Copt'd from Page 1A ,'bure:, , '.
," NlMethamphetamnie kills by causing heart failui', brain


A third change will carry special meaning for students in el-
ementary school who do not pass the FCAT and would be re-
tained. Waldrep explained that the student might present a port-
folio of his work for the year, showing that he has mastered at
least 60 percent of the material in at least 70 percent of the skills
measured on the FCAT. The scores would have to come from at
least five assessments (PPP p. 10). All elementary students must
show mastery of at least 70 percent of the required skills in or-
der to be promoted.
A change which will affect K-8 students brings the grading
scale into conformity with that already being used at MCHS. A
grade of .90-100 is an A, 70-89 a B, 60-63-69 a D (PPP p. 14).
MCHS seniors who h'i\ e not passed the ECAT may be required
to attend after-school or Saturday tutoring sessions (PPP P. 22).
The board agreed that the stipulations for mandatory tutoring
should be spelled out in a separate policy so that all students and
parents would understand the requirement. The board will ad-
dress that policy at a later date. .
The plan sets out the criteria for retention, promotion (PPP
p. 13-14), graduation credits, credit retrieval and summer school
courses, dual enrollment (PPP P. 36), drop-out prevention (PPP
P. 48), and special programs at Excel (PPP P. 23) and Central.
The new PPP will appear on the agenda of the school board af-
ter being advertised. Copies of the plan are available at the
School Board Office for review by parents, students, and other
concerned parties. Margin notes indicate deletions and other
changes related to the state A++ Plan.
Board members VeEtta Hagan-Smith and Bart Alford voted
to advertise the plan. Kenny Hall voted no, saying, "I have been
against it all along. I'm not going to change my vote now."
(Page numbers are approximate and may change due to re-
visions and deletions.)


Couple


Cont'd from Page 1A


Because it is an ongoing investigation, this newspaper is not in-
cluding any of that information, which does not deal with the
Nerrins directly.
The Nerrins said that they are foster parents, who have to
undergo random drug tests every few months. They are attempt-
ing to open a business and are, in no way, affiliated with dealing
drugs. They had to close down their barbecue because of the
press release.
They emphasized again that they are not affiliated with
Sheffield in any way and want everyone in the community to
know that they are not drug dealers.
"It's a small town in the Bible Belt," Tom said. "I'm sur-
prised at how fast this rumor spread."


damage and stroke.

Arrest


Cont'd from Page IA


gram bags of marijuana.
Blue also had another plastic bag containing numerous emp-
ty one-gram bags used to package and sell marijuana.
Blue was arrested and transported to the Madison County
Jail, where he was charged with possession of marijuana with in-
tent to sell and possession of drug paraphernalia.


Drugs


Cont'd from Page 1A


report in their bodies.
Medical Examiners specifically collected information on
these drugs: Ethyl Alcohol, Amphetamines, Methamphetamines,
MDMA (Ecstasy), MDA, MDEA, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Flu-
nitrazepam (Rohypnol), other Benzodiazepines, Cannabinoids,
Carisoprodol/Meprobamate, Cocaine, GHB, Inhalants, Keta-
mine, Fentanyl, Heroin, Hydrocodone, Hydromorphone,
Meperidine, Methadone, Morphine, Oxycodone, Propoxyphene,
Tramadol, other Opioids, and Phencyclidine (PCP).
The report reveals decreased incidences of Heroin, Di-
azepam, MDMA, MDA, and Cannabinoids in 2005 when com-
pared with 2004. These decreases include cases in which the
drug levels were both lethal and non-lethal. The data for lethal
dosages also shows decreases in Heroin and Hydrocodone.
Some increased incidences of drugs were Oxycodone, Hy-
drocodone, Methadone, Alprazolam, Tramadol, Methampheta-
mine, Meperidine, Morphine, Propoxyphene, and Cocaine. Oc-
currences of Cocaine rose to its highest level since the drug be-
gan being tracked in 1987.
The report indicates the three most frequently occurring
drugs found in decedents were Ethyl Alcohol (3,875), all Ben-
zodiazepines (2,080), and Cocaine (1,943). The drugs that
caused the most deaths were Cocaine, Methadone, all Benzodi-
azepines, Alprazolam, Ethyl Alcohol, Oxycodone, Morphine,
and Hydrocodone.
The three drugs that were the most lethal, meaning more
than 50 percent of the deaths -were caused by the drug when the
drug was found, were Heroin (89.3 percent), Methadone (66.4
percent), and Fentanyl (55.1 percent).
The report also reveals that prescription drugs continued to
be found more often than illicit drugs in both lethal and non-
lethal levels.
"While this report shows evidence that progress is being
made in the fight against heroin abuse in Florida, cocaine con-
tinues to be a lethal threat to our communities as it has contin-
ued to increase over the past five years," FDLE Commissioner
Gerald Bailey said. "Additionally, prescription drugs continue to
be a major source of drug abuse with unfortunate results
throughout the state."
"The Medical Examiners Report confirms the continued
devastation caused by prescription drug abuse," said Bill Janes,
Director of the Florida Office of Drug Control. "These drugs are
too prevalent and largely uncontrolled. The Florida Office of
Drug Control remains committed to educating Floridians, par-
ticularly our youth, about the dangers of prescription drug abuse.
We will also continue to seek legislation to control prescription
drugs in Florida."









Wednesday, June 7, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 5A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY




OBITUARIES .-
C5 l y J vfi3t ^I. f


Rosemary

Anderson Almand


Rosemary A. Almand, 82,
passed away in Tampa, on April
27, 2006 following a tragic acci-
dent on February 20, 2006. She
was a resident of Ft. Myers, but
previously lived for 18 years in
Lee.
She is survived by a son,
Edward F. Almand, Jr., of Orlan-
do, and a daughter, Frances G.
(Gerri) Almand of Tampa, two
grandchildren, and two great-
grandchildren.
Rosemary received a B.A.
degree from Florida State Uni-
versity and a M.S. degree from
Nova University. She was an art
teacher with the Lee County
Public School System for 17
years prior to her retirement in
1989. She was a prolific reader.
an avid gardener, and a lifelong'
learner. She is deeply missed.
A memorial service to cele-
brate Rosemary's life will be
held on Sunday, June 11,2006 at
4:00 p.m. at The Unitarian Uni-
yversalist Church of Tampa, with
a reception following at the
home of Gerri Almand, Ph. 813-
264-6859. The Rev. Marjorie
Bowers-Wheatley will officiate.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to The Tampa Bay
Chapter 1of the American Red
Cross, 3310 West Main Street,
Tampa, FL 33607.


John Cecil

Willliamson

John Cecil Williamson,
age 89, died on Sunday, May 28,.
in Madison.
Funeral services will be
Tuesday, May 30, 2006 at 2:00
p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home
Madison Chapel. Burial will be
at Midway Cemetery in Lee.
The family received friends at
the Beggs Chapel on Monday,
May 29, 2006 from 6 to 8 p.m.
Williams was born in Madi-
son on October 8, 1916, the son
of the late John Carlton and
Ellen Dixon Williamson. He
lived in Madison all his life. He
drove a school bus for many
years for the Madison County
School Board and was a farmer.
He was a good neighbor and
friend to all. He was a member
of the Church of Jesus, Christ of
Latter Day Saints, Madison
Branch. He was a U.S. Army
Veteran having served in World
War II in New Guinea.
He is survived by his wife
of 59 years, Edna Hamrick
Williamson of Madison; two
sons; Frank Williamson and his
wife, Susie of Madison: one
daughter: Becky Williamson
Wimberly and husband, Antho-
ny of Mayo; one brother; Ken-
neth Williamson, of Ohio; two
sisters; Mary Ellen Grimes, of
Ohio, and :Lorrine Meeks, of
Texas; six grandsons: Frankie
Williamson, Justin Williamson,
Jay Williamson, Benji Wimber-
ly, Cody Wimberly and wife,
Shila and Scott, Wimberly; three
granddaughters: Kimberl. Gur-"
ley and husband, .,Rob; Nicole
Unriderwood! and husband, Rus-
sell, and Jessica Williamson. He
was blessed with five great-
grandchildren.
He is also survived by. a
host of other relatives and
friends.
He was predeceased by a
grandson, Keith Williamson.


r0citifV I1


June
The Greenv ille Library will be offering,
Book Fest Fun every Wednesday from
10:00 a.m. until I11:00 a.m.
June,
The Greenville Library will be offering
Preschool Storytime every Thursday from
10:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 8
The Lee Library will be offering Book
Fest Fun every Thursday from 10:00 a.m.
until 11:00 a.mi.
June 9
The Madison Library will be offering
Preschool Storytime every Friday from
10:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 12
The Greenville Library will be offering
Teen Art Fest every Monday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 13
The Madison Library will be offering
Book Feast Fun every Tuesday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
'.June13
The Madison Library will be offering
extreme Teens every Tuesday from 2:00
p.m. until 3:00 p.m.
June 13
The Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District's Governing board will meet at
9:00 a.m. at District Headquarters in Live
Oak. The meeting is to consider District
business and conduct public hearings. Fol-


CAM0AR


lowing the meeting. there will be a work-
shop. All meetings, % workshops. and hear-
ings are open to the public.
June 14
The Green\ ille Library v ill be offering
.Book Fest Fun every. Wednesday from
10:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 14
The June meeting of the 55 Plus Club
.w ill be held at United Methodist Coopera-
tive Ministries at 12:00 noon. The host will
be Harison United Methodist Church. The
55 Plus Club is for anyone in the communi-
ty 55 years old and older. The program fol-
lows the luncheon, and is planned with se-
niors in mind. The program for June will be
presented by Diann Douglas, County Exten-
sion Director. Her program is entitled "Who
Gets Grandmother's Yellow Pie plate?"
This will be about transferring personal
property. She will also bring materials on
Disaster Preparedness. There are no costs of
any kind and no reservations are necessary
for the luncheon. Also, a reminder that the
55 Plus Club takes a break for the summer,
so there will be no meetings in July or Au-
gust. For more information, please call Lin-
da Gaston at 929-4938.
June 14
Doers Club, a Diabetes Support Group,
will meet at 11:00 a.m. at the Senior Citizens
Counsel of Madison County to discuss Un-
derstanding the A1C Blood Test for Diabet-
ics.


June 15
The Greenville Library will be offering
Preschool Storytime every Thursday from
10:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 15
The Lee Library will be offering Book
Fest Fun every Thursday from 10:00 a.m.
until 11:00 a.m.
June 15
Residents living in and around the
Madison, Fla., community can be screened
to reduce their risk of ha\ ing a stroke. Life
Line Screening will be at the Senior Citizins
Council of Madison County on June 15th.
The site is located at 486 SW Rudedge St. in
Madison. Appointments will begin at 9:00
a.m.
June 16
The Madison Library will be offering
Preschool Storytime every Friday from
10:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 19
The Greenville Library will be offering
Teen Art Fest every Monday from 10:00
a.m. until 11:00 a.m.
June 19-23
Sirmans Baptist Church will host a re-
vival. Paster Bro. Garland Jones and his son
Ron Jones will be preaching Bro. Ron will
preach on Monda), Wednesday, and Friday,
and Bro. Garland on Tuesday and Thursday.
There will be special music each night. The
church is located 8 miles on 221 South of
Greenville, in the community of Sirmans.


Florida Trail Association

Will Hold Meeting

On June 12th
The Suwannee Chapter of the Florida Trail Association will
hold its monthly meeting on Monday, June 12, 2006 at the
Suwannee River Water Management District from 7-9 PM, on
US 90 and CR 49, 2 miles east of Live Oak. The Public'is Wel-
come!
The program will feature photos of past chapter trips and
chapter activities. The chapter maintains the Florida Trail from
the Econfina River in the Big Bend east to the Suwannee River
State Park at Ellaville, including riverfront hiking along the
Suwannee and Withlacoochee Rivers.
Come join us and bring a friend!
For more information, call Chapter Chair, Sylvia Dunnam,
362-3256,dunnams@alltel.net, Sam Bigbie, 362-5090,
sam8591 @alltel.net.








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6A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 7, 2006




AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Sheriff's Office Honors Bobby Lawson

With Retirement Luncheon

By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Wednesday, May 31, the Sheriff's Office honored Bob-
by Lawson with a luncheon to thank him for all of his hard work
and dedication. Also, it gave the staff a time to say their good-
byes since it was his very last day at work.
He has been with the Madison County Sheriff's Department
for a whopping 21 years! He worked with the Madison County
Emergency Medical Services (EMS) for 6 years totaling a won-
derful 27 years!
Sheriff Pete Bucher presented Lawson with a plaque and
certificate for all of his years of work at the Sheriff's Office.
David Ballengher, Leroy Buchanan and Pam Knight pre-
pared the meal for the luncheon.
Lawson stated, "I would like to thank everyone who pre-
pared and attended the luncheon. I will miss working with the'
people of Madison. They are wonderful people."


Former Sheriff's Office Transportation Officer, Bobby
Lawson, left, and Madison County Sheriff, Pete Bucher,
right, enjoyed themselves at the luncheon the Sheriff'p
-4 nL1


OffO ice held in. honor of Lawson's retirement. (Photo sub.
AW .m W W 5I mitted)

The Importance' Of O0nngOur'He-arts,


By Ed Rubenstein
As a spiritual aspirant for
over 30 years, and in my pro-..
fession as a Ph.D. Psycholo-
gist, I (have ,experienced nu-
merous practices and ap-
proaches for enhancing well
being and spiritual growth. I
now realize that the path
through the Heart is the most
direct approach to our ultimate
fulfillment.
As I share this statement,
many people will agree that
they know we are meant to
follow our hearts, listen to our
hearts, and live from our
hearts. Many will also believe
that they are already following
and living from their hearts:'-I
know this from personal expe- '
science, because I used to think
[ was in .my heart. However,
after I began studying with the
Padmacahaya Foundation, I
came to. realize that I was ac-
tually in my head, and just be-
ginning to scratch the surface
of my heart. I was not truly
heart centered nor was I expe-
riencing the depths of my
heart.
We cannot follow the
heart while focusing, through
the brain. We cannot use our
heads to get into our hearts.


Experiencing the peace, joy,
love and gratitude of our
hearts is actually a simple
process. However, it may
seem difficult to us because,
due to our conditioning, we try
to be in the heart. It is this ef-
fort that keeps us anchored in
our heads. Many people have
come to believe that the expe-
rience of being brain-domi-
nant is normal. They have not
fully realized how this colors
their perceptions, determines
what they think is reality, and
keeps them disconnected from
true joy and from their deepest
purpose here on earth.
Our head is the center of our
ego. 'Our educational training
has taught us to d'pen~Adon our
intellectual and mental func-
tions excessively. Unfortu-
nately, many of us have never
received proper guidance or
education on how to be in our
hearts. Thus we miss out on
the greatest gift that life offers.
As I said before, most
people are actually in their
heads when they imagine they
are in -their hearts. Although
they may attempt to be heart-
centered, they don't recognize
that it is this "effort" that
keeps them anchored in their


The office of David W. Frasure, DC, is
Relocating to Tallahassee, FL.

Effective June 16, 2006, the office will be closing in
Madison, FL and will re-open in Tallahassee, FL on
July 16, 2006. Our new office will be located at:

1690 Raymond Diehl Road, Suite B3
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Phone: 850-973-4268
(right behind Osaka Japanese Restaurant)

Patient records will be located at the
Tallahassee office after June 16, 2006.


heads.
While some people may
have achieved a start in being
in their hearts, the biggest part
of them may still be observing
the process. It is this act of
observation that keeps them
separated from their hearts.
While they think they are hav-
ing a great heart experience.
in reality, they may only be
experiencing a minute frac-
tion of what is available. Joy
and love are boundless. How-
ever, such expansive aware-
ness of the depths of the heart
is only available to us when
we are able to be fully in our
hearts with our whole being..
The Open Heart Work-
shops guide and teach people
to experience the joy in their
hearts in a way that they most
probably never did before. As
people feel the deeper essence
of their hearts, they also come
to realize that up until that
point, they were not embrac-
ing the heart or benefiting
from and enjoying the gifts
that it offers.
Some people are hesitant
to open their hearts because
they believe this will cause
them to reconnect with emo-
tional hurts from the past.
However, opening our hearts
does not mean that we will be
easily exposed to negative
emotions. On the contrary,
as our hearts open and be-
comes stronger, positive
heart felt feelings will grow
and automatically reduce neg-
ative emotions. The heart
cannot hurt us, and complete-
ly opening our hearts will
heal us on the deepest level.
Then we can move towards
feeling whole, complete, sat-
isfied, and fulfilled in our mo-
ment to moment lives.
In Open Heart Level 1,


A Heajt WORKSHOP

That wirf f yoqr member the sti#out LOVE
:)bunLldant ic.ssincgs. .:p.re-ahzo I c'

eOll peaC 'r/




LEVEL 1: Sat., June 10, 9:30 AM-5PM $100 Unity Eastside
LEVEL II: Sun., June 11,9:30AM-SPM $150 Courtyard by Marriott
A practical and experiential workshop designed to help you feel the beauty of Love
within the heart, reduce the domination of the brain, and strengthen your heart
connection bringing joy, peace, and calm into your life. Level I includes an attunement
helping connect you to your deeper heart. Level II supports and guides you to more
deeply experience peace, joy, and blessings, while relying on the Love within your
heart (Level I class required).
A PADMACAHAYA INSTITUTE FOR INNER STUDIES PROGRAM.

INSTRUCTOR Dr. Ed Rubenstein PH.D. PSYCHOLOGIST
MORE INFO KurtValle, RN 850-510-0604
REGISTRATION www.h2amedia.com/hw.html Holistic Learning Center
ANONPROFITSo01(tc3)CHARITABLE ORGANIZATION
FOR MORE EXCITING EVENTS CALL 850-878-8643 www.SouthernSprings.org


we will learn to recognize and
experience the difference be-
'tween emotions and. feelings
from the heart. Anger, fear,
worry, resentment, guilt, sad-
ness, jealousy, insecurity and
arrogance are examples of the
many difficult emotions peo-
ple experience. Following
such emotions is not pro-
ductive because it's like
putting wood on the fire.'
These emotions end up com-
plicating our relationships as
well as leading to unpleasant
experiences. Following emo-
tions also obscures the field
of the heart and creates
clouds that block the radiance
of our inner sun.
In contrast to emotions.
feelings are the subtle quali-
ties of the heart. Love, joy,
compassion, appreciation,
and gratitude are feelings
from our heart. That is Why
we say. "heart-felt love and
gratitude". Being filled, with
positive heart-felt feelings is
the' key to happiness and true
fulfillment.
Opening our hearts as
wide as possible is the great-
est gift that we can offer our-
selves and the world. Open-
ing .our hearts has a profound
healing affect on all levels of,
our being as well as on our
families and communities.
The more we open our hearts,
the more we share uncondi-
tional love by our presence.,
The Source of Light and
Love, the True Source, is the
Source of our True Self which
resides in the. very core of our
hearts. This 'is why the heart
is the key to our. connection
with the True Source, (or
whatever name you choose to
call the Source of Light and
Love). The core of our hearts
is always radiating, -even-
when we do not experience it
because we have learned to
live our lives from our heads.
Our life on earth is a gift,
and to live this life without
opening our hearts is to miss
out on the deeper meaning
and purpose of why we are
alive. The core of our hearts
is calling to us. Our hearts
want to open so that we can
have the very best, on all lev-
els that Love offers. When
we open our hearts, we deep-
en our spiritual connection to
the True Source, and this al-
lows us to live genuinely and
authentically in the sacred-
ness of love. Then we can live
our life as instruments of the
True Source, and Light and
Love will radiate out in all di-
rections. We will wake up to
why we are here on earth.
May we all pray that the True
Source bless all beings, so
that all hearts will hear the in-
ner call to awake, open, and
follow the Love


What to Expect

During a Portfolio Review
Provided by Brad Bashaw, Edward Jones
If you are serious about achieving your long-term
financial goals, you should work with an investment pro-
fessional someone with the training, resources and
objectivity to help you choose the right mix of invest-
ments: for your individual needs. and.,preferences. And
) you'll \\ ant tb aeet periodit)'all ith \our invegtmento
professional to gauge your, progress. You'll getmore.outl.
of these meetings if you know what to look for and
what to expect.
To prepare for a portfolio review, you may need to
bring last year's tax return, recent statements from your
401(k) or other employer-spbnsored retirement plan, life
insurance policies and other documents suggested by
your investment professional. When the review begins,
here are a few things to look for:

*Suitability of investments You'll need to make
'sure your investments are suitable for your individual
needs. This may mean holding on to investments that are,
for the moment, not "doing well" as defined by tradition-
al measures, such as stock prices. To cite a recent exam-
ple, from 2000 to 2002, many investments were "down"
- and yet, they were still the right ones for some people
to own. This isn't to say you don't want to know your
investments' recent performance history just don't let it
be the determining factor in making "buy" or "sell" deci-
sions.
*Portfolio balance Investment portfolios are never
"static." You should be open to making adjustments in
response to changes in your life; i.e., a child nears col-
lege, you move closer to retirement, etc. Consequently,
it's a good idea to review your holdings periodically to
see if they are still properly balanced in a way to help you
make progress toward your goals. At the same time,
you'll need to make sure your portfolio is still aligned
with your risk tolerance; in other words, you don't want
to inadvertently take on more risk than you'd like.
*Tax efficiency Many people don't pay sufficient
attention to the impact of taxes on their investments. A
portfolio review may be a good time to examine your sit-
uation and determine if you are fully taking advantage of
tax-deferred vehicles (such as your 401(k) or traditional
IRA), tax-advantaged free investments (such as munici-
pal bonds) and tax-efficient strategies (such as holding
stocks for the long term to achieve the best capital gains
rate). Be sure to consult with your tax advisor prior to
making any "tax-smart" investment decisions.
*Changes in investment-related laws Like most
people, you are probably busy with your work and fami-
ly, and you may not have time to stay current on the
always-changing laws that can affect your investment
strategies. At your portfolio review, your investment pro-
fessional can inform you of these changes. In 2006, for
instance, the new "Roth 401(k)" was introduced; if you
have this option where you work, you may be able to
receive tax-free earnings on some of your 401(k) dollars.

To stay on track toward your important financial
objectives, you will find few events more helpful than
your portfolio reviews so make the most out of them.


Brad Bashaw
Investment Representative


EdwardJones


114 SW Range Avenue
P.O. Box 631
Madison, FL 32341
Bus 850-973-8334 Fax 877-516-2596
Hm 386-362-6204 Toll Free 866-973-8334
ww.edwardjones.com
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


'T ~-0 "

di


LIM- -' -


L.


I-






Wednesday, June 7, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 7A


P.
Z -.
4. '-
2-' $~


TI5


By Jacob Bembry .
Greene Publishing, Inc. -
Prentiss and Hiroko Cherry have a unique and
happy marriage.
Prentiss, a native of Lee, the youngest of five sons
born to M.W. and Marianne Cherry, is well known for 7'
his friendly smile and his affable personality.
Hiroko came from Yokosuka, Japan, which is in .
Tokyo Bay. It is the largest Navy base in Japan. She
came to the United States, following her marriage to
Jimmy Newman, who was killed in a car accident in
Lee. Together, they had two children, Linda Albritton
and Lina Cates.
Prentiss has two sons from his first marriage,
Tommy and Kenny, who live in Macon, Ga. His other son, I
Sid, died of cancer a few years ago.
Together, Prentiss and Hiroko have seven grandchildren.
Prentiss worked with Cherry Farms for his brother, Larrie
Cherry. While there, he delivered feed and loaded chickens.
He is also the former owner of the White Auto Hardware Prentiss Cherry has his
Storein Madison. Prentiss Cherry has his
Store ineMadison. lunchbox and school books
Prentiss has worked with the Sheriff's Department, as an
EMT, as a fireman and as an auxiliary Florida Highway Patrol and heads off to school as a
trooper. youngster at Lee School.
He was in the first EMS graduating class from North Flori- (Photo submitted)
da Junior College, along with Juan Botino and Carlton Burnette.
Prentiss recalled that EMS used to have a station wagon for its
emergency vehicle. One time, they went to pick up a patient and the
doors on the station wagon locked. They had to take the barbwire off
bhee"aik bftbipeprson's pickup truck and take him to the hospital on the
back of the truck.
When Prentiss worked with the FHP Auxiliary, there were two
troopers in the county Joe Peavy and Howard Ross, and about six oth-
er members of the auxiliary.
Prentiss began work as a firefighter in 1971, being paid only $425
a month. The department was always short of help so he could pick up
extra time and extra pay by doing fill-in work.
Prentiss said that the worst fire he, worked was as a volunteer in
1963 when the tobacco warehouse burned down.
Prentiss also did a lot of repair work over the years, working on al-
most anything mechanical or electrical.
He graduated from Madison High School in 1949 and was part of
the students, who adopted the nickname "the Red Devils" for the school.
He had earlier attended Lee School, where his teachers included .
Willie Phillips, Corrine Henderson and Florida Davis.
Prentiss said that the principal at the time, Candler Matheny, was a
real disciplinarian and didn't allow the students to get by with too much
unruly behavior.
Prentiss enlisted in the United States Air Force, serving from 1951-
1953 in bases in England, in Amerillo, Texas, Sheffield, Illinois and at
McDill Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, where he went through Prentiss and Hiroko C
basic training. ,Pentin ram, rndsH,-nn .


.' Hiroko arrived in the LI.S. in 1959 with her then-
husband, Jimmy Newman. She had worked at an
1American naval base, near w here New man had been
stationed at a Marine base.
Hiroko said that w hen she moved to North Carolid-
na with Neawman, eer.thing "as completely differ-
en(. The f-ood was different. Back then. she said. the
Japanese food was much different than it is today. She
S said that American food had become popular in Japan.
She said that when she arrit ed in the U.S.. she could-
n't speak English %ell, so she stated home and watched d
tele vision. She began looking at Japanese magazines and
started learning how to make dresses from the maga-
zines.
i -Hiroko said that, since she no"\ works. she doesn't get
to do much of that stuff anymore.
Hiroko said that, one of the things she eras taught in
Japan, was to respect the elderly. She said there, that, as the
parents become older, it falls upon the children to take care
Prentiss Cherry, as a of them.
young man, in the United In Japan, she said. t\hile she as living there. the %omen .
States Air Force. (Photo didn't %ork .erv much. The\ had to take care of the children.
submitted) She said that it's different, no. ho\sever, as Japan as become
more westernized.
She noted that the Japanese stll respect the elderly, ho\e\er.
After moving to Madison. Hiroko worked at Madison House
z. "' Furniture Compans for; ears. She said it was hard on her u hen they
.' shut the plant and e% erN one lost their. jobs.
Hiroko embarked on a career change, entering college at age 54.
'"When you have an opportunity to do something," she said, "do
it." I wish that I had done it when I was much younger. Anything you
try to do, put 100 percent into it."
She graduated from the drafting program at the college and got a
job drawing maps at the Property Appraiser's office. She drew the maps
I by hand for 14 years and she now does it by computer.
S Hiroko said that honesty is very important to her.
"Mine and Prentiss's beliefs are alike. We follow God's teachings,"
she said.
Both of them are members of Midway Baptist Church.
Hiroko is very proud of her adopted country.
"Americans have always been very good to me," she said. She not-
/ ed that every one of her employers had been good to her.
SHiroko said that she still had a problem understanding why the
Japanese government did what they did to the U.S. during World War

She said that she remembered little about the war, but she did re-
member having to go into aiemunderground shelterevery time the air raid
sirens went off. There was food and other things stacked in there, in case
they were.needed.
,L < She remembers when Tokyo was bombed.
erry are pictured on their "I still feel bad aboutt the war," she said. "I don't know why they
tted) have to have war. Peace is very important. War is terrible."


N11


H IROK







8A Madison County Carrier www.2reenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 7, 2006




AROUND MADISON COUNTY



My Soldier.com Offers Five Simple Ways To Show


Your Patriotic Support For Troops on July 4th


This is the fourth straight
year that Americans will cele-
brate the Independence Day
Holiday, and their right to live
in.freedom, while U.S. troops
engage in dangerous missions
in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Richard Berman, Manhat-
tanville president and co-
founder of the My Soldier pen
pal program suggests that,
"You can make a difference in
those soldier's daily lives.


Registering and participating
in My Soldier provides civil-
ians the chance to show how
grateful we all are for every-
thing our soldiers and marines
do to protect our freedom and
liberties."
Since Independence Day
-is recognized as a main patri-
otic holiday of the entire coun-
try it is an appropriate time to
let service personnel know
you are thinking of them. Ac-


cordingly, My Soldier.com
created

Five simple ways to show pa-
triotic support:
1. Go to
www.mysoldier.com to register
for the "My Soldier" program.
and adopt a soldier who could
use a pen-pal friend
2. Encourage children
/students to spend their sum-
mer vacation creating a mean-
ingful, even educational, pen
pal relationship.
3. Join the program as a
family. Family writing pro-
jects can create a bond for a
common cause, which deep-
ens familial ties.
.4. Wear the free red My
Soldier bracelet mailed to you
via a SASE (self addressed
stamped envelope) to show
your support
5. Submit the name of an
active soldier who would like
to. be adopted through the
website link.
The program's cofounders
maintain that in addition to
physical protection, such as
well-armored vehicless for
those in harm's way, we must
tend to psychological needs as
well. Sometimes, soldiers just.
need a human touch, an a bill )


need for affirmation for our find out if this
soldiers onj a one-by-one ba- arranged.
sis.


"If the. United States.
Swishes to remain a society of
justice and opportunity, we
must continually find ways to
protect the :people who lay
their life on the line to pre-
serve it," said Berman. "Our
men and women in uniform
deserve 'continuing confirma-
tion of the value of their
courage, commitment and ser-'
vice.". .
About Interviewing Par-


store ide to know that someone out ticipants fromnyour area.
store w de there really) does care and ap- If you are interested in in-
Excludes antiques &fixtures which will be priced preciate what they do, regard- terviewing My Soldier partici-
as marked. less of the political controver- pants that live in your regional
sy engendered by their assign- area, please contact Mike
F i ment. The My Soldier pen pal Seminara at (914) 323-5466 or
F i al D ays program seeks to fulfill that seminaram@mville.edu to
1601Baytree Rd. "I' DO It Hauling And
Mon.-Fr. 10-6 (Barclay Square)U g IL
-Sat.4 ;. 229-257-0030 More" Opens For Business


can


be


Aboul M3 Soldier
U.S. Army Sergeant Juan
Salas, a student at Manhat-
tanville College in Purchase,
New York served for 14
months in Iraq. Upon his re-
turn to campus, he and, Man-
hattanville President Richard
Berman developed My Sol-
dier, a special program that
puts politics aside and lets
U.S. soldiers know that some-
one back home cares. Salas
and Berman hope that the My
Soldier program brings sol-.
diers and American citizens
.together and helps soldiers-
feel appreciated.
Currently the program is
serving over 175,000 service-
men and women, and has ap-
proximately 350,000 civilians
participating by writing letters
and. sending care packages to
their "adopted" soldier Partic-
ipants who agree to "adopt" a
soldier are provided with a
"starter kit" which contains in-
formation to help get them
stated with writing to their sol-


dier, a list of items they may
appreciate in a care. package
and a red bracelet which has
Manhattanville My Soldier
embossed on it. The bracelet
is a thank you to the partici-
pant, and allows them to visi-
bly show their support as a
participating member of the
program.









: .NEW
PRIOGRAIf .- ;-:


starts Aug10
in Monticello, .Fla.
Mandatory Orientation Aug 3


Website: WWW.NFCC.EDU
TO REGISTER:,

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Chris and Portia Neal of Madison, named their
business, "I'll Do It Hauling And More" after their two
year old daughter, Jasmine. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
Photo by Jessalyn Covell, May 31, 2006)


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Chris and Portia Neal of
Madison have been constant-
ly working around the clock
to prepare for one of the most
needed trades in .Madison
County. What does it entail?
Well, a little bit of every-
thing!
The Neals are ready to
perform any job that is rea-


NOWOPEN IN;
M Madison June 12th -9a.m.


973-4700
Old Sale Ace Building South Range
Madison, Florida

Over 9,000 locations worldwide.


ffr bd on fra vtr lme, minimum 12m
proaim. No alid whih any ofiher l''.
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sonable and no job is too
small!
Their business includes
tree removals, hauling, trim-
ming, weeding,.mowing, edg-
ing and painting (inside of
houses only).
Also, the Neals perform
clean outs whether it be out of
a house, apartment or garage.
They provide light landscap-
ing which includes digging,
planting and mulching.
Unique designs are available.
Further, Portia Neal offers
cooking and baking services.
The Neals are wonderful
members of the Church of
God in Madison and have two
adorable daughters, Jasmine,
two; and Kimberlee, one.
Some may be wondering
why their family business is
named, "I'll Do It Hauling
and More?" This is because
their two-year-old, Jasmine,
always tells her parents, "I'll
do it, I'll do it!" whenever
there is something to be done,
whether it be a chore or just
helping them out.
To take advantage of the
Neal's services and great spe-
cials, please contact them at
929-4207.


Chris Neal 850-929-4027
Hauling Trimming Weeding Mowing Edging
Painting Clean-Outs (Houses, Apartments and Garages)
Landscaping (digging, planting and mulching)... Unique Designs
Many Extras No Job Too Small....Let's Talk!!!


CHARLESTON, SC


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* Two Tour/Attraction Tickets
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i.ht, lodging at a Charleston hotel and two tickets to a tour or
attraction of your choice.
This package rate is not per person or per night, $119 is all you pay!
Call early to be assured of reservations.
843-514-4326











-- -_!or-
I ,, j _
*" - 11,


I






Wednesday, June 7, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 9A



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Local Cirls Move On To Area 111 Championships I A

And Finals In U11S. Eventing Association


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Amanda Bunnell of Madi-
son has been showing horses
since she was a mere six months
old. She was bom into a life
filled with horses with her
mother being very active in
horse shows and her grand-
mother raising winning horses.
Bunnell still rides, shows
and competes at national levels.
Also, she provides lessons to
people in the Madison area and
neighboring counties.
Megan Jackson of Madison
has been competitively riding
horses for approximately five
years. She began by Amanda
Bunnell approaching her to
compete in comprise to help sell
one of her winning horses.
Needless to say, Jackson has
been hooked ever since!
In 2005, Megan Jackson
competed within the Pony of
the Americas (POA) which is an
international organization com-
prised of more than 40 State
Clubs throughout the United
States. POA is unique in that it
is the only equine organization
devoted to youth riders.
At the 2005 POA Interna-
tional Show (nationals), Jack-
son placed eighth out of approx-
imately 70 other girls in Equi-
tation Over Fences! This class
is primarily based on how well
the rider rides their pony, jump-
ing over fences. The horse that
Megan Jackson rode was fresh
out of Bunnell's grandmother's
farm in Eustis. The horse is
named, RM Kat A Lac QT,
also known as "Kaddy."
Eventing is an Olympic
sport and is comprised of three
phases: dressage, cross country


Megan Jackson and Amanda Bunnell, of Madison, pictured left to right, show of-
"Kaddy," when Jackson placed eighth in the 2005 POA International. (Photo submitted)
and stadium jumping. .SearchingI
This year, Bunnell placed in the
top three against Olympic hope-
ful horses within the USEA
Winter 1 Horse Trials at Rock- .;, .
ing Horse in Altoona, which '.
qualified her to go on to com- ,
pete at the Area Three event lo- \.;-. S
cated in Pine Mountain, Geor- .' '
gia near Columbus on June 9 i


for services offered local
Look no further.
This


NESS CARl


has local businesses ready to help!


Plans June 10th Launch

Public Invited To Bring Models


Amateur rocket men will gather at 10: 30 a.m., Saturday, June
10, on the hillside of a local farm in Madison, for a series of launch-
es. The NFCC Sentinel Rocketeers are hosting a rocket demon-
stration. Visitors are welcome to watch launches of rockets big
and small.
"Visitors are welcome to bring their model rockets to launch,"
said Terry Zimmerman, chemistry instructor and Rocketeer club
sponsor.
The launches will take place on Sampala Lake Road, a dirt road
off Highway 14, south of Madison. From 1-10 if you're traveling
east, take exit 251, turn right onto Highway 14 West and go .10
mile. Turn right again onto Sampala Lake Road. Direction signs
will be posted.
The NFCC Rocketeers is the only club of its type in the North
Florida area with the nearest being in metro areas of Jacksonville,
Gainesville and Tampa. The club has sponsored a series of launch-
es of Level 1 and smaller rockets inviting the public to watch and
participate. Membership is open to any one interested in rockets and
rocket launching.
For more information on the June 10 launch or the Rocketeers
Club, contact Terry Zimmerman by telephoning 973-1646 or email
ZimmermanT@nfcc.edu.






10A Madison County Carrier.


www.greenepublishing.com


Wednesday, June 7, 2006


Jefferson County Watermelon Festival



f- 4 Sice o6 te 9ood id e -


SALUTING THE WATERMELON GROWERS

SFarmers &
q, Merchants
W-Bank


CONGRATULATIONS WATERMELON GROWERS


Complete Business & Personal Insurance Service

Jack Proctdr
9 .1# 4%111 ft- -- - -* A.- rI


Is Proud To Salute
The Jefferson County
Watermelon Festival


I1325 SW Main St. 17 bU' matra Ave. ason Jessie HugheyIndustrial Park
13r G nW8MinSl FL 850" 0973-2281 Fax: (850) 973-2426 826 SW Harvey Greene Dr." Madison, FL
Greenville. FL MK (t850I 7-ra228hA u(l 0 2 F2 (850)l973-6896


Jefferson County Celebrates 56th Annual Watermelon Festival


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The sweet smell of water-
melons will be in the air and the
sweet taste will be in visitors'
mouths at the 56th Annual Wa-
termelon Festival celebration,
to be held Saturday, June 17, in
Monticello.
The festival will kick off
from 6-10 p.m. on Friday, June
9, with a dinner and dance at
Willow Pond.


At noon, on Saturday, June
10, the former Queens' Lun-
cheon will be held at the Cham-
ber of Commerce in Monticel-
lo.
At 4. p.m.,. the Queen's
Contestants' tea will be held at
the Chamber of Commerce.
At 7 p.m., the Watermelon
Queen pageant will be held at
the old Jefferson County High
School Auditorium. At that'
time, the winners of the


Princess Pageant and the Baby
Contest winners will be an-
nounced.
On Thursday, June 15, a
fashion show and luncheon
will be held at the Monticello
Opera House.
On Friday, June 16, from'
noon until close, an arts and
crafts show will be held in
downtown Monticello.
At 5:30 p.m,, the RotarN
Club Barbecue will be held at


the Monticello Opera House.
At 7 p.m., a street dance
will be held on South Water
Street.
At 8 p.m., a rodeo will be-
gin on Nash Road in Monticel-
lo.
On Saturday, June 17, a
breakfast will beheld ,at the
Farmers & Merchants Bank n
Monticello.
At 8:15 a.m., the Melon
Run will begin at Tiger Lane.


Beginning at 9 a.m. and
lasting all day, arts and crafts
exhibits will be on display in
downtown Monticello.
At 10 a.m., the Watermel-
on parade will wind through
downtown Monticello.
There will be an all day car,
show in the FMB parking lot.,
From 11:30 a.m. until 1
p.m., the Children's Theater
will present a presentation at
the Monticello Opera House.


From 11 a.m. until 2 p.m., ,,'
there will be platform events,
with the Marine Corps band in
downtown Monticello.
At 6.p.m., there will be a
gospel sing at the Monticello
Opera House.
At 8 a.m., the rodeo will
once again begin on .Nash
Road.
For more information on
this exciting event, please call
,850-997-5552...


R. Winston Connell, Realtor
Serving Your Community Since 1978
Homes Acreage *Timber Tracts
"Commercial Farms
!i',* d Licensed In Florida & Georgia
S (850) 997-4780
310 S. Jefferson Street Monticello, Florida ,
Fax: (850) 997-0216 Email: rwconnell@aol.com


Jlackxmn a *rfujtor
Salutes

The Jefferson County

SWatermelon Festival.
2 Locations To Serve You Best!
-Monticello-
166 E. Dogwood, Monticello, Florida* (850) 997-3553
"Where Pharmacy is Phamily"
Home Health Care Free Blood Pressure
Gifts Counseling on Medication
Free Delivery For Prescriptions
-Greenville-
1308 SW. Grand St., Greenville, Florida (850) 948-3011
Full Prescription Service
Danny Jackson, R.Ph.
Prescriptions filled promptly With Patient Consultation


WAUKEENAH
Fertilizer & Farm
SUPPLY INC.
.p o'.ai. ng in
SEED FEED FERTILIZER (Bag/Bulk)
SPREADER SERVICE
FENCING MATERIALS
VETERINARIAN SUPPLIES
FARM CHEMICALS
Wal.eenah, Florida

(850) 997-4460
Salutes
The Watermelon Growers


^ Jefferson County

Watermelon Festival 2006
- June 9 6-10 p.m. \illow, Pond Dinner & Dance

.June 10 Noon Former Queens" Luncheon Chamber
4:00 p.m. Queen's Contestants' Tea Chamber
7:00 p.m. Queen Pageant & Winners of Princess
Pageant & Babs Contest Announced at
old JCHS Auditorium
June 15 Noon Fashion Sho\\ & Luncheon at Opera House

June 16 Noon-until Arts & Crafts Show Downtown
5:30 p.m. Rotary Barbecue Opera House
7:00 p.m. Street Dance S. Water Street
8:00 p.m. Rodeo on Nash Road I

June 17 7:30 a.m. Breakfast at Farmers & Merchants Bank
8:15 a.m. Melon Run Tiger Lane
9:00 a.m. Arts & Crafts. downtown n Monticello
10:00 a.m. Parade Do\\ nto\ n
ALL DAY Car Show in FMNIB Parking Lot
11:30 1 p.m. Children's Theater Opera House
S11 2 p.m. Platform E ents ,,/ Marine Band Downto,,n
6:00 p.m. Gospel Sing at the Opera House
8:00 p.m. Rodeo on Nash Road

For Information Call 850-997-5552


Gordon Tractor, Inc.
Come See Us For Sales & Service of
New Holland Equipment
SALUTING THE WATERMELON GROWERS 0


TREWWOLLAA


Welcome Visitors! Enjoy The Festival!l

MONTICELLO'S ONLY FULL SERVICE HARDWARE


EDENFIELD i HARDWARE
HARDWARE STORES

"We Are Just Around The Corner"

155 N. JEFFERSON ST.
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
(850) 997-2144 (fax) (850) 997-4624
MARK & TRISHA WIRICK, OWNERS/MANAGERS


- june 17 -
The Opera House Presents
"The Three Little Pigs"
For Children Of All Ages


The Monticello
Opera House
Is Waiting
To Welcome You
To The
Watermelon
Festival
Courthouse Circle
* Monticello, FL *
(850) 997-4242


Have A Great Time
At The Watermelon Festival
1 FARM BUREAU A
Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King Agent
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor Counties
233 W. Base St., Madison (850) 973-4071
105 W. Anderson St., Monticello (850) 997-2213
813 S. Washington St., Perry (850) 584-2371
Lauren Lilliott, Agent





IN DOWNTOWN MONTICELLO '
S, 110 E. Dogwood Monticello, Florida

Saturday & Sunday Breakfast Buffet
( 6:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M...........$5.98 (C
Sunday Lunch Buffet
11:30 A.M. 2:00 EM...........$7.45
Saturday Lunch Buffet
11:30 A.M. 2:00 PEM..........$7.45
Week-Day Lunch Buffet 4
/, 11:00 A.M. 2:00 PEM...........$6.95
Large Parties Welcome At Our C
.Saturday Breakfast And Luncheon i
Buffet Starting At 6:00 A.M.


Come On Inside We're Air Conditioned!
Available For Weddings, Receptions,,
Banquets & Meetings!


)WNING & SONS,
WATERMELON GROWERS


491 SW Range Ave.
Madison, FL
973-2245










Wednesday, June 7, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 11A


Summer Fun Safety Ti


,Summer activities should
be fun and safe. Many differ-
ent problems can occur that
could have been avoided. Be
prepared before starting out.
Have a great summer.
Swimming Safety
Rules for Safe Swimming
1. Learn to swim.
2. Always swim with a
buddy.
3. Swim in a designated
area.
4. Wear a life jacket if you
can't swim or if you are just
learning to swim.
5. An inflatable air mat-
tress or swim ring does not
take the place of a life jacket.


how you would deal with
those situations. What if you
got lost, or were unexpectedly
confronted by an animal?
What if someone became ill or
injured? What kind of weather
might you encounter? Add to
your hiking checklist the sup-
plies you would need to deal
with these situations.
Make sure you have the
skills you need for your camp-
ing or hiking adventure. You
may need to know how to read
a compass, erect a temporary
shelter or give first aid. Prac-
tice your skills in advance.
If your trip will be stren-
uous, get into 'good physical


ANDERSONVILLE.
CIVIL WAR VILLAGE
Located 50 miles south of Macon on Georgia Highway 49
Weekend Blacksmith year-round
JUNE 10, 2006
HERITAGE RUN
OCTOBER 7 & 8, 2006,
ANDERSONVILLE HISTORIC FAIR
Civil War Reenactments Live Music
Confederate & Union Encampments
Arts Crafts Antiques
(229) 924-2558 258919


6. Don't swim in cold wa-
ter. Swimmers can get hy-
pothermia (dangerously low
body temperature) in cold wa-
ter.
7. Never dive or jump into
unknown waters ..
8. No drugs or alcohol.
9'. Obey all "No Swim-
ming" and other warning
signs.


condition before setting out. If
you plan to climb or travel to.
high altitudes, make plans for.
proper acclimatization to the
altitude.
It's safest to hike or camp
with at least one companion.
If,'ou'll be entering a remote
area, your group should have
a minimum of four people; this
way, if one is hurt, another can


ISGOSHIN-DO SCHOOL OF KARATE
0-Sensei Thomas H. Hardeman
81 Degree Black Belt 38 Years Experience -Teaching In Valdosta Since 1983
229-247-2799
SEISHIN-RYU SCHOOL OF KARATE
Sense Jay M. Balinter
6" Degree Black Belt 23 Years Experience Okinawan Weapons Kobudo
229-242-0604
Monday thru Thursday ..
g Kids 6pm7pm Adults 7pm-8:30pm

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Old BLDG of Steve Hall Flooring next to Speedee Cash 266920jrv


10. Never swim in a canal.
Hiking and Camping
Safety
Hiking and camping pro-
vide exercise and interest for
people of any age. Just getting
out and walking around is a.
wonderful way to see nature.
Since unexpected things hap-
pen, however, the best way to
help guarantee a good time for
all is to. plan ahead carefully
and follow commonsense safe-
ty precautions.
If you have any med-
ical conditions, discuss your
plans with your health care
provider and get approval be-
fore departing.
Review the equip-.
ment, supplies and skills that
you'll need. Consider what
emergencies could arise and


stay with the victim while two
go for help. If you'll be going
into an area that is unfamiliar
to you, take along someone
who knows the area or at
least speak with those who do
before you set out.
Some areas require
you to have reservations or
certain permits. If an area is
closed, do not go there. Find
.out in advance about any reg-
ulations--there may be rules
about campfires or guidelines
about wildlife.
Pack emergency sig-
naling devices, and know
ahead of time the location of
the nearest telephone or,
ranger station in case an
emergency does occur on
your trip.
Leave a copy of your


itinerary with a responsible
person. Include such details as
the make, year, and license
plate of your car, the equip-
ment you're bringing, the
weather you've anticipated
and when you plan to return.
Get trained in American
Red Cross first aid before
starting out. Contact your lo-
cal American Red Cross
chapter for a Community First
Aid and Safety course.
What to Bring: A Hiking
Checklist
What you take will de-
pend on where you are going
and how long you plan to be
away, but any backpack
should include the following:
Candle and matches
Cell phone
Clothing (always bring
something warm, extra socks
and rain gear)
Compass
First aid kit
Food (bring extra)
Flashlight
Foil (to use as a cup or
signaling device)
SHat
Insect repellent
SMap
Nylon filament
Pocket knife
Pocket mirror (to use as
a signaling device)
Prescription glasses (an
extra pair)
Prescription medica-
tlitfs for ongoing medical
conditions
Radio with batteries
Space blanket or a piece
of plastic (to use for warmth
or shelter)
Sunglasses
Sunscreen
Trash bag (makes an ad-
equate poncho)
Water
Waterproof matches or
matches in a waterproof tin
Water purification
tablets
Whistle (to scare off an-
imnals or to use as a signaling
device)
Always allow for bad
weather and for the possibili-,
ty that you, may be forced to
spend a night outdoors unex-
pectedly.
It's a good idea to assem-
ble a separate "survival pack"
for each hiker to have at all
times. In a small waterproof
container, place a pocket
knife, compass, whistle,
space blanket, nylon filament,
water purification tablets,
matches and candle. With
these items, the chances of be-
ing able to survive in the wild
are greatly improved.
Heat Cramps, Heat
Exhaustion, and Heat
Stroke .
Warm weather is wonder-


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SPRING CAMP Ribits ARTastic Camp Adventures
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Time: 12:30-5:10 POTTERY t CERAMIC MIXED MEDIA
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SUMMER CAMP
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6/5-16 6/19-30
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Monday-Frida)
Time: 12:10-.5: 10
Cost: $100.0(0


S. ,'.

ottag o ake t
s ake Eli 6r, tallahassee, FL 32303


ful.. However, sometimes you
can overdo the warmth -- es-
pecially if you are active or
exercising..
Here are three problems
children can have in hot
weather. These conditions are
largely brought on by heat and
dehydration -- and with prop-
er care it is possible to prevent
them.
Heat Cramps
Heat cramps- are muscle
contractions, usually in the
gastrocnemius or hamstring
muscles '(the muscles at the
back of the calves). These
contractions are forceful and
painful.
These cramps seem to be


perature reduced quickly, of-
ten with ice packs, and must
also be given IV fluids for re-
hydration; they must be taken
to the hospital as quickly as
possible (EMS is appropriate
here), and may have to stay in
the hospital for observation'
since many different body or-
gans can fail in heat stroke.
Preventing Heat-Related
Illnesses
It is possible to prevent
heat-related illnesses. The
important thing is to stay
well-hydrated, to make sure
that your body can get rid of
extra heat, and to be sensible
about exertion in hot, humid
\ weather.


S . . .


connected' to neat, aenyara-
tion, and poor conditioning,
rather than to lack of salt or
other mineral imbalances.
They usually improve with
rest, drinking water, and a
cool environment.
Heat Exhaustion
Although partly due to
exhaustion -- and feeling like
exhaustion, as the name im-r
plies -- heat exhaustion is.also
a result of excessive heat and
dehydration. The signs of heat
exhaustion include' paleness,
dizziness, nausea, vomiting,
fainting, and a moderately in-
creased temperature (101-
102 degrees F) which, in this
case, is not truly a fever, but
caused by the heat. Rest and
water may help in mild heat
exhaustion, and ice packs and
a cool environment (with a
fan blowing at the child) may
also help. More severely ex-
hausted patients may need IV
fluids, especially if vomiting
keeps them from drinking
enough.
Heat Stroke
If you see these symp-
toms, stop right here and call
your doctor or EMS. Heat
stroke is a medical emer-
gency!
Heat stroke is the most
severe form of heat illness. It
can occur even in people who
are not exercising, if the
weather is hot enough. These
people have warm, flushed
skin, and do not sweat. Ath-
letes who have heat stroke af-
ter vigorous exercise in hot
weather, though, may still be
sweating considerably.
Whether exercise-related or
not, though, a person with
heat stroke usually has a very
high temperature (106 de-
grees F or higher), and may
be delirious, unconscious, or
having seizures. These pa-
tients need to have their tem-


Your sweat is your body's
main system for getting rid of
extra heat. When you sweat,
and the water evaporates
from your skin, the heat that
evaporates the sweat comes
mainly from. your skin. As
long as blood is flowing
properly to your skin, extra
heat from the core of your
body is "pumped" to the skin
and removed by sweat evapo-
ration. If you do not sweat
enough, you cannot get rid of
extra heat well, and you also
can't get rid of heat as well if
blood is not flowing to the
skin. Dehydration will make
it harder for you to cool of in
two ways: if you are dehy-
drated you won't sweat as
much, and your body will try
to keep blood away from the
skin to keep your blood pres-
sure at the right level in the
core bf your body. But, since
you lose water when you
sweat, you must make up that
water to keep from becoming
dehydrated. The best fluid to
drink when you are sweating
is water. Although there is a
little salt in your sweat, you
don't really lose that much
salt with your sweat, except
in special circumstances; tak-
ing salt tablets may raise
your body's sodium level to
hazardous levels.
It's also important to be
sensible about how much you
exert yourself in hot weather.
The hotter and more humid it
is, the harder it will be for
you to get rid of excess heat.
The clothing you wear makes
a difference, too: the less
clothing you have on, and the
lighter that clothing is, the
easier you can cool off.
Injuries
Warm weather and the
lure of summertime activities
means we increase our
chance of some common in-


ps

juries. Here's some advice on
how to handle them.
Wounds:
A bruise is the most com-
mon closed wound. Bruises
result from excess force to the
skin that causes bleeding un-
derneath the skin. Most bruis-
es can be treated with a few
simple steps:
Immediately following
injury apply pressure to re-
duce bleeding
Keep the, area elevated
and apply ice or a cold pack
to help reduce swelling and
decrease pain.
'Open wounds are abra-
sions or scrapes.
Cleanse the areas with
soap and warm water, care-
fully washing away dirt.
Apply a dry sterile ban-
dage to the wound for protec-
tion. Use antibiotic ointments
only on infected wounds
Deep wounds require
medical attention
Watch for .infection-
signs include: swelling, red-
ness, warmth, pain or possi-
bl. fever.
Bee Stings:
The hone\ bee stinger has
a barb that holds the stinger
in the victim. The stinger has
a venom sac which will con-
tinue to release venom for up
to 20 minutes. Removal of
the stinger and venom sac is
necessary. The swelling from
a bee sting should be gone in
about 24 hours. If the
swelling persists, seek med-
ical attention.
Remove the stinger by
scraping it away from the
skin with a fingernail, blunt
knife or plastic card. Do not
use tweezers because squeez-
ing the stinger will release
more toxins into the skin.
Wash the area with soap
and water and cover the area
with a dry dressing, to keep
the site clean
Put ice or a cold pack
over the area to reduce
swelling and pain
Watch the victim for
signs of a delayed allergic re-
action
Sunburn:
Sunburn is dangerous and
should be avoided. If it does
occur, follow these steps:,
For sunburns in chil-
dren less than one year of
age, severe sunburn or where
headache, fever or shivering
occur, seek medical help.
For minor sunburn, ap-
ply cool compresses to the
red areas for 20 minutes.
Resting and staying out

of the sun while the burn
heals is essential since dam-
aged skin is more prone to
burning again.
Avoid anesthetic sprays
since they could cause a hy-
persensitivity reaction.


I




starts lUly 11
NFCC Madison, Fla

Website: WWW.NFCC.EDU o
TO REGISTER: Ei

850.9I7 I


I


, 1[. ,'T "









12A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 7, 2006



IFHEALTH


New Program Gives Free Education And Suppirt

To Alzheimer's Caregivers In Madison.- ty
To Alzheimer's Caregivers In Madison:County:


Research shows that nearly
half of adults, age 85 and older.
may have Alzheimer's disease or
some other form of dementia and
as man\ as 50(i of dementia
caregivers experience depression
- making them the most dis-
tressed of the caregiver poptda-
uon. Add to this. the fact that ser-
vices are often linuted or nonex-
istent in rural counties and you
have the formula for why low-
cost, accessible education and
support services are so vital to
this population.
The Alzheimer's Rural Care
Healthline or 'ARCH' program
was created to meet this need.
The program helps people caring
for loved ones with Alzheimer's
disease and other Ibmis of merm-


ory loss called 'dementia'.
Through community part-
ners, like North Florida Commu-
nity College and Big Bend Hos-
pice. the free program \ ill give
information and education that
will help rural caregivers devel-
op skills to help them provide
better care and deal with the
stress that beini a caregiver can
bring on. One of the best things
about the program is that care-
givers get all the benefits of a
support group program \ ia tele-
phone. so they never have to
leave home.
The telephone support con-
sists of 12 weekly sessions, in-
cluding seven group sessions on
relaxation. problem-solving
skills and stress management,


and 'five individual, sessions to
allo-w caregivers to work on
their personal caregiving goals.
The program also deals with
common caregiver issues like:
giving medicines, dealing with
agitated or aggressive behavior,
safety and wandering issues and
talking with your doctor.
If you, or someone you
know of is taking care of a per.
son with Alzheimer's disease.
memory loss or dementia,
please call ARCH toll-free at (1-
866-778-2724) for more infor-
mation on how to receive these
services.
For additional information
or a sample copy, -Contact:
vanessa.bvrd@med.fsu. edu or
call 850-645-2999.


Watermelon Offers Many Benefits


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
One of the best summer
fruits is watermelon! Most
watermelons are offered year
round, but during the summer
time is when they are sweet
and of the best quality.
Watermelon has an extremely
high water content, approxi-
mately 92 percent.
As the summer heat rises,.
so do the sales of watermelon.
Why? This fruit is a delightful








Fo Free Consltation


thirst quencher. It also. helps
quench the inflammation that
contributes' to certain health
conditions such as asthma. di-
abetes.- colon cancer and
arthritis.


*J 1


Watermelon is an excel-
lent source of vitamin C and
vitamin A.
Additionally, a recent


study shows that eating three
or more servings of fruit per
day may lower ones: risk of
age-related macular degenera-
tion iARNMDi. the primary.
cause of vision loss in older
adults.
Though it may seem like a
lot of fruit to consume in one
day, it will, pay off in the fu-
ture.
There are sev eral wayN N
that one can contribute to their
everyday meals. These simple,
and quick ideas include
adding watermelon to a fruit
salad or some people roast wa-
termelon seeds that are sea-
soned and eaten as a snack
food or put into bread.
Last, but not least, wator-
melori mixed with thinly
sliced red onion, salt and pep-
per makes a splendid summer
salad.


The Epilepsy Association ut

The Big Bend Serves The Area


The Epilepsy Association of the Big Bend
iEABB) is a pniate. non-profit organizauon
sern ing men, women. and children w ith epilep-
sy/seizure disorders and their families. The
EABB is the sole provider of specialized ser-
vices for persons %with epilepsy/seizure.
They current l senre 14 counties: Bay. Cal-
houn. Franklin.Gadsden. Gulf. Holmes. Jack-
son. Jefferson, Leon. Liberty. NMadi-
son. Taylor. Wakulla and Washing-
ton. With three offices within the (
sen ice area: Tallahassee 850-222- _
1777: Panama City 850-872-2998;:
and Marianna 850-482-8822.
You can also email them at:
epilepsyassoc @earthl ink. net
The purpose of the Eplepsy As- TI
sociation is to pro\ ide ser\ ices for Opf
those diagnosed \with epilepsy and E
provide up-to-date information
about epilepsy and how to pre ent
Their goals include: You
Present the occurrence of froill
new cases of epilepsy whenever
possible. I
Prevent recurring seizures
once epilepsy has been diagnosed.
Prevent social'and personal Tri
problems that may be caused by
having epilepsy
Who can be a client?
*Any resident of Florida who is


diagnosed % ith epilepsy. or is suspected of hav-
ing epilepsy, and %%ho needs the program's ser-
\ ices can apple to be a client.
The Epilepsy Sernices Program works s
\\ilh the client's ability to pay.
Funds are limited, so therefore some ser-
Sices ma\ be limited or clients may be placed
on a waiting list..


No Time

S To See A
Doctor?
ri-County Family Health Care is
pen Tuesday evenings until 7 PNI
Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Board Certified Family Physician

may save $ on your prescriptions
us, when filled at Jackson's Drugs

Please call 850-948-2840
for more information

i-County Family Health Care
193 NW US 221
Greenville, Florida 32331
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.


Big Bend Cares Awarded Silver ADDY Award


Big Bend Cares, the local.
support agency for people in-
fected with or affected by
HIV/AIDS, was recently
awarded a Silver ADDY for
their AIDS Walk 2005 adver-
tising poster. At a dinner gala
held at FSU's ,University Cen-
ter Club on February 18th, Big
Bend Cares Board President
Brad Ray, BBC Executive Di-
rector Rob Renzi,' and graphic
designers Nathan and Tony
F- *t '.
in


Archer were present to receive
the aw ard from the Greater Tal-
lahassee Advertising Federa-
tion (GTAF).
The ADDY Awards hon-
or excellence in advertising
and cultivate the highest cre-
ative standards within the in-
dustry. Having scored the high-
est number of points in its cate-
gory, Nathan and Tony
Archer's work' on the AIDS
Walk 2005 poster will automat-


ically be entered into the Amer,-
ican Advertising Federation's
4th District ADDY Awards
competition.
Having recently started
their own freelance graphic de-
sign firm (Lorem Ipsum De-
sign Studio), Nathan and Tony
Archer are already busy at
work on Big Bend Cares' next.
major fundraising event- Ar-
topia: Art Zen, which-will be
held June 24, 2006.


1'


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Wednesday, June 7, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 13A



SCHOOL

IA _* A A . ......_a & A - n:^ A 1 ---^*A I


Madison Academy Students

Place In State Poster Contest


w nedacAn osidaM Presents Pia no Recit l


Mrs. Debbie's Paino Recital included, left to right, back row: Mrs. Debbie
Gilbert, Taylor Hudson, Abigail Blanton, Taylor Money, Sarah Baltzell, Amelia Blan-
ton, anrd Sarah Ashley. Front row, left to right: Kaleb Wyche (standing), Zackery Pe-
terson, Jim Flournoy, MckenzieWilliamson, John Flournoy, and Josua Wood. (Pho-
to submitted)


.*. i wnn m enw n ~ -M m--"an
Kailee Morris, second place state winner; C.J. Htnson, second place state
winner; and Gabrielle Aranda, third place state winner, placed in a state wide wa-
termelon poster contest with over 600 entries. (Photo submitted)


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The week of June 4-
10th, is National Florida
Watermelon Week.
The Florida Watermelon
Association (FWA)
launched a statewide mar-
keting campaign to increase
public awareness of the
-he.ilh .benefits of watermel-
'o n ei 1 , ( . "


One of the activities
sponsored by the FWA in-.
cluded a State Poster Con-
test. There were over 600
entries in grades kinder-
garten through fifth grade
throughout Florida.
Three students from
Madison Academy placed
statewide in the contest.
These okie-Mliding stii-
Sdents include .Kailee Morris,


a fifth grader at the Acade-
my; second place state win-
ner, C.J. Hinson, a, third
grade student, second place
state winner; and Gabrielle
Aranda, second grader, third
place state winner.
The students were pre-
sented their trophies at the
year-end Spirit Day
The. program was ,held
on Ma.i 2-hh.


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Friday, May 19, the
Madison Academy held
their piano recital at the
First Baptist Church.
There was an excellent
show of approximately 50
friend and relatives who at-
tended the recital.
The recital included pi-


ano students of Mrs.
Gilbert and two students of
Mr. Ron Chiarenza from
the Music Center in Live
Oak.
At the conclusion of the
recital, Mrs. Gilbert pre-
sented certificates to all of
her students. Each year, she
presents a special award to
an outstanding student.


This year's special award
was given to second grader,
Zackery Peterson for his
hard work and dedication.
Mrs. Debbie has been
teaching music at the Madi-
son Academy for over ten
years, as a music teacher
4K eighth grade and also
as a private voice and piano
teacher.


C.R.O.P. Students Meet

Legislators During Capitol Tour


Oh, No!


I Forgot To

Renew My

Subscription *

To The

Newspaper!


Don't Be Afraid!

Subscribe Today!

The Price For Both
The Madison County Carrier
And The Enterprise-Recorder
is Just $28.00 per Year In-County,
$35 per Year Out-of-County


I NEW RENEW
I I
IName
lAddress
I I
I I
ICity /State/Zip
IPhone# I
I I
Mail To: Greene Publishing, Inc., PO. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341

or bring by the Enterprise-Recorder office.
L . . . . . . . .


Rep. Will Kendrick poses for photo with Madison County High School students at
the Capitol in Tallahassee. (Photo submitted)


Local high school stu-
dents took a field trip to Talla-
hassee April 19th and 20th to
get an idea of what goes on
during a legislative session.
Young people in the College
Reach Out Program (CROP),
sponsored by North Florida
Community College, met with
state representatives Will
Kendrick (D,10) and Dwight
Stansel (D,11) during their
tour. Some watched legislators
discuss bills in house cham-
bers and others viewed activi-


ties celebrating Military Ap-
preciation Day. CROP case
manager Mary Frances
Mauldin and NFCC legisla-
tive liaison Gerri Bucher,
arranged the visit.
CROP helps students im-
prove grades, focus on school
requirements and. provides a
link between parents and
schools. CROP also offers op-
portunities for students to take
field trips, like the recent one
to Tallahassee, and enjoy col-
lege experiences.


CROP applications are
accepted any time during the
year. Students must meet cer-
tain economic and academic
eligibility requirements, but
there is no cost to. participate
in the program.
For more information in
Jefferson, Madison and Taylor
counties, contact Mary
Frances Mauldin at (850) 973-
9436; in Hamilton, Lafayette
and Suwannee counties con-
tact Lonnie Ford at (386)792-
8459.


C.R.O.P. students from Madison County High School meet with Rep. Dwight
Stansel in his office at the Capitol in Tallahassee. (Photo submitted)








14A Madison County Carrier www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, June 7, 2006



SCHOOL



Madison's Foundation for Excellence In Education Awards LES With Grant
~ .i-w i i, ./ *9, S." ;.


LES teacher, Susan Phillips, left, was pleased to have
NASA aquanaut/guest speaker, Dennis Chamberland,-
pictured left to right, to talk with students about the plan-
et's universe. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn,
Covell, May 16, 2006)


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing,-Inc.
In March, Susan Phillips,
Lee Elementary School's, (LES)
third through fifth grade sci-
ence teacher, wrote a grant and
submitted it to the Madison
County Foundation for Excel-
lence in Education. They gra-
ciqusly accepted it and granted
funds for all students at LES to
learn about space and the solar
system.
Third Graders Hosted
Astronomy Night
On April 28, the LES third
graders hosted an astronomy
night at the Madison County
High School (MCHS). Wayne
and Liane Wakefield were pre-
sent to point out all of the visi-
ble spring constellations and
planets. Excited and curious
participants were able to -see
Jupiter, Mars and even Saturn's
amazing rings! There were ap-
proximately 30 people at the
event and it was a huge hit with
the LES students and the com-
munity. Following, there will
be more astronomy nights to
come! ,
Students Enjoyed A Day
Designated To Space Literacy
On May 5, the LES stu-
dents and staff actively partici-
pated in a space literacy day.
All of the classes chose a spe-
cific topic related to space and
highlighted key points on the
particular topics of interest.
Many students learned po-
ems, songs and interesting facts
about planets, stars, the Interna-
tional Space Station and other
various space topics. The
neatest thing about .the event
was that all of the LES classes
had an opportunity to rotate and
visit each and every classroom.
NASA Visits LES
LES has been using their
grant for an assortment of dif-
ferent activities for the students
to participate in and-take part
in. The grant was used for vari-
ous things including to invite
guest speaker, Dennis Cham-
berland, an aquanaut for
NASA, to come to Lee Ele-
mentary.
On May 16, LES wel-
comed Dennis Chamberland of
NASA. All of the classes came
in and listened to him as he pro-
vided students with power
point presentations about the
planets and the new rockets that
will replace the Space Shuttle
program. He also described
what it is like to live in a life
habitat under the ocean. His
wife, also an aquanaut, accom-
panied him with the presenta-
tion.
LES Fourth Graders Held
Space Science Fair
Another Dart of the grant


"'" ?.IW .k
LES fourth grade stu-
dent, Darby Thompson,
took home the first place
ribbon for her science fair
project on static electricity.
(Photo submitted)
was used to purchase presen-
tation boards for a fourth
grade space science fair. On
May 18, all LES fourth
graders were required to pre-
sent a project about space,
earth science or forces of mo-
tion. The purpose for this par-
ticular project was to teach
students about the Scientific
Method. The LES students
that received ribbons included
first place winner; Darby
Thompson for her project on
static electricity; second place
winner, Olivia Murphy for her
project on solar energy and
color; and third place winner,
Colby Panaro for his solar hot
dog cooker. Honorable men-
tions were. awarded to Nicole
Davis, Daniella Floyd, Jodi
Phillips and Ashley Donald-
son. The space science fair
was rightly judged by Bern
Smith and M.J. Kinard.
Fifth Graders
Demonstrated Newton's
Laws Of Motion
Finally, the last part of the
grant was designated for the
LES fifth grade to construct
and launch their very own wa-
ter bottle rockets. The funds
were used to purchase a
launcher and provide students
with the appropriate materials
to build the rockets. On May
18, the rockets were launched
before the entire school! John
Henry Phillips and his son,
Bryan, assisted the fifth
graders as they launched their
rockets. The primary purpose
of this event was to teach the
fifth graders about Newton's
laws of motion.
Lee Elementary students
and staff would to thank the
Madison County Foundation
for Excellence in Education
for the generous grant, that
they bestowed to the school
for making these fun, educa-
tional experiences possible for
the students. They all learned
an assortment of facts about
space and look forward to do-
ing something like this again
in the future!


LES students, Nicki Thompkins, Callie Henderson
and Auston Lyons, pictured left to right, were excited as
could be to hear the tales of a real live astronaut. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, May 16, 2006)


LES fifth grade students, Blaise Mendheim, Josh A set of outstanding LES fifth graders, Dalton Tulk,
Brooks and Shane Coody, pictured left to right, had fun Bryce Swilley and Jared Kinard, pictured left to right,
shooting off their hand constructed water bottle rocket. have used their own hands to construct these rockets
(Photo submitted) that were launched May 18 at LES. (Photo submitted)


Our


Dining Out Guide

is your "menu" of

great places to eat!


Where the Locals Eat!





-Featluring Primre Rib, Steaks Grilledi Seafood
-USDA Cluuc.7 Beef ctia ft'sh daii~iioni premi?~.se
I trnoLl-; fo!,-(3re-11i I.'d ,l tGr"Itf &r.t
E xti-PiqEW1% 11' L :,i I,,-j E,,'pa h* wc r ,3 ~ i,
-Pre,,,gum 1%el4 J~jpjT10ir ,. J jr..- 7 p,., -.por,r-Bar
*229-259-9333

A-1II.bk Open 7 dv. Iv week im lunch and dinner ~.
L.~~~~~~~~~~1 n.nlOipO-.~~ T.rJ~ I f,,,.jIi.CQP- 1I,.j.1 .".t


U*w^^l
j^ 'y-B

w^^^^l


Wr IVr V
1Bric
Ovenf.Hi^^


,Red- Moa''A'taiw.Grill
-------- --- --------------
:,Buy One Dinner & TeceiVe 2nd Dinner:
Of Equal or Lesser, Value Free

Excludes any other discount offer &
T-Bone offer.'(Plea.se Present Coupon) I

*Red Mountain Griffe
-------------- ------- ---------------
3460 Madison Hwy. Valdosta, GA. (229) 293-0008


Oie Times CouniLry Buffet

Soup, Salad & Fruit Bar With Lunch Buffet
Hand Cut Top Sirloin Steaks On Buffet Nightly!
, 7 i-Banquet Facilities Aiailable

(229) 253-1600
1193 N. St. Augustine Road, Valdosta, GA
MasterCard/Visa/American Express/Discover





All-U-Can-Eat Buffet
Ribeye, Crab legs, Seafood,
Vegetables, Bakery,
& Desserts
All Baked Fresh Daily
Open Eviydavy ,r Lunchi & Dinner
1550 Ba tree Rd Vahdosta, Ga.
229-253-1119
"Let ouir friendly staff serve vOilt"

Enjoy some great home style cooking!

Rpd Onion Grill
1-10 & Exit 262 Lee, Florida 850-971-4240
Sunday Special $6.99
Choice of
Fried Chicken or Baked Ham
Choice of
Cornbread Dressing or Rice & Gravy
Choice of 2 Veggies: *-
Steamed Cabbage, Candied Yams, Blackeyed Peas __
-Served with Cornbread!-
Add a trip to our Salad Bar $1.99-
Hotdog & Fries $2.99 Enjoy Our
Hamburger & Fries $4.99 Salad Bar Every Day! Q









Mullet Grouper Catfish Shrimp
Scallops Clams Swamp Cabbage
OYSTERS RAW OR FRIED
Hwy. 98 West Perry, FL

850-584-4966









Wednesday, June 7, 2006 www.greenepublishing.com Madison County Carrier 15A



SCHOOL


Pacific Intercultural

Exchange Looking For

Caring Host Families
Pacific Intercultural Ex-
change is looking for caring
families to host high school
students from various coun-
tries for the 2006-2007 acad-
emic school year. There are
few opportunities in this
world where an individual All the students are pre-
can take an active hand in screened: they speak English;
making the world a better have medical insurance, and
place. This is such an oppor- their own spending money
tunity. It is the time of year for any incidental costs. All
when the holidays are ap- these students require is a
preaching and Americans loving family to share their
everywhere are considering experience within our beauti-
opening their hearts to their ful country. Help them learn
friends and neighbors. Pacif- the meaning of "Life, Liber-
ic Intercultural Exchange (P. ty, and the Pursuit of Happi-
I.E.) asks local families to ness.'
consider showing one of P.I.E is looking for host
these foreign teens what families in your area. Those
American generosity is all who are interested are urged
about. Students from many to contact Pacific Intercultur-
countries have been staying al Exchange right away at
with families all over the 877-534-3144. Experience is
United States since-August, not necessary, as an orienta-
and now a new group of in- 'tion and support will be pro-
ternational neighbors would vided.
like to add a little more to the Please help P.I.E. make
community and leave in June the dreams of these young,
with American passion, pride teens come true, with the op-
and sense of values. portunity to live and study in
There is no such thing as our country, and possibly aid
a typical host family. in making a difference in
Whether you are a single par- their future and the future of
ent, retired, have small chil- the world.
dren, teens, or no children at BRING THE WORLD
all, anyone can have a great TO YOUR DOORSTEP -
experience hosting an ex- ONE EXCHANGE AT A
change student. TIME!




Experience the world:
Open your heart and home to a
foreign exchange student. PI.E. needs loving host
families in your community. Volunteers also needed
to help place and mentor foreign teens from around
the world. Call Pat Littrell today at 1-877-534-3144
or PI.E. at 1-888-PIE-USA-1.

MMMI


BETTER
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Summer Special First Month r.
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850-878&q245
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Madison Academy Graduates


Eleven Students


The Madison Academy graduated eleven students at its Graduation and HonorsProgram May 25. The
event was held at the First Baptist Church of Madison.
Graduates included: back row, left to right: William Tyler Kelley; Joshua ScottTimmons; KyleTravis Sweatt;
General Elee Gene Storey; and Booke Alexis Bezick.
Front row, left to right: Amanda Beth Gordon; Tyler Sullivan Land; Brooke Hollie Stewart; Travis Wade
Strickland; Katrina Colby Jessup; and Zacchary Taylor Salsgiver.
Homeroom teacher for the graduating class was Ms. Michelle Peacock.
Head Mistress at the Madison Academy is Mrs. Willa Branham. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald


Greene Kinsley, May 25, 2(
By: Mary Ellen Greene
The Madison Academy
honored its Class ,of 2006
with a Graduation and Honors
Program May 25 at the First
Baptist Church of Madison.
The program began witlh
a Processional of the' fourth-
eighth grade classes.
A Devotional was given
by Abigail Vasquez; a prayer
by Rebekah Miller; 'and the
pledge was led by Sadie
Stokes.
Mrs. Willa Branham,
Head Mistress, welcomed the
parents and guests. Special
music was give by the 6th,
and 7th grade classes, and by
Mrs. Debbie Gilbert.
Mrs. Janna Barrs, the
fourth grade teacher, told of
the awards criteria .and gave
the fourth grade awards. Fifth
grade awards were given by
teacher, Mrs. Kim WhigLam;
sixth grade awards by Mrs.
Branham; seventh grade
awards by Ms. JerriAnn Gray;
and eighth grade awards by'
Ms. Michelle Peacock.
Mrs. Tonja Davis, Presi-
dent of the Board of Directors
spoke to the audience and the
school about its activities.
Mrs. Linda Bezick pre-
sented the eighth grade spe-
cial Presidential Academic
Excellence Award and the
History Award to Brooke Hol-
lie Stewart, the class valedic-
torian.
The Class of 2006 Madi-
son Academy Salutary Award
was given by Mrs. Branham


in a b.b~d.UW



ivilleronrd
Bolded WI~aler9


peeke(~d at
th pice.,


to Josh Timmons, who then
gave his Salutatorian Address.
Mrs. Branham then an-
nounced the Valedictory
Award winner Brooke Stew-
art, who gave an outstanding
.VdiledictoriaLi Address. '" "
The presentation of diplo-
ma's were done by Mrs. Davis
and Mrs. Peacock.
The Rev. John Peterson
gave the Benediction, after
which the Class of 2006
marched out the auditorium to
the strains of the Recessional.
Class of 2006 Madison
Academy graduates include:
*Brooke Alexis Bezick;
Amanda Beth Gordon; *Kat-
rina Colby Jessup; William
Tyler Kelley; Tyler Sullivan
Land; *Zacchary Taylor Sals-
giver; *Brooke Hollie Stew-
art; *General Elee Gene
Storey; Travis Wade Srick-
land; Kyle Travis Sweatt; and
*Joshua Scott Timmons.
(* Denotes BETA Club
Members/or Honor Gradu-
ates, (those with all A's and/or
B's, and an overall 90 average


for grades sixth through surer Glenn Strickland; Sec-
eighth.) retary Melinda Smith; Mem-
Board of Directors at the bers At Large Joe Blanton;
Madison Academy are: Presi- Jinm Flournoy; Steve Odiorne;
dent: Tonja Davis; Vice-Presi- Conniie Peterson and Johnny
dent Annette' Johnson; Trea-' Stevens.


ft5'


*
Leading the Madison Academy Class of 2006 in
academics are: Brooke Stewart, Valedictorian, left;
and Josh Timmons, Salutatorian. They each received
special awards for their achievements. (Greene Pub-
lishing, Inc. photo by Emerald Greene Kinsley)


THE PUBLIC IS INVITED
to a meeting on the establishment of


MFLs
(Minimum Flows & Levels)
for the

Middle Suwannee

River and Springs

Monday, June 12, 2006
7:00 p.m.
Branford Elementary School
26801 State Road 247, Branford


MFLs are water levels and flows designed to
prevent significant harm to water resources.

The purpose of the meeting is to provide
information and to receive public comment.

Hosted by:

Suwannee River
Water Management District


ij TW


...the perfect time for NFCC


New Classes


Start June 26
Summer Term IIIB
NFCC Campus Madison, Fla


REGISTER NOW. CALL TODAY.
North'
oid w 850.973.1622

I www.nfcc.edu


ALM









I C) A nN4l, c n Cniintv C-r rifipr


www~greenenublishini!.comn


Wednesday Tune 7. 2006


I ~ADd I ~, '


-Mil -
lml-i--
- -


TILE FLOORING
Selling your home?
Beautiful tile floors
will practically sell
the house for you!
Quality work at a
reasonable and
affordable price.
15 years experience.
Call Greg at
404-914-7443

Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326
Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848


I Clean For You!
Rentals Offices Homes
$10 hour References Available
Pet care available in your home.
850-971-5684

Custom embroidery service on
uniforms, golf shirts, T- shirts, hats,
bags, afghans. Free logo digitizing
with order. No minimum. Busi-
ness logo, team logo, personaliza-
tion and monogramming. For in-
formation contact nfcraftand-
stuff@vahoo.com or call 850 948
7042 -





AUCTION
Saturday, June 10th at 6:30PM
1693 SW Mosley Hall Rd.
(CR360) Madison, Florida
SUMMER COOKOUT
STARTS AT 5:30PM
We Buy Truckloads From Major
Retailers. If you haven't been to
one of our Auctions, you are Miss-
ing out on the 'Greatest Buys
Around!
LOTS OF FUN & GIVEAWAYS
Directions From 1-10: Take SR14
SW to stop sign. Turn right on
SR14/360 until "fork in road and
bear right onto SW Mosley Hall
Rd.(CR360). Past fire house, on
left. From Perry: Take RT 221
North to CR 360 (SW Mosley Hall
Rd) Turn Right, we are about 8
miles on the right.





Estate Sale
June 9th & 10th
9 a.m. 5 p.m.
June 11th
1 p.m. 5 p.m.
411 US 221 South, Greenville
Furniture, appliances, nicknacks;
and all household furnishings; for
more information call: 948-8951
Quality Garage Sale
Sat. June 10th
9 a.m. till 12 noon
235 NE Range Ave, Madison, FL
Nice Clothes, Linens, Household
Goods & Accessories.





Free House
Old House to be dismantled or re-
moved in Greenville on 221. Call
352-726-0046 ask for Bob or Joan.


Moving?
2 51bs. of Clean
Bundled
Newspapers
$2 each.
850-973-4141






Wanted peafowl. Need one ma-,
ture male now before spring, but
will buy pairs if needed. Call 85,0-
973-6131 or 850-464-1165. Also
want guineas.




I
Planted Pines Wanted For Straw
Operation. Call Tippette Farms
971-5495. Minimum 20 acres
please.


LAND WANTED
400 to 600 acres of land in
the vicinity of Madison.
Phone Tommy
850-973-4141.







Please Help!!
Our Elderly neighbor has had a se-
vere stroke and sadly will not be
able to come back home. He has
three medium dogs who were his
*loyal: and loving' companions.
These dogs are now in desperate
need of good homes. We all have
dogs of our own and are unable to
provide for these dogs. If you think
you would like to have one of these
great dogs, and can provide for
them, please call Debbie at 850-
948-6993





'(3) FOR RENT
(1) 2 bedroom doublewide that's 2
miles from the city. No more than
three people. (2) Small 1 bedroom
trailer, for single person. (3) Also.
have a small house for single per-
son. No calls past 9 p.m. please!
850-973-6991
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Se-
nior's and Disabled. 1 & 2 bed-
rooms, HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 TTY Acs
711
Equal Housing Opportunity


reenville Pointe

apartments
1,2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. HUD vouchers accept-
ed. Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity


L m
... '" t;
^-"--jL--sl I-M I'


DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.


Field Service Techs



* Company provided truck & tools

* Paid training-no experfince required

" Great advancement opportunities

* Medical & Dent

* Paid vacations



Positions throughout Florida
For details and to apply online go to:

www.careersatdrs.com


Services"


Id CmNDtAUCTewodN


I* Gated Community Fleetwood, NC
SMountain Lots with Views of NC, VA, TN
S90% Fiandng On Spot


Items For Sale


www.greenepublishing, com














Once-in-a-Lifetime Opportunity!

FREE TRAINING! FREE TRAINING!

-Interested in a Health Care Career?

-Love older people and people of all ages in need
of care?

-Always wanted to work in nursing?

-Want to be a CNA but can't afford it?

-Got your high school diploma or GED?

-Got a clear record?

-Are you at least 18 years old?

-We provide training at no cost to you!*


-Will Pay for Certification Exam!*.

Lake Park of Madison is looking for compassion-
ate, quality-minded, self-starters willing to take an
intensive 10-day course at no charge* that pre-
pares you for the State of Florida CNA certifica-
tion examination. If successful in passing the
course, you are eligible for a job at Lake Park of
Madison until you can get your CNA certificate.***

The next CNA Exam prep course is offered every
day for 2 weeks, Mon-Fri 8:00-5:00 starting Mon-
day July 10, 2006. at 8:00 a.m. and ending with a
graduation ceremony on Friday, July 21, 2006.
The course is offered at Lake Park of Madison
Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 259 SW
Captain Brown Road, Madison, FL.

If interested, please call 850-973-8277, Human
Resources Department.

-must pass course for free tuition
-*must get certification for free certification exam
-**must get certification within 60 days of hire


Lake Park of Madison is an Equal Opportunity
Employer and adheres to requirements of Title VII
of the Civil Rights Act in selecting employment
candidates and employees


Preview Property
on June 4, 10, 1 1,
17 81 18 ...


2bdrm/l bath MH in park on
Highway 53 in Madison,
$135/wk includes electric, ten-
ant to pay for propane.
Call Erin Levin -.
at 850-570-0459


Qouthem Illas of

C adison apartments

HUD vouchers accepted. 1,2, & 3
BR, HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call 850-973-8582/ TDDTTY 711.
200 Southern Villas Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity.

._ _",-,,- --__N -- -_

^ r-i. .. .... .. -....

192 ACRES OF PRIME
HUNTING PROPERTY
(Madison County)
Four Star Hunt Camp, Virgin
Timber, 8 Cabins, Huge Cook-
house, Fully Equipped Work-
shop w/3 Bays, Tractor, Four
Wheeler, Completely Furnished,
HVAC, I/M, Washer/Dryer,
Satellite TV, No Expense
Spared. For sale by owner
$1.75M. 863-634-3340

Cherry Lake Area
Charming 2br/lbth, all wood interi-
or house, on six lovely acres. This
home has a working fireplace, 2 en-
closed porches, new roof all for
$140,000.
Peggy Ball Realtor 850-228-3721


Office Building For sale by owner.
Range Ave. Madison, FL. 1168 sf.
0.17 Ac., fenced. $157,655. Shown
By Appointment Only. 850-973-
4353.





The Madison County Sheriff's
Office is. accepting applications.
for a full-time LPN to iork in the
county jail. A current/active Flori-
da nursing license is required. Du-
ties include care of county prison-
ers, setting doctors appointments,
and being a liaison between doc-
tors, pharmacists, and jail staff.
This will be 40 hours per week po-
sition with on-call time. Benefits
include-health insurance, life insur-
ance, Florida retirement, sick and
vacation time. Starting salary will
be $15 per hour. Applications avail-
able at the Madison County Sher-
iff's Office, Courthouse, Monday-
Friday 8 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The
Madison County Sheriff's Office is
an EOE; drug free work place.


FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENT, On TV.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS


(800) 794-7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements! .


IWA IVIaUISUII %-,UUIILV Vd.111CI vv VV VVOSJL%,%,JLK%,F""JLJLYJLJLAJLJLS.%"%-PJLJLJL v T %%All%-OkAcLy, _I LAX I WW


Waste/Recycling Department is ac-
cepting applications for two (2).
Part-Time Collection Center Atten-
dants. Major responsibilities will
include the opening and closing of
the collection center; assisting res-
idents with proper disposal and re-
cycling techniques, as well aas the
distribution of educational material.
Attendant must maintain center
grounds in a neat and orderly fash-
ion. Applicants must have the abili-
ty to establish and maintain a posi-
tive working relationship with resi-
dents who use the Drop-Off Center.
Employee must report any prob-
lems and concerns to the office of
the Solid Waste Coordinator. Other
related duties may be required and
assigned by the Administrative
Staff. A 30-35 work week is re-
quired with flexible hours a must,
to cover week ends and holiday
time schedules.. Salary starts at
$6.53 per hour. The positions will
remain open -until positions are
filled. For additional information
contact the Solid Waste Office at
850-973-2611. A completed Madi-
son County Employment Applica-
tion is required. Madison County is
an equal opportunity employer and
a Drug Free Workplace. All appli-
cations must be submitted to the
following address by Friday, June
16, 2006 at 5:00 p.m.

Madison County Board of Com-
missioners
Att: AllenCherry
Courthouse Anneox. Room 219
112 E. Pirckine, St.' -
P.O. Bu;x3' .
Madison, Fl. 32341
850-973-3179

Person Needed For
Advertising Sales at:
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Does a fast-paced career with
a growing newspaper group
spark your interest? Do you
enjoy customer contact, both
Sin person and -over the
phone? Then, it's a safe bet
you will enjoy this job. We're
fun, we're busy and work
best under pressure. If that
sounds like you, please. fax
your resume to Emerald at:
850-973-4121 or apply in
person at the office on Hwy
53 South. Please, if you're
not sure how an alarm clock
works or you average more
than three dramatic incidents
per week in your life, or sim-
ply only work because you're
bored, then PLEASE DO
NOT APPLY.

Drivers & Contractors:
Home through the week!
Drop & Hook Loads!
Great Pay/Benefits!
CDL-A, 3yrs exp.
browntrucking.com
770-344-2028
HOUSE SUPERVISOR
FULL TIME
Must be RN with Manager Exp.
and good clinical skills. Please con-
tact Amelia Tompkins at 386-362-
7860. Or apply in person at Suwan-
nee Health Care Center, 1620 E.
Helvenston St, Live Oak, FL.
EOE/D/V/M/F

Kountry Kitchen
Now Hiring Servers
850-971-0024

$$ AVON $$
Be your own Boss!
Earn 50%
Sell $500, earn $250
Starter Kit is only $10
Call Dorothy 973-3153


ICANNI


As seen


PART-TIME LIBRARY AID H
LEE PUBLIC LIBRARY
Madison County is currently seek-
ing applicants for the position of
regular part-time Library Aide II at
the Lee Public Library. The appli-
cant will work approximately 8
hours per week and also be used as
a substitute. Minimum qualifica-
tions include graduation from a
standard high school, ability to type
.and experience with Internet and
computer software. Library and/or
experience working with children
and youth are desired. Salary is
$6.80 to $10.24 per hour depending
on qualifications and experience.
Interested applicants may obtain an
application at the Madison,
Greenville, or Lee Public Libraries,
or at the Suwannee County Admin-
istrative Services Department, 224
Pine Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064,
telephone (386) 362-6869. Appli-
cants are encouraged to submit re-
sumes, letters or reference and oth-
er biographical information with
their applications. All applications
must be returned to the Administra-
tive Services Department in Live
Oak. Position will remain open un-
til filled. All applicants subject to
drug testing prior to employment.
EEO/AA/V/D.

RECEPTIONIST

General office and secretarial
work. Greeting and providing gen-
eral information to the public, filing
and typing. Will be responsible for
answering the telephone and direct-
ing calls appropriately or take
down written messages, greet the
public and answer question of a
general nature or direct to appropri-
ate person, typing correspondence
and/or reports as needed, filing and
management of filing system, oper-
ation of office machines and other
similar duties as requested by su-
pervisor. Requirements for this po-
sition include the following:
Knowledge or ability to learn office
procedures and 'office equipment,
knowledge of business communi-
cation both verbal and written, abil-
ity to understand and follow verbal
and written instructions, ability to
communicate effectively with vari-
ous individuals, ability to establish
good. working relationships and
work as a team with other staff,
ability to type 35 words per minute,
and have a High School Diploma or
GED/equivalent. To apply for this
position please fill out a Madison
County Board of Commissioners
Employment Application, and a
Background Check Form. You can
pick up an application at the Madi-
son County Board of County Com-
missioners Administrative Office
located in the Court House Annex,
229 SW Pinckney Street, Room
219, Madison, Florida. For further
questions please contact Allen
Cherry, Interim County Coordina-
tor at (850) 973-3179. Applications
deadline is Monday, June 19, 2006
@ 5:00 P.M.

Madison County is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer and a Drug
Free Workplace.
Now Hiring
Fence & Deck Installers Trans-
portation, Experience and Desire to
Work a Must. Only Qualified Ap-
plicants Accepted. Call 850-973-
3422
Madison County
Memorial Hospital
LPN & RN positions available
Medical Floor & ER
Full-time & PRN
850-973-2271



EmI t


Tractor Work
free estimates
NO JOB TOO SMALL
Mowing, Discing, tilling and box
blading. Call 973-6326.
Need a helping hand?
Gardening, housekeeping, rental
cleanup or any odd jobs done for
reasonable prices in Madison area.
Call 850-508-2164.

rOBSATYOUHi

FINGERTIPS I


I


I











Wednesday. Tune 7, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 17A


LEGAL LE* LS LGA s


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 2006-216-CA
DIVISION:

CHARLIE ARNOLD, JR. and
MAZIE ARNOLD,

Plaintiffs,

vs.

CLAYTON T. MCWILLIAMS, JR. a/Ika C.T.
MCWILLIAMS, JR., if living, and all unknown
parties claiming by, through, under or and against
the above named defendants who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may
claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, or other claimants; VESS PROPERTIES,
a Florida general partnership; and CREDITHRIFT,
INC., a Florida corporation,


Defendants.


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: CLAYTON T. MCWILLIAMS, JR. a/k/a.C.T. MCWILLIAMS, JR, if living, and all
unknown parties claiming, by, through, under or and against the above named defen-
dants who are not known to be dear or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim
an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants, VESS PROPERTIES,
a Florida general partnership, and CREDITHRIFT, INC., a Florida corporation, or any
parties claiming any right title or interest in the property herein


YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to Quiet Title to real prop-
erty in the Circuit Court in Madison, Madison County, Florida styled as Case No.: 2006-
216-CA, Charlie Arnold, Jr. and Mazie Arnold vs. Clayton T. McWilliams, Jr., et al. to
the property described as:


THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND,
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE COUNTY OF MADISON, STATE
OF FLORIDA, TO WIT:

START AT SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF
(SW 1.4) OF NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW_) OF SECTION 28, TOWN-
SHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN"
RIGHT OF WAY OF SR S-360-A OPPOSITE STATION 171+64.5;
THENCE RUN NORTH 0 DEG. 04.7' E ST I FOOT TO NORTH RIGHT
OF %% Y LINE OF SAID ROAD: THENCE SOUTH 88 DEG. 24' 22" WEST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE 50 FEET TO WEST SIDE OF A
STREET; THENCE NORTH 9 DEG. 04.7' EAST 170.62 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEG. 55.3' WEST 210 FEET TO EAST SIDE OF A 50 FOOT
STREET AT POINT OF BEGINNING OF LOT 14: THENCE NORTH 9.
DEG. 04.7' E AST 80 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 55.3' EAST 11)'0
FEET;THENCE SOUTH 0 DEG. 04.7' WEST 811 FEET: THENCE NORTH ,
89 DEG. 55.3. WEST 100 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO
KNOWN AS A LOT NUMBER FOURTEEN (14) OF OAK ESTATES, AN
UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION IN MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

BEING,THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO VESS PROPERTIES
BY DEED FROM FREDERICK D. SMITH RECORDED 12/04/1985 IN
DEED BOOK 156 PAGE 163, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA


has been filed by Charlie Arnold, Jr. and Mazie Arnold, Plaintiffs and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses if any, to it on William S. Frazier, 1919-8 Bland-
ing Boulevard, Jacksonville, Florida 32210, 904-384-1441 on or before July 7, 2006, and
file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on said Plaintiffs or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a judgment will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Petition.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 30 day of May, 2006.

TIM SANDERS -Clerk of the Court
:By: Romona Dickinson
'.. .. .. Deputy Clerk

6/7, 6/14


NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83. PART IV

Under the Authority of the Self-Servicing Storage Facility Act, Section 83.805 the de-,
scribed below has been seized for nonpayment of rent and other accrued expenses. Prop-
erty consists primarily of household goods in units rented by: Tanya Butler, and Brian N.
English. The property will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the
Self-Storage Facility Act, Section 83.806. The sale will be held Friday, June 23, 2006 at
10:00 A.M., at the Madison Mini Storage, 1098 East US. 90, in Madison, Florida. For
further information call 971-5744.

6/7. 6/14



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION


IN RE: ESTATE OF



WESLEY MATTHEW SULLIVAN,

Deceased,


File Number: 0622-CP

Division:


NOTICE TO CREDITORS


The administration of the estate of WESLE .TAITHEll E SULLIVAN, de-
ceased. File Numbetr 022-CP pending in the Circuit Courl for Madison County, Flori-
da. Probate Division. the address, of hbich is P.O. Box 23"'. Madison. Florida 32341. The
names and address of the Personal Representarti~ and ihe Personal Representariet's al-
Iorney ar* set forth belu".
All credilors of the dlcdent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estalt, including unmarured. contingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom acopy of hiis 6orice is strtd must file their claims nnh this Court 1,ITHIN THE
LATER OF3 MONTHS F FIER THE DATE OF rTHE FIRST PUBLICATION Of THlI
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the deidenl and other pers-onis hainp claims or de-
mands against dsecdenLs estate, including unmarured. contingent or unliquidated claims.
must file their claims with this court % %ITHIN 3 MONTHS %,FTER THE D %TE OF THE
FIRST PUIBLIC.ATION OF THIS NOTICE.
\L L CLLAIIS NOT SO FILED WILl BE FORE\ETR BARRED.
The dateof the irst puhlicatino.n ihis Notice is lune 7. 20ub


/s/ EVELYN M. FLETCHER
Attorney for Personal Representative

Florida Bar No. Q162744


/s/ JOHN SULLIVAN
Personal Representative
P. 0O. Box 92
Pinetta, Florida 32350


6/7, 6/14





HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR

TRAINING FOR EMPLOYMENT


BID NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commissioners of Madison County,
Florida will be accepting sealed bids for the following:

Furnishing all needed materials, equipment, labor and supervision to: widen and resur-
face Madison County Road NE County Road CR-255 for a distance of 5.5 miles and
known as Project Number 2006 04; and placing new asphalt road surfaces on NE Beu-
lah Church Road for a distance of 3 miles and SE Farm Road for a distance of 1.939 miles
(road base to be prepared by Madison County), and known as Project Number 2006 05.
Please note that these are two separate projects and bidders may bid one or both.

Sealed bids may be submitted to the Board of County Commissioners by depositing same
at the Board office located in the Madison County Courthouse Annex, Room 219, 112
'East Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida 32340, or Post Office Box 539, Madison, Florida
32341, anytime prior to 5:00 PM on Wednesday, June 28, 2006. ANY BIDS RECEIVED
AFTER SUCH DATE AND TIME WILL NOT BE OPENED OR CONSIDERED. Sealed
bids must be clearly marked as a sealed bid and the bid number must be printed on the
outside of the front of each envelope as follows: Resurfacing/Widening NE County Road
CR-255, Project Number 2006 04; and Placing Asphalt Road Surfaces on NE Beulah
Church Road and SE Farm Road, Project Number 2006 05. Each project bid must be
placed in a separate envelope and marked as described above.

BID MUST CONTAIN A COPY OF THE VENDOR'S MADISON COUNTY OCCUPA-
TIONAL LICENSE WHERE APPLICABLE, OR CERTIFIED STATE CONTRACTOR
NUMBER TO BE CONSIDERED FOR AWARD.

Bid Plans and Specifications, as well as other pertinent documents, may be obtained from
the Madison County Public Works/Road Department office located at 2060 NE Rocky
Ford Road
(C-591), 2 miles north of Madison, telephone # 850-973-2156, beginning June 8, 2006.
Each contractor interested in bidding these projects is strongly urged to obtain copies of
the bid package prior to the pre-bid conference in order to have time to review them and
visit the project locations. Copies of Plans and Specifications will be available for inspec-
inon ai hlih County Commission Office during regular office hours beginning on June 8,
2006.

Please be advised that a mandatory pre-bid conference will be held on Tuesday, June 20,
2006 atl 1:00 PM in the County Commission Meeting Room located in the Madison Coun-
ty Courthouse Annex Building, 112 E. Pinckney Street in Madison, Florida. BIDS WILL
NOT BE CONSIDERED FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT REPRESENTED AT
THIS CONFERENCE. Madison County reserves the right to waive any informality or
to 'reject any or all bids.

Bids will be opened at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, June 29, 2006, after which all bids will
be available for public inspection. Award by the Board of County Commissioners is
s scheduled for Wednesday, July 5 2006 and all vendors will be notified in writing of the
successful bidder.


6.7. i6/9. 114. 6.'16


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF

PHILLIP DALE FRANKLIN
File No. 2006-49-CP
Division
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Phillip Dale Franklin, deceased, whose
date of death was April 1, 2006 and whose Social Security Number is 261-02-7636, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is P.O. Box 237, Madison, Florida 32340. The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claim, or dr ;
mands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court \lIHIN 3.H
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABO\ E. A .N
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DI T E OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
.. ;. ::.. Thedate of fir publication fl' his noinci -i l Ma 31. 2Ill16.


DARBY, PEELE, BOWDOIN & PAYNE
Attorney for Personal Representative:
By: /s/M. Blair Payne
Florida Bar No. 0342378
285 N. E. Hernando Ave.
P. 0. Drawer 1707
Lake City, FL 32056-1707
Telephone: 386-752-4120

1/31.6/7


Personal Representative:
/s/ Phillip Dale Franklin, H

4854 NW County Road 146
Jennings, Florida 32053


Rhi L i Of Redr Statewid!J





PlaceAn ANFAdvrtseet yaalig;May lenGreeGrenaubisinIn.a85)97-44


Announcements
Is Stress Ruining Your Relation-
stup-,' Bu\ and Read DLANETICS
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Financial
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WANT HOME MOST WEEK-
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. DRIVERS $1500.00 bonus every 6
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Computer Required. Ecellcnt Ca-
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Only i80u1ji344-9036 Eit. 700.

INTERESTED IN A POSTAL JOB.
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Sales
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Instruction
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Lots & Acreage
MULTI-PROPERTY A\UCION
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ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from home. *Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Computers *Criminal


Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer provided. Financial Aid
it qualified Call 1866iS5S-212!
in wit O eldtl t,.' i, i'rT c/l.co'n

WOLFF TANNING BEDS Bu\
Dtrett and Sa\e! Full Bod> units
trom $22 a month' FREE Color
Cataldog CALL TODA.-Y' 00iS42--
1305 un n up Iii.fcrh,~n.'omi.

Real Estate
TENNESSEE GRAND OPEN-
ING' Swan Ridge Lake Re-ort, a
pri.aile. gated conmunits ,ithi
both lake-i tew and mountain-v'ie\
homesites. Lois starting at
$29.9010 CALL TODAY!
t9312-243-4,- 71 ,in s uo 1L dJ /t .e-
1 c-i b'pc'111t t'itiin

BEALITIFULL N. CAROLINA ES-
CAPE TO BEAUTIFUL \WEST-
ERN NC MOUNTAINS. FREE
COLOR BROCHURE & INFOR-
MNITION MOUNTAIN PROPER-
TIES \V/ SPECTACULAR
VIEWS HOMES. CABINS.
CREEKS & INVESTMENT
ACREAGE Cherokee NMluntain
GMAC Real Estate ._/ir,-




BENT TREE Golf and Tenrnis. G.-ti-
ed Comimuni, in the Noitih Ge. i-
gia MNountain-.. .i h Clutbhouse,
Pools. Lake. Stable. Home. arnd
Lots a ailable Craft. Inc
(iS 1-i 822-1966
www.craftrealestate. coin.

North Carolina Cool Mountain Air,
Views & Streams, Homes, Cabins
& Acreage. FREE BROCHURE
(800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy
317 Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C.
28906. www.realtvofinurph-v.com.

6.24 Acres! Excellent Investment
Opportunity Property. 1-95 & Hwy
17, First Exit in Florida. Joins 95
Ramp, 15 minutes JAX Interna-
tional. 1.6m obo (904)321-2679.


Mortgage Brokers/ loan officess'
branch managers- read) to take the
ne\ step in Nout mortgage career"
it i 1 GET9OPERCENT.com.

EUFAULA. AL WATERFRONT
1/2 to 3 acres from the 40's. Gated
with Planned clubhouse. docks.
and boat ramp 2 hours from At-
lana & the coast. Rolling terrain.
beautiful hardssoods. l!66'8S2-
1107.

LAKEFRONT PARCELS FOR
SALE Gorgeous lakefront and
%lev. lots. .A'.esome '.ie\\.. On
46K acre Lake Barkle\. 9t0 nun to
Nah illc. Gieat for 2nd&retirement
home I to 40+ acres from die
$40's Call i8h66133Q-4966

TN- CLIMBERLAND PLATEAU
I to 5 acie parcel, tioin the $-40's
Anti.: ing iolling \i a ile\s Close
to parks & likes Planned club-
house, nature tails. Call for appi
i;,i661292-5769

\A MOUN-TAINS 5 acres o\ith
fr.i-inIage ,on eti large pristine
creek. .er', pn'. aic excellent lisli-
ing. can,.ecing. good access, rear
New Ri'.er Trail State Park.
$31' 5ii) Owner i.66is'9-9535
II1 t W 'l lil'lllll,.IttlI -l A '1 ,*"P '

Ist YEARS PAYMENTS ARE ON
US"' Dcckable Lakefiont Lots
fiom s149 90111' 1+ Acre Lake Ac-
cess Lots from 49,900! Giant
72,000 acre lake only 2 hrs from
Atlanta. Next available showing on
Saturday, June 24th. Call for your
appointment NOW! (877)426-
2326 X. 1344. *Sonme restrictions
apply. Qualified buyers only. Rates
and terms subject to change w/o
notice. Offer void where prohibited
by law.

Lakefront and Lakeview Properties
Nestled in the hills of Tennessee on
the shores of pristine Norris Lake.
Call Lakeside Realty at (423)626-
5820 Or visit www.lakesiderealtv-


fri colil


WNC Mountains 3.84 Acres W/
\iew and hardwood tree,. Os'ner
naincmi at $65.2S(0 ./Iitde do% n.
This one -%ont last call today
1800 699- 1289 or nt, iiitc'rbend-
laktilre.orun.

TENNESSEE NORRIS L KE.
MOST BEAUTIFUL OF TEN-
NESSEE LAKES v.ith 800 mile,
of shoreline. Waterisew and 'A ater-
front lots from $l.ij:000. Boat
docks ai ailable w, itv SuimtCti-
Bav'Reot/'c''oii Sunset Ba\ Realt\
i.8065 278-39St.

Coastal Southeast Georgia Large
V. ouded .atei access mdish. '.ieW.
lakefront rand o.if oriented home-
,site flum the mid .T0k, Li.e
oak. pool. tennis. golt ,S7'726r-


Western Ne'.' Mlerco Pri.j ae 74
Acre Ranch $129.1.90 M- l MNI c A..
tree,. rollin. hills. pastureland.
\'.ildhle. borders BLMN Pic-
turc'que homnic.ie at 6. itii' ele'.a-
tion Hor',reback riding., hilng.
hunting Perfect famiil, ranch. elec-
tricit 100% financing. NALC
i663'305-2825

B N K FORECLOSURES!
Homes from $10,000! 1-3 bed-
room available! HUD, Repos,
REO. etc. These homes must sell!
For listings call (800)425-1620
ext.4237.

Steel Buildings
ALL STEEL BUILDING SALE!
"Plus Free Bonus!" 20x28 Now
$4200. 25x32 $5800. 30x42
$9200.40x62 $14,900. Other mod-
els and sizes. Front end optional.
Pioneer (800)668-5422. Since
1980.

ANF
( Advertising
\ Network of Florida


Bulldozers, Bacf6oes, Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators

-National Certification
-Job Placement Assistance


800-405-5833

Associated Training Services www.equipment-school.com


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