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 Rootstock experiment
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Group Title: AREC-H research report - Agricultural Research and Education Center-Homestead ; SB-74-1
Title: Tahiti lime rootstocks for southern Florida
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067834/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tahiti lime rootstocks for southern Florida
Series Title: Homestead AREC research report
Physical Description: 3 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Campbell, Carl W
Agricultural Research and Education Center, Homestead
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Homestead Fla.
Publication Date: 1974
 Subjects
Subject: Persian lime -- Rootstocks -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Citrus -- Rootstocks -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Carl W. Campbell
General Note: "February 14, 1974."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067834
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 72444110

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    History
        Page 1
    Rootstock experiment
        Page 1
    Responses of lime trees on different rootstocks
        Page 2
    List of Tables
        Page 3
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida





Sj

Homestead AREC Research Report SB74-1 February 14, 1974

TAHITI LIME ROOTSTOCKS FOR SOUTHERN FLORIDA


u BrAY Carl W. Campbell
Horticulturist
University of Florida
R I AH Ins itute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Agri cultural Research and Education Center
Homestead
niv. Fori
.F.T.S. -- UHistory

For many years the Tahiti lime orchards of southern Florida have been planted princi-
pally with 2 types of tree, marcots, made by air-layering, and trees budded on seed-
lings of Rough Lemon.

Marcot trees have various attributes, including early bearing and freedom from foot
rot, but they have the disadvantage of susceptibility to magnesium deficiency and a
weak root system easily damaged by strong winds.

The Rough Lemon has long been the most important rootstock for Tahiti lime in Florida.
Trees on this rootstock have many good features, such as rapid growth, good yield,
good fruit quality and freedom from nutrient deficiencies. However, they also have
faults, including suckering and susceptibility to foot rot, caused by Phytophthora
spp.

* Also it should be pointed out that it can be disastrous to base an entire fruit in-
dustry on only 1 or 2 kinds of rootstock, because the trees may be destroyed by some
new disease to which the rootstocks are susceptible. Therefore, research workers and
growers have continuously searched for other rootstocks for Tahiti lime.

The objective of this report is to present data from a rootstock experiment now in
progress at the University of Florida Agricultural Research and Education Center,
Homestead, and to summarize what has been learned about a variety of rootstocks from
research and from grower trials.


Rootstock Experiment

An experiment was begun in 1967 to test 12 citrus rootstocks which have shown promise
in Florida and elsewhere. The rootstocks are listed in Table 1. The trees were bud-
ded with the disease-free Tahiti lime clone 37-1-8, commonly called the "Landrum
clone" because it was selected by Mr. H. M. Landrum. The trees were planted at a
spacing of 20 ft by 20 ft so that individual tree yield records could be taken for
many years without the necessity of pruning to keep the trees separate. Single tree
plots were planted in a randomized block design with 15 replications.

Yield of fruit has been directly proportional to tree size up to now. This is illus-
trated by the yield and tree size data in Table 1. Table 2 gives yields for 1973 and
also cumulative yields for the entire life of the trees. Rootstocks such as Alemow,
Kalpi and Rough lemon are clearly superior in yield to the other rootstocks in this
dh experiment thus far.





Sj

Homestead AREC Research Report SB74-1 February 14, 1974

TAHITI LIME ROOTSTOCKS FOR SOUTHERN FLORIDA


u BrAY Carl W. Campbell
Horticulturist
University of Florida
R I AH Ins itute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Agri cultural Research and Education Center
Homestead
niv. Fori
.F.T.S. -- UHistory

For many years the Tahiti lime orchards of southern Florida have been planted princi-
pally with 2 types of tree, marcots, made by air-layering, and trees budded on seed-
lings of Rough Lemon.

Marcot trees have various attributes, including early bearing and freedom from foot
rot, but they have the disadvantage of susceptibility to magnesium deficiency and a
weak root system easily damaged by strong winds.

The Rough Lemon has long been the most important rootstock for Tahiti lime in Florida.
Trees on this rootstock have many good features, such as rapid growth, good yield,
good fruit quality and freedom from nutrient deficiencies. However, they also have
faults, including suckering and susceptibility to foot rot, caused by Phytophthora
spp.

* Also it should be pointed out that it can be disastrous to base an entire fruit in-
dustry on only 1 or 2 kinds of rootstock, because the trees may be destroyed by some
new disease to which the rootstocks are susceptible. Therefore, research workers and
growers have continuously searched for other rootstocks for Tahiti lime.

The objective of this report is to present data from a rootstock experiment now in
progress at the University of Florida Agricultural Research and Education Center,
Homestead, and to summarize what has been learned about a variety of rootstocks from
research and from grower trials.


Rootstock Experiment

An experiment was begun in 1967 to test 12 citrus rootstocks which have shown promise
in Florida and elsewhere. The rootstocks are listed in Table 1. The trees were bud-
ded with the disease-free Tahiti lime clone 37-1-8, commonly called the "Landrum
clone" because it was selected by Mr. H. M. Landrum. The trees were planted at a
spacing of 20 ft by 20 ft so that individual tree yield records could be taken for
many years without the necessity of pruning to keep the trees separate. Single tree
plots were planted in a randomized block design with 15 replications.

Yield of fruit has been directly proportional to tree size up to now. This is illus-
trated by the yield and tree size data in Table 1. Table 2 gives yields for 1973 and
also cumulative yields for the entire life of the trees. Rootstocks such as Alemow,
Kalpi and Rough lemon are clearly superior in yield to the other rootstocks in this
dh experiment thus far.






-2-

Response of Lime Trees on Different Rootstocks

* The following information is compiled from research results and grower experience in
the southern Florida Tahiti lime production area, most of which contains well-drained
limestone soils. It does not necessarily apply in other areas where different soil
and climatic conditions exist.

Rough Lemon.--Fast growing in nursery and in field. Early bearing. Good yield of
fruit. Suckers frequently. Susceptible to foot rot. Available in nurseries.
Recommended.

Marcot trees.--Easy to make by air-layering. Fast growing in field. Susceptible to
magnesium deficiency. Very early bearing. Good yield. Suckers no problem because
they are the same as the parent tree. Not susceptible to foot rot. Susceptible to
wind damage, which reduces productivity. Available in nurseries. Recommended.

Alemow.--Very fast growing in nursery and field. Early bearing. Good yeld. Seldom
suckers. Not susceptible to foot rot. Susceptible to tristeza disease-. Not usu-
ally available in nurseries. Recommended.

Cleopatra.--Slow growing in nursery and field, but makes a long-lived tree. Suscep-
tible to iron deficiency. Slow to come into bearing. Medium yield. Seldom suckers.
Not susceptible to foot rot. Sometimes available in nurseries. Recommended for home
planting, but not for commercial orchards.

Kalpi.--Medium fast growing in nursery and in field. Early bearing. Good yield.
Seldom suckers. Apparently not susceptible to foot rot. Not available in nurseries.
SPromising, but needs further testing.

Shekwasha.--Relatively slow growing in nursery and field. Slow to come into bearing.
Medium yield. Seldom suckers. Susceptible to foot rot. Not available in nurseries.
Not recommended.

Rangpur.--Medium fast growing in nursery and in field. Yield variable, good in some
trials and poor in others. Suckers frequently. Not susceptible to foot rot. Not
available in nurseries. Not recommended.

Grapefruit.--Medium fast growing in nursery and field. Yield variable. Susceptible
to foot rot. Not available in nurseries. Not recommended.

Sour Orange.--Performance variable in limestone soils, often poor. Susceptible to
tristeza disease. Not susceptible to foot rot. Tolerant of wet soil conditions.
Susceptible to tristeza disease. Sometimes available in nurseries. Recommended for
home planting in wet areas. Not recommended for commercial planting.

Tangelo (Sampson).--Medium to fast growing in nursery and field. Yield fair. Sucket
frequently. Susceptible to foot rot. Not available in nurseries. Not recommended.

Citrange (Troyer).--Performance variable. Susceptible to iron deficiency. Poor to
fair yield. Not available in most nurseries. Not recommended.

Nansho-daidai.--Medium growth in nursery and in field. Poor to fair yield. Not
Available in nurseries. Not recommended.




Tristeza disease, caused by a virus, is not a problem in the Tahiti lime industry
of Florida now, but it could be in the future.








Ichang lemon.--Medium growth in nursery and in field. Poor to fair yield. Not
available in nurseries. Not recommended.

Citrumelo.--Poor growth in nursery and field. Trees very short-lived. No yield.
Not available in nurseries. Not recommended.


Table 1. Yield and tree size in 'Tahiti' lime rootstock
experiment, University of Florida AREC, Homestead, 1971.

Mean Mean
Rootstock yield-55 Ib tree size (ft)
boxes/tree Height Width

Alemow (C. macrophylla) 1.62 7.0 10.3
Kalpi C. excelsa var. 1.25 6.5 9.3
davaoensis
Rough Lemon (C. jambhiri) 1.14 6.8 9.9
Cleopatra (C. reshni) 0.77 5.7 8.3
Shekwasha (C. depressa) 0.67 5.0 7.2
'Ichang' lemon 0.62 5.2 7.6
Nansho-daidai (C. taiwanica) 0.61 6.3 8.5
Rangpur (C. limonia) 0.51 5.5 7.7
'Sampson' tangelo 0.38 6.1 8.8
'Troyer' citrange 0.17 4.6 5.9
'Leonardy' grapefruit 0.09 4.9 6.0
(C. paradisi)
'CRC 1452' citrumelo 0 2.4 0.8


Table 2. Yields of fruit in 'Tahiti' lime
University of Florida AREC, Homestead.


Rootstock


Alemow
Kalpi
Rough Lemon
Cleopatra
Shekwasha
'Ichang' lemon
Nansho-daisai
Rangpur
'Sampson' tangelo
'Troyer' citrange
'Leonardy' grapefruit
'CRC 1452' citrumelo


4.11
4.75
3.43
1.89
2.53
2.79
2.81
2.75
3.31
2.03
2.16
0


rootstock experiment,


Yield per tree (55 lb. boxes)
1973 Cumulative 1971-73


9.01
8.30
6.50
3.49
4.26
4.46
4.27
3.97
4.45
2.64
2.78
0


Rootstock --~




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