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Group Title: Research report - Bradenton GCREC - BRA1995-5
Title: Butternut squash variety evaluation
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067765/00001
 Material Information
Title: Butternut squash variety evaluation summer-fall 1994
Series Title: Bradenton GCREC research report
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Maynard, Donald N., 1932-
Elmstrom, G. W ( Gary William )
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Bradenton FL
Publication Date: 1995
 Subjects
Subject: Squashes -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 3).
Statement of Responsibility: Donald N. Maynard, Gary W. Elmstrom.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "February 1995."
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067765
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 73256783

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Materials and methods
        Page 1
    Results
        Page 2
    Note
        Page 3
    Literatured cited
        Page 3
    Tables
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Gulf coast research and education center
        Page 7
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida




F6 364tJ


UNIVERSITY OF
9 FLORIDA
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
5007 60th St. E., Bradenton, FL 34203
Bradenton GCREC Research Report
BRA-1995-5 (February 1995)
Marston Science
Library


APR 2 0 1995

University of Florida


BUTTERNUT SQUASH VARIETY EVALUATION
SUMMER-FALL 1994


DONALD N. MAYNARD AND GARY W.


ELMSTROM








Bradenton GCREC Research Report BRA1995-5


BUTTERNUT SQUASH VARIETY EVALUATION
SUMMER-FALL 1994

Donald N. Maynard1
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
University of Florida, IFAS
5007 60th Street East
Bradenton, FL 34203

Gary W. Elmstrom2
Central Florida Research and Education Center
University of Florida, IFAS
5336 University Avenue
Leesburg, FL 34748

Butternut, as well as other fall and winter-type squash are grown throughout
Florida in appropriate seasons, but on a very limited acreage. Accordingly,
production data are not available.

This trial was arranged to evaluate performance of some butternut inbreds and
hybrids which were developed at the Central Florida Research and Education Center
(CFREC-Leesburg) with commercial hybrid and inbred butternut squash varieties in
west central Florida.

Materials and Methods

Soil samples from the experimental area in Bradenton obtained before
fertilization were analyzed by the University of Florida Extension Soil Testing
Laboratory (Hanlon and DeVore, 1989): pH=6.9, Mehlich I extractable P=52, K=18,
Mg=148, Ca=784, Zn=3.6, Cu=2.4, and Mn=3.7 ppm.
The EauGallie fine sand was prepared in July 1994 by incorporation of 0-1.2-0 lb
N-P,0O-KO2 per 100 linear bed feet (Ibf). Beds were formed and fumigated with
methylbromide:chloropicrin, 67:33 at 2.3 lb/100 1bf. Banded fertilizer was
applied in shallow grooves on the bed shoulders at 3.0-0-4.0 lb N-P205-K 0/100
Ibf after the beds were pressed and before the black polyethylene mulch was
applied. The total fertilizer applied was equivalent to 137-58-190 lb N-P 0 -
K20/A. The final beds were 32 in. wide and 8 in. high, and were spaced on t
centers with four beds between seepage irrigation/drainage ditches which were on
41-ft centers.

Butternut squash seeds of 17 entries (Table 2) were planted in holes punched in
the polyethylene mulch at 3 ft in-row spacing on 3 August at Bradenton. The
plots were 15.0 ft long, had five plants each, and were replicated three times
in a randomized, complete block design. Weed control in row middles was by
cultivation and application of paraquat. Pesticides were applied as needed for
control of silverleaf whitefly endosulfann and esfenvalerate), and aphids
endosulfann).

'Professor of Horticultural Sciences and Extension Vegetable Specialist.
2Professor of Horticultural Sciences.


February 1995










In Leesburg, Apopka fine sand was prepared in July by incorporation of 0.8-1.1-
1.1 lb N-P20-K O per 100 linear bed feet (Ibf). Beds were formed, white
polyethylene muTch, and drip tubing (emitters spaced 12 in. apart) were applied
in one operation. The final beds were 24 in. wide and 8 in. high and were spaced
on 10 ft centers. Vapam soil fumigant was applied at the rate of 0.2 gal./lbf
30 days prior to planting. The total fertilizer supplied, including that
supplied through the drip irrigation system, was equivalent to 140-80-160 lb N-
P205-K20/A. Drip irrigation was supplied as needed based on soil tensiometer
readings.

Seeds of the 17 entries (Table 3) were planted in holes punched in the
polyethylene mulch at 3 ft in-row spacing on 15 August. The plots which were 30
ft long and had 10 plants each were replicated four times in a randomized,
complete block design. Weed control in the middles was by Curbit and
cultivation. Pesticides were applied as needed to control pickleworms (methomyl
and endosulfan) and gummy stem blight (chlorothalonil and maneb).

Squash were harvested on 4 October at Bradenton and on 9 November at Leesburg.
Marketable fruit (U.S. No. 1 or better) according to U.S. grades (U.S. Standards
for Grades of Fall and Winter Type Squash, 1944) were separated from culls
(fruit<0.9 lb and/or crookneck) and counted and weighed.

Plants were rated from 1 (least resistant) to 5 (most resistant) for downy mildew
on 3 October. The designation of individual plant appearance ratings was 1 =
dead, 2 = 10% green, 3 = 40% green, 4 = 70% green, and 5 = 100% green.

Results

Temperatures and rainfall at Bradenton during the experimental period from 3
August to 4 October were very close to normal (Table 1). However, somewhat
cooler temperatures and lower rainfall would have provided better growing
conditions for butternut squash.

Marketable yields in Bradenton (Table 2) ranged from 5 bu/acre for 'Hercules' to
229 bu/acre for J25xJ31. The three highest yielding entries were the J25 inbred
and two hybrids with J25 as one parent. In Leesburg, yields ranged from 70
bu/acre for 'Ponca' to 303 bu/acre for J25 (Table 3). 'Hercules', a late
maturing variety, had a much higher yield at Leesburg than at Bradenton.
Generally, yields of experimental lines exceeded those of named varieties. This
could be related to the fact that the named varieties were developed in more
temperate areas of the country.

Yields obtained in this trial are similar to those obtained in recent trials in
Florida. At Leesburg, yields ranged from 160 to 452 bu/acre in spring 1988
(Maynard, 1989), from 134 to 212 bu/acre in spring 1989 (Maynard, 1990), and 33
to 90 bu/acre in spring 1990 (Maynard, 1991). At Live Oak, yields in fall 1990
ranged from 217 to 250 bu/acre (Maynard, 1994).

Grade standards do not provide guidelines for neck curvature, however,
straightneck butternut fruit are demanded in most markets and this trait has been
selected for by plant breeders. The proportion of straightneck fruit at
Bradenton ranged from 53% for J22xJ31 to 100% for J25 and 'Hercules' (Table 2).










Cull fruit were those judged to be too small, i.e. less than 0.9 lb
curvature greater than what would be accepted in most markets.
criteria, the proportion of marketable fruit at Bradenton varied
J21xJ30 to 90% for J25xJ31 (Table 2).


or have neck
Using these
from 32% for


Average weight of marketable fruit at Leesburg ranged from 0.9 lb for J21xJ30 to
3.0 lb for J25 and J25xJ31 (Table 3).

Downy mildew was prevalent because of the frequent rains. However, there was a
marked variation among entries in reaction to downy mildew. In Bradenton, all
of the plants of J25xJ32 were dead whereas all of the plants of J25xJ31 and
'Hercules' were not visibly affected by the fungus. Factors other than reaction
to downy mildew were related to yield, however, since the highest (J25xJ31) and
lowest ('Hercules') yielding entries were the most tolerant of the fungus.
Furthermore, the second highest yielding entry (J25xJ32) was the most
susceptible.

The results of this trial indicated that the experimental inbreds and hybrids
developed in Florida perform better under summer/fall conditions than
varieties/hybrids developed under more temperate conditions.

Note

The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and
should not be used as recommendations for crop production. Where trade names are
used, no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied.


Literature Cited


Hanlon, E. A. and J. M. DeVore. 1989. IFAS
chemical procedures and training manual.


Maynard, D. N.
Fla. Agr.

Maynard, D. N.
Fla. Agr.

Maynard, D. N.
Fla. Agr.


(ed). 1989. Vegetable variety
Expt. Sta. Circ. S-363.


(ed).
Expt.

(ed).
,Expt.


1990. Vegetable variety
Sta. Circ. S-371.

1991. Vegetable variety
Sta. Circ. S-382.


extension soil testing laboratory
Fla. Coop. Ext. Circ. 812.

trial results in Florida for 1988.

trial results in Florida for 1989.

trial results in Florida for 1990.


Maynard, D. N. (ed). 1994. Vegetable variety trial results in Florida for 1993.
Fla. Agr. Expt. Sta. Circ. S-392.

Stanley, C. D. 1994. Weather report for 1993. Gulf Coast Research and
Education Center Res. Rept. BRA1994-1.

U.S. Standards for Grades of Fall and Winter Type Squash. 1984. USDA, AMS,
Washington, D.C.










Cull fruit were those judged to be too small, i.e. less than 0.9 lb
curvature greater than what would be accepted in most markets.
criteria, the proportion of marketable fruit at Bradenton varied
J21xJ30 to 90% for J25xJ31 (Table 2).


or have neck
Using these
from 32% for


Average weight of marketable fruit at Leesburg ranged from 0.9 lb for J21xJ30 to
3.0 lb for J25 and J25xJ31 (Table 3).

Downy mildew was prevalent because of the frequent rains. However, there was a
marked variation among entries in reaction to downy mildew. In Bradenton, all
of the plants of J25xJ32 were dead whereas all of the plants of J25xJ31 and
'Hercules' were not visibly affected by the fungus. Factors other than reaction
to downy mildew were related to yield, however, since the highest (J25xJ31) and
lowest ('Hercules') yielding entries were the most tolerant of the fungus.
Furthermore, the second highest yielding entry (J25xJ32) was the most
susceptible.

The results of this trial indicated that the experimental inbreds and hybrids
developed in Florida perform better under summer/fall conditions than
varieties/hybrids developed under more temperate conditions.

Note

The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and
should not be used as recommendations for crop production. Where trade names are
used, no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied.


Literature Cited


Hanlon, E. A. and J. M. DeVore. 1989. IFAS
chemical procedures and training manual.


Maynard, D. N.
Fla. Agr.

Maynard, D. N.
Fla. Agr.

Maynard, D. N.
Fla. Agr.


(ed). 1989. Vegetable variety
Expt. Sta. Circ. S-363.


(ed).
Expt.

(ed).
,Expt.


1990. Vegetable variety
Sta. Circ. S-371.

1991. Vegetable variety
Sta. Circ. S-382.


extension soil testing laboratory
Fla. Coop. Ext. Circ. 812.

trial results in Florida for 1988.

trial results in Florida for 1989.

trial results in Florida for 1990.


Maynard, D. N. (ed). 1994. Vegetable variety trial results in Florida for 1993.
Fla. Agr. Expt. Sta. Circ. S-392.

Stanley, C. D. 1994. Weather report for 1993. Gulf Coast Research and
Education Center Res. Rept. BRA1994-1.

U.S. Standards for Grades of Fall and Winter Type Squash. 1984. USDA, AMS,
Washington, D.C.








4
Table 1. Temperature and rainfall at the Gulf Coast Research and Education
Center from 3 August 1994 to 4 October 1994 and 40-year monthly
averages (Stanley, 1994).

Average daily temperature (OF)
1994 40-year average Rainfall (in.)
Month' High Low High Low 1994 40-year average

August (3-31) 91 72 91 72 9.34 9.74
September 89 72 90 71 7.24 8.17
October (1-4) 88 72 85 64 1.54 2.91

'1994 dates are for the dates indicated. 40-year averages are for the entire
month.









Table 2. Yield, proportion of straightneck and marketable fruit, average fruit weight, and reaction to downy
mildew of butternut squash. Gulf Coast Research and Education Center. Summer-Fall 1994.



Marketable Straightneck Marketable Avg. Marketable Downy Mildew
Entry Source Wt (bu/A)' Fruit (%) Fruit (%)2 Fruit Wt (Ib) Rating (1-5)3
J25xJ31 CFREC-Leesburg 229 a4 77 b-e 90 ab 2.2 a 5.0 a
J25xJ32 CFREC-Leesburg 212 ab 57 ef 67 b-e 1.7 b 1.0 e
J25 CFREC-Leesburg 200 ab 100 a 85 a-c 2.3 a 4.0 b
J22xJ31 CFREC-Leesburg 172 bc 53 f 67 b-e 1.3 cd 2.7 c
J27xJ30 CFREC-Leesburg 148 cd 80 a-e 58 d-f 1.1 d 1.3 de
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Supreme Jordan 143 cd 78 a-e 59 d-f 1.3 d 1.3 de
J22 CFREC-Leesburg 133 cd 97 ab 67 b-e 1.2 d 2.0 cd
J21xJ32 CFREC-Leesburg 122 de 64 d-f 51 d-g 1.2 d 1.7 de
Ultra Jordan 115 de 63 d-f 60 c-f 1.6 bc 2.7 c
NVH 4007 Rogers 111 de 68 c-f 65 b-e 1.1 d 1.7 de
------------------------------------------------------------------------ 7----------------------
Zenith Jordan 90 ef 82 a-d 59 d-f 1.1 d 1.3 de
Waltham Jordan 85 ef 94 ab 68 b-d 1.2 d 2.7 c
Early Butternut Jordan 83 ef 70 c-f 44 d-g 1.1 d 2.0 cd
J21xJ30 CFREC-Leesburg 62 f 64 d-f 32 g 1.0 d 2.0 cd
Ponca Jordan 60 f 96 ab 41 e-g 1.1 d 1.7 de
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
J21 CFREC-Leesburg 58 f 90 a-c 35 fg 1.0 d 4.0 b
Hercules Jordan 5 g 100 a 100 a 1.8 b 5.0 a

1Bushel = 42 lb., Acre = 4840 lbf.
2Marketable fruit percentage by weight.
3Downy mildew rating: 1 = dead, 2 = 10% green, 3 = 40% green, 4 = 70% green, 5 = 100% green.
Mean separation in columns by Duncan's Multiple Range Test, 5% level.









Table 3. Yield, average fruit weight, and reaction to downy mildew of butternut squash. Central Florida
Research and Education Center. Summer-Fall 1994.


Marketable Avg. Marketable Downy Mildew
Entry Source Wt (bu/A)' Fruit Wt (Ib) Rating (1-5)

J25 CFREC-Leesburg 303 a3 3.0 a 3.1 a-c
Hercules Jordan 277 a 2.7 a 3.5 a
J25xJ31 CFREC-Leesburg 275 a 3.0 a 2.9 a-d
Ultra Jordan 189 b 2.8 a 3.2 a-c
J21 CFREC-Leesburg 176 b 1.1 d-f 3.4 ab
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
J22xJ31 CFREC-Leesburg 166 bc 1.4 c-e 3.2 a-c
J22 CFREC-Leesburg 142 b-d 1.5 bc 3.1 a-c
J21xJ32 CFREC-Leesburg 134 b-e 1.2 c-f 3.0 a-c
J25xJ32 CFREC-Leesburg 113 c-f 1.9 b 2.3 d
Supreme Jordan 111 c-f 1.6 bc 3.0 a-c
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Early Butternut Jordan 110 c-f 1.4 cd 2.9 a-d
Waltham Butternut Jordan 100 d-f 1.5 bc 2.8 cd
J21xJ30 CFREC-Leesburg 97 d-f 0.9 f 2.9 a-d
Zenith Jordan 78 ef 1.2 c-f 2.6 cd
J27xJ30 CFREC-Leesburg 77 ef 1.0 ef 2.3 d
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NVH 4007 Rogers 76 ef 1.4 c-f 2.8 b-d
Ponca Jordan 70 f 1.3 c-f 3.2 a-c


'Bushel = 42 lb., Acre = 4356 Ibf.
2Rated from 1, least resistant, to 5, most resistant.
Mean separation by Duncan's New Multiple Range Test, 5% level.







The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center


The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center is
a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences, University of Florida. The Research Center
originated in the fall of 1925 as the Tomato
Disease Laboratory with the primary objective of
developing control procedures for an epidemic out-
break of nailhead spot of tomato. Research was ex-
panded in subsequent years to include study of sev-
eral other tomato diseases.

In 1937, new research facilities were established
in the town of Manatee, and the Center scope was
enlarged to include horticultural, entomological, and
soil science studies of several vegetable crops. The
ornamental program was a natural addition to the
Center's responsibilities because of the emerging in-
dustry in the area in the early 1940's.

The Center's current location was established in
1965 where a comprehensive research and extension
program on vegetable crops and ornamental plants is
conducted. Three state extension specialists posi-
tions, 16 state research scientists, and two grant
supported scientists from various disciplines of
training participate in all phases of vegetable and
ornamental horticultural programs. This interdisci-
plinary team approach, combining several research
disciplines and a wide range of industry and faculty
contacts, often is more productive than could be ac-
complished with limited investments in independent
programs.


The Center's primary mission is to develop new
and expand existing knowledge and technology, and
to disseminate new scientific knowledge in Florida, so
that agriculture remains efficient and economically
sound.

The secondary mission of the Center is to assist
the Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS campus
departments, in which Center faculty hold appropri-
ate liaison appointments, and other research centers
in extension, educational training, and cooperative
research programs for the benefit of Florida's pro-
ducers, students, and citizens.

Program areas of emphasis include: (1) genetics,
breeding, and variety development and evaluation;
(2) biological, chemical, and mechanical pest manage-
ment in entomology, plant pathology, nematology,
bacteriology, virology, and weed science; (3) produc-
tion efficiency, culture, management, and counteract-
ing environmental stress; (4) water management and
natural resource protection; (5) post-harvest physiol-
ogy, harvesting, handling and food quality of horti-
cultural crops; (6) technical support and assistance to
the Florida Cooperative Extension Service; and (7)
advancement offundamental knowledge ofdisciplines
represented by faculty and (8) directing graduate
student training and teaching special undergraduate
classes.


Location of
GCREC Bradenton


IFAS IS:
0 The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
University of Florida.
Q A statewide organization dedicated to teaching,
research and extension.
Q Faculty located in Gainesville and at 13 research
and education centers, 67 county extension
offices and four demonstration units throughout
the state.
[ A partnership in food and agriculture, and natural
and renewable resource research and education,
funded by state, federal and local government,
and by gifts and grants from individuals, founda-
tions, government and industry.
Q An organization whose mission is:
Educating students in the food, agricultural,
and related sciences and natural resources.
Strengthening Florida's diverse food and
agricultural industry and its environment
through research.
Enhancing for all Floridians, the application
of research and knowledge to improve the
quality of life statewide through IFAS exten-
sion programs.




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