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 Title Page
 Materials and methods
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 Literature cited
 Tables
 Gulf coast research and education...






Group Title: Research report - Gulf Coast Research and Education Center - BRA1996-12
Title: Yield evaluation of five bell pepper cultivars grown with micro-irrigation during the spring and fall seasons of 1995
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067763/00001
 Material Information
Title: Yield evaluation of five bell pepper cultivars grown with micro-irrigation during the spring and fall seasons of 1995
Series Title: GCREC research report
Physical Description: 9 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Howe, T. K ( Teresa K )
Csizinszky, Alexander Anthony, 1933-
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Gulf Coast Research & Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Bradenton FL
Publication Date: 1996
 Subjects
Subject: Peppers -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Peppers -- Irrigation -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Peppers -- Yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 4-5).
Statement of Responsibility: T.K.Howe and A.A. Csizinszky.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "July 1996."
Funding: Bradenton GCREC research report
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067763
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 73259503

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Materials and methods
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Summary
        Page 4
    Literature cited
        Page 4
    Tables
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Gulf coast research and education center
        Page 10
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida








UNIVERSITY OF
Ie FLORIDA
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
5007 60th Street East, Bradenton, FL 34203
GCREC-Bradenton Research Report BRA-1996-12


YIELD EVALUATION OF FIVE BELL PEPPER
CULTIVARS GROWN WITH MICRO-IRRIGATION
DURING THE SPRING AND FALL SEASONS
OF 1995


T. K. Howe and A. A. Csizinszky


4larston Science
Library
rOV 1 41996


University of Florida








GCREC Research Report BRA1996-12


YIELD EVALUATION OF FIVE BELL PEPPER CULTIVARS GROWN WITH
MICRO-IRRIGATION DURING THE SPRING AND FALL SEASONS OF 1995

T. K. Howe and A. A. Csizinszky'
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
University of Florida, IFAS
5007 60th St. East
Bradenton, FL 34203

Florida vegetable statistics for 1994-95 indicated that the value of fresh market green bell peppers
was $188.9 million, down from the record high in 1993-94 of $219.8 million (Fla. Agric. Stat. Serv.,
1996). The value of green peppers in Florida was surpassed only by tomatoes during 1994-95.
Pepper production totaled 15.7 million 28-lb bushels, and came from 20,300 acres with an average
price of $12.01 per bushel. The average yield per acre was 775 bushels.

Pepper production is concentrated in southwest, southeast and west central Florida (Fla. Agric. Stat.
Serv., 1996). During 1994-95, single County records indicate that Manatee County in west-central
Florida ranked fourth in harvested acreage, behind Palm Beach County, Collier and Hendry Counties
with a total of 2450 acres, up dramatically from 900 acres the previous year.

A variety trial grown with micro-irrigation was conducted at the Gulf Coast Research and Education
Center (GCREC)in Manatee County during the spring and fall of 1995 to provide the industry
information on yield and horticultural characteristics of five standard bell pepper cultivars.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Raised beds ofEauGallie fine sand were formed on 13 February 1995 and 9 August 1995. The 33-
inch wide, 8-inch high beds were spaced on 5-ft centers with seepage drainage ditches spaced every
6 beds. A production acre was equivalent to 8712 linear ft of bed. Fertilizer placed in the bed
included a band down the bed center of 18-0-25 (N-P205-K20) at 348 Ib/A and superphosphate ,0-
20-0, (N-P20,-K20) in a 6 inch-wide band on the pre-finished bed at 523 lb/A. Beds were fumigated
with methyl bromide:chloropicrin (66:33) at 213 lb/mulched A, and covered with black polyethylene
film mulch in the spring and white on black polyethylene film mulch in the fall.

Cultivar selection was based on previous research that defined 'Summer Sweet 860' and 'Whopper
Improved' stable for mean fruit size and fruit yield (Stoffella et.al.,1995) and research at this location
which showed all five selected cultivars yield consistently well under the subsurface irrigation
practices typical for the region (Howe and Waters, 1994b; 1994a; 1993b; 1993a; 1992b; 1992a;
1991). Seed were sown on 10-11 January and 10-11 July into transplant flats (1.5 x 1.5 x 2.5 inch
cells) containing a peat:vermiculite medium (1:l,v:v) amended with dolomite (11.3 lb),
superphosphate (5.6 lb), and hydrated lime (2.8 lb), each per cu. yd. of medium. Seeds were
germinated in the laboratory, then flats were transferred to a screen-sided greenhouse.


1Research Program Coordinator and Associate Horticulturist, respectively.


July 1996











Transplants were set into the field on 2 March and 23 August in two rows per bed with rows spaced
12 inches apart with an in-row spacing of 12 inches. Four replications of 32 plants in the spring and
34 plants in the fall per cultivar were arranged in a randomized complete block design.

The crop was irrigated via a micro-irrigation tape (T-Tape, 0.67 gpm/100ft, 8-inch emitter spacing)
placed in the center of the bed. Soil moisture was monitored by tensiometers placed 6 inches deep
in the plant row. Irrigation was applied according to daily open pan evaporation measurements at
GCREC. The crop received 15.10 acre inches of irrigation during the 85-day long season during the
spring and 15.26 acre inches in the 114-day long season during the fall. Additional fertilizer was
applied through the irrigation tape as a liquid 8-0-8 (N-P20O-K2O) at 219 gal/A that provided 200 lb
N and 200 lb K20 for a total of 261 lb N, 105 lb P,20, and 287 lb K20 per acre from liquid and pre-
plant dry fertilizers.

The crop was scouted for pests throughout the season. Problem pests were primarily lepidopterous
larvae both seasons and broad mites in the fall. Insect populations were managed with: two strains
of Bacillus thuringiensis, dicofol, permethrin, insecticidal soap, oxamyl, azadirachtin, endosulfan,
sulfur, methomyl, chlorpyrifos and cryolite. Bacillus thuringiensis, cryolite, azadirachtin, sulfur and
insecticidal soap were utilized most often to attempt to control insect populations with a more
biorational approach in order to protect beneficial insects. The crop also was treated with maneb and
copper salts to control bacterial and fungal pathogens. Phytopthora blight was a problem in the fall
when plants were primarily infected on the stems and fruit, causing losses of plant branches and fruit.

Fruit were harvested on 3, 10, 16, 25 May in the spring and 14, 29 November and 13 December in
the fall. Fruit were not allowed to reach mature color. Harvested fruit were separated by USDA
standards for grades (USDA, 1981), counted and weighed. Yields were computed on a weight basis
and were expressed in 28-lb bushels. A sample of eight marketable fruit per cultivar and replication
was taken from the first fruit harvested. These fruit were measured for length, diameter and pod wall
thickness and the number of lobes were counted.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Weather information for the season compared to the 42-year averages (Stanley, 1996) is in Table 1.
In the spring, average maximum daily temperatures were one to seven degrees above normal, while
minimum daily temperatures were two to six degrees above normal. Rainfall was below normal
during Mach and May, but above normal in April. During the fall, average maximum and minimum
daily temperatures were above normal as compared to the 42-year averages during August,
September and October, but below normal during November and December. Rainfall was above
average during all but December. The combination of high temperatures and rainfall in the fall had
an adverse effect on early season fruit set since climatic conditions were favorable for flower/fruit
abortion.

Spring 1995: Early US Fancy (pods greater than 3.5 inches long and 3.0 inches wide, typical for the
cultivar, well shaped and free from defects) yield among the bell pepper cultivars entries for four
harvests ranged from 32 bu/A for 'King Arthur' to 111 bu/A for 'Whopper Improved' (Table 2). US
Fancy yields for 'Whopper Improved' and 'Valiant' were significantly different than 'Summer Sweet










860' and 'King Arthur'. The US Fancy grade was predominant for three of the five cultivars at the
first harvest, and there were no significant differences among those three. US No. 1 (pods not less
than 2.5 inches in length or diameter, fairly well shaped and free from defects) yields ranged from 17
bu/A for 'Whopper Improved' to 49 bu/A for 'Summer Sweet 860'. US No.2 (those not U.S. Fancy
or No.1, and free from serious damage) yields ranged from 1 bu/A for 'Whopper Improved' to 9
bu/A for 'King Arthur'. Total yield at the first harvest from all fruit grades ranged from 85 bu/A for
'King Arthur' to 145 bu/A for 'Valiant', with no significant differences among the cultivars. Cull fruit
yield was at or below 3 bu/A for all cultivars at the first harvest.

Fruit pod dimensions and characteristics from the first harvest are in Table 2. Average fruit length
of the earliest fruit ranged from 3.7 inches for 'Summer Sweet 860' and 'King Arthur' to 4.0 inches
for 'Whopper Improved'. 'Whopper Improved' and 'Boynton Bell' were significantly different in pod
length from 'Summer Sweet 860' and 'King Arthur'. Fruit width ranged from 3.4 to 3.5 inches
among the cultivars with no significant differences. The ratio of fruit length to fruit width ranged
from 1.11 for 'Valiant' to 1.24 for 'Whopper Improved'. A ratio of 1.00 would indicate a square
fruit.

Yields of US Fancy fruit for the entire season from four harvests ranged from 172 bu/A for 'King
Arthur' to 566 bu/A for 'Whopper Improved' (Table 3). 'Whopper Improved' produced the greatest
US Fancy yield of all the cultivars. The US Fancy grade was predominant portion of total seasonal
yield for 'Whopper Improved' only. US No.1 yield ranged from 299 bu/A for 'Whopper Improved'
to 678 bu/A for 'Summer Sweet 860', with no significant differences among the cultivars. US No.2
yield ranged form 40 bu/A for 'Valiant' to 133 bu/A for 'King Arthur'. 'King Arthur' produced the
greatest yield of US No.2 fruit.

Total seasonal yields across all grades ranged from 889 bu/A for 'King Arthur' to 1021 bu/A for
'Summer Sweet 860' with no significant differences among the cultivars. All cultivars were above
the 1994-95 average commercial yield of 775 bu/A (Fla. Agric. Stat. Serv., 1996). Cull fruit yield was
also not significantly different among the cultivars.

Fall 1995: Early US Fancy yield ranged from 10 bu/A for 'Boynton Bell' and 'Valiant' to 38 bu/A
for 'Whopper Improved', with no significant differences among the cultivars (Table 4). US No.1
yield at the first harvest ranged from 198 bu/A for 'Boynton Bell' to 319 bu/A for 'King Arthur'.
Only 'Boynton Bell' was significantly different from 'King Arthur' with respect to US No. 1 yield.
The US No. 1 was the predominant grade for the first harvest. US No.2 yield ranged from 70 bu/A
for 'Valiant' to 113 bu/A for 'King Arthur', with no significant differences among the cultivars. Total
early yield for all grades of marketable fruit ranged from 278 bu/A for 'Boynton Bell' to 468 bu/A
for 'King Arthur'. Only 'Whopper Improved' and 'Summer Sweet 860' were similar to 'King Arthur'
in total early yield.

Fruit pod dimensions and the average number of lobes per fruit for fruit sampled from the earliest
harvest are in Table 4. Fruit length ranged from 2.8 inches for 'Summer Sweet 860', 'Valiant' and
'Boynton Bell', which were significantly different than 'Whopper Improved' ant 3.2 inches. Fruit
width ranged from 2.9 inches for 'Whopper Improved' and 'Valiant' to 3.3 inches for 'King Arthur'.
The greatest fruit width came from 'King Arthur'. The ratio of fruit length to width ranged from











0.911 for 'King Arthur' to 1.09 for 'Whopper Improved'. Lobe number was greatest for 'King
Arthur' with an average of 4.1 lobes per fruit. Fruit of other cultivars had from 3.2 to 3.6 lobes.
Wall thickness ranged from 0.204 inches for 'Summer Sweet 860' to 0.235 inches for 'Whopper
Improved'.. There were significant differences between 'Summer Sweet 860', 'King Arthur',
'Boynton Bell' and 'Whopper Improved.

US Fancy yield for the entire season from three harvests ranged from 17 bu/A for 'Valiant' to 64
bu/A for 'Whopper Improved' (Table 5). Only 'Valiant' and 'Whopper Improved' were significantly
different from one another with respect to US Fancy yield for the season. US No.1 yield, the
predominant grade for all cultivars, ranged from 666 bu/A for 'Boynton Bell' to 791 bu/A for
'Whopper Improved' and 'Valiant'. There were no significant differences among the cultivars in US
No. 1 yield for the season. US No.2 yield ranged from 239 bu/A for 'Whopper Improved' to 413
bu/A for 'Summer Sweet 860', with no significant differences among the cultivars.

Total marketable yield across all grades ranged from 1004 bu/A for 'Boynton Bell' to 1170 bu/A for
'King Arthur', with no differences among the cultivars. These yields exceeded the commercial
average yield of 775 bu/A (Fla. Agric. Stat. Serv., 1996). Cull fruit yield ranged from 155 bu/A for
'Valiant' to 215 bu/A for 'King Arthur', with no differences among the cultivars.

SUMMARY

Based on early and seasonal U.S. Fancy yields, 'Whopper Improved' had the best performance in the
spring. In the fall, all cultivars but 'Valiant' performed similarly well.


Note: The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and should not
be used as recommendations for crop production. No discrimination is intended or endorsement
implied where trade names are used.

LITERATURE CITED

Florida Agricultural Statistics Service. 1996. Florida Agricultural Statistics. Vegetable Summary
1994-95. Fla. Agr. Stat. Serv., Orlando, FL.

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1991. Bell pepper variety trial for spring 1991. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1991-16

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1992a. Bell pepper variety trial for fall 1991. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1992-08.

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1992b. Bell pepper variety trial for spring 1992. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1992-14.

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1993a. Bell pepper variety trial for fall 1992. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1993-07.











0.911 for 'King Arthur' to 1.09 for 'Whopper Improved'. Lobe number was greatest for 'King
Arthur' with an average of 4.1 lobes per fruit. Fruit of other cultivars had from 3.2 to 3.6 lobes.
Wall thickness ranged from 0.204 inches for 'Summer Sweet 860' to 0.235 inches for 'Whopper
Improved'.. There were significant differences between 'Summer Sweet 860', 'King Arthur',
'Boynton Bell' and 'Whopper Improved.

US Fancy yield for the entire season from three harvests ranged from 17 bu/A for 'Valiant' to 64
bu/A for 'Whopper Improved' (Table 5). Only 'Valiant' and 'Whopper Improved' were significantly
different from one another with respect to US Fancy yield for the season. US No.1 yield, the
predominant grade for all cultivars, ranged from 666 bu/A for 'Boynton Bell' to 791 bu/A for
'Whopper Improved' and 'Valiant'. There were no significant differences among the cultivars in US
No. 1 yield for the season. US No.2 yield ranged from 239 bu/A for 'Whopper Improved' to 413
bu/A for 'Summer Sweet 860', with no significant differences among the cultivars.

Total marketable yield across all grades ranged from 1004 bu/A for 'Boynton Bell' to 1170 bu/A for
'King Arthur', with no differences among the cultivars. These yields exceeded the commercial
average yield of 775 bu/A (Fla. Agric. Stat. Serv., 1996). Cull fruit yield ranged from 155 bu/A for
'Valiant' to 215 bu/A for 'King Arthur', with no differences among the cultivars.

SUMMARY

Based on early and seasonal U.S. Fancy yields, 'Whopper Improved' had the best performance in the
spring. In the fall, all cultivars but 'Valiant' performed similarly well.


Note: The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and should not
be used as recommendations for crop production. No discrimination is intended or endorsement
implied where trade names are used.

LITERATURE CITED

Florida Agricultural Statistics Service. 1996. Florida Agricultural Statistics. Vegetable Summary
1994-95. Fla. Agr. Stat. Serv., Orlando, FL.

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1991. Bell pepper variety trial for spring 1991. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1991-16

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1992a. Bell pepper variety trial for fall 1991. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1992-08.

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1992b. Bell pepper variety trial for spring 1992. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1992-14.

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1993a. Bell pepper variety trial for fall 1992. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1993-07.









5

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1993b. Bell pepper variety trial for spring 1993. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1993-15.

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1994a. Bell pepper variety trial for fall 1993. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1994-07.

Howe, T. K. and W. E. Waters. 1994b. Pepper variety trial for spring 1994. Bradenton GCREC
Res. Rept. BRA1994-15.

Stanley, C. D. 1996. Weather report for 1995, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center,
Bradenton, Florida. Bradenton GCREC Res. Rept. BRA1996-06.

United States Department of Agriculture. 1981. U. S. standards for grades of peppers. USDA Agr.
Mktg. Serv., USDA, Washington, DC.








Table 1. Temperature and rainfall at the GCREC during the spring and fall of 1995 and the 42-year
averages (Stanley, 1996).


Average Daily Temperature (F)
Maximum Minimum Rainfall (in.)
Month 1995z 42-yr avg 1995z 42-yr avg 1995z 42-yr avg

March 85 78 57 55 2.57 3.45
April 83 82 63 60 3.41 1.83
May 91 87 70 64 1.48 2.86

August 93 91 75 72 11.30 9.61
September 91 90 73 71 8.25 7.76
October 87 85 70 64 5.12 2.93
November 77 79 56 58 3.97 1.94
December 72 74 50 52 1.16 2.22


"Fields transplanted 2 March and 23 August 1995. Last harvests 25 May and 13 December 1995, for
spring and fall seasons, respectively.













Table 2. Marketable yields, cull yield, and marketable fruit characteristics for the first harvest, spring 1995.


Yield (bu/A)z Marketable Fruit y

U.S. U.S. U.S. Total Length Width Ratio No. Wall Thickness
Cultivar Fancy No. 1 No. 2 Marketable Cull (in.) (in.) L/W Lobes (in.)

Whopper Improved I1 ax 17 b 1 a 130 a 2 a 4.0 a 3.3 a 1.24 a 3.3 a 0.240 a
Valiant 107 a 35 ab 3 a 145 a 2 a 3.8 ab 3.5 a 1.11 c 3.4 a 0.241 a
Boynton Bell 70 ab 42 ab 3 a 115 a <1 a 3.9 a 3.4 a 1.17 b 2.9 b 0.234 a
Summer Sweet 860 36 b 49 a 8 a 93 a 3 a 3.7 b 3.4 a 1.08 c 3.3 a 0.228 a
King Arthur 32 b 44 ab 9 a 85 a Oa 3.7 b 3.5 a 1.06 c 3.3 a 0.227 a


zBushel = 28 lbs. Acre = 8712 linear ft of bed.
YMeans from sample of eight fruit per replication.
xMean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.











Table 3. Marketable yields and cull yield for the entire season, spring 1995.


Yield (bu/A)z
U.S. U.S. U.S. Total
Cultivar Fancy No. 1 No. 2 Marketable Cull

Whopper Improved 566 a 299 b 58 b 923 a 113 a
Valiant 375 b 542 a 40 b 957 a 84 a
Boynton Bell 271 c 669 a 69 b 1009 a 135 a
Summer Sweet 860 266 c 678 a 77 b 1021 a 88 a
King Arthur 172 d 584 a 133 a 889 a 188 a


'Bushel = 28 lbs. Acre = 8712 linear ft of bed.
YMean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.














Table 4. Marketable yields, cull yield, and marketable fruit characteristics for the first harvest, fall 1995.


Yield (bu/A)z Marketable Fruit Y
U.S. U.S. U.S. Total Length Width Ratio No. Wall Thickness
Cultivar Fancy No. 1 No. 2 Marketable Cull (in.) (in.) L/W Lobes (in.)

Whopper Improved 38 ax 302 a 93 a 433 ab 77 b 3.2 a 2.9 b 1.09 a 3.6 b 0.235 a
KingArthur 36a 319a 113a 468 a 107a 3.0ab 3.3 a 0.911b 4.1 a 0.215b
Summer Sweet 860 16 a 288 a 92 a 396 a-c 75 b 2.8 b 3.1 b 0.919 b 3.3 b 0.204 b
Boynton Bell 10 a 198 b 71 a 278 c 34 c 2.8 b 3.0 b 0.941 b 3.2 b 0.215 b
Valiant 10 a 235 ab 70 a 315 be 39 c 2.8 b 2.9 b 0.971 ab 3.4 b 0.222 ab


'Bushel = 28 Ibs. Acre = 8712 linear ft of bed.
YMeans from sample of eight fruit per replication.
xMean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.










Table 5. Marketable yields and cull yield for the entire season, fall 1995.


Yield (bu/A)z
U.S. U.S. U.S. Total
Cultivar Fancy No. 1 No. 2 Marketable Cull

Whopper Improved 64 a 791 a 239 a 1094 a 195 a
King Arthur 58 ab 780 a 332 a 1170 a 215 a
Summer Sweet 860 26 ab 693 a 413 a 1132 a 198 a
Boynton Bell 22 ab 666 a 316 a 1004 a 194 a
Valiant 17 b 791 a 319 a 1127 a 155 a


"Bushel = 28 lbs. Acre = 8712 linear ft of bed.
YMean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.








The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center


The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center is
a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences, University of Florida. The Research Center
originated in the fall of 1925 as the Tomato
Disease Laboratory with the primary objective of
developing control procedures for an epidemic out-
break of nailhead spot of tomato. Research was ex-
panded in subsequent years to include study of sev-
eral other tomato diseases.

In 1937, new research facilities were established
in the town of Manatee, and the Center scope was
enlarged to include horticultural, entomological, and
soil science studies of several vegetable crops. The
ornamental program was a natural addition to the
Center's responsibilities because of the emerging in-
dustry in the area in the early 1940's.

The Center's current location was established in
1965 where a comprehensive research and extension
program on vegetable crops and ornamental plants is
conducted. Three state extension specialists posi-
tions, 16 state research scientists, and two grant
supported scientists from various disciplines of
training participate in all phases of vegetable and
ornamental horticultural programs. This interdisci-
plinary team approach, combining several research
disciplines and a wide range of industry and faculty
contacts, often is more productive than could be ac-
complished with limited investments in independent
programs.


The Center's primary mission is to develop new
and expand existing knowledge and technology, and
to disseminate new scientific knowledge in Florida, so
that agriculture remains efficient and economically
sound.

The secondary mission of the Center is to assist
the Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS campus
departments, in which Center faculty hold appropri-
ate liaison appointments, and other research centers
in extension, educational training, and cooperative
research programs for the benefit of Florida's pro-
ducers, students, and citizens.

Program areas of emphasis include: (1) genetics,
breeding, and variety development and evaluation;
(2) biological, chemical, and mechanical pest manage-
ment in entomology, plant pathology, nematology,
bacteriology, virology, and weed science; (3) produc-
tion efficiency, culture, management, and counteract-
ing environmental stress; (4) water management and
natural resource protection; (5) post-harvest physiol-
ogy, harvesting, handling and food quality of horti-
cultural crops; (6) technical support and assistance to
the Florida Cooperative Extension Service; and (7)
advancement offundamental knowledge ofdisciplines
represented by faculty and (8) directing graduate
student training and teaching special undergraduate
classes.


Location of
GCREC Bradenton


IFAS IS:
Q The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
University of Florida.
Q A statewide organization dedicated to teaching,
research and extension.
" Faculty located in Gainesville and at 13 research
and education centers, 67 county extension
offices and four demonstration units throughout
the state.
D A partnership in food and agriculture, and natural
and renewable resource research and education,
funded by state, federal and local government,
and by gifts and grants from individuals, founda-
tions, government and industry.
" An organization whose mission is:
Educating students in the food, agricultural,
and related sciences and natural resources.
Strengthening Florida's diverse food and
agricultural industry and its environment
through research.
Enhancing for all Floridians, the application
of research and knowledge to improve the
quality of life statewide through IFAS exten-
sion programs.




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