• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Copyright
 Curvularia rot of corms
 Stromatinia soil test
 Soil treatment tests
 Flower dips for botrytis contr...
 Fusarium control tests
 Tables






Group Title: Mimeo report - Gulf Coast Station - 57-1
Title: Summary of 1956 research on gladiolus
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067756/00001
 Material Information
Title: Summary of 1956 research on gladiolus
Series Title: Gulf Coast Station mimeo report
Physical Description: 6, 5 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Magie, R. O ( Robert Ogden ), 1906-
Gulf Coast Experiment Station (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Gulf Coast Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Bradenton FL
Publication Date: 1956
 Subjects
Subject: Gladiolus -- Research -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: R.O. Magie.
General Note: Caption title.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067756
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 73266344

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Curvularia rot of corms
        Page 1
    Stromatinia soil test
        Page 2
    Soil treatment tests
        Page 2
    Flower dips for botrytis control
        Page 2
    Fusarium control tests
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Tables
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida





Gulf Coast Station Mimeo Report 57-1 V,
Bradenton, Florida

SUMIRY OF 1956 RESEARCH ON GLADIOLUS
p DEC 17 19561
R. 0. Magie


Curvularia Rot of Corms

Curvularia disease was first noticed on gladiolus in Florida about ten years

ago. During the first few years bulbs were not attacked severely. However, in re-

cent years the disease has been second in importance to Fusarium in rotting bulbs.

It is most severe on bulbs grown from bulblets. The variety Picardy is very suscep-

tible. Bulbs are infected as a result of being planted in infested soil or from the

spread of leaf infection. Curvularia lives over in the soil in the absence of glad'-

iolus for at least four years. The disease spreads from the leaves to the bulbs

even though zineb and maneb sprays are applied weekly.

Recommendations on bulbs are 1) Treat infected bulbs after cleaning with cap-

tan or Dowicide B and again before planting with N.I.Ceresan; or captain dust (15%)

can be used at cleaning and Dowicide B before planting; 2) Plant bulblets on new

land or on vegetable land. Avoid replanting gladiolus bulbs for 4 years in land

where a crxp was severely attacked by Curvularia. Wait 8 years before planting bulb-

lets or planting stocks.

Recommendations on spraying. Begin weekly spraying before disease appears

on bulblets and spray twice each week after leaf spots show up. Use zineb and ma-

neb alternately. $dd a wetting agent and sprtr thoroughly with about 200 to 250 Ibs.

pressure. On bulblet plants use 3 nozzles per row and adjust nozzles to the height

of plants. Apply enough spray to wet the soil around the base of plants. One grow-

er reports better control by adding captan to the maneb spray.

Curvularia on leaves or flower spike is difficult to control unless sprays

are applied thoroughly and frequently. Triton B 1956 should be used at about 4 to

8 ounces per 100 gallons. Unless the plants are small, 80 to 150 gallons are needed

to adequately spray an acre. Some growers are using too much spray pressure. Usu-

ally 300 pounds pressure is enough to form a driving mist. Each grower must deter-

irine how to adjust prssure, nozzleo eand tractor speed to the size of piRfnts by ob-




-2-

serving the spray coverage behind the sprayer.


Stromatinia Soil Test

Many gladiolus fields have been temporarily abandoned because the soil is

infested with the Stromatinia root rot fungus. Before replanting such land fo- a

.'Ll crop when the disease is severe, growers would like a way to determine whf-t'VFr

:;s land needs chemical treatment to control the disease or whether it is safe t,.

l',int '"thout treatment. There is no laboratory or culture method for finding tae

Stromatjiia population of the soil but an indication of the degree of infestat:c-i

can be found by planting bulblets in a sample of the soil, The percentage of ILi t:

that survive for 6 or 8 weeks compared to growth in "clean" soil indicates the a-

mirrnt of disease. The test planting should be made during the first two weeks .i

November, using 2 flats or boxes of clean soil and 2 flats of diseased soil. Use

largee Picardy bulblets. It is advisable to remove their husks one week before plant

ing and discard any with disease spots. Plant 100 bulblets in each flat. The t-i

nust be mide a year or more before the fields are to be planted.


Soil Treatment Tests

TVpam and Crag Mylone (974) were tested at different dosages in the control

it Fusarium and Stromatinia diseases. Disease control was good at 100 to 200 Lbs.

per rcre or at 50 to 100 Ibs. in the row if the soil was moist and sealed by roll-

ing or sprinkling after application of the chemicals. Current tests are aimed at

finding the best methods of applying the chemicals. Growers who wish to replas.nt 06

~ladiolus fields are beginning to test these chemicals on a small eca3o in orc., tc

become familiar with their use. A few growers in other States are using Vapam exten

sively to treat gladiolus fields.


Flower Dips for Botrytis Control

Promising results were obtained with systemic fungicides as flower spike dip.

before shipping. No new recommendations are made at this time. Zineb at 2-100, no-

bcm plu2 zinc sulfate at field concentration, Vancide "51" at one pint per 100 ga'

and Puratized Agrieultural Spray at one pint per 100 gal. are agnin rooommended.




-2-

serving the spray coverage behind the sprayer.


Stromatinia Soil Test

Many gladiolus fields have been temporarily abandoned because the soil is

infested with the Stromatinia root rot fungus. Before replanting such land fo- a

.'Ll crop when the disease is severe, growers would like a way to determine whf-t'VFr

:;s land needs chemical treatment to control the disease or whether it is safe t,.

l',int '"thout treatment. There is no laboratory or culture method for finding tae

Stromatjiia population of the soil but an indication of the degree of infestat:c-i

can be found by planting bulblets in a sample of the soil, The percentage of ILi t:

that survive for 6 or 8 weeks compared to growth in "clean" soil indicates the a-

mirrnt of disease. The test planting should be made during the first two weeks .i

November, using 2 flats or boxes of clean soil and 2 flats of diseased soil. Use

largee Picardy bulblets. It is advisable to remove their husks one week before plant

ing and discard any with disease spots. Plant 100 bulblets in each flat. The t-i

nust be mide a year or more before the fields are to be planted.


Soil Treatment Tests

TVpam and Crag Mylone (974) were tested at different dosages in the control

it Fusarium and Stromatinia diseases. Disease control was good at 100 to 200 Lbs.

per rcre or at 50 to 100 Ibs. in the row if the soil was moist and sealed by roll-

ing or sprinkling after application of the chemicals. Current tests are aimed at

finding the best methods of applying the chemicals. Growers who wish to replas.nt 06

~ladiolus fields are beginning to test these chemicals on a small eca3o in orc., tc

become familiar with their use. A few growers in other States are using Vapam exten

sively to treat gladiolus fields.


Flower Dips for Botrytis Control

Promising results were obtained with systemic fungicides as flower spike dip.

before shipping. No new recommendations are made at this time. Zineb at 2-100, no-

bcm plu2 zinc sulfate at field concentration, Vancide "51" at one pint per 100 ga'

and Puratized Agrieultural Spray at one pint per 100 gal. are agnin rooommended.




-2-

serving the spray coverage behind the sprayer.


Stromatinia Soil Test

Many gladiolus fields have been temporarily abandoned because the soil is

infested with the Stromatinia root rot fungus. Before replanting such land fo- a

.'Ll crop when the disease is severe, growers would like a way to determine whf-t'VFr

:;s land needs chemical treatment to control the disease or whether it is safe t,.

l',int '"thout treatment. There is no laboratory or culture method for finding tae

Stromatjiia population of the soil but an indication of the degree of infestat:c-i

can be found by planting bulblets in a sample of the soil, The percentage of ILi t:

that survive for 6 or 8 weeks compared to growth in "clean" soil indicates the a-

mirrnt of disease. The test planting should be made during the first two weeks .i

November, using 2 flats or boxes of clean soil and 2 flats of diseased soil. Use

largee Picardy bulblets. It is advisable to remove their husks one week before plant

ing and discard any with disease spots. Plant 100 bulblets in each flat. The t-i

nust be mide a year or more before the fields are to be planted.


Soil Treatment Tests

TVpam and Crag Mylone (974) were tested at different dosages in the control

it Fusarium and Stromatinia diseases. Disease control was good at 100 to 200 Lbs.

per rcre or at 50 to 100 Ibs. in the row if the soil was moist and sealed by roll-

ing or sprinkling after application of the chemicals. Current tests are aimed at

finding the best methods of applying the chemicals. Growers who wish to replas.nt 06

~ladiolus fields are beginning to test these chemicals on a small eca3o in orc., tc

become familiar with their use. A few growers in other States are using Vapam exten

sively to treat gladiolus fields.


Flower Dips for Botrytis Control

Promising results were obtained with systemic fungicides as flower spike dip.

before shipping. No new recommendations are made at this time. Zineb at 2-100, no-

bcm plu2 zinc sulfate at field concentration, Vancide "51" at one pint per 100 ga'

and Puratized Agrieultural Spray at one pint per 100 gal. are agnin rooommended.







Maneb (Manzate or Dithane M-22) should never beo uied for dipping flowers as it w:'.ll

burn the buds. Maneb spray will also burn leaves and buds if the spray does not

dr off promptly or if the spray is applied to wet foliage.


Fusarium Control Tests

In past years the main purpose of treating bulbs vith fungicides was to c"c-

-rol bulb rot. Our tests show that the increase in flower production and the tbe--t-,M

quality spikes obtained as a result of bulb treatments are even more important to

growers than just controlling bulb rot, especially in the more resistant varieties.

The latent Fusarium infections in the resistant varieties often cause poor flc v'

.yids. On a majority of the gladiolus farms, losses caused by the Fusarium dj.-aso

are considerably less than they were five years ago. However, Fusarium is still +he

No. 1 problem in flower production. Some of the research results in Fusarium con-

trol are summarized below.

Fusarium located in husks and cores. Tests indicate that much of the inf -e

tion in Picardy bulbs is located in the husks and cores; also in the husks of bi':.

lets. "'hen husks or cores *fe removed from jugbo bulbse,-the.dlieasea wS- ontrcl'

toa. large extrit and more flowers and bulbs were produced. Bulb production 7;07,s

.Aver three times that of the checks when either husks or cores were removed wo

wesks before planting.

TLese results indicate the importance of adding a penetrating agent like Tri-

ten X-10 to the bulb dip in order to wet the inside of the husks quickly. T'he ir-

;,crcance of using enough wetting agent increases as the dipping period is shoc,'.i _,

Between 1/3 and 1/2 cup of Triton X-100 per 100 gallons is sufficient unless t:.e

husks are tight and heavy.

Ntes on bulb dipping. Each farm should have at least two dip tanks go

that sprouted bulbs can be treated in captain while the others are given the uozsi

treatment. All tanks should have one or more agitators. The propellor agitators

are preferred because they do not throw a spray of the chemical into the air to

bother the workers.





-4-

Dowicide B solidifies or cakes when held in common storage for a few months

Tests were made to determine whether the caked material could be used. A year-old

supply was compared with a new supply and found to be equally effective as a bulb

diV provided that more of the caked material was used to balance the water absorLel.

T.'refore, with caked Dowicide B, use 25 percent more than recommended (e.g.5 l~.

instead of 4 lb.)


Bulb Treatment Tests,

Purposes and aims.

1. To test various combinations and concentrations of captan, Dowicide B and N.T

Ceresan when bulbs are treated both prestorage and preplanting as compared t

one treatment at either time.

2. To test allyl alcohol and acetone as penetrators to carry fungicide into bulb

far enough to kill latent Fusarium infections.

3. To determine whether better Fusarium control is obtained by cleaning and trent-

ing bulbs as they are dug.

4. To determine whether injury from Ceresan M and N.I.Ceresan used prestorage can

be safely reduced by adding captain or Arasan.

5. To find a mercury fungicide which is safe to use prestorage.

C, To test new fungicides including Vapam, Crag IMylone (974), Fanogen, Ceresan Li-

quid 364, Merculine and Bayer TB 4452 in comparison with the standard fungicides.

Conclusions and recommendations.

L. Flower quality in some varieties is reduced somewhat by using the highest i...-.

mended concentrations of Dowicide B, especially at the time of cleaning the bulbs.

The higher concentrations usually resulted in the largest yields of sound bulbs

and the number of spikes also was often high but the grade was reduced. It Iz

now recommended that for the preplanting treatment in warm weather four pounw.s

of Dowicide B per 100 gallons with about 1/2 cup of Triton X-100 be used for fif-

teen minutes. Use 5 or 6 pounds in cool weather. If the bulbs were treated with

captan or Spergon before storage, use only 3 or 4 pounds of Dowicide B per 100





-5-

.(galons as a 10-minute preplanting dip.

If it is desired to use Dowicide B after cleaning the bulbs, 2 lbs.in 100

gal. + Triton X3O00 for 10 minutes is sufficient unless the bulbs are well curei

and hard. If so, 3 Ibs.cen be used safely. To get the maximum control of Fu-

sarium disease, the bulbs should be treated again before planting, using cap-'nn

or N.I.Ceresan.

The advantage of using two treatments, one at cleaning and another at pre-

planting, is that lower concentrations of both chemicals can be used, thereby

minimizing chemical injury and stunting of flowers. Various tests have indii&-

ted that all chemical treatments tend to reduce the grade of spikes if no dis -

ease is present. The goal is to get good disease control and the highest fl2:rsr

production with the lowest possible dosages of chemicals. The best method found

so far is to use two different chemicals, one at cleaning and one at planting

time.

The one-minute preplanting dip of N.I.Ceresan gives good flower production

but is too weak for good bulb production unless the bulbs were treated at clea:.-

ing time also. If a dip or dust was not used at cleaning, increase the time to

ten minutes with W.I.Ceresan at 2 lbs. per 100 gal.

2, Bulbs tolerated rather high concentrations of acetone and allyl alcohol but no

advantage could be found in using them.

3. Cleaning and treating bulbs as they are dug proved to be as good or better than

waiting two weeks to clean and treat but the bulbs were more easily injured by

Dowicide B, making it advisable to use captain or Spergon.

1. Captan and Arasan made the Ceresan fungicides safer to use as bulb dips but not

safe enough for a prestorage dip.

F. The only safe mercury fungicide for prestorage dipping was Panogen 15 (Pano-

Drench 4 is a weak formulation of Panogen).

6. DowiciLo B vas cor~tatible wwih aptan or wlth N.I.Cereaan aWdothfr msroury ter-

icals tested. Captan was the safest fungicide to use on soft, uncured or sprouted

bulbs. A prestorage treatment with captain dip or dust followed by Ceresan or





-6-

Dowicide B at planting time produced the heaviest bulbs in most tests. Flower-

ing was delayed by practically nll treatments except captan dust or dip treat-

ments and a dust mixture applied at cleaning made up of equal parts of Spergon

,ettable, captan 50", Arasan SF-X and diluent.

The following cleaning-time treatments were very effective against FusariJum

disease if followed by a preplanting dip in either N,I.Ceresan or Dowicide B:

a) Sporgon (24% active) dust used immediately after cleaning.

b) COptan (15% active) dust used immediately after cleaning.

c) Capton 501, 12 lbs.-100 gals, for 15-20 minutes.

d) Dowicide B followed by a preplanting dip in N.I.Ceresan or captain.

Panogen 15 was the only new fungicide to compare favorably with standr~"d

treatments. No recommendations on Panogen can be made this year.

Since the data W.re too extensive to summarize adequately in words, the to-

tals for the more important treatments are shown in Tables 1 to 6. Preliminary

tests on cleaning and treating bulbs immediately after digging are included in

the tables. Such treatments are not recommended at this time.







September 1956.
350 copies







Table 1 Eff.ctY o" s.ir. ? sd double tr t:e-~-: on. yields froc1n jnmbo
buiji l f .-ic;ady, Valeri; Ji; jills s.i : Yoi.>g Kiss.
110 bulcs of each variety used per treatment


cor-mzrcial-grosn


Bulb treatments


After cleaning or digging
None
None
None
Spergon (484 + Arasn SF-X +
Captan 50 + diluent (equal parts)
used as a dust
Panogen 15, 1/2 gal.-100,10
min. soak
Dowicide B 3-100, 15 min.
Captnn (75%) 8-100, 15 rin.
Captsn (12 1/2%) as a dust
Spergon (244) as a dust
Gleaned 1 day after digging and
dipper for 5 min.in Dowicide B
3-100
Washed bulbs and dipped 1 day
after digging in Dowicide B
3-100, 5 min.
Washed bulbs and dipped 1 day
after digging in N.I.Cerespn
2-100 + cnptan (75) 4-100
5 min.


Before planting


None
Dowicide B 6-100, 20 min.
N.I.Ceresan 2-100,1 min.


None


None 108
N.I.Ceresan 2-100, 1 min. 138
Dowicide B 6-100,15 min. 132
Dowicide B 6-100,15 min. 112
Doiicide B 6-100,15 min. 144


N.I.Ceresnn 2-100,1 min. 124


N.I.Ceresan 2-100,1 min. 175



Dowicide B 6-100, 15 min. 0


Flower production inre


"Pic. Val.
43 261
111 297
103 312


J.B.
265
336
395


I'. X
115
171
195


Sum
684
915**
1005*'


93 316 395 205 1009*


303
239
205
224
264


279


330



58


386
354
383
462
386


1127**
927
912
898
976*


356 159 918*


434 152 1091



6 4 68**


Total
spikes


cut
220
327
319


Weight of bulbs (lbs.)


No. of
sound


Pie. Val. J.B. M.K. Sum bulbs


3.3
18.6
5.0


16.1
23.5
23.1


12.0
19.8
12.1


3.5
17.0
17.0


34.9
78.9
66.2


349 8.1 19.5 21.6 19.8 69.0


343
325
311
290
347


20.5
19.9
28.1
16.7
16.2


20.5
21.5
23.7
23.6
23.7


19.4
21.8
21.9
25.5
19.7


21.6
25.9
22.7
23.4
22.5


82.0
89.1
88.4
89.2
82.1


313 19.4 23.6 27.0 25.5 95.5


307 14.3 21.4 17.9 28.1 81.7


0 2.9 1.0 1.5 5.4


Differences required between sums for significance at odds of 19:1

*Greater number of spikes cut early.
*Spiking delayed by treatment.


130


182
403
332


360

461
468
493
499
453


506


472



36


11.3 54


Bulb treatments










Table 2. Comparison of different treatments made before and after storage
on yields of jumbo bulbs of Picardy, Valeria, June Bells and
Spotlight grown on a commercial flower farm.
150 bulbs of each variety per treatment


Bulb treatment


Applied after cleaning
None
None
Spergon (24%) dust
Dowicide B 4-100, 5 min.
Captsn (75o) 8-100,15 min.
Captan (75%) 8-100, 15 min.
Bulbs washed at digging
and immediately dipped
in Dowicide B 4-100,5 min.
Bulbs cleaned at digging
and dipped in Dowicide
B 4-100, 5 min.


Flower production index


Before planting
None
Dowicide B 6-100,20 min.
Dowicide B 6-100 15 min.
N.I.Ceresan-2-100, 1 min.-
Dowicide B 6-100, 15 min.
N.I.Ceresan 2-100, 1 min.


N.I.Ceresan 2-100,1 min.


Pic.
93
136
144
168
170
150


Val.
279
310
289
393
467
307


J.B.
286
344
392
456
375
435


Spot. Sum


781
962**
1075**
1247
1280**
1117**


123
172
250
230
268
225


210 196 432 165 .1003"


N.I.Ceresnn 2-100, 1 min. 217 295 432 263 1207*


Total
Spikes
cut
310
401
422
513
484
438


No. sound bulbs dug


Pie.
28
63
78
79
71
71


Val.
94
123
113
138
147
123


J.B.
78
95
112
127
95
114


Spot.
23
39
52
60
63
64


Weight
of bulbs


Sum
223
320
355
404
376
372


(Ibs.)
40
63
66
76
75
71


461 102 157 110 41 410 73


518 131 152 117 56 456 83


Difference required between sums for significance at odds of 19:1


*Early spiking
**Late spiking


150


64 14


I









Table 3. Effects of sigle os- double trentneits oa yields frc'l ?l. 3ld
coimmercial-giown stock of jumbo Picardy bulbs
125 bulbs used per treatment


Bulb tr


After cleaning bulbs
Spergon (24%) dust
Spergon (24%) dust
Dust of Spergon 148%), Arasan
SF-X, captain (50f) and pyro-
phyllite in equal parts
Captan (12 1/2%) dust
Captan (12 1/2%) dust
Dowicide B 4-100, 5 min.
Dowicide B 4-100, 5 min.
Captsn (755) 8-100, 20 min.
Captan (75'1) 8-100, 20 min.
N.I.Ceresan 2-100 + captain (75%)
8-100, 1 min.
Pano-Drench 4 (.6u" active)
1 gal.-100, 15 min.
None
None


eatment
Before planting
None
N.I.Ceresan 2-100, 1 min.


None
None
N.I.Ceresan 2-100, 1 min.
None
N.I.Ceresan 2-100, 1 min.
None
Dowicide B 6-100, 15 min.

Dowicide B 6-100, 15 min.

None
Dowicide B 6-100, 15 min.
None


No. spikes
cut before
Feb. 3
59
60


Total
spikes
cut
76
69


92
90
114
86
90
78
73


No.of Weight Weight
sound bulbs bulblets
FPT_' bulbs (lbs.) (oz.)
178 98 20 8
182 106 26 10


303
254
270
231
239
244
219


100 339


255
219
134


102
94
141
100
138
79
124

116

92
189
64


20 14


19
23
8


Difference required between sums for significance at odds of 19:1

*The flower production index is obtained by giving a grade C flow
additional point.


18 60 35


er a score of 2 and each increase in grade an


U







Table 4 Effects of single and double treatments on yields from jumbo Picardy
grown on a commercial flower farm


15
After cleaning
Dowicide B 3-100

Dowicide B 3-100

Dowicide B 4-100

Dowicide B 4-100

Captnn 75, 8-100

Captnn 75, 8-100

Cnptan 75, 8-100

Captan 75, 8-100

Panogen 15, 1 pt.

Panogen 15, 1 pt.

None

None

None

None

None

Least significant


225 bulbs


minutes bulb treatments
Prepla nt ing
None

N.I.Ceresan 2-100

None

N.I.Ceresna 2-100

None

N.I.Ceresnn 2-100

None

Dowicide B 6-100

100 None

-100 Dowicide B 6-100

None

N.I.Ceresnn 2-100

Dowicide B 6-100

Captnn 75, 8-100

Phnogen 15, 1 qt.-100

difference. 5


per treatment

No. spikes
cut before
2/20
37

26

19

11

37

8

25

17

23

11

26

5

12


1Flower production index is obtained by giving C grade spikes a value of 2 anl each increase in grade is
point. The FPI per spike is brsed on totpl spikes cut. A score of 3 means an average grnde of B, 4 is
a special grade e-? ge .....


FPI*
1166

1134

1055

1178

1207

1157

1031

1020

1136

1137

675

992

1296

955

966

!>6 5A


II U


Total
spikes
cut
281

302

262

359

249

291

243

262

260

280

179

297

308

247

219


FPI*
per
spike
4.2

3.8

4.0

3.3

4.9

4.0

4.5

3.9

4.3

4.2

3.8

3.3

4.2

3.8

4.4


No.of
bulbs
dug
281

307

290

255

244

302

220

247

252

291

174

299

243

252

168


Weight
bulbs
(Ibs.)
57.6

54.0

58.2

52.7

59.7

60.0

46.1

50.4

53.6

55.4

38.2

60.2

51.7

53.4

37.4

10
given nn nddditional
grande A and 5 means







Table 3. ..i -ct: of single rn: di-.:. bc-intments on commercial jumbo bulbi
of Picardy, Valeris, June Blls aen Morning Ki~es
110 bulbs of each variety used for each treatment


Bulb treatment
AoDlied after cleaning bulbs Befo:


None
None
None
Captan (75%) 8-100, 15 min.
Capton (75%) 8-100, 15 min.
Dowicide B 4-100, 15 min,


Flower production iniex?


re leaning


None
N.I.Ceresan 2-100, 1 min.
Dowicide B 6-100, 1i min.
None
Dowicide B 4-100,15 min.
Capton (75%) 8-103, 15 min.


Plc. Val. J.B.


62
132
116
133
151
146


96
114
155
154
193
196


89
279
421
305
459
411


M.K.
74
99
81
126
147
145


Sum
321
624*
773
718
950
898


Number of
Pic. Val.
43 58
139 42
169 140
63 76
106 109
132 122


sound bulbs
J.B. M.K. S
31 60
75 93
132 121
111 80
107 119
126 94


Weight Weight
bulbs bulblets


Sum
L92
539
562
330
141
174


(lbs.)
32
49
84
53
70
73


(Ounces
19
26
77
35
57
66


Difference required between sums for significance at odds of 19-1


*Flower production index is obtained by giving Grnde C flowers a score of 2 and each increase in grade
**Spiking delayed by treatment.


an additional point.


Table 6. Valeria, June Bells and Morning Kiss bulbs, size No. 3 and 4,
inoculated heavily with Fusarium after cleaning end treated 3 days later;
50 bulbs of each variety per treatment


Treatment s
Csptan 75 (Orthocide) 8-100
Dowicide B 2-100
Dowicide B 4-100
Phnogen 15, 2 qt.-100
Merculine 2 qt.-100
Allyl alcohol 2 qt.-100
Check, no treatment


Flower production index


Val. J.B.
45 63
49 65
71 78
58 47
9 10
20 64
88 36


M.K.
59
73
47
69
12
35
35


Sum
167
187
196
174
31
119
88


No. of
spikes
cut
60
68
76
61
14
53
42


No. sound bulbs


VeI..
44
43
42
45
U
44
42


J.B.
41
50
57
56
19
37
32


M.K.
23
39
49
42
12
38
11


Sum
108
132
148
143
42
119
85


40 16


Wt. of
bulbs


(Ibs.)
13.6
21.5
21.2
21.1
6.2
15.3
9.6


Pi.p1.TB




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