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 Title Page
 Introduction
 Materials and methods
 Results and discussion
 Summary
 Literature cited
 Tables
 Gulf coast research and education...






Group Title: Research report - Bradenton Gulf Coast Research and Education Center - BRA 1997-2
Title: Plum and saladette tomato variety trial results for fall 1996
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067743/00001
 Material Information
Title: Plum and saladette tomato variety trial results for fall 1996
Series Title: GCREC-Bradenton research report
Physical Description: 12 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Howe, T. K ( Teresa K )
Waters, W. E ( Will E )
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Bradenton FL
Publication Date: 1997
 Subjects
Subject: Tomatoes -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Tomato industry -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 5).
Statement of Responsibility: T.K. Howe and W.E. Waters.
General Note: Cover title.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067743
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 37267878

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Materials and methods
        Page 2
    Results and discussion
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Summary
        Page 5
    Literature cited
        Page 5
    Tables
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Gulf coast research and education center
        Page 13
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Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
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flc3;


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
5007 60th Street East, Bradenton, FL 34203
GCREC-Bradenton Research Report BRA 1997-2


Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences




PLUM AND SALADETTE TOMATO VARIETY
TRIAL RESULTS FOR FALL 1996


T. K. Howe and W. E. Waters








GCREC Research Report BRA1997-2


PLUM AND SALADETTE TOMATO VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS FOR FALL 1996

T. K. Howe and W. E. Waters1
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
University of Florida, IFAS
5007 60th Street East
Bradenton, FL 34203


In 1994-95, 49,000 acres of tomatoes were harvested in Florida, yielding 64.2 million 25-pound
cartons worth $461 million (Fla. Agr. Stat. Serv., 1996). Tomatoes accounted for 30% of the total
production value for all vegetables grown during 1993-94, making it the most important vegetable
produced in the state. The Palmetto-Ruskin area (west-central Florida) accounted for 31% of the
state's total fresh market tomato production in 1994-95.

Plum tomatoes are a growing proportion of the fresh tomato production. Separate production figures
for Florida grown plum tomatoes are not available, but are incorporated within production figures
for standard tomatoes (Fla. Agr. Stat. Serv., personal communication). However, the importance of
the plum tomato market is reflected by the fact that the acreage of two major growers in the
Manatee County area have shifted to 20% plum tomatoes. Overall, Manatee County has
approximately 10% of its tomato production in plum tomatoes (Gilreath, P., private communication).
Separate pricing reports for standard, cherry and plum tomatoes in market Internet services also
indicate the significance of plum tomatoes in the market place. Recently, more shelf space in
supermarkets is devoted to plum tomatoes on a regular basis.

Local interest in plum tomato cultivars centers on an oval, elongated, cylindrical shaped fruit,
frequently referred to by growers as a "roma" tomato. Saladette type plum tomatoes are in the
strictest definition "plum to globe shaped" (Leaper, 1977). This shorter, rounder shape is at a distinct
disadvantage in the Florida market, which demands the more elongated type. To further complicate
the issue of defining plum tomato shape characteristics, seed companies have their own vernacular,
where a "saladette" can mean any shape of plum tomato intended for a fresh market product.

For the purposes of this study, the term "plum" will refer to the elongated fruit type, while the term
"saladette" will refer to the shorter, rounder fruit type.

A plum and saladette tomato variety trial was conducted in fall 1996 at the Gulf Coast Research &
Education Center in west-central Florida to evaluate fresh market plum and saladette tomato varieties
and breeding lines. Twelve entries were evaluated in a replicated yield trial and an additional seven
entries were evaluated visually in unharvested observational plots.



1Research Program Coordinator and Center Director, respectively.


LI4NJVERSITY OF FLQRIDA I 1"'. '6TVES


February









MATERIALS & METHODS

S Soil Test Results: Soil in the trial area was sampled before field preparation and analyzed by the
IFAS Soil Testing Lab. The pH = 6.8, NH4-N = 3.5 ppm and N03-N = 6.0 ppm were determined
S7 from a water extract (Geraldson, 1967), and P = 74 ppm, K = 32 ppm, Ca = 839 ppm, and Mg = 126
ppm were determined from a Mehlich I extract (Hanlcn and DeVore, 1989).
SCIEi:"
LI ?.' ,y Bed Preparation: The 32.5-inch wide, 8-inch high beds were spaced on 5 ft centers with 6 beds
between seepage irrigation ditches. Fertilizer included 15-0-30 (N-P20O-K20) at 1742 lb/A (A =
8712 linear ft of bed) distributed in 2 narrow bands in shallow grooves on the bed surface 10 inches
to either side of the bed center. In addition, a banded false bed application was made of
superphosphate (0-20-0 with 80 lbs per ton minor elements as F503) at 174 lb/A. This fertilizer
regime provided a 1:2 ratio of N:K20 with approximately 260 lb N/A and 523 lb K20/A. Beds were
fumigated with methyl bromide:chloropicrin (67:33) at 189 lb/mulched A (mulched acre = 23,522
sq ft) and covered with white on black polyethylene film.

Transplant Production: Seeds were sown on July 15, 1996 into planter flats (1.5 x 1.5 x 2.5-inch
cells) containing vermiculite and Canadian peat (1:1 ,v:v) amended with dolomite, superphosphate,
and hydrated lime (11.3, 5.6 and 2.8 lb/cu yd, respectively) then covered with a layer of coarse
vermiculite and germinated in a greenhouse. Plants were hardened before transplanting by limiting
water and nutrients in the final phase of production.

Crop Production: Transplants were set in the field on August 26 and spaced 24 inches apart in single
rows in the center of each bed. Transplants were immediately drenched with water containing
imidacloprid to control silverleafwhitefly populations. Fields were also baited for mole crickets
after transplanting. Four replications of 10 plants per entry were arranged in a randomized complete
block design in the replicated trial and single 10-plant plots were used in the observational trial.
Plants were staked and tied without pruning.

Plants were scouted for pests throughout the season. Lepidopterous larvae, leafmniners and silverleaf
whitefly were the primary insects found. Bacillus thuringiensis, insecticidal soap, esfenvalerate,
abamectin, endosulfan, methamidophos, fenpropathrin, cryolite, and methomyl were used according
to label instructions to control insect pest populations during the season. A preventative spray
program using maneb, copper salts, chlorothalonil and chlorothalonil plus copper oxychloride was
followed for control of bacterial as well as fungal-incited diseases. Disease pressure was minimal
during the course of the season.

Fruit of the replicated entries were harvested at the breaker stage or beyond on November 6, 13, 20,
27, and December 10. Breakers were selected to assure maximum fruit size was obtained for each
cultivar. Tomatoes were graded as cull or marketable by U.S. standards for grades (USDA, 1981)
and marketable fruit were sized into extra-large, large, medium, and small by examination (see
footnotes Tables 2 and 4 for specifications). Sizing was consistent under this method based on
calculated fruit weights of each size category. Both cull and marketable fruit were counted and
weighed. Subjective ratings of plant and fruit characteristics were given to the observational entries.
Plum and saladette data were analyzed separately, since the saladette types were larger fruited and
distinct from the plum type.











RESULTS & DISCUSSION

Average maximum daily temperatures were normal or slightly above normal compared to the 42-year
averages during the entire season (Table 1). Average minimum daily temperatures were normal or
within two degrees of normal during the season. Rainfall was well below average during August,
September and November, slightly below average during December, and much higher than the
average during October. The sparsity of rainfall reduced disease pressure and fruit disorders.

REPLICATED TRIALS

Plum: Total marketable yield among the eight plum entries from five harvests ranged from 1595 25-
lb cartons/A for 'Plum Dandy' to 2593 cartons/A for 'Marina' (Table 2). 'Veronica', 'Hybrid 882',
and 'Supra' were not significantly different than 'Marina' in total seasonal yields. Yields were
similar to those obtained in a trial completed in Boynton Beach, FL in the winter/spring of 1995-96
(Shuler, 1996). An average seasonal fruit weight of a 2.6 oz to 2.9 oz per fruit would pack out at 153
to 138 fruit per box, respectively. The market will not accept 180 to 200 fruit per box, and is
satisfied with 150 fruit per box. These seasonal yields would be acceptable in the packing house.

Extra-large fruit were too large (approaching the old 7x7 size category for standard tomatoes), with
an average fruit weight of 4.0 oz, and usually poorly shaped (out of class for the variety). Yield of
extra-large fruit ranged from 110 cartons/A for 'Plum Dandy' to 274 cartons/A for 'Supra'. Fruit in
the large category were judged to be the ideal size and quality. Large fruit yield ranged from 571
cartons/A for 'Plum Dandy' to 1057 cartons/A for 'Marina'. Average fruit weight for the large sized
fruit was 3.3 oz. Medium fruit yield ranged from 709 cartons/A for 'Agriroma' to 1089 cartons/A
for 'Hybrid 882'. The average fruit weight for all medium fruit was 2.6 oz. Together, large and
medium fruit provided acceptable packout. Small fruit, however, were too small to market with an
average weight of 1.9 oz Yields of small fruit for the season ranged from 138 cartons/A for
'Puebla' to 323 cartons/A for 'Hybrid 882'. Cull fruit accounted for between 23 and 44% of the total
fruit harvested. Attributes which culled fruit included nipple tipped blossom ends, poorly shaped
fruit, damaged fruit and extremely undersized fruit, in order of importance.

Yields for each harvest appear in Table 3. The plants were harvested weekly except the last harvest
which was performed two weeks after the fourth harvest. Earliest entries were 'Hybrid 882',
'Marina', 'Veronica', Sunre 6249, 'Supra' and 'Agriroma'. 'Plum Dandy' was exceptionally late
compared to the other entries, not approaching a reasonable yield until the third harvest. By
midseason, very few differences existed among the entries. Yields peaked at the fourth harvest. The
number of small fruit and cull fruit increased substantially at the fifth harvest and these increases
were used as indicators to terminate the trial.

Observations in the field and during grading indicated that some entries had distinguishing attributes.
'Agriroma' provided very elongated fruit, with highly variable shapes (not round in cross-section),
concentric zippering, and nipple-tipped blossom ends. This cultivar was the poorest for consistency
of fruit shape and had the greatest number of nipple-tipped fruit. 'Plum Dandy' had some nipple-










tipped fruit when fruit was immature, which smoothed out early in the season, and many concentric
zippers appeared by midseason. 'Hybrid 882' was variable in fruit shape, showed a slight amount
of nipple-tipped fruit, a tendency toward producing fruit with a narrow "neck" (fruit tapered at the
stem end, pear shaped), and a small amount of blossom-end rot the first three harvests. 'Puebla'
displayed very few nipple-tipped fruit, but had a slight amount of narrow "neck", variable fruit
shape, and radial cracks which appeared later in the season. 'Supra' was slightly pear shaped, had
nipple-tipped fruit, which became worse as the season progressed, and concentric zippers. 'Marina'
had some fruit with indented blossom ends, a definite lack of nipple-tipped fruit, fruit with a slight
"neck", and variable fruit shape and size. 'Veronica' produced slightly pear shaped fruit and variable
fruit shapes. Sunre 6249 had a high amount of nipple-tipped fruit, concentric zippers, and slightly
pear shaped fruit. At the second harvest, subjective notes were made on the most attractive fruit.
They were produced by 'Puebla', 'Supra' and 'Veronica'. At the final harvest rain checking
appeared in 'Hybrid 882', 'Puebla', 'Supra', 'Marina' and 'Veronica'.

Saladette: Total marketable yield among the four saladette entries from five harvests ranged from
1555 25-lb cartons/A for HMX 5885 to 2745 cartons/A for 'Orion' (Table 4). 'Orion' had the best
total, extra-large and large fruit yields of the four entries. Once again, extra-large fruit were deemed
of unacceptable quality, while large and medium fruit were of ideal shape and weight for this fruit
type. Medium fruit yields were not significantly different among the entries. Small fruit were
deemed too small to satisfy the 150 fruit per carton packout constraint.

Yields for each harvest appear in Table 5. The field was harvested weekly until the end of the season
with one exception. The last harvest was performed two weeks after the fourth harvest. Very few
differences existed among the entries throughout the season, except that 'Orion' produced
significantly more large sized fruit at the second and third harvest than any other entry. No entry was
particularly early. Again, yields peaked at the fourth harvest. The number of small fruit and cull
fruit increased substantially at the fifth harvest and these increases were used as indicators to
terminate the trial.

Distinguishing features were noted for the four entries. 'Orion' had no nipple-tipped fruit until late
in the season, a large number of fruit with radial zippers, and was slightly pear shaped. 'Sheriff had
immature fruit with nipple-tipped blossom ends early in the season which was persistent in mature
fruit later in the season, and slightly variable fruit shape. HMX 4878 was uniform, but had radial
cracks even at the first harvest, and slight grey wall. HMX 5885 had concentric zippers, poor fruit
shape, and deep radial cracks.

UNHARVESTED OBSERVATIONAL TRIAL

Horticultural Evaluation: Eight observational entries were rated for numerous horticultural
characteristics (Table 6). Plant and fruit attributes were rated at the end of the season on December
19. Ratings provide general indications of crop performance at a particular location and time.










SUMMARY

Based on grower acceptance of shape, only the elongated plum type should be considered for west-
central Florida. Of those plum entries investigated 'Marina', 'Veronica', 'Hybrid 882', and 'Supra'
had the best total, large, and medium fruit yields for the season. These entries also were similar in
earliness. Of these 'Marina' and 'Veronica' had the least incidence of fruit with nipple tipped
blossom ends.


Note: The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and should not
be used as recommendations for crop production. No discrimination is intended nor endorsement
implied where trade names are used.

Acknowledgment: The authors thank the following organizations/firms which donated funds toward
vegetable cultivar research during 1996: Abbott & Cobb Inc., Agrisales, American Takii, Asgrow
Seed Co., Daehnfeldt Inc., Ferry-Morse, Harris Moran Seed Co., Pepper Research, Rogers Seed Co.,
Sakata Seed America Inc., Samen Mauser, Shamrock Seed Co., and Sunseeds.

LITERATURE CITED

Florida Agricultural Statistics Service. 1996. Vegetable summary 1994-1995. Florida Agricultural
Statistics Service, Orlando, FL.

Geraldson, C. M. 1967. Evaluation of the nutrient intensity and balance system of soil testing. Soil
Crop Sci. Soc. of Fla. Proc. 27:59-67.

Hanlon, E. A. and J. M. DeVore. 1989. IFAS extension soil testing laboratory chemical procedures
and training manual. Fla. Coop. Ext. Serv. Circ. 812.

Leaper, P. 1977. TAMU saladette, a new dual purpose, fresh market and/or processing tomato.
Tomato Genetics Cooperative Rept. No. 27.

Shuler, K. D. 1996. Plum tomato variety performance, 710 Farms, Boynton Beach, FL.
Winter/Spring 1995-96. Palm Beach County Extension Rept. 1996-4.

Stanley, C. D. 1996. Weather report for 1995, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center,
Bradenton, Florida. Bradenton GCREC Res. Rept. BRA1996-06.

United States Department of Agriculture. 1981. U.S. standards for grades of tomato. USDA
Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA, Washington, D.C.










SUMMARY

Based on grower acceptance of shape, only the elongated plum type should be considered for west-
central Florida. Of those plum entries investigated 'Marina', 'Veronica', 'Hybrid 882', and 'Supra'
had the best total, large, and medium fruit yields for the season. These entries also were similar in
earliness. Of these 'Marina' and 'Veronica' had the least incidence of fruit with nipple tipped
blossom ends.


Note: The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and should not
be used as recommendations for crop production. No discrimination is intended nor endorsement
implied where trade names are used.

Acknowledgment: The authors thank the following organizations/firms which donated funds toward
vegetable cultivar research during 1996: Abbott & Cobb Inc., Agrisales, American Takii, Asgrow
Seed Co., Daehnfeldt Inc., Ferry-Morse, Harris Moran Seed Co., Pepper Research, Rogers Seed Co.,
Sakata Seed America Inc., Samen Mauser, Shamrock Seed Co., and Sunseeds.

LITERATURE CITED

Florida Agricultural Statistics Service. 1996. Vegetable summary 1994-1995. Florida Agricultural
Statistics Service, Orlando, FL.

Geraldson, C. M. 1967. Evaluation of the nutrient intensity and balance system of soil testing. Soil
Crop Sci. Soc. of Fla. Proc. 27:59-67.

Hanlon, E. A. and J. M. DeVore. 1989. IFAS extension soil testing laboratory chemical procedures
and training manual. Fla. Coop. Ext. Serv. Circ. 812.

Leaper, P. 1977. TAMU saladette, a new dual purpose, fresh market and/or processing tomato.
Tomato Genetics Cooperative Rept. No. 27.

Shuler, K. D. 1996. Plum tomato variety performance, 710 Farms, Boynton Beach, FL.
Winter/Spring 1995-96. Palm Beach County Extension Rept. 1996-4.

Stanley, C. D. 1996. Weather report for 1995, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center,
Bradenton, Florida. Bradenton GCREC Res. Rept. BRA1996-06.

United States Department of Agriculture. 1981. U.S. standards for grades of tomato. USDA
Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA, Washington, D.C.











Table 1. Temperature and rainfall at the GCREC during the fall of 1996 and the 42-year averages
(Stanley, 1996).


Average Daily Temperature (F)
Maximum Minimum Rainfall (in.)
Month 1996z 42-vr avg 1996z 42-vr avg 1996z 42-yr avg

August 92 91 72 72 3.20 9.61
September 91 90 71 71 3.20 7.76
October 85 85 65 64 4.94 2.93
November 80 79 56 58 0.65 1.94
December 75 74 51 52 1.82 2.22


TField transplanted August 26, 1996. Last harvest December 10, 1996.










Table 2. Seasonal yields, seed sources, average fruit size and cull percentages for plum tomato entries in fall trial of 1996.
November 6, 13, 20 and 27, December 10, 1996).


(Harvest dates:


Seedz Marketable Yield (cartons/A)Yx Average Marketable Cullsw Plant
Entry Source Total Extra-large Large Medium Small Fruit Wt (oz) (%) Stand (%)

Marina SA 2593 av 182 a 1057 a 1047 ab 308 a 2.6 a 40 ab 100 a
Veronica SA 2379 ab 206 a 961 ab 952 a-c 260 ab 2.7 a 30 ab 100 a
Hybrid 882 PS 2297 ab 204 a 680 bc 1089 a 323 a 2.6 a 27 ab 100 a
Supra RO 2119 a-c 274 a 868 a-c 788 be 190 ab 2.7 a 32 ab 100 a
Puebla PS 1952 be 202 a 794 a-c 818 a-c 138 b 2.9 a 40 ab 100 a
Sunre 6249 SS 1877 be 214 a 673 be 790 be 200 ab 2.8 a 42 a 100 a
Agriroma AG 1735 c 199 a 546 c 709 c 183 ab 2.7 a 44 a 100 a
Plum Dandy NCSU 1595 c 110 a 571 c 724 c 190 ab 2.6 a 23 b 100 a


zAG= Agrisales; NCSU = North Carolina State University; PS = Petoseed; RO = Rogers; SA = Sakata; SS = Sunseeds.
YCarton = 25 lb. A = 8712 linear ft. of bed, beds on 5 ft centers.
xSized by visual inspection. Extra-large fruit = 4.0 oz, large fruit = 3.3 oz, medium fruit = 2.6 oz, small fruit = 1.9 oz.
"By weight.
'Mean separation by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.


<* '*








Table 3. Yields, fruit size and cull percentage of plum tomato entries, by harvest, in the fall trial of 1996.

Marketable Yield (cartons /A) y Average Marketable Cullsx
Entry Total Extra-large Large Medium Small Fruit Wt (oz) (%)

Harvest 1 November 6. 1996

Hybrid 882 272 a" 33 a 77 a 109 ab 53 a 3.0 a 35 b
Marina 270 a 27 a 101 a 114 a 28 a-c 3.0 a 26 b
Veronica 181 ab 9 ab 76 a 70 a-c 27 a-c 3.0 a 38 b
Sunre 6249 164 ab 10 ab 56 ab 63 a-c 34 ab 2.9 a 38 b
Supra 160 ab 31 a 60 ab 49 b-d 19 be 3.2 a 24 b
Agriroma 154 ab 18 ab 44 ab 66 a-c 26 a-c 2.8 a 39 b
Puebla 128 b 12 ab 58 ab 46 cd 12 be 3.0 a 39 b
Plum Dandy 1 c Ob 1 b Od Oc 3.2 a 83 a

Harvest 2 November 13. 1996

Marina 400 a 20 ab 154 ab 176 a 50 ab 2.9 a 27 a
Supra 386 a 42 a 175 a 138 ab 31 be 3.1 a 30 a
Veronica 349 ab 18ab 149 ab 153 ab 28 be 3.1 a 28 a
Hybrid 882 342 ab 23 ab 91 a-c 168 a 60 a 2.8 a 27 a
Puebla 311 ab 41 a 126 ab 119 ab 25 c 3.1 a 26 a
Sunre 6249 219 b 9ab 62 bc 123 ab 26 c 2.9 a 40 a
Agriroma 201 be 21 ab 72 be 88 be 20 c 2.9 a 41 a
Plum Dandy 71 c 5b 24 c 34 c 9c 3.1 a 30 a

Harvest 3 November 20, 1996

Marina 433 a 55 a 175 a 175 a 29 ab 2.8 a 15 b
Veronica 426 a 112 a 157 a 131 ab 25 ab 2.8 a 17 b
Puebla 407 a 48 a 174 a 163 a 23 ab 3.0 a 23 ab
Hybrid 882 374 ab 40 a 120 ab 174 a 41 a 2.6 a 23 ab
Supra 358 ab 88 a 144 ab 114 ab 12 b 2.8 a 25 ab
Sunre 6249 350 ab 87 a 128 ab 116 ab 19 ab 2.8 a 35 a
Agriroma 318 ab 74 a 105 ab 118 ab 20 ab 2.7 a 36 a
Plum Dandy 208'b 47 a 81 b 60 b 19 ab 2.9 a 18 b

Harvest 4 November 27. 1996

Veronica 513 a 37 a 207 a 219 a 50 ab 2.7 a 14 c
Puebla 482 ab 25 a 204 a 222 a 30 b 2.8 a 22 c
Marina 454 ab 17 a 177 a 195 ab 65 a 2.6 a 14 c
Sunre 6249 435 ab 27 a 169 a 192 ab 46 ab 2.7 a 34 b
Plum Dandy 418 ab 10 a 181 a 188 ab 39 ab 2.7 a 19 c
Hybrid 882 412 ab 13 a 126 a 218 a 55 ab 2.7 a 17 c
Supra 378 ab 27 a 153 a 161 ab 36 ab 2.7 a 37 ab
Agriroma 339 b 28 a 146 a 135 b 30 b 2.6 a 48 a








Table 3. Continued.


Marketable Yield (cartons /A) y Average Marketable Cullsx
Entry Total Extra-large Large Medium Small Fruit Wt (oz) (%)

Harvest 5 December 10. 1996

Marina 1036 a 62 a 451 a 387 ab 136 a 2.4 a 50 a
Veronica 910 ab 29 a 372 ab 379 ab 130 a 2.5 a 40 a-c
Plum Dandy 897 ab 47 a 284 be 443 a 123 a 2.4 a 25 c
Hybrid 882 896 ab 97 a 267 bc 419 ab 113 ab 2.5 a 29 b-c
Supra 837 ab 85 a 336 be 325 ab 91 ab 2.5 a 35 a-c
Agriroma 723 b 58 a 278 bc 300 ab 87 ab 2.7 a 48 ab
Sunre 6249 709 b 81 a 258 be 296 ab 74 ab 2.7 a 49 ab
Puebla 624 b 76 a 232 c 268 b 48 b 2.7 a 56 a


zCarton = 25 lb. A = 8712 linear ft. of bed, beds on 5 ft centers.
YSized by visual inspection.
xBy weight.
"Mean separation by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.








Table 4. Seasonal yields, seed sources, average fruit size and cull percentages for saladette tomato entries in fall trial of 1996. (Harvest
dates: November 6, 13, 20 and 27, December 10, 1996).

Seedz Marketable Yield (cartons/A)Yx Average Marketable Culls" Plant
Entry Source Total Extra-large Large Medium Small Fruit Wt (oz) (%) Stand (%)

Orion DF 2745 av 500 a 1122 a 878 a 246 be 3.3 ab 37 a 100 a
Sheriff FM 2068 b 88 c 523 b 987 a 469 a 2.6 c 32 a 100 a
HMX 4878 HM 1965 b 188 bc 674 b 796 a 307 ab 3.0 b 35 a 100 a
HMX 5885 HM 1555 c 308 ab 615 b 498 b 134 c 3.5 a 42 a 97 a


ZDF = Daehnfeldt; FM = Ferry-Morse; HM = Harris Moran.
YCarton = 25 lb. A = 8712 linear ft. of bed, beds on 5 ft centers.
xSized by visual inspection. Extra-large fruit = 4.5 oz, large fruit = 3.7 oz, medium fruit = 3.0 oz, small fruit = 2.2 oz.
"By weight.
"Mean separation by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.








Table 5. Yields, fruit size and cull percentage of saladette tomato entries, by harvest, in the fall trial of 1996.

Marketable Yield (cartons /A) '- y Average Marketable Cullsx
Entry Total Extra-large Large Medium Small Fruit Wt (oz) (%)

Harvest 1 November 6. 1996

Sheriff 186 aw 13 a 56 a 80 a 37 a 3.1 b 30 ab
HMX 4878 163 a 21 a 43 a 62 a 37 a 3.5 ab 38 a
Orion 157 a 24 a 58 a 56 a 20 ab 3.9 a 25 b
HMX 5885 80 a 17 a 34 a 23 a 6b 3.9 a 41 a

Harvest 2 November 13. 1996

Orion 384 a 110a 156 a 89 ab 29 a 3.8 a 24 b
HMX 4878 247 ab 63 b 80 b 75 ab 29 a 3.5 a 26 b
Sheriff 233 be 11 c 69 b 103 a 39 a 2.8 b 25 b
HMX 5885 91 c 19 bc 38 b 28 b 5b 3.6 a 50 a

Harvest 3 November 20. 1996

Orion 487 a 124 a 197 a 143 a 23 b 3.4 ab 11 b
HMX 4878 396 ab 44 ab 148 b 170 a 34 b 2.9 be 15 b
Sheriff 368 ab 12 b 107 b 180 a 68 a 2.5 c 16 b
HMX 5885 332 b 68 ab 131 b 114 a 18b 3.5 a 30 a

Harvest 4 November 27. 1996

Orion 745 a 130 a 326 a 230 a 59 ab 3.1 a 10 c
Sheriff 520 ab 33 b 148 b 236 a 103 a 2.4 b 23 b
HMX 4878 478 ab 37 b 185 ab 195 ab 60 ab 2.9 ab 17 be
HMX 5885 332 b 61 ab 116 b 124 b 31 b 3.4 a 35 a

Harvest 5 December 10. 1996

Orion 973 a 113 a 384 a 360 a 116 ab 3.1 b 52 a
Sheriff 771 a 19 b 142 b 388 a 222 a 2.6 c 44 a
HMX 4878 766 a 44 b 245 ab 319 ab 157 ab 2.9 b 49 a
HMX 5885 14 a 143 a 296 ab 209 b 73 b 3.5 a 48 a


zCarton = 25 lb. A = 8712 linear ft. of bed, beds on 5 ft centers.
YSized by visual inspection.
xBy weight.
"Mean separation within columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.











Table 6. Late season ratings of fruit and plant characteristics for observational entries in trial, fall 1996.



.1-N








Source/Entry Comments'

North Carolina State University
NC 96153 mt 5.0 ug jo 4.5 3.0 4.5 2.0 short egg 5.0 3.0 3.5 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 spider track
NC 96159 s 5.0 ug jo 4.5 3.5 4.0 4.0 short plum 3.0 2.5 3.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.7 5.0 5.0 5.0 nipple tip
NC 96161 m 4.0 ug jo 4.5 4.5 2.5 3.0 Ig. plum 3.0 4.0 1.5 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 necky, pers nipple tip
NC 96164 s-m 4.0 ug jo 4.0 3.0 3.5 3.0 sl. pear 4.5 4.0 3.5 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9 4.5 5.0 v. necky, sl. spider track
NC 96185 vs 4.0 ug jo 4.0 4.0 3.0 4.0 plum 5.0 3.0 4.5 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.5 5.0
Paramount
DPSX 93796 m 4.0 ug j2 4.0 4.0 2.5 2.5 oval 5.0 4.0 3.0 4.5 5.0 5.0 4.5 5.0 4.0 5.0 ripens from bottom
DPSX 93596 m 4.5 ug j2 4.0 4.0 2.5 3.0 round 5.0 3.5 3.0 4.5 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 4.5 5.0 indented be
Snnseeds
Sunre 6241 s 4.0 ug jo 4.5 4.0 4.5 4.0 plum 5.0 3.0 2.5 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 4.9 4.7 5.0 cone. cracks, cone. zippers


zAbbreviations: s = short, m = medium, t = tall, v = very.
v" = rough, 5 = smooth, gb = green base; ug = uniform green.
xjo= jointed, j2 =jointless.
I = poor, 5 = excellent.
V1 = small, 5 = extra large
U1 =late, 5 = early.
'1 = inconsistent, 5 = very consistent, Ig = large, sl = slight.
'I = severe, 5 = absence of defect.
'Abbreviations: be = blossom end; ber = blossom end rot; frt = fruit; irr = irregular; pers = persistent; rough = roughness; shldr = shoulder; sl = slight; sv = severe; var = varies or variable; v = very; w/ = with. Definitions: necky =
pear shaped, narrow at stem end of fruit, nipple tip = pointed blossom end; spider track = small, white, tan or green streaks on fruit radiating from stem.







The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center


The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center is
a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences, University of Florida. The Research Center
originated in the fall of 1925 as the Tomato
Disease Laboratory with the primary objective of
developing control procedures for an epidemic out-
break of nailhead spot of tomato. Research was ex-
panded in subsequent years to include study of sev-
eral other tomato diseases.

In 1937, new research facilities were established
in the town of Manatee, and the Center scope was
enlarged to include horticultural, entomological, and
soil science studies of several vegetable crops. The
ornamental program was a natural addition to the
Center's responsibilities because of the emerging in-
dustry in the area in the early 1940's.

The Center's current location was established in
1965 where a comprehensive research and extension
program on vegetable crops and ornamental plants is
conducted. Three state extension specialists posi-
tions, 16 state research scientists, and two grant
supported scientists from various disciplines of
training participate in all phases of vegetable and
ornamental horticultural programs. This interdisci-
plinary team approach, combining several research
disciplines and a wide range of industry and faculty
contacts, often is more productive than could be ac-
complished with limited investments in independent
programs.


The Center's primary mission is to develop new
and expand existing knowledge and technology, and
to disseminate new scientific knowledge in Florida, so
that agriculture remains efficient and economically
sound.

The secondary mission of the Center is to assist
the Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS campus
departments, in which Center faculty hold appropri-
ate liaison appointments, and other research centers
in extension, educational training, and cooperative
research programs for the benefit of Florida's pro-
ducers, students, and citizens.

Program areas of emphasis include: (1) genetics,
breeding, and variety development and evaluation;
(2) biological, chemical, and mechanical pest manage-
ment in entomology, plant pathology, nematology,
bacteriology, virology, and weed science; (3) produc-
tion efficiency, culture, management, and counteract-
ing environmental stress; (4) water management and
natural resource protection; (5) post-harvest physiol-
ogy, harvesting, handling and food quality of horti-
cultural crops; (6) technical support and assistance to
the Florida Cooperative Extension Service; and (7)
advancement offundamental knowledge ofdisciplines
represented by faculty and (8) directing graduate
student training and teaching special undergraduate
classes.


Location of
GCREC Bradenton


IFAS IS:
" The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
University of Florida.
D A statewide organization dedicated to teaching,
research and extension.
O Faculty located in Gainesville and at 13 research
and education centers, 67 county extension
offices and four demonstration units throughout
the state.
" A partnership in food and agriculture, and natural
and renewable resource research and education,
funded by state, federal and local government,
and by gifts and grants from individuals, founda-
tions, government and industry.
O An organization whose mission is:
Educating students in the food, agricultural,
and related sciences and natural resources.
Strengthening Florida's diverse food and
agricultural industry and its environment
through research.
Enhancing for all Floridians, the application
of research and knowledge to improve the
quality of life statewide through IFAS exten-
sion programs.




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