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Group Title: Research report - Gulf Coast Research and Education Center - BRA1995-27
Title: Performance of tropical pumpkin inbreds and hybrids, spring 1995
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067742/00001
 Material Information
Title: Performance of tropical pumpkin inbreds and hybrids, spring 1995
Series Title: GCREC research report
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Maynard, Donald N., 1932-
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Bradenton FL
Publication Date: 1995
 Subjects
Subject: Pumpkin -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Pumpkin -- Yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 3).
Statement of Responsibility: D.N. Maynard.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "September."
Funding: Bradenton GCREC research report
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067742
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 73491754

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Materials and methods
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 2
    Acknowledgement
        Page 3
    Note
        Page 3
    Literature cited
        Page 3
    Tables
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Gulf coast research and education center
        Page 7
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida




fc6s

UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
5007 60th St. East, Bradenton, FL 34203
Bradenton GCREC Research Report
BRA-1995-27 (September)


PERFORMANCE OF TROPICAL PUMPKIN INBREDS
AND HYBRIDS, SPRING 1995


D. N. MAYNARD


Marston Science
Library
JAN 19 1996











GCREC Research Report BRA1995-27


PERFORMANCE OF TROPICAL PUMPKIN INBREDS AND HYBRIDS
SPRING 1995

D. N. Maynard'
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
University of Florida, IFAS
5007 60th Street East
Bradenton, FL 34203
Cucurbita moschata (Duchesne) Poir., known as calabaza in Puerto Rico, is a
pumpkin-like fruit that is grown throughout the tropics and subtropics. This
species is also known as auyama in the Dominican Republic, calabash or pumpkin
in the English-speaking islands, ayote in Central America, and zapallo in South
America. Plants are monoecious, and insects, primarily honeybees and bumblebees,
are required for transfer of pollen from staminate to pistillate flowers. Fruits
are produced along trailing vines that may spread up to 50 ft from the base or
crown of the plant. Each plant commonly produces two to five fruits; however,
some selections may produce as many as nine fruits per plant. Fruit weight
ranges from 5 to 50 lb. Fruit shape varies in unimproved types from globe,
round, oval, obovate, pear, oblate and gourd, to elliptic. Likewise, there is
much variation in rind color from green immature fruit to light-orange mature
fruit and in rind pattern from piebald (pinta) to mottled. The rind may be
smooth or warted. The fruit wall varies in color through several shades of
yellow to orange and is from 1 to 3 inches thick.

One goal of the University of Florida/University of Puerto Rico cooperative
tropical pumpkin improvement program is to develop a short-vined plant that will
produce high-quality fruit with a hard rind, superior internal flesh color, and
good culinary quality and nutritional composition.

Development of hybrids is an important part of the variety improvement program
at the present time. With hybrids, the seed industry will have exclusivity which
should provide the incentive and profit necessary for commercial seed production.
Seed costs to the grower will be increased and the practice of farm-saved seed
will be eliminated if hybrids are adopted. Nonetheless, the grower should
benefit from the availability of high quality commercial seed and improved
varieties.

The objective of the research reported herein was to evaluate the performance of
hybrids and parental vining varieties and bush lines (Table 1) which were
selected at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center.

Materials and Methods
Soil in the experimental area was sampled before fertilization and analyzed by
the IFAS Extension Soil Testing Laboratory (Hanlon and DeVore, 1989): pH = 7.1
and Mehlich I extractable P = 52, K = 13, Mg = 90, Ca = 674, Zn = 3.1, Cu = 2.8,
and Mn = 2.6 ppm.


'Professor and Vegetable Extension Specialist.


September










The EauGallie fine sand was prepared in March 1995 by incorporation of 0-1.2-0
lb N-P20-KO per 100 linear bed feet (Ibf). Beds were formed and fumigated with
methylbromide:chloropicrin (67:33) at 2.3 lb/100 Ibf. Banded fertilizer was
applied in shallow grooves on the bed shoulders at 2.7-0-3.8 lb N-P205-K 0/100
Ibf after the beds were pressed and before the black polyethylene mulch was
applied. The total fertilizer applied was equivalent to 130-60-184 Ib/acre N-
P, 0-K 0. The final beds were 32 in. wide and 8 in. high, and were spaced on 9
ft centers with four beds between seepage irrigation/drainage ditches which were
on 41 ft centers. Seeds were planted on 21 March 1995 in holes punched in the
polyethylene at 3 or 4-ft in-row spacing, based on expected plant habit. Each
five-plant plot was replicated three times in a complete randomized block design.
Weed control was by cultivation and applications of paraquat. Pesticides were
applied weekly for control of the silverleaf whitefly endosulfann and
esfenvalerate), aphids endosulfann) and downy mildew (chlorothalonil).

Pumpkins from bush inbreds and bush:vining hybrid plants were harvested on 7
June; pumpkins from vining inbreds were harvested on 19 June 1995. Each fruit
was individually weighed.

Results and Discussion
Temperature and rainfall during the experimental period from 21 March to 19 June
1995 compared to the 40-year averages are shown in Table 2. Minor deviations
from the average occurred.

Average fruit weight varied from 2.1 lb for G38-2 to 17.6 lb for 'Soler' (Table
3). Weight of G38-2 fruit was similar only to that of G39-5 but 'Soler' fruit
weight was greater than any other entry.
The number of fruit per plant (Table 3) varied from 1.7 for the large-fruited,
long-vined Puerto Rican selections 'Soler' and Linea C. Pinta to 7.1 fruit per
plant for the G39-5 x Seminole hybrid. In general, the vining types had larger
fruit than the bush types, but fewer fruit per plant.

Yields ranged from 138.5 cwt/acre for G38-2 to 593.4 cwt/acre for C42-1-9-9 x
Linea C. Pinta (Table 3). Yields of G39-5 were similar to those of G38-2 whereas
seven other entries had yields similar to those of C42-1-9-9 x Linea C. Pinta.
'La Segunda' was the only bush or vining inbred to have yields comparable to the
best yielding hybrids.
Plant habit of the hybrids varied from bush/short vine to intermediate length
vines. The bush/short-vine type set several fruit at the crown and later
developed short vines on which additional fruit set. These hybrids had 'La
Primera', 'La Segunda' and 'Seminole' as long-vine parents. The intermediate-
vine length hybrids set fruit on short laterals. Long-vine parents for these
hybrids were Linea C. Pinta and 'Soler'.

The distribution of fruit into various weight classes is shown in Table 4. Fruit
from the bush inbreds was 5 lb or less. Whereas, fruit from vining inbreds was
almost all greater than 5 lb; the exception being that 19% of 'Seminole' fruit
were 5 lb or less. Fruit from hybrid plants generally was intermediate in weight
between the bush and vining hybrids. Fruit from hybrids made with bush lines










G38-2 and G39-5 were smaller than those made with C42-1-9 as the bush parent
(Tables 3,4). Fruit from hybrids where Linea C. Pinta and 'Soler' were the
vining parents were generally larger than when 'La Primera', 'La Segunda', or
'Seminole' were used as the vining parent (Tables 3,4).

Yields in this trial generally exceeded those in three previous trials conducted
in the fall season at this location. In 1991 (Maynard, 1991), highest yield -
462.8 cwt/acre was produced by 'La Segunda'. This trial only included bush and
vining inbreds. In 1992 (Maynard, 1993), highest yield of 416 cwt/acre was
produced by the hybrid C42-1 x 'La Segunda'. In 1993, (Maynard, 1994), the
hybrid C42-1-5-3 x Linea C. Pinta produced 627.9 cwt/acre. Highest yields in
1995 were produced again by a C42 x Linea C. Pinta hybrid (Table 3).

Fruit quality parameters will be reported separately.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture under
CSRS Special Grant No. 91-34135-6165 managed by the Caribbean Advisory Group
(CBAG).

Note
The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and
should not be used as recommendations for crop production. Where trade names are
used, no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied.

Literature Cited
Hanlon, E. A. and J. M. DeVore. 1989. IFAS extension soil testing laboratory
chemical procedures and training manual. Fla. Coop. Ext. Circ. 812.

Maynard, D. N. 1991. Calabaza variety evaluation, Fall 1991. GCREC Res. Rept.
BRA1992-1.

Maynard, D. N. 1993. Performance of calabaza hybrids. Fall 1992. GCREC Res.
Rept. BRA1993-3.
Maynard, D. N. 1994. Performance of calabaza hybrids. Fall 1993. GCREC Res.
Rept. BRA1994-2.
Stanley, C. D. 1994. Weather report for 1993. GCREC Res. Rept. BRA1994-08.










G38-2 and G39-5 were smaller than those made with C42-1-9 as the bush parent
(Tables 3,4). Fruit from hybrids where Linea C. Pinta and 'Soler' were the
vining parents were generally larger than when 'La Primera', 'La Segunda', or
'Seminole' were used as the vining parent (Tables 3,4).

Yields in this trial generally exceeded those in three previous trials conducted
in the fall season at this location. In 1991 (Maynard, 1991), highest yield -
462.8 cwt/acre was produced by 'La Segunda'. This trial only included bush and
vining inbreds. In 1992 (Maynard, 1993), highest yield of 416 cwt/acre was
produced by the hybrid C42-1 x 'La Segunda'. In 1993, (Maynard, 1994), the
hybrid C42-1-5-3 x Linea C. Pinta produced 627.9 cwt/acre. Highest yields in
1995 were produced again by a C42 x Linea C. Pinta hybrid (Table 3).

Fruit quality parameters will be reported separately.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture under
CSRS Special Grant No. 91-34135-6165 managed by the Caribbean Advisory Group
(CBAG).

Note
The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and
should not be used as recommendations for crop production. Where trade names are
used, no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied.

Literature Cited
Hanlon, E. A. and J. M. DeVore. 1989. IFAS extension soil testing laboratory
chemical procedures and training manual. Fla. Coop. Ext. Circ. 812.

Maynard, D. N. 1991. Calabaza variety evaluation, Fall 1991. GCREC Res. Rept.
BRA1992-1.

Maynard, D. N. 1993. Performance of calabaza hybrids. Fall 1992. GCREC Res.
Rept. BRA1993-3.
Maynard, D. N. 1994. Performance of calabaza hybrids. Fall 1993. GCREC Res.
Rept. BRA1994-2.
Stanley, C. D. 1994. Weather report for 1993. GCREC Res. Rept. BRA1994-08.










G38-2 and G39-5 were smaller than those made with C42-1-9 as the bush parent
(Tables 3,4). Fruit from hybrids where Linea C. Pinta and 'Soler' were the
vining parents were generally larger than when 'La Primera', 'La Segunda', or
'Seminole' were used as the vining parent (Tables 3,4).

Yields in this trial generally exceeded those in three previous trials conducted
in the fall season at this location. In 1991 (Maynard, 1991), highest yield -
462.8 cwt/acre was produced by 'La Segunda'. This trial only included bush and
vining inbreds. In 1992 (Maynard, 1993), highest yield of 416 cwt/acre was
produced by the hybrid C42-1 x 'La Segunda'. In 1993, (Maynard, 1994), the
hybrid C42-1-5-3 x Linea C. Pinta produced 627.9 cwt/acre. Highest yields in
1995 were produced again by a C42 x Linea C. Pinta hybrid (Table 3).

Fruit quality parameters will be reported separately.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture under
CSRS Special Grant No. 91-34135-6165 managed by the Caribbean Advisory Group
(CBAG).

Note
The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and
should not be used as recommendations for crop production. Where trade names are
used, no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is implied.

Literature Cited
Hanlon, E. A. and J. M. DeVore. 1989. IFAS extension soil testing laboratory
chemical procedures and training manual. Fla. Coop. Ext. Circ. 812.

Maynard, D. N. 1991. Calabaza variety evaluation, Fall 1991. GCREC Res. Rept.
BRA1992-1.

Maynard, D. N. 1993. Performance of calabaza hybrids. Fall 1992. GCREC Res.
Rept. BRA1993-3.
Maynard, D. N. 1994. Performance of calabaza hybrids. Fall 1993. GCREC Res.
Rept. BRA1994-2.
Stanley, C. D. 1994. Weather report for 1993. GCREC Res. Rept. BRA1994-08.










Table 1. Descriptions and sources of tropical pumpkin inbreds.

Plant
Entry Source1 Habit Mature Fruit Description

C42 GCREC Bush Piebald, deep flat smooth fruit

G38 CFREC Bush Piebald, flat smooth fruit

G39 CFREC Bush Piebald, flat smooth fruit

La Segunda GCREC Vining Piebald, round/flat fruit

La Primera GCREC Vining Piebald, round fruit

Linea C Pinta PRAES Vining Piebald, slightly ribbed, flat fruit

Seminole GCREC Vining Buff, round, very smooth fruit

Soler PRAES Vining Dark green, slightly ribbed, flat fruit

1PRAES = Puerto Rico Agricultural Experiment Station; GCREC = Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center-Bradenton, University of Florida; CFREC = Central Florida
Research and Education Center-Leesburg, University of Florida.




Table 2. Temperature and rainfall at the Gulf Coast Research and Education
Center, Bradenton from 21 March 1995 to 19 June 1995 and 40-year
averages (Stanley, 1994)

Average Daily Temperature (F)
1995 40-yr avq Rainfall (in.)
Month' Max Min Max Min 1995 40-yr avq

March 21-31 83 61 77 55 0 3.35
April 83 58 82 60 3.41 1.72
May 91 70 87 64 1.48 3.20
June 1-19 89 71 89 70 7.51 7.48

11995 data are for the dates shown; 40-yr averages are for the entire month.










Table 3. Yield, fruit per plant, and average fruit weight of tropical
pumpkins. Spring 1995. Gulf Coast Research and Education Center,
Bradenton.

Average Fruit Fruit/ Yield
Entry Wt (Ib) Plant (No.) (cwt/acre)l

C42-1-9-9 x Linea C. Pinta 12.0 b2 3.2 fg 593.4 a
C42-1-9 x Seminole 5.6 de 6.3 a-c 571.1 ab
C42-1-9-5 x Soler 8.4 c 4.0 ef 537.5 a-c
La Segunda 12.9 b 3.1 fg 487.6 a-d
G38-2 x Soler 5.3 de 5.5 cd 484.1 a-d

G39-5 x Soler 5.3 de 5.6 b-d 476.3 a-d
C42-1-9 x La Segunda 4.4 e 6.7 a-c 475.7 a-d
G38-2 x Linea C. Pinta 6.3 d 4.7 de 475.0 a-d
G39-5 x Seminole 4.0 ef 7.1 a 456.7 b-d
G39-5 x Linea C. Pinta 5.2 de 5.4 cd 454.0 b-d

G38-2 x Seminole 4.3 e 6.1 a-c 426.3 cd
C42-1 x La Primera 4.1 ef 6.9 ab 425.2 cd
Soler 17.6 a 1.7 h 362.8 de
La Primera 12.1 b 2.1 gh 299.3 e
Seminole 6.9 cd 3.6 ef 294.6 e

Linea C. Pinta 13.6 b 1.7 h 276.5 e
C42-1-9 2.8 f 5.8 a-d 262.1 e
G39-5 2.5 fg 3.8 ef 150.9 f
G38-2 2.1 g 4.1 ef 138.5 f

1Acre = 4840 linear bed feet.
2Mean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.










Table 4. Fruit weight distribution of tropical pumpkin entries. Spring 1995.
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, Bradenton.

Fruit Wt (Ib)
> 5 5.1-10.0 10.1-15.0 15.1-20.0 >20
Entry (% of fruit)

C42-1-9 100 -
C42-1-11 x La Primera 83 17 -
C42-1-9 x La Segunda 80 20 -
C42-1-9-9 x L.C.P. 8 33 38 19 2
C42-1-9 x Seminole 52 37 11 -
C42-1-9-5 x Soler 30 28 37 5

G38-2 100 -
G38-2 x L.C.P. 22 78 -
G38-2 x Seminole 74 26 -
G38-2 x Soler 45 55 -

G39-5 100 -
G39-5 x L.C.P. 53 47 -
G39-5 x Seminole 85 15 -
G39-5 x Soler 51 46 3 -

La Primera -16 77 7 -
La Segunda -23 47 28 2
Linea C. Pinta (L.C.P.) 8 60 32
Seminole 19 76 5 -
Soler 4 35 23 38








The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center


The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center is
a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences, University of Florida. The Research Center
originated in the fall of 1925 as the Tomato
Disease Laboratory with the primary objective of
developing control procedures for an epidemic out-
break of nailhead spot of tomato. Research was ex-
panded in subsequent years to include study.of sev-
eral other tomato diseases.

In 1937, new research facilities were established
in the town of Manatee, and the Center scope was
enlarged to include horticultural, entomological, and
soil science studies of several vegetable crops. The
ornamental program was a natural addition to the
Center's responsibilities because of the emerging in-
dustry in the area in the early 1940's.

The Center's current location was established in
1965 where a comprehensive research and extension
program on vegetable crops and ornamental plants is
conducted. Three state extension specialists posi-
tions, 16 state research scientists, and two grant
supported scientists from various disciplines of
training participate in all phases of vegetable and
ornamental horticultural programs. This interdisci-
plinary team approach, combining several research
disciplines and a wide range of industry and faculty
contacts, often is more productive than could be ac-
complished with limited investments in independent
programs.


The Center's primary mission is to develop new
and expand existing knowledge and technology, and
to disseminate new scientific knowledge in Florida, so
that agriculture remains efficient and economically
sound.

The secondary mission of the Center is to assist
the Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS campus
departments, in which Center faculty hold appropri-
ate liaison appointments, and other research centers
in extension, educational training, and cooperative
research programs for the benefit of Florida's pro-
ducers, students, and citizens.

Program areas of emphasis include: (1) genetics,
breeding, and variety development and evaluation;
(2) biological, chemical, and mechanical pest manage-
ment in entomology, plant pathology, nematology,
bacteriology, virology, and weed science; (3) produc-
tion efficiency, culture, management, and counteract-
ing environmental stress; (4) water management and
natural resource protection; (5) post-harvest physiol-
ogy, harvesting, handling and food quality of horti-
cultural crops; (6) technical support and assistance to
the Florida Cooperative Extension Service; and (7)
advancement of fundamental knowledge of disciplines
represented by faculty and (8) directing graduate
student training and teaching special undergraduate
classes.


Location of
GCREC Bradenton


IFAS IS:
3 The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
University of Florida.
D A statewide organization dedicated to teaching,
research and extension.
Z Faculty located in Gainesville and at 13 research
and education centers, 67 county extension
offices and four demonstration units throughout
the state.
" A partnership in food and agriculture, and natural
and renewable resource research and education,
funded by state, federal and local government,
and by gifts and grants from individuals, founda-
tions, government and industry.
Q An organization whose mission is:
Educating students in the food, agricultural,
and related sciences and natural resources.
Strengthening Florida's diverse food and
agricultural industry and its environment
through research.
Enhancing for all Floridians, the application
of research and knowledge to improve the
quality of life statewide through IFAS exten-
sion programs.




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