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Group Title: Research report - Bradenton Agricultural Research & Education Center - GC1980-9
Title: Nine new tomato lines from the tomato improvement program of the Institute of Food & Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067736/00001
 Material Information
Title: Nine new tomato lines from the tomato improvement program of the Institute of Food & Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Series Title: AREC-Bradenton research report
Physical Description: 7 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Waters, W. E ( Will E )
Agricultural Research & Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Agricultural Research & Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Bradenton Fla
Publication Date: 1980
 Subjects
Subject: Tomatoes -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: W.E. Waters, editor.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "November 1980."
Funding: Bradenton AREC research report
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067736
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 73503034

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HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida









Agricultural Research & Education Center l- "... .r
IFAS, University of Florida I iRY
Bradenton, FLorida
NINE NEI! TOMATO LINES FROM THE TOMATO IMPROVEMENT PROGRAm 1
OF THE INSTITUTE OF FOOD & AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY Y ,OF FLORIDA
.! .* :i. of Florida
W. E. Waters, Editor -------
AREC-Bradenton Research Report GC1980-9 November 1980
The Agricultural Research & Education Center, IFAS, Bradenton, is in the
process of releasing nine new tomato varieties or lines from the IFAS tomato
breeding program.
Three of the ines are jointed, fresh market types similar to 'Walter' and
'Flora-Dade' but with superior characteristics. These three sister lines have
been named 'Florida 1A,' 'Florida IB,' and 'Florida 1C.'
Three additional lines released are jointless, fresh market types and have
been named 'Burgisi' 'Hayslip,' arid 'Florida 2432.' 'Burgis' and 'Hayslip' are
intended for coimnercial fresh market stake or ground production. 'Florida 2432'
is a sister line of 'Florida Ml-I' but carries the ug gene for uniform green fruit
and is intended for use as a machine harvest breeding line.
Also being released are three dwarf ornamental types designed for the orna-
mental potted plant tr8de and outdoor patio gardens. They have been named 'Florida
Petite' for an extreme dwarf type, 'Florida Lanai' for a dwarf type, and 'Florida
Basket' for a prostrate dwarf type.
Seed of these nine releases will be available tO commercial seed producers
in early 1981 from the Florida Foundation Seed Producers, Inc., P.O. Box 309,
Greenwood, FL 32443.' Seeds should be available to tomato growers and gardeners
through routine seed outlets in late 1981.
A brief summary, variety names, and the developers of these nine varieties
follow.









-2-


I. Varieties -


Authors*:


'Florida IA,' 'Florida 1B,' and 'Florida IC' Three Jointed Fresh
Market TcKato Selections of Florida 1 Resistant to Race 1 and 2 of
Fusarium Wilt and Verticillium Wilt


J. J. Augustine, R. B. Volin, D. S. Burgis, P. H. Everett, N. C. Hayslip,
H. H. Bryan, D. D.Gull, and J. P. Crill


Three new fresh market tomato varieties for
18,' and 'Florida 1C' are described here. These
fruit qualities of 'Walter PF,' and, in addition,
ness, and resistance to Verticillium wilt. Also,
or gold fleck which the original 'Walter' had.


Florida called 'Florida 1A,' 'Florida
three varieties all have the good
have increased fruit size and firm-
they do not exhibit the fruit pox


'Florida 1A,' 'Florida 1B,' and 'Florida 1C' were derived from a cross between
'Walter' and 2153-05-01-1-BG3K-Ru3-11-1 made in the spring of 1972. They are all
resistant to Fusarium wilt race 1 and 2, Verticillium wilt, Stemphylium (gray leaf-
spot), and tolerant to blossom-end rot, black shoulder, catface, and fruit cracking.
They appear tolerant of the genetic diseases fruit pox and gold fleck. For several
years all three varieties appeared tolerant tb graywall; however, 'Floriea.1A' had
a much higher percentage of graywall than 'Florida 1B' or 'Florida 1C' in the fall
season of 1980 when graywall occurred.


"Walter' contributed resistance to
duction and fruit quality, and the 2153
firmness, concentrated fruit set, and i
varieties.


Fusarium wilt race 1 and 2 and superior pro-
line contributed Verticillium wilt resistance,
increased fruit size to all three of these


Yield trials indicate that 'Florida IA,' 'Florida IB,' and 'Florida 1C' have the
capacity to produce yields comparable to 'Walter PF' and 'Florc-Dade' and with signif-
icantly larger fruit. They mature 8 to 10 days earlier than 'Flora-Dade.'

Fruit of 'Florida IA,' 'Florida 18,' and 'Florida IC' are generally larger and
firmer than 'Walter PF' and 'Flora-Dade' and have more concentrated set. Mature
green fruit are similar in appearance and ripen similarly when exposed to ethylene
gas. Post-harvest ripening studies indicate excellent ripening characteristics.
The color of vine ripe fruit of these three selections is a more intense red than
'Walter PF' or 'Flora-Dade.'

The vines of these three varie'es are shorter determinates than 'Walter PF,'
with 'Florida lA' b' ng the shortest and 'Florida 1C' the tallest. The vines of all
produce sufficient foliage for adequate fruit cover. The leaves have a slight Teaf
curl permitting better air movement.in the interior of the plant. Because of their
vine growth havits, pruning is rot recommended for maximum yields. Growers should
initially evaluate these three selections on a limited basis and select the best
one(s) for their own environmental and cultural conditions.





-3-


II. Variety -


Authors*:


'Burgis' A Jointless Uniform Green Fruited Fresh Market Tomato
with Resistance to Race 1 and 2 of Fusarium Wilt and Verticillium
Wilt

J. Augustine, R. B. Volin, P. H. Everett, H. H. Bryan, N. C. Hayslip,
D. Gull, and J. P. Crill


'Burgis' was released as a new fresh market jointless tomato variety for
Florida which is superior to 'Walter PF' and 'Flora-Dade.' The name 'Burgis' was
chosen in recognition of Mr. D. S. Burgis' efforts in tomato variety development
and evaluation work. The variety.'Burgis' has disease resistance similar to
'Flora-Dade' but better fruit quality and yield. Like 'Flora-Dade,' 'Burgis'
carries the recessive j gene and is jointless. In addition, 'Burgis' has the ug
gene and has the desirable quality of uniform green shoulders, which make for more
even ripening and less of the disorder black shoulder.
'Burgis' is resistant to Fusarium wilt race 1 and race 2, Verticillium wilt,
and Stemphylium (gray leafspot), and is tolerant to blossom-end rot, black shoulder,
catface, and cracking. 'Burgis' does not have the genetic diseases fruit pox and
gold fleck.


'Burgis' was derived from a cross b
D1-BG1 made in the spring 1971 season.
increased size, and uniform green color.
Dade.'


between CABStMVWd 11-6-1-1 and CAVStWd 908-1-
The 11-6-1-1 line contributed earliness,
The 908 line is a sister line of 'Flora-


'Burgis' has been tested widely in Florida as 71057 and shows potential for
comparable or better yield than 'Walter PF' and 'Flora-Dade' in replicated trials
and matures 4-6 days earlier. In all 12 commercial field trials, 'Burgis' was
superior to both 'Halter PF' and 'Flora-Dade.' Post-harvest ripening studies of
chilled fruit indicate excellent ripening characteristics.
The vines of 'Burgis' are determinate and shorter than 'Flora-Dade' and have
a more open growth habit. 'Burgis' grows well on ground or stake culture. Produc-
tion practices should be similar to the ones used for 'Flora-Dade.'













III. Variety 'Hayslip' A Jointless Fresh Market Tomato Resistant to Race 1 and 2
of Fusarium Wilt and Verticillium Wilt

Authors*: J. J. Augustine, R. B. Volin, H. H. Bryan, P. H. Everett, D. S. Burgis,
and D. D. Gull

'Hayslip' is a new fresh market tomato variety for Florida somewhat similar
to 'Burgis' and is superior to 'Walter PF' and 'Flora-Dade.' The name 'Hayslip'
is used in recognition of Mr. N. C. Hayslip's efforts in tomato variety development
and evaluation work. 'Hayslip' has disease resistance similar to 'Flora-Dade' and,
similarly, carries the j, gene, therefore is jointless (detaches from the vine free
of stems). However, 'Hayslip' generally yields a greater number and size of smooth
fruit than 'Walter PF' or 'Flora-Dade.'
'Hayslip' is resistant to Fusarium wilt race 1 and 2, Verticillium wilt,
Stemphylium (gray leafspot), and is tolerant to blossom-end rot, black shoulder,
catface, and cracking. 'Hayslip' does hot have the genetic diseases fruit pox
and gold fleck. 'Hayslip' was derived from a cross between 648-4-1-VS1-BK-BK
and 71057-1-3-BK-BK made in the spring of 1976. The 648 lines contributed
smoothness and the 71057 line contributed large size.
'Hayslip' has been widely tested in Florida as 648 x MH-11 and shows poten-
tial for comparable or better yield than alterr PF' and 'Flora-Dade' in replicated
trials. In all 11 commercial field tests, 'Hayslip' was superior to both 'Walter
PF' and 'Flora-Dade.'

Mature green fruit of 'Hayslip' exposed to ethylene gas ripen satisfactorily
and similarly to 'Walter PF' and 'Flora-Dade.' Post-harvest ripening studies of
chilled fruit indicate excellent ripening characteristics.
The vines of 'Hayslip' are determinate and similar in growth habit to
'Flora-Dade' and the number of days to maturity is the same for the two culti-
vars. 'Hayslip' vines produce sufficient foliage for adequate fruit cover. It
grows well on both ground and stal:e culture. Production practices should be
similar to the ones used for 'Flora-Dade.'
'Hayslip' and 'Burgis' are very similar in disease resistance characteristics
and they are both jointless. The 'Hayslip' vine is slightly taller than 'Burgis'
and not as open. The 'Hayslip' fruit have green shoulders in the mature green
stage, whereas 'Burgis' has uniform green fruit.











IV. Breeding Line 'Florida.2432' A Jointless, Uniform Gteen Frutted Fresh
Market Tomato Breeding Line

Authors*: J. J. Augustine, R B. Volin,,H. H. Bryan, P. H, Everett, N. C. Hayslip,
D. S. Burgis, b. 0. Gulb J. P. Crill, and C. A4 John


'Florida 2432' is a breeding line being released for genetic use in breeding
programs in Florida and the USA. It is an inbred tomato line developed at the
Agricultural Research & Education Center, Bradenton, and Agricultural Research
& Education Center, Homestead, in cooperation with the H. J. Heinz Company.
'Florida 2432' has demonstrated its usefulness as a breeding line in improving
fruit quality of the jointless, fresh market type and has shown desirable combin-
ing ability in F1 hybrid combinations.
'Florida 2432' is a sister line of 'Florida MH-1,' crossed in 1969, and, like
'Florida MH-1' is resistant to Fusarium wilt race 1 and 2 and Stemphylium (gray
leafspot) and is not resistant to Verticillium wilt. 'Florida 2432' carries the
ug gene, therefore has uniform green fruit, which improves the ripening qualities
with less black shoulder disorder. 'Florida MH-1' is not uniform green. 'Florida
2432' is tolerant to blossom-end rot, catface, cracking and graywall. It does not
have the genetic diseases fruit pox and gold fleck.
'Florida 2432' generally yields similar number and size of fruit as 'Florida
MH-1' and 'Flora-Dade' and matures at the same time as 'Florida MH-1.' Fruit
firmness, vitamin A content, and taste of 'Florida 2432' are similar to 'Florida
MH-1.' Vitamin C content and vine-ripe fruit color are greater than 'Florida
MH-1.'
Vines of 'Florida 2432' are determinate and of medium height and have the
jointless characteristic, therefore fruit detach from the vines free of stems.
Its desirable characteristics of disease resistance, fruit quality, and yield
potential make 'Florida 2432' valuable in tomato improvement programs.











V. Variety 'Florida Petite' An Extremely Dwarf Tomato for Window Sill Gardens

Authors*: J. J. Augustine, B. K. Harbaugh, and J. P. Crill

'Florida Petite' is a new dwarf tomato variety developed for growing in 4" pots
in limited space arrangements. In dwellings where outdoor gardening is limited or
unavailable, 'Florida Petite' can be grown in a 4" pot on a window sill. It makes
an attractive plant of a height of 6 to 8 inches and width of 6 to 9 inches and
produces about twenty-five 1*" pleasant tasting fruit. Fruit mature in 35 to 40
days from transplanting and 60-65 days from seeding. The immature fruit are uniform
green and the ripe fruit are firm and a dark red color.
'Florida Petite' is resistant to gray leafspot (a fungal leaf disease). It is
not resistant to other foliar or any vascular diseases; therefore, it should be pro-
duced in sterilized soil. Recommended measures for disease and insect control should
be followed (Fla. Coop. Ext. Circ. 98D). Under extreme stress situations of high
temperature and high light conditions, 'Florida Petite' may be susceptible to A-N
autogenouss necrosis), a genetic disorder; therefore production under extreme stress
conditions should be avoided. For best fruit setting and ripening, plants should be
grown under 25% shade in commercial operations, and receive direct sunlight part of
the day in the home environment.




VI. Variety 'Florida Lanai' A Dwarf Tomato for the Patio
Authors*: J. J. Augustine, B. K. Harbaugh, and J. P. Crill

'Florida Lanai' is a dwarf tomato variety developed for growing in 6" pots
for the patio. When grown in a 6" pot, it reaches a plant height of 9" to 11"
and a width of 12" to 17". 'Florida Lanai' yields about forty 1-3/8" firm, red,
pleasant tasting fruit. The fruit mature in approximately 60 days from trans-
planting and 90 days from seeding.
'Florida Lanai' is resistant to gray leafspot (a fungal leaf disease). It
is not resistant to other foliar or any vascular diseases, therefore it should be
grown in sterilized soil. Recommended measures for disease and insect control
should.be followed (Fla. Coop. Ext. Circ. 98D). For the b:st fruit setting and
ripening, plants should be grown in direct sunlight part of the day in the home
environment.










VI. Variety 'Florida Basket' A Dwarf Tomato for Hanging-Baskets

Authors*: J.J. JAugustine, B. K. Harbaugh, and J. P. Crill

'Florida Petite' is a new dwarf tomato variety developed for hanging basket
culture. It is a very short determinate plant with a prostrate growth habit and
good vine cover. When grown in 10" baskets with 4 plants per pot, the vines drape
4" to 6" over the edge of the pot, making the baskets attractive and easy to handle.

'Florida Basket' yields about eighty 1" fruit per 10" basket containing 4 plants.
The ripe fruit are firm and have a good red color, and are pleasant tasting. Fruit
mature in approximately 56 days from transplanting and 85 days from seeding.
'Florida Basket' is resistant to gray leafspot (a fungal leaf disease). It
is not resistant to other foliar or any vascular diseases, therefore it should be
grown on sterilized soil. Recommended measures for disease and insect control should
be followed (Fla. Coop. Ext. Circ. 98D). For the best fruit setting and ripening,
plants should be grown in direct sunlight part of the day in the home environment.








The Authors
Dr. Augustine is Director of Research, BHN Research, Naples, FL, formerly Assistant
Professor of Genetics (AREC-Bradenton); Dr. Volin is Associate Professor of Plant
Pathology (AREC-Homestead); Dr. Bryan is Professor of Horticulture (AREC-Homestead);
Dr. Everett is Professor of Soil Chemistry (ARC-Immokalee); Mr. Hayslip is Professor
Emeritus of Horticulture; Mr. Burgis is Professor Emeritus of Horticulture; Dr. Gull
is Associate Professor of Horticulture (Vegetable Crops Department, University of
Florida, Gainesville); Dr. Crill is Plant Pathology Department Chairman, Internati
ional Rice Research Institute, Manila, Philippines; Mr. John is Research Consultant
A. L. Castle, Inc., formerly Manager of Crops Research, H. J. Heinz Co.; and Dr.
Harbaugh is Associate Professor of Ornamental Horticulture (AREC-Bradenton).




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