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 Copyright
 Introduction
 Materials and methods
 Results and discussion






Group Title: Mimeo report - Gulf Coast Experiment Station - GCS70-4
Title: Response of two tomato varieties to sand damage and control of fruit rot with sodium hypochlorite
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067663/00001
 Material Information
Title: Response of two tomato varieties to sand damage and control of fruit rot with sodium hypochlorite
Series Title: Gulf Coast Experiment Station mimeo report
Physical Description: 2 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Crill, Pat, 1939-
Villalon, B ( Ben )
Bartz, Jerry A., 1942-
Gulf Coast Experiment Station (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Gulf Coast Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Bradenton Fla
Publication Date: 1970
 Subjects
Subject: Tomatoes -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Tomatoes -- Diseases and pests -- Control -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Pat Crill, Ben Villalon, J.A. Bartz.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "March 1, 1970."
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067663
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 71815883

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Materials and methods
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 2
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida






GULF COAST EXPERIMENT STATION
SBradenton, Florida

Mimeo Report GCS70-4 HUME tI0fAI0

Response of Two Tomato Varieties to Sand Da age and Control
of Fruit Rot with Sodium Hypochl rite MAR 72

Pat Crill, Ben Villalon and J. A. Bartz1
I.F.A.S. Univ. of Florida
INTRODUCTION

One of. the most serious problems anticipated in the development of a

machine harvest tomato industry in Florida is sand damage to the fruit.

This damage will occur presumably when 1) the plant is cut off and elevated

onto the harvester, 2) the plants are shaken to remove fruit, 3) the fruit

are removed from the vine and are moving through the harvester and 4) the

fruit are in transit to the packing shed. Sand will be introduced into the

harvester on the plants in quantities sufficient to cause considerable fruit

damage because of the nature of the machine. The objectives of this study

were: 1) to develop a screening technique to use in a breeding program for

evaluation of sand damage, 2) ascertain the effects of sodium hypochlorite

on control of fruit rot on sand damaged fruit and 3) observe the response of

two different varieties to the abrasion and sodium hypochlorite treatments.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Mature green tomato fruit were harvested by hand from field grown plants

of the varieties Walter and Homestead 500. Fruit were stored at room

temperature for two days before treatments were applied.

Treatments consisted of abrading the fruit with sand and then washing

with water and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite. Abrasion was accomplished by

rubbing the fruit on four sectors with field soil such as would be encountered


Assistant Professor (Assistant Plant Pathologist) Gulf Coast Experiment
Station, Bradenton; Assistant Professor (Assistant Plant Pathologist) Sub-
Tropical Experiment Station, Homestead, and Assistant Professor (Assistant
Plant Pathologist), Department of Plant Pathology, Gainesville.






GULF COAST EXPERIMENT STATION
SBradenton, Florida

Mimeo Report GCS70-4 HUME tI0fAI0

Response of Two Tomato Varieties to Sand Da age and Control
of Fruit Rot with Sodium Hypochl rite MAR 72

Pat Crill, Ben Villalon and J. A. Bartz1
I.F.A.S. Univ. of Florida
INTRODUCTION

One of. the most serious problems anticipated in the development of a

machine harvest tomato industry in Florida is sand damage to the fruit.

This damage will occur presumably when 1) the plant is cut off and elevated

onto the harvester, 2) the plants are shaken to remove fruit, 3) the fruit

are removed from the vine and are moving through the harvester and 4) the

fruit are in transit to the packing shed. Sand will be introduced into the

harvester on the plants in quantities sufficient to cause considerable fruit

damage because of the nature of the machine. The objectives of this study

were: 1) to develop a screening technique to use in a breeding program for

evaluation of sand damage, 2) ascertain the effects of sodium hypochlorite

on control of fruit rot on sand damaged fruit and 3) observe the response of

two different varieties to the abrasion and sodium hypochlorite treatments.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Mature green tomato fruit were harvested by hand from field grown plants

of the varieties Walter and Homestead 500. Fruit were stored at room

temperature for two days before treatments were applied.

Treatments consisted of abrading the fruit with sand and then washing

with water and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite. Abrasion was accomplished by

rubbing the fruit on four sectors with field soil such as would be encountered


Assistant Professor (Assistant Plant Pathologist) Gulf Coast Experiment
Station, Bradenton; Assistant Professor (Assistant Plant Pathologist) Sub-
Tropical Experiment Station, Homestead, and Assistant Professor (Assistant
Plant Pathologist), Department of Plant Pathology, Gainesville.








in mechanical harvesting. After each fruit was individually abraded, all

fruit for paired comparisons were placed in an 18" x 24" polyethylene bag

with one quart of Leon fine sand (non-treated field soil) and agitated

vigorously for 30 seconds. Fruit were washed with tap water immediately after

removal from the bag and immediately submerged for either 30 or 60 seconds in

sodium hypochlorite. The 30 and 60 second submersions were selected because

preliminary observations indicated they were most practical. In previous

tests, amount of fruit rot did not decrease with treatments longer than 60

seconds and submersion for 5 minutes resulted in a breakdown and deterioration

of the fruit. Each treatment was conducted as a paired comparisons test in

order to achieve uniform abrasion. 40 fruit were simultaneously abraded for

each comparison. Variation in abrasion was minimized within individual com-

parisons using this method. Six paired comparison tests were conducted.

Fruit were removed from the sodium hypochlorite and immediately placed in boxes

and stored at 38-40F for 24 hours and then ripened at 68-70F. Fruit were

held for 11 days at 68-70F when final readings for fruit rot were made.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Sodium hypochlorite reduced the amount of rot on fruit artificially

abraded with field sand (Figure 1). The efficiency of rot control varied with

varieties. Rot was completely eliminated in the variety Walter with sodium

hypochlorite treatments, but rot still developed on Homestead 500 fruit. Con-

trol of fruit rot associated with sand and/or machinery damage is necessary

if fresh market tomato harvesting is to be successfully mechanized in Florida.

Distinct variety differences existed with respect to fruit rot occurrence.

Fruit rot was controlled in these experiments and mechanical harvesting without

excessive fruit rot appeared possible. The method used in these experiments

appeared to be a promising tool for tomato breeders to use in evaluating

genetic stocks for sand damage and fruit rot.




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