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Group Title: Mimeo report - University of Florida Everglades Experiment Station ; 59- 20
Title: Some recent variety and horticultural trials with vegetable crops in the Everglades
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067552/00001
 Material Information
Title: Some recent variety and horticultural trials with vegetable crops in the Everglades
Series Title: Everglades Station Mimeo Report
Physical Description: 8 leaves : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Guzman, V. L ( Victor Lionel ), 1914-
Burdine, Howard W., 1909-
Everglades Experiment Station
Publisher: Everglades Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Belle Glade Fla
Publication Date: 1959
 Subjects
Subject: Vegetables -- Varieties -- Florida -- Everglades   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Summary: "This report includes a compilation of results from some replicated experiments conducted during the 1958-59 growing season with vegetable crops. The tabulated date are preliminary and, in most cases, have not been subjected to statistical analysis. The information is presented in order that it might be available to participants in the 1959 Field Day."
Statement of Responsibility: V.L. Guzman and H.W. Burdine.
General Note: "May 6, 1959."
General Note: Cover title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067552
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 65221059

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Full Text









SOME RECENT VARIETY AND HORTICULTURAL TRIALS
WITH VEGETABLE CROPS IN THE EVERGLADES

V. L. Guzman and H. W. Burdine








This report includes a compilation of results from
some replicated experiments conducted during the 1958-59
growing season with vegetable crops. The tabulated date
are preliminary and, in most cases, have not been sub-
jected to statistical analysis. The information is pre-
sentedd in order that it might be available to participants
in the 1959 Field Day.



















Everglades Station Mimeo Report 59-20
Belle Glade, Florida
May 6, 1959









CELERY VARIETY TRIALS

Replicated Tritls


1958-59
Acces. No.


Variety


S. Pascal 259-19
Improved Pascal #375
Tall Utah 52-70
Utah 16-11
Green Light (Utah)
MSU #153
Tall Utah Type #135C1
Pascal #137-D5
Tall Utah Type #143D2
EES #148
EES #148-@


Seedsman

Ferry Morse
Abbott & Cobb
Ferry Morse
Associated Seed Growers
Joseph H. Harris
Michigan State Univ.
Ferry Morse
Ferry Morse
Ferry Morse
Everglades Expt. Sta.
Everglades Expt. Sta.


S Observational Trials


Utah 96
XP 22
XP 15
MSU #118
MSU #142
MSU #162
MSU #163
MSU Composite
57-35
259-19A
Tall Utah 70K
Tall Utah 187A
Green Light Water


Ferry Morse
Associated Seed Growers
Associated Seed Growers
Michigan State Univ.
Michigan State Univ.
Michigan State Univ.
Michigan State Univ.
Michigan State Univ.
Eastern State F. Exg.
Ferry Morse
Ferry Morse
Ferry Morse
Selection Joseph Harris


A summary of one test (winter) is presented in Table 1.


Lot
No.

6730
--
4872
77012
370


--
--
--


c6455
PC57132
PC57132
--



Lost
39201








Table 1. Preliminary data on the performance of celery varieties,
Harvested March 9, 1959 Wedgworth Farms.


transplanted December 1, 1958.


Sub- Early
Total Total Blight
Dozen per Crate up to Crates Ranks Rating*
Varieties* 1~ 2 2 3 4 6 3 doz. A Yield Test Appearance 0 to 5

259-19 69.2 181.7 141.9 274.1 108.2 67.8 666.9 842.9 8 2 9 1
375 17.3 134.1 235.4 268.3 129.8 57.7 655.1 842.6 9 5 10 1
52-70 115.4 151.4 235.4 219.3 97.3 79.3 721.4 898.1 4 9 2 3
16-11 230.8 181.7 287.3 150.7 73.5 44.7 858.5 976.7 6 6 5 3
Green Light 173.1 263.9 180.0 239.5 86.5 38.9 856.5 981.9 1 8 6 3
MSU-153 11.5 47.6 145.4 282.7 155.7 76.4 487.2 719.3 11 10 8 1
135-C1 46.5 164.4 287.3 248.1 82.2 54.8 746.3 883.3 5 7 1 2
137-D5 98.1 181.7 263.1 225.0 106.0 44.7 767.9 918.6 3 & 4 3
143-D2 103.9 203.4 173.1 225.0 110.3 63.4 705.4 879.1 6 3 3 3
148 40.4 82.2 218.1 248.1 153.6 59.1 588.8 801.5 10 4 7 Traces
148-2 69.2 134.1 221.6 259.7 127.5 43.3 684.6 855.5 7 4 11 Traces


* Zero, no blight; 5,
transplanting.


severe blight. Tentative rating, under commercially sprayed conditions, one month after


No celery variety was found with the combinations of all desirable characteristics. Probably the tall Utah
types are the most desirable for winter harvest. 135-C1 (compact No. 1), because it is less susceptible to blight,
may be tried for late fal or early winter production, followed by 52-70. Green Light and 16-11 should be tried
on a small scale for winter harvest. These are heavy yielders but their appearance is less attractive than the tall
Utah types. 16-11 showed in some trials a very severe manganese and magnesium deficiency. EES 148 (Emerald) and
the selection in these tests appeared to be more adapted to November and early December and late spring harvest.







Sweet Corn Hybrid Variety Trials

Golden Security was the best yielding variety, 85-1 and R-8 were second and
third respectively, followed closely by W-6, Seneca Waupam and Florigold (Table
2, fall season trials).

In the commercial trials R-8 and 85-1 gave better yields than Golden Security.
However, this could be due to the fact that the latter was harvested about two days
from optimum maturity (Table 3). Appearance rating made by experts of two packing
houses did not agree (see last two columns in Table 3).

Table 2. Number of ears harvested in 50' test plots x four replications
(200' row). (Preliminary data, not for publication.) Planted
September 12, 1958, harvested November 18, 1958. S. N. Knight Farm.

No. of Marketable Ears Yield
Fancy No. 1 Total Rank

1. Golden S. 152 73 225 1
2. Florigold 163 27 190 6
3. Sixtypak 151 26 177 7
4. 85-1 187 21 208 2
5. W-6 173 26 199 4
6. Seneca Wampum 151 41 192 5
7. R-8 159 48 207 3


Table 3. Commercial trials. Average yield of approximately 3 acres. Planted
September 9, 1958, harvested November 15, 1958.

Yields in boxes per acre Ranks
Yield Appearance**

1. Golden S. 172* 6 6 2
2. Florigold 200 3 2 4
3. Sixtypak 173 5 4 6
4. 85-1 216 2 1 5
5. w-6 180 4 5 3
6. S. Wampum 162 7 3 7
7. R-8 231 1 7 1

Pulled 2 days before maturity.
** Judged by two packinghouses.

Snapbean Variety Trials

Eleven varieties were compared in replicated plots. Yields are shown in
Table 4. Yields are not as high as expected, due probably to severe winds of
long duration at flowering time.





-4-


The longest shelf life appearancee on the display counter after several days)
among these varieties was that of St. Black Valentine, Extender, Wadex, Valentine
type 942, B3125-x-5-2 and B1370. Some of these varieties are also the best yield-
ers, such as Extender, Valentine type 942, and B3370.

Table 4. Yields of bean varieties in bushels per acre calculated from replicated
trials (25' x 32" x 4). Planted March 2, 1959. Harvested April 21-28,
1959, Prison Farm.

Varieties Bushels/A.

St. Black Valentine 110.0
Wade 131.0
XP233 192.0
Longval 172.0
Extender (B2567-1) 193.0
Imp. Supergreen 155.0
Wadex 109.0
Valentine type 942 (USDA) 226.0
B3034-1-1 156.0
B3125-x-5-2 176.O
B3370 196.0

Experiments to Determine the Harvest Time of 3 Varieties of Celery

Yield increased up to 91 days from transplanting for the 3 varieties (Table
5). There are two dates at which a sharp increase occurred, one from the 70th to
the 77th day and the other from the 84th to the 91st day. In regard to 52-70
variety the optimum number of days for maximum yields may be between 91 and 98
days. Thus, the decrement in yield for 52-70 was 125 boxes from the 91st to the
98th day, whereas for 259-19 and 148 a reduction of 183 and 185 boxes respectively
was found for the same period.
It is evident that celery should be harvested at the peak of its growing
period, which appears to be around 91 days from transplanting under the conditions
of this experiment, to assure maximum yields

Table 5. Yield of crates per acre of 3 varieties of celery, harvested 70 to 119
days from transplanting (preliminary data, not for publication).
Transplanted November 6, 1958; began harvest January 15, 1959. Evans
and Rogers Farm, South Bay.

Harvest
Days from Varieties
Transplanting 259-19 148 52-70

70 393 307 295
77 644 718 684
84 723 736 686
91 893 982 1045
98 710 797 920
105 740 749 845
112 738 816 753
119 712 730 729







-5-


Celery Spacing Experiment


Treatments:
Varieties
A = 259-19
B : 148 (Emerald)
0 = 52-70


Row
1
2
3


Spacing
20 inches
24 inches
28 inches


Table 6. Field crates per acre of 52-70 celery at 20, 24 and 28 inch row spacing
in combination with 6, 7, and 8 inch plant spacing (preliminary data,
not for publication). Transplanted November 18, 1958; harvested
February 19, 1959. Sullivan Farm.


20"
6 7 6
200 273 327
197 167 211
225 316 219
287 192 150
170 128 100

1079 1076 1007


24"
6 7 8
227 318 302
163 205 182
323 236 312
174 117 102
161 80 45

957 956 943


28"
6 7 8
195 279 318
135 119 182
212 268 173
185 137 78
125 65 58

852 868 809


The effect of various row and plant spacings within the row shows that the
closest row spacing (20") gives the highest yields (Table 6, 8 and 9). This is
due chiefly to greater plant population per acre at close row spacing as compared
with wider row spacings (24" and 28"). When row yields are considered the reverse
is true; wider row spacing gives in general greater yields per row. This latter
consideration is also of practical importance because most farm operations are
done on cost basis for half mile rows (transplanting, weeding, sidedressing and
harvesting, Table 7).

Table 7. Number of rows to make one acre at 20", 24" and 28" row spacing


Row inches
20" =
24" =
28" :


Row feet
1.66' x 2450'*
2.00' x 2450'*
2.33' x 2450'*


Sq.ft./per row
: 4067.00
: 4900.00
: 5708.50


Number of rows/A
10.71
8.88
7.63


* Actual planting length of a half mile row.
1/ No consideration was taken for the spray alley.

The outbreak of pink rot during this season was serious on most farms.
Under these conditions plants in the 28" row spacing have been infected to lesser
degree than the 24" ones and the latter less than those growing in the 20" rows.
It appears that the older leaves remained green longer in the 28" row plants and
this in turn seems to give better protection against infection (field observations
only).

Appearance and pithiness of 52-70 celery plants appear to improve with wider
row spacing.

The effect of spacing within the row seems to have less effect on yield than
row spacing. A similar trend was noted with 259-19 and 148 varieties, although
the drop in yields at wider row spacing was more pronounced than with 52-70.


Plant
a 6
b 7
c 8


Spacing
inches
inches
inches


Doz. per
Crate
2
2j
3
4
6

Total/A






-6-


Table 8. Yields in crates per acre of 52-70 celery grown in replicated trials
at 28, 30 and 32 inch rows and 6, 7 and 8 inchre spacing in the row.
(Preliminary data not for publication). Transplanted February 28,
1959. Harvested April 30, 1959. Duda & Sons Farm.


Spacings
Inches


28-6
28-7
28-8

30-6
30-7
30-8

32-6
32-7
32-8

*28-9
*30-9
*32-9


Crates per acre
i doz. 2 doz. 2a doz. 3 doz. 4 doz. 6 doz. Total/A


*50.5
103.9
190.3

40.3
137.0
104.7

68.2
144.0
121.3

138.4
128.9
90.9


292.0
318.0
408.8

217.8
326.7
326.7

289.7
272.6
335.1

415.2
459.8.:
136.4


446.3
389.3
332.2

348.5
396.9
256.5

376.8
394.9
258.8

249.1
290.4
399.6


363.7
268.5
125.6

378.8
173.3
185.4

306.9
147.8
140.2

15.2
'32.4
75.6


39.0
22.7
16.3

93.9
18.2
27.3

34.1
28.4
31.2

39.0

45.6


12.9
4.3

10.1

10.1

7.6

7.6

8.7

7.56


1214.4
1106.7
1073.2

1089.4
1052.1
910.7

1083.3
987.7
894.2

865.6
911.5
823.7


* Pilot experiment non replicated.

In another experiment 52-70 variety was planted at 28, 30 and 32 incheaovow
spacing, with all possible combinations with, 6, 7 and 8 inches plant spacing
within the row. Yields were superior with 28 inchrows, 6 inch plant spacing
(Table 8). Yield differences from varying the row width were not as pronounced
in this experiment as in the first already discussed. Yield-variation was about
equally dependent on plant spacing as that of row spacing. There was not visible
differences in appearance of the celery in the various treatments.

Data on other plant characteristics in this experimentwere not analyzed at
this date, but it appears that pithiness at the base of the plant was slightly
more pronounced in plants grown at closer row and plant spacings.

A pilot test was conducted with no replications at 28, 30 and 32 inch< rows
with 9 inch spacing between plants. Results are shown in Table 8.










-7-
Table 9. Effects of Plant Spacing and Row Spacing on Yields of Three Celery Types.
Plants set in field October 4, 1957, harvested January 1-5, 1958


Row Plant
Stac. Soac.


Estimated crates per acre


-- ? 4 6 Totd~l


Waltham S. Pascal




tt It it





EES #148


Utah 52-70


20"


28"


20"


24"


20"


24 6
7
8

28 6
7
8


60 344
72 521
108 444

40 574
151 468
322 657

113 415
242 472
198 466

157 553
97 734
157 580
302 438
282 377
302 476

250 362
267 440
233 563

290 851
249 682
314 725
161 447
312 649
292 566

112 453
276 505
380 356


319
312
355

356
278
211

347
285
248

428
384
413

338
362
235


386 249 76 1434
326 113 40 1384
260 50 62 1279


307
247
106

246
147
99

374
248
175
247
221
166


359 237
300 138
248 56


406
370
312

314
266
205

356
267
181


87 36 1400
34 48 1226
15 3 1314

74 15 1209
36 4 1186
19 6 1036

131 7 1650
86 15 1564
50 25 1400

106 27 1458
41 9 1292
26 9 1214

42 2 1252
36 2 1183
19 11 1130


223 77 36 1883
175 54 43- 1573
91 82 15 1539

312 113 27 1374
116 34 18 1395
111 34 24 1232

190 55 17 1183
86 42 o 1176
73 23 13 o106


1


Spac. Sna. 2 PAL q 4 6 Tota


- --- --










-8-


Preliminary Experiments on Sprouting Potato Seed Pieces

1. Induction of sprouting in Red Pontiac potato seed pieces by the use of 1.0
ppm of Gibberellic acid during a 4 minute dip.

The potatoes arrived in Belle Glade September 10, 1958 and were treated
September 16 and planted the following day in a replicated experiment.

Chemicals used:
Potassium Thiocyanate: 3 pounds in 50 gallons of water)Check
Hot Formaldehyde: 1 quart to 30 gallons of water )
Gibberellic acid: 1.0 ppm
Agromycin 1QO: .100 ppm
Captan 4 pounds to 100 gallons of water
Terrachlor: 100 pounds per acre.

Treatments:
1. (Check) Tuber uncut K Thiocynate tuber cut.
2. Tuber uncut Formaldehyde-Gibberellic acid-Agromycin-tuber cut.
3. Formaldehyde Tuber cut Gibberellic acid-Ag~omycin.
4. Tuber uncut Captan-Gibberellic acid-Agromycin-tuber cut.
5. Tuber cut Captan-Gibberellic Acid- Agromycin.
6. Tuber cut K Thiocyanate-Terrachlor applied in 18" band before covering
the tubers.
7. (Check) Formaldehyde-Tuber cut K Thiocyanate Agromycin.

Tubers of treatments receiving Gibberellic acid sprouted seven days before
those treated with K Thiocyanate. Thus, these plants were larger for most of the
growing season. No differences were found in color, shape, or eating quality of
the tubers. Yields were not detrimentally affected by the use of Gibberellic
acid. The use of Agromycin, Captan and Terrachlor did not modify the sprouting
properties of Gibberellic acid.

2. Effect of 0.5 ppm, 1.0 ppm and 1.5 ppm of Gibberellic acid on the sprouting of
potato seed pieces when the dipping time varied from 1, 30, 60, 120 and 240
seconds.

Variety: North Dakota Red Pontiac, which arrived in Belle Glade September
10, 1958. Treatments applied October 23, 1958 were replicated 4 times. The
potatoes were in storage at room temperature prior to the treatments. All treat-
ments received 100 ppm of Agromycin 100, 4 pounds of Captan per 100 gallons of
water simultaneously with the Gibberellic acid treatment. One of the checks was
3 pounds of K thiocyanate in 50 gallons of water, the other check was "no chemi-
cal treatment".

The Gibberellic treated tubers sprouted about the same time as the check
ones (probably the rest period of the tubers partially ended during storage).
No differences in size, color, shape or eating quality of the tubers could be
attributed to the treatment.

Caution It has been reported elsewhere that Gibberellic acid used for
sprouting potato seed pieces produced a crop of abnormally shaped potatoes; there-
fore, its use should be restricted to small trials until more data ee secured in
this area.




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