Group Title: Mimeo Report - University of Florida Everlgades Experiment Station ; EES64-15
Title: A summary of soybean insects in Palm Beach County
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067446/00001
 Material Information
Title: A summary of soybean insects in Palm Beach County
Series Title: Everglades Station Mimeo Report
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Genung, William G., 1915-1982
Green, Victor
Everglades Experiment Station
Publisher: Everglades Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Belle Glade Fla
Publication Date: 1964
 Subjects
Subject: Soybean -- Diseases and pests -- Florida -- Palm Beach County   ( lcsh )
Insect pests -- Florida -- Palm Beach County   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 1).
Statement of Responsibility: William G. Genung and Victor E. Green.
General Note: "February, 1964."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067446
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 63667588

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Everglades Station Mimeo Report EES64-15 s february 1964

A Summary of Soybean Insects in Pdli Beactounty

William G. Genung and Victor E. J1/


Observations of soybean insects in the Everglades have been made on each
experimental planting since 1951. These plantings include variety trials during
1951, 1954, 1957 and 1962 and two experiments in 1963 that were designed speci-
fically for observations on stinkbugs, diseases and their interrelationships. Most
of the information from the latter tests will be reported elsewhere since the data
are largely of a specific nature. Reports on soybean insects have been made by
Genung (1951a) on varietal resistance to leafhoppers, on varietal resistance to
cutworms (1951b) and by Genung and Green (1962) on various soybean insects with
emphasis on varietal susceptibility, particularly to the velvet bean caterpillar.
Green et al (1962) reviewed the various aspects of soybean research in the Ever-
glades including that on insects from the initial experiments in the mid 1920's
until 1962. More recently Genung and Green ( 1964 ) have discussed the various
stem-boring insects attacking this crop in recent seasons.

The purpose of the present report is to summarize our present knowledge of
insects attacking soybeans in the Everglades, since interest has been expressed
on possibilities of rather extensive commercial plantings there. The rather dismal
results of 40 years of intermittent research on the crop in the area, do not justify
this confidence. While it is believed that insects are only contributory, rather
than wholly responsible, for the total yield failures that have characterized this
research, it is felt that they are of sufficient importance in production of the
crop to warrant this rather complete survey of injurious insects associated with
the crop. Several of the insects .reported here are not now known as economic pests
of the crop although they appear,(in view of their geographic distribution, degree
of soybean infestation in the Everglades and host adaptability) to hold considerable
economic potential against this crop. ( b /- fI)

Control data are summarized in Table 2 for several of the major insects.
Since cultural factors such as handling of cover crops and weed stand are important,
they are included in the information in Table 2.

Literature Cited

Genung, W. G., Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Ann. Rept. 1951. p. 183 (a).
Ibid. 1951. p. 192-193 (b).
____.__, and Victor E. Green, Jr. 1962. Insects Attacking Soybeans with
Emphasis on Varietal Susceptibility. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. of Fla. Proc.
22: 138-142.
and Victor E. Green, Jr. 1964. Some Stem-boring Insects Associated
with Soybeans in Florida. (Manuscript prepared for Fla. Ent.)
Green, Victor E., Jr., William G. Genung and Joseph R. Orsenigo. 1962. A History
of Research on Soybeans on Everglades Organic Soils. Everglades Station
Mimeo Report 63-8.

SAssociate Entomologist and Associate Agronomist, respectively.









Table 1. Insects attacking soybeans in the Everglades and adjacent sandy soils, in experimental plantings,
summary of injury, occurrence and preference.


Maximum.
Degree of Regularity
nfestatiop of
observed 1 occurrence I Most
On On conspicuous
Scientific soy- soy- Varietal damage as:
Common name name Order Family Areal bean Areal bean pref. _


A bean leafhopper
Three corn. Alfalfa
hopper
Sou. green stinkbug
a stink bug

a stink bug
a stink bug

a stink bug

a stink bug
Leaf footed bug


Big thighed bug


Lima pod borer

Cowpea curculio


Black cutworm


Granulate cutworm


Empoasca Krameri
Stictocephalus
.. festinus
Nezara viridula
Euschistus
ictericus
Thyanta perditor
Prezodoroo

Proays punctu-
latus
Euschistus sp.
Leptoglossus
phyllopus
Acanthocephal'a
sp.
Etiella zinck-
enella
Chalcodermus
aeneus

Agrotis
ypsilon
Agrotis
ygpesaft
-5- ix 7';-. ,- a IV


Homoptera
Homoptera


Hemiptera

Hemiptera
Hemiptera

Hemiptera

Hemiptera
Hemiptera

Hemiptera

Hemiptera
Lepidop-
tera
Coleoptera


Lepidop-
tera
Lepidop-
tera


Cicadellidae
Membracidae


Pentatomidae

Pentatomidae
Pentatcmidae

Pentatomidae

Pentatomidae
Pentatomidae

Coreidae

Coreidae
Pyralidae

Curculionidae


Phalaenidae-


Phalaenidae


b
c

d

c
b

c

d
b

c

c
d(on

d


d

d


b
b

d

c
b

b


c
a

b

b
sand)


a

c


c


yes
no

no

no
no

no

no
no

no

no
no

no


yes


yes


foliage sucker



pod sucker

pod sucker
pod sucker

pod sucker

pod sucker
pod sucker

pod sucker

pod sucker
pod borer

pod borer

cutworm and
defoliator
cutworm and
defoliator







Table 1 (continued)


Velvet bean caterp.

Sou. armyworm

Larger cotton
cutworm
Yellow striped
armyworm
Fall armyworm

Corn earworm

Bean leaf
skeletonizer



Salt Marsh
caterpillar
Bean leafroller

A Longhorned borer

A moth borer

Lesser cornstalk
borer


American
grasshopper
Obscure
grasshopper


Anticarsia
gemmatilis
Prodenia
erad nia
Prodenia
dolchos
Prodenia
ornithogalli
Laphygma
frugiperda
Heliothis
zeae
Autoplusia
egena
Pseudoplusia
includes
fstigmene
acraea
Urbanus
proteus
Hippopsis
lemniscata
Selenis
monotropa
Elasmopalpus
lignosel3us
Languria sp.
Schistocerca
americana
Schistocerca
americana


Lepidoptera Phalaenidae


Lepidoptera

Lepidoptera

Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera

Lepidoptera

Lepidoptera

Lepidoptera

Lepidoptera

Lepidoptera

Coleoptera

Lepidoptera

Lepidoptera

Coleoptera
Orthoptera

Orthoptera


Phalaenidae

Phalaenidae

Phalaenidae
Phalaenidae

Phalaenidae

Phalaenidae

Phalaenidae

Phalaenidae

Phalaenidae

Cerambycidae

Phalaenidae

Phalaenidae

languridae
Locustidae

Locustidae


5


5

2

3
3

4

3

3

4

4

5

5

4



4

4


yes


?


defoliator


defoliator

defoliator

defoliator
defoliatcr

defoliator

defoliator

defoliator

defoliator

defoliator

stem borer

stem borer

stem borer

stem borer
defoliator and
stem chewer
defoliator and
stem chewer


Tabl I. (continued)-


I .









Table 1 (continued)


Sou. Red legged
grasshopper
Long-horned
grasshopper
Long-horned
grasshopper
Banded cue.
beetle
Spotted cue.
beetle
A serpentine
leafminer
Wireworms


Indian meal
moth
Angoumois
grain moth


/ 1. Non economic
2. light
3. moderate
4. heavy
5. very heavy


- -g --- -


I


Dichromorpha Orthoptera
viridis
Paroxya sp. Orthoptera

Chortophaga Orthoptera'
australior
Melanoplus F. Orthoptera
Rubram Propinquus
Neoconocephalus Orthoptera
sp.
Conocephalus Orthoptera
sp.
Diabrotica Coleoptera
balteata
Diabrotica Coleoptera
11-punc. howar
Liriomyza sp. Diptera

Melanotus Coleoptera
communis (and-
others)
Plodia LepidopterE
interpunctella
Sitotroga Lepidoptert
cerealella


2 a irreg


ular


b


Locustidae

Locustidae

Locustidae

Locustidae

Tattigcnidae

Tattigonidae

Chrysomelidae

Chrysomelidae

Agromyzidae

Elataridae


Pyralidae

Gelechidae


b fairly frequent
c usually annually
d occurs annually


aL
I


defoliator and
stem chewer
defoliator and
stem chewer
defoliator and
stem chewer
defoliator

defoliator

defoliator

defoliator

defoliator

defoliator

attack under-
ground stem
and roots
storage pest

Storage pest








Table 2. Insect control for soybean insects in Palm Beach County. Control suggestions for some of the insects
are based on results or observations on other crops.

Insect species
or complex Insecticide I Amount: Ibs./act./A. Remarks Cultural factors


Stinkbugs
(various species)


Phosdrin
Parathion


0.25-0.50
0.25-0.50


-_ --- I I *1


Velvet bean
caterpillar


Parathion
Phosdrin
DDT


0.50
0.50
0.50


May move from adjacent cover
crops when these are disked.
Use of preferred and non-
preferred varieties in alter-
nate strips may have merit.
Preferred varieties could be
treated as needed.


Leafhoppers Phosdrin 0.25 Hairy varieties appear to
Toxaphene 1.50 have resistance to leaf-
___ hoppers.


Armyworm complex


Toxaphene +
Parathion


2.00 + 0.50


Heavy populations build up in
amaranth and move to crops as
the amaranth becomes defol-
iated.


Subterranean Endrin 0.50 Pre-planting broadcast Amaranth appears preferred
Cutworms Toxaphene 2.00 spray to soil surface. for oviposition.
Should not be disked in.
Do not disturb soil for
two or three days.
Grasshoppers Parathion 0.50
Toxaphene 2.00
_Sevin 1.00


Leaf beetle
complex


Parathion
Toxaphene


0.15-0.25
1.50










Table 2 (continued)


Hippopsis
lemniscata


DIDT
Parathion
Toxaphene


Selenis
monotropa


1.00-1.50
0.50
1.00


Observations on chemical
control have not been made,
but DDT, parathion or
Toxaphene would probably
aive control.


Wireworms I Aldrin 5.00 Apply broadcast spray
Parathion 5.00 application and disk in,
immediately.
0 2 Vr heavy populations occur


Disking stands of ragweed
and Bidens has forced adults
to oviposit in crop plants.
Disking should be done prior
to planting adjacent fields.
Very heavy populations build
up in sesbania and related
legumes. Untimely disking
force ovipositing females to
o0 to other lemimes.


Lima pod borer


Parathion


Very heavy populations occur
in Crotalaria striata. Poorly
timed disking can force moths
to other legume crops. If
Crotalaria is not disturbed
it is sufficiently preferred
so that it acts as a trap crop.


Wireworm data are from recommendations of Dr. E. D. Harris, Jr., Associate Entomologist, for wireworm control
on Everglades organic soil.








EES Mimeo Rpt. 64-15
300 copies


I


0.15-0.25




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