• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Table of Contents
 Preface
 Jamaica
 Barbados
 Antigua
 St. Christopher, Nevis, and...
 British Guiana
 West India Colonies
 Index to names of persons occurring...






Group Title: Monumental inscriptions of the British West Indies from the earliest date, : with genealogical and historical annotations, from original, local, and other sources, illustrative of the histories and genealogies of the seventeenth century, the calendars of state papers, peerages and baronetages; with engravings of the arms of the principal families.
Title: Monumental inscriptions of the British West Indies from the earliest date
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067430/00001
 Material Information
Title: Monumental inscriptions of the British West Indies from the earliest date with genealogical and historical annotations, from original, local, and other sources, illustrative of the histories and genealogies of the seventeenth century, the calendars of state papers, peerages and baronetages; with engravings of the arms of the principal families
Physical Description: xii p., 1 â„“., 442 p. incl. front., illus. (coats of arms) : ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lawrence-Archer, J. H ( James Henry ), 1823-1889
Publisher: Chatto and Windus
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1875
 Subjects
Subject: Epitaphs -- West Indies, British   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
Turks and Caicos Islands
Jamaica
Cayman Islands
Anguilla
Antigua and Barbuda
Trinidad and Tobago
Barbados
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Grenada
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Dominica
Montserrat
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Chiefly collected on the spot by Captain J.H. Lawrence-Archer.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067430
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01821290
lccn - 05024588

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Dedication
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Preface
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
    Jamaica
        Page xiii
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Chronological table
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
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            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
        Epitaphs and monumental inscriptions
            Page 21
            Page 22
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    Barbados
        Page 343
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        Chronological table
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        Epitaphs and monumental inscriptions
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    Antigua
        Page 403
        Page 404
        Page 405
        Chronological table
            Page 406
            Page 407
            Page 408
        Epitaphs and monumental inscriptions
            Page 409
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    St. Christopher, Nevis, and Auguilla
        Page 415
        Page 416
        Chronological roll of governors, etc.
            Page 417
        Epitaphs and monumental inscriptions
            Page 418
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    British Guiana
        Page 421
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        Chronological roll of governors
            Page 423
        Epitaphs and monumental inscriptions
            Page 424
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    West India Colonies
        Page 427
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        Grenada
            Page 429
        St. Vincent - Montserrat
            Page 430
        St. Lucia - Tobago - Trinidad - Dominica
            Page 431
        Turks and Caicos Islands - The Virgin Islands - The Bahama Islands - Honduras
            Page 432
    Index to names of persons occurring in the monumental inscriptions and epitaphs
        Page 433
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Full Text


















MONUMENTAL


INSCRIPTIONS


THE BRITISH WEST


INDIES.


:""' r~~ : :-:~~--1










*Monumcntal nsrritpttst

of the


artties eIEt j3bntife


FROM THE EARLIEST DATE,

WITH GENEALOGICAL AND HISTORICAL ANNOTATIONS, FROM ORIGINAL
LOCAL, AND OTHER SOURCES, ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE HISTORIES
AND GENEALOGIES OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY,
THE CALENDARS OF STATE PAPERS, PEERAGES
AND BARONETAGES; WITH ENGRAVINGS
OF THE ARMS OF THE PRINCIPAL
FAMILIES.

CHIEFLY COLLECTED ON THE SPOT BY CAPTAIN J. H. LAWRENCEARCHER.
^ L- %L ^ ^ ^


Xaon Don:
CHATTO AND WINDUS, PICCADILLY.
1875.






























Pebiciteb, by Permission,

TO

HIS GRACE

THE DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM AND CHANDOS,

FORMERLY SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE COLONIES.


















CONTENTS.


PREFATORY REMARKS ...

JAMAICA ... ...
CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE ...
EPITAPHS AND MONUMENTAL INS

BARBADOS ... ...

CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE...
EPITAPHS AND MONUMENTAL INS

ANTIGUA ... ...
CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE...
EPITAPHS AND MONUMENTAL IN'

ST. CHRISTOPHER, NEVIS, AND
CHRONOLOGICAL ROLL OF OVER
EPITAPHS AND MONUMENTAL IN!

BRITISH GUIANA ...

EPITAPHS AND MONUMENTAL IN!

OTHER COLONIES, ETC. NOTICED


GRENADA ...
ST. VINCENT ...
MONTSERRAT ... .

ST. LUCIA
TOBAGO ...
TRINIDAD ...
DOMINICA ...
TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS ...

THE BAHAMA ISLANDS ...
HONDURAS ...
INDEX ... ...


PAGE
.... ... ... ix


S ... ... ... ... 10
CRIPTIONS ... ... ... 21

... ... ., ... 341
... ... ... ... 347
CRIPTIONS ... ... ... 355

... ... ... ... 403
406
SCRIPTIONS ... ... ... 409

ANGUILLA ... .. 415
NORS, ETC. ... ... ... 417
SCRIPTIONS ... ... ... 418

... ... ... ... 423
SCRIPTIONS ... ... ... 426

... ... ... 427
... ... ... ... 429
... ... ... ... 431
... .. ... ... 431
... ... ... ... 431
... ...... 431

431
.. ... ... ... ... 431
... ... ... ... 43
... ... ... ... 432

... ... ... ... 432
... ... ... ... 432
... ... ... ... 432
... ... ... ... 433


'





















PREFATORY REMARKS.




THE Author formed the design of visiting the older English colonies of the West
Indies, and of examining, so far as he might be permitted, their local records,
with a view to the production of a work which should contribute, through the genea-
logical medium, to a better knowledge of the social origin of those colonies, in the
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
It may not be unworthy of note, that those early settlers were, as a rule, men of
great energy, with moderate political opinions. They belonged to the same class
from which the titled aristocracy is for the most part derived, and many of their
numerous descendants are to be found in the present peerage and baronetage, holding
posts of honour under the Crown.
The higher class of planters or proprietors almost invariably educated their
children in England; and, although in those days, the voyage was so much longer
and more difficult than at present, it is surprising how frequently those colonial gentry
made it; and many of their adventures might, even now, afford subject of interest for
the novelist.
There was, towards the close of the seventeenth century, another element in the
social condition of these colonies-namely, white slaves,-an institution perhaps sug-
gested by Cromwell's Government, but only carried out to its full extent, by James the
Second, while disposing of the unfortunate adherents of Monmouth.
Another principal object of the present collection is, to preserve records which,
in the course of a few generations, would otherwise be destroyed through neglect,
spoliation, the effects of climate, and other causes.
In Jamaica, most of the handsome old mausoleums-at Port Royal, for instance-
being secluded from the town, and partially concealed by gigantic cacti, cashaw, and
mangrove trees, have been, from time to time, broken into and plundered-the leaden
coffins stolen, the marble tablets carried off, and sold again for the lke purposes,
and the empty vault left for the lugubrious pic-nics of the dangerous," or at any
rate, idle classes, whose broken bottles, mingled with the relics of humanity, bear wit-
ness to the revelries by which they have been desecrated.










PREFA TOR Y REMARKS.


In many other places, the older slabs have been broken up, to supply the ordinary
necessities of repairing walls, &c., while, in some of the disused cemeteries, the monu-
ments themselves have been gradually and surely entombed, by the encroachments of
the matted crab-weed. In numerous instances, the larger sepulchres have been
insidiously destroyed by the seeds of overhanging trees, which, vegetating in their
fissures, and striking their roots downwards, in search of nourishment, have so disinte-
grated the masonry, as, in some places, to carry it up in their growth, and in others, to
reduce it to mouldering heaps. Such a struggle between robust nature and frail art,
in the less frequented private cemeteries, has generally resulted in the entire destruc-
tion of tombs scarcely half a century old.
The present collection was made in 1858 and 1864-5,* and almost entirely anno-
tated by the author, under circumstances of considerable personal difficulty, in the
churches and cemeteries of Jamaica, and Barbados. Later, he discovered that some
pamphlets, entitled "Church Notes," and "A History of the Parish of St. James',
Jamaica,"t had been printed by the late Mr. Roby, of the latter island, and from
portions of these, which fell into his hands, and also from a small MS. collection of
pedigrees given to him by the late Mr. H. L. Long, of Hampton Lodge, he has made
several useful extracts, which will be found duly acknowledged, along with other de-
sultory contributions.
After many researches amongst the local public records of the West Indies, the
author, on his return to England, continued his annotations, in the various registries
of the three Kingdoms; but, ultimately finding these too extensive for the limits of
his work, he made a careful selection, and then abridged the latter.:
One of the objects of the present work being to link, however slightly, the Home
and Colonial records of the seventeenth century, the author made an application to
His Grace the Secretary of State for the Colonies (1867), who very liberally en-
deavoured to facilitate his farther inquiries in the islands which he had just left; but
owing to unforeseen obstacles this attempt was frustrated, and, consequently, many
valuable sources of information yet remain available for some future labourer in the
same field.
In Barbados, the task of transcribing epitaphs, owing to the highly cultivated
and open character of the country, was comparatively easy; but in Jamaica, where
the wild vegetation of nature is so remarkable, the explorer of its older and private



The author's term of service in command of the depot of his regiment-2nd Batt. 6oth Rifles-having
then expired.
+ Unfortunately, the author was unable to discover the Ist and and Parts of the latter, until the greater part
of Jamaica had passed through the press.
The present object being to present the materials in as condensed a form as possible, it has seemed unne-
cessary to repeat in every instance local official titles, names of the estates of their owners, and much interesting
collateral matter, which may be reserved for another occasion.










PRFFA TOR Y REMARKS.


cemeteries, must resort to manual labour; and the author has, not unfrequently
passed days, from breakfast-time until sunset, with the common woodman's cutlas,
clearing away the dense and matted undergrowth, while approaching the objects of his
search.
In these dark and humid spots, shut up in woods which have undone the labours,
in some instances, of generations, the loneliness is equal to, if not greater, than that of
the great forests of India, for here animal life-with the exception of birds and insects
-is almost unknown, and the perfect solitude is quite undisturbed. But although there
may be grander trees in the Indian forests, they cannot compare with those of the
West Indies in the wealth of gorgeous blossoms, and in variety of aspect, from the
wild tamarind, whose graceful boughs hang out their scarlet clusters, and the spicy
pimento, with its chaste myrtle bloom-to the cedars, and the giant cotton tree,
overgrown with delicate or brilliant flowering orchids, and festooned with climbing
plants of exquisite beauty.
Without a record of every consecrated ground in the West Indies, and more
especially, in a densely wooded island like Jamaica, it would be impossible to make a
complete collection of these mortuary memorials; and moreover, without very unusual
advantages, a private explorer would meet with incessant and vexatious obstacles.
The author made this collection as exhaustive as possible, where he had the oppor-
tunity, but much has been left undone.
He did not confine himself, as will be observed, to the transcription of merely
old, curious, or dignified epitaphs, but included many of no particular interest,
and which can only be expected to acquire a slight value in the lapse of time. Nor
did he desire to make, by a studied selection, any invidious distinction between social
classes, and different races and nationalities. There are doubtless inconveniences in
thus treating the subject-especially since the period of the negro emancipation-but
there is a classical excuse, which may be accepted as sufficient apology-

"Nil nimitm studeo, Caesar, tibi velle placere;
Nec scire utrhm sis albus an after homo."

The intention of the author was originally restricted to a collection of epitaphs,
from the earliest period to the year 1750, but, for reasons which will be apparent,
this limit has been frequently exceeded, except as regards the island of Barbados, in
which his stay was so short that it would have been impossible to do otherwise, while
on the other hand, where inscriptions, mostly of modern date, were received from a
few minor islands, it seemed undesirable to reject them, in conformity to an arbitrary
arrangement.
The endeavour has been made to avoid, in annotation, the error of over-
estimating the importance of families whose influence was only local, but, at the
same time, not to overlook anything curious in their histories, and also to give









PREFA TOR Y REMARKS.


space to their genealogies, in preference to those already before the public, and
which are readily accessible.*
J. H. L.-A.


SArchbishop Whately was, doubtless, just in the following remarks, but, as much of this spirit of which he
complained will always prevail, it is scarcely safe to be generous:-" I have always desired to repress that narrow,
provincial spirit, that would separate island from island, county from county, one portion of the British
empire from the other. Two eminent prelates, raised to the bench of bishops in England, are natives, not of
Great Britain, but of Barbados. Suppose the narrow feeling had been nourished of Barbados for the Barba-
dians, could these prelates ever have attained their high dignity ?"
















MR INT


T

RECINCTUS


















JAMAICA.
















JAMAICA.



THE idea of making Jamaica an English colony seems to have been started about
that period when, from our increasing settlements on the American continent, the
want of convenient harbours among the West India Islands began to be felt. (Cal.
S. P., Col. S. 16i3.)
The project was revived at intervals, but as is well known, the immediate cause
of our obtaining possession of the Island of Springs, was the failure of the expedition
against Hispaniola.
On the capture of the former island (May. I6th, 1655), by Penn and Venables,
about fourteen hundred of the inhabitants took refuge in the almost inaccessible
fastnesses of its mountains, while a few of the Negro and Portuguese population
submitted to the conquerors.
Although the commanders were subjected to censure for their conduct in other
particulars, the capture of Jamaica was a source of pride to the Lord Protector, who
addressed himself with energy to its colonization, for which purpose immigrants were
invited from all the other English settlements, while the officers and soldiers of the
force which had taken possession of the island received, shortly afterwards, allotments
of land on a species of military tenure, a practice observable in many patents even so
late as the year 1743.*
While Barbados had from the first been so exclusively British that at one time
the Island legislature even passed a law adverse to Irishmen, the English in Jamaica
seem at once to have fraternized with the races already there, and to have sedulously
invited the influx of strangers from all parts. The mother country provided adminis-
trative talent, and the energy, aroused amongst their cadets by the decay of good
houses during those troubled times at home. The Jewish settlers brought their
proverbial talents into its commercial interests; and to the Spaniard was perhaps due
much of the social style of the people. There was another element of prosperity in
the frequent visits of Buccaneers, who called to dispose of their plunder on the
wharfs of Port Royal, and whose personal gallantry and quasi-crusade against Spain
were no mean recommendations. Moreover, many of them were gentlemen by birth,
and in every way fitted to mingle with the higher class of residents.

A useful and economical system of defence might be organized in this and the other islands, by granting
temporarily small allotments of waste land (strategically distributed) to pensioned soldiers and their white
offspring, renewable periodically, and under conditions which would develop the resources of these colonies,
check continental propagandism, and relieve the mother country of a serious burden in time of war.









Y AMAICA.
Hither came likewise many of the unfortunate victims of the Darien intrigue, and
introduced'a strong and useful Scotch element.
Still the island felt the want of skilful agriculturists, and although it had
received at the outset every encouragement, it required the steady diligence of the
acclimatized Barbadian to bring its great estates into that working order which resulted
in such colossal fortunes in the following century.
Sir Charles Lyttleton convened the first Legislative Assembly of thirty repre-
sentatives; who formed, so to speak, the nucleus of the local aristocracy (1664-75).
Of the French invasions of 1691 and 1702 there is little to be said; while the
history of the Maroon war, which lasted thirty-seven years, can only be brought
within the scope of these introductory remarks as the field where the warlike reputa-
tion of the militia leaders was tried, and, notwithstanding their frequent reverses, well
sustained.
Earthquakes, servile revolts, and terrible epidemics followed each other at com-
paratively short intervals, and are sometimes briefly noticed on the tombstones of the
early settlers. Many of these inscriptions are quaint, but the majority are in ob-
jectionable taste-a fault rather of the period than of the place, and introduced from
England, where, during the eighteenth century, a bombastic style of epitaph was
usual. There are, however, many magnificent marble sepulchral monuments in
Jamaica, from the chisels of the first sculptors of Europe, and which, in discussing the
whole collectively, are sufficient to redeem the faults of some others. A few remarks
on the parishes of Jamaica may here be necessary.
In the time of Sir Thomas Modyford (1664) there were seven parishes, namely,
St. Catherine, St. John, Port Royal, Clarendon, St. David, St. Andrew, and
St. Thomas, but there was only one church-the present Cathedral of Spanish Town.
It is true that about the time when Colonel Edward D'Oyley received his commission
as Governor, from Charles II. in 1661, or soon afterwards, the island was divided into
twelve districts, which, according to Long, included the subsequent parishes, in addition
to those already mentioned, of St. George, St. Mary, St. Anne, St. James, and St.
Elizabeth; and this number has been further increased by the addition of Vere,
Portland, St. Thomas ye Vale, Metcalf, Kingston, Manchester, Westmoreland, Hanover,
St. Dorothy, and Trelawney.
St. Thomas in the Vale and St. Dorothy were constituted parishes in 1675; the
former was originally a part of St. Catherine. St. Dorothy separated from Clarendon,
in 1675.
Westmoreland was separated from-St. Elizabeth, in 1703, and Hanover, from the
former, in 1723.
Trelawney separated from St. James in 1770; Portland was taken from St.
George, and St. Thomas in the East, in 1723.
Manchester was formed out of portions of St. Elizabeth, Clarendon, andVere, in 1814.
Metcalfe was severed from St. George and St. Mary, in 1841.
Vere was separated from Clarendon, in 1673.











VAMAICA. 3
The Parishes were thus constituted:-
Between 1661-4-St. Catherine, St. John, Port Royal, Clarendon, St. David, St.
Andrew, St. Thomas in the East.
1665-St. George, St. Mary, St. Ann, St. James, St. Elizabeth.
1673-Vere.
1675-St. Thomas ye Vale, St. Dorothy.
When the division of St. James's was first contemplated, in 1733, it was proposed
to name the new subdivision Brunswick, but on the third reading, the bill was lost,
and it was called Trelawney, after Sir W. Trelawney, the governor from 1767
to 1772.
The Duke of Portland was appointed Governor of Jamaica, 9th September, 1721;
arrived 22nd December, 1722; and died in Spanish Town, 4th July, 1726-hence the
name of the parish.
Metcalfe was so named after the eminent and liberal-minded governor of that
name.
Manchester received the name of the ducal governor.
In allusion to the patron saint of its discoverer Columbus, in 1494, the emblem*
of St. James, from whom Jamaica takes its name (although by a curious phonetic
coincidence it was previously known by its Indian name Xaymaca, Isle of Springs) has,
along with the arms of Jamaica,f been adopted in the Parochial Seals of the island.
By an act passed in 1789, burying in Churches was prohibited, and a penalty of
5oo imposed on any Rector permitting it; but two local bills dispensing with that
act, were specially passed in the case of the Earl and Countess of Effingham, who
were the last so interred, in Jamaica; hence, at the present day, the few additions to
the monuments within the Church, and, as it were, an abstract of inscription on the
grave-stone without.
Besides the cemeteries of the Church of England, there are, of course, many
others, which go on increasing with the progress of dissent and sectarianism, but these
are comparatively modern, and therefore scarcely come within the scope of the present
undertaking; at the same time, a few such collections have been preserved, and will, at
any rate, afford a curious contrast in nomenclature, inasmuch as they contain chiefly
the epitaphs of the blacks, who, since the era of Emancipation, have not been back-
ward in seeking to flatter "the dull cold ear of death !"

The Emblem of St. James are a pilgrim's staff and a gourd bottle-hence the seal of the Churchwardens of
Jamaica bears according to the Local Act, 7 Vie. cap. 39-" Argent-a palmer's staff erect, depending from its
rest, by a leather thong, a gourd bottle, ppr. On a border gules five Pine Apples Or. Sigill: )Edelium Sancti
Jacobi in Jamaica. (Roby.)
The double gourd bottles of the Chinese and Japanese, so frequently represented in their works of art, are
called by them, also, pilgrim bottles, and may be observed attached to the girdles of the Fusiyama excursionists.
t The inscription on the Great Seal of Jamaica bearing these Arms is-
"ECCE ALIUM RAMOS PORREXIT IN ORBEM
NEC STERILIS EST CRUX."
Bridges says, "This Seal was designed by the Archbishop of Canterbury." At that time (x662) the Metropolitan
See was filled by William Juxon, who, when Bishop of London, attended Charles I. on the scaffold.
I-2


*vCp;-'. yf.












4 JAMAICA.
In giving a short account of the various religious denominations, I cannot do
better than quote the words of a gentleman,whose acquaintance with the subject entitles
him to be considered an authority.
"It is now (1865) two hundred and ten years ago, since the island of Jamaica passed
into the hands of the English nation. One hundred and sixty-four years before this, it
was possessed by the Spaniards. At three hundred and seventy-two years from this
present year, it was the home of the aboriginal Indians. The latter are exterminated,*
and we do not recognize any of their descendants occupying the homes of their
fathers."
"The Spaniards were the first Europeans who possessed these islands. They
failed to Christianize them; and destroyed the people. Scarce more than two hundred
years back, the English took Jamaica, and drove out the Spaniards. Now, in addition
to the Spaniards, there were Portuguese settlers here, but they were Jews, and not
Christians. When the Spanish Inquisition drove the Jews, as well as the Moors out
of Spain, the Jews found an asylum in Portugal. The family of Columbus, the dis-
coverer of America, had received this island as a sovereign possession."
His son, Diego, was created Marquis of St. Jago de la Vega. On the grand-daugh-
ter of Columbus marrying into the house of Braganza (the family that now occupies
the throne of Portugal), the Jews from Portugal came to Jamaica in numbers.
Though the English drove out the Spaniards from the colony on its capture, they
suffered the Portugals, as they were called, to remain. These were the Jewish settlers,
whose families are perpetuated to this day, in their descendants-the Dasilvas and
Soarezes, the Cordozos, the Belisarios, and Belinfantes, the Nunezes, the Fonsecas, the.
Guttereces, the Da Cordovas, and a hundred such names. They became the first
traders and merchants of the English Colony, and owe to their precedence, as a
people holding to a revealed faith, the preponderance of social and political influence
they possess at this day, as Magistrates, as Members of the Legislature, and as mem-
bers of learned professions."
"The first introduction of the Jews into Jamaica, is thus recorded by Sir Wm.
Beeston. 'On the 3 st March, 1663, H. M. Ship the "Great Guest," Captain Bernard,
Commander, arrived from London, and brought six Jews (with a rich cargo), who

A cursory glance-over public documents supplies us with a number of Swiss and French Huguenots:
James Zellar, Rector of St. Andrew's; Hausyer, Rector of St. Catherine's; Calvin Galpine, Rector of St. John's;
Mignot, Rector of a midland Parish. Joseph Delaunay, Peter Valette, and Leopold de Stapelton, Justices and
Vestrymen of Port Royal in 1725. The Honourable Gabriel Marquis Duquesne, Commander of the Fort of Port-
Royal,-Woolmer, Merchant of Kingston, who endowed the Grammar School of that City. There was a Huguenot
Merchant, who bequeathed an annuity for a School in St. Andrew's; and the Bernards, of St. James'; the Le
Contes and the Grignons, allied families of Lord Abinger, were all French Protestant settlers.
In a MS. in the House of Assembly Library, entitled "The State of the Church in his Majesty's Island of
Jamaica," dated May, 1675, twenty years after the capture, it is there stated, after enumerating the then
Stipended Ministers of Religion, "All the other Parishes on the North side, and St. Elizabeth's on the South, are
great and ill-settled, without Churches, they being most planted in Sir Thomas Lynch's time, who ordered Glebe
Lands to be reserved in two or three places in every Parish, that in time may prove convenient. He likewise,
observing how prejudicial and dishonourable it was for the Ministers to be at the will of the vestys, prevailed with
the Assembly to make a Law that every Parish should pay their Parson \ioo per annum at least."












YAMAICA. 5
pretended they came to discover a gold mine, known to them in the Spaniard's Govern-
ment, but concealed for fear it might bring grievances on a place so weakly manned, as
Jamaica was, in the Spaniard's time; but this was basely a pretence, for their design
was only to insinuate themselves into the country, for the sake of trade, and was
managed by Sir John Davidson, who sent them with Mr. Watson, a German, who
managed all.'"
The Jews, for a long time, were not taxed like other residents, but were obliged
to pay an annual tribute, which the government of Sir T. Lynch assessed at 750 per
annum, besides five per cent on their rents.
The oldest inscribed Jewish monument is that of Leah Gedaleah:-
"The earliest missionary teachers here, under the English, were the Independents
that came with the army of Venables, in 1655. They were the first stipended ministers,
and when they were unstipended, by the operation of the Act of Uniformity, they became
the first Christian teachers, supported by voluntary contributions. Their numbers were
augmented by the imported Nonconformists, who were not emigrants to Jamaica, but
shipped off to be sold for slaves to the planters."
After these came hither the Huguenots-French Protestants, who were driven
out of France, on account of their Protestant faith, at the Revocation of the Edict of
Nantes. Many of them were accepted as stipended ministers, and became the early
rectors of parishes.*
The Moravians, under the auspices of the families of Barham and Foster, fol-
lowed, about the year 1765.
These were followed by the Baptists, and other sects.
Besides the public cemeteries, there were other places of sepulture; but, "when
we consider that many monuments have doubtless been destroyed by earthquake and
hurricane, particularly at the times when Port Royal and Savanna-la-Mar were sub-
merged-that some tombs have been thrown down by wanton violence, and others
mutilated, or lost in the fires, alterations, or desecrations of the buildings that con-
tained them-we ought not to be surprised at the comparative rarity of monuments of
the seventeenth century. No doubt, many of these exist, in the depths of im-
penetrable bush,' or jungle, never again to meet the eye; but there are also others
on private estates, which are, I am told, well known, although I have not been able to
obtain any accurate description of them."
On the estate called "Greenwich," for instance, and likewise at Spitzbergen, and
Dublin Castle (the latter in the Port Royal mountains), are some old tombs. Such
names are often apt to put the genealogist on a wrong scent, but they are at times
correct guides; and by even so faint a light, we are sometimes enabled to trace a
family back to the registers of some remote parish church at home.
Parnassus," "Bellevue," "Golden Grove," Running Gut" (probably a corrup-
tion, by some seafaring man, of Harangutta, a branch of the Ganges), "Romsey,"
"Arcadia," Lacovia, and Luana are amongst the names of old estates; while it is not
A lecture by R. Hill, Esq.


~L~sasln~













6 YAMAICA.

altogether unworthy of note, in connection with one of the old stories of the island,
that the celebrated buccaneer Governor of Jamaica, Sir Henry Morgan, lived on an
estate near Spanish Town, which was called Laurencefield.*
Most of the handsome old mausoleums at Port Royal, secluded as they are from
the town, and partially concealed by cashaws, gigantic cacti, and mangrove-trees,
have been broken into and plundered, the lead of the coffins stolen, and the empty

In a letter from Sir S. Watson to the Committee of Plantations, 27 Oct., 1689, speaking of the depreda-
tions of freebooters on the coasts of Jamaica, the writer says:-" Major Lawrence, with a ship and pirago, and
about 200 men, the last month, touched at Mantega (Montego) Bay, on the north side of this island, did no harm
then, but gave out that he would sail up to Petit Goave, a French settlement upon Hispaniola, and procure a com-
mission from the governor, wherewith he will return with greater force, and plunder all the north side, killing
man, woman, and child, which has so affrighted the inhabitants of these parts, they have sent away their wives and
children to Port Royal."
Lawrence and Towneley were two buccaneer captains, commanding in the fleet of Sir H. Morgan.
The Earl of Inchiquin, in a letter to the same committee, 6 July, 169o, says of the Calapatch, and some
small vessels, which had been sent to the Camanas for turtle, They were there found by Lawrence, the great
pirate of Petit Goave, who bore down upon the Calapatch, and engaged him. *" That Lawrence has taken her,
is the conclusion.
For further notices of the name Lawrence in these parts, vide Appendix.
When, and where, the piratical brotherhood first settled as planters in Jamaica, cannot with accuracy be de-
termined, prior to the proclamation of George I., dated 5th September, 1717, when he promised and declared, that
each and all of the pirates who should submit before the 5th September, 1718, should have the royal pardon for
piracies committed.
The adventurers who entered the fraternity of freebooters in the time of Lawrence,* were influenced by
reasons for their lawlessness different from those which existed amongst the earlier buccaniers.1
Their act was hostility to the Spaniard, because the government of Spain, having made all trading within
their declared lines of empire, unlawful, put it down as piracy; but, after the restoration of Charles II., and the
disputed succession to the British throne on the abdication of James, enabled Louis XIV. to resort to his avowed
and decided warfare, as a partizan of James against William and Mary, it gave an abiding salvo to the con-
sciences of English desperadoes (similar to those under the belligerent Federals and Confederates, in the
quasi piratical Alabamas, Georgias, and Floridas which swept the high seas), and gentlemen like Lawrence did not
hesitate to become adventurers. Such men yielded in acquiescence, when the king's proclamation, on the succes-
sion of the Hanoverian line, assured a settlement of all differences, by the suppression of the Scotch rebellion of
1715. Those that held out, on the chances of continued disorder in England, were such runagates as Blackbeard
(Teach of Spanish Town), Rackham, and the petty rascals distinguished as Piccaroons.
The later history of the freebooters assumes a different aspect from that of the legitimate (so to speak) Buc-
caniers, and belongs rather to the HOME, than the FOREIGN department.
At the present day, an islet and reef on the coast of Jamaica bear the name of Rackham; and on the former
may be noticed the site of the gibbet where perished the last of the Piccaroons.
There was in the possession of a late President of the Executive Committee, a deed of his maternal ancestor,
Claver Tayler, a member of "the fraternity," dated in 1655, at Cabo Bonito, in Westmoreland (parish), the year
of the capture of the island by Penn and Venables. Claver Tayler was a grandson of Tayler, one of the pilgrim
fathers of the Mayflower," and perhaps a settler from among the crew. His location was Rhode Island.
The Taylers (probably through their previous common adventures) formed family alliances with the Lawrences.
There exists a MS. account of European families in Jamaica, compiled by a member of the Hinds' family.
My informant had not seen it himself, but had no doubt of its existence.
The Honourable Alexander Bravo (Auditor-General's office), of a Portuguese family, is said to possess much
valuable information as to the rise of the older Jewish families in Jamaica, which, it may be observed, have de-
veloped no small amount of ability amongst their members.: Amongst the earliest of the converts from Judaism
were the Vidals, of Spanish Town, and the Israels, of St. Dorothy.
He was twice married, first in x729.
t Properly so spelt.
Amongst desultory works on the buccaneers of the West Indies is one more immediately connected with the present subject,
"An Account of the Rise and Growth of the West India Colonies, by Dalby Thomas, London, 69o."- Harleian Misy., vol. ix., p. 422.
"Memoranda of West Indian History," divided into "One Hundred and Fifty YearsAgo" and Supplement" to the same, ending
with the disastrous war with Spain, in 170o.
t Mr. Bernal Osborne, for example, is the son of Bernal, an extensive proprietor of the Vega. (St. Cath. Par.)*











YAMAICA.


vault left for the lugubrious picnics of the dangerous classes," whose broken bottles,
mixed up with human bones, bear witness to the revelries by which these solemn
scenes have been desecrated.
No doubt the social vagabond of these parts sees little to reverence in such monu-
ments. His own remains may be hastily consigned to the deep, or disposed of by the
local authorities.
"And in the next generation let his name be clean put out." "Root out the
memorial of them from off the earth."
These, and many similar expressions in Scripture, show the estimation in which
records of the dead were held; and that it was no derogation from spiritual hopes, or
any evidence of pride and vanity in the living, to be solicitous of such mementos.
I have endeavoured to curtail as much as possible the conventional eulogies of
these epitaphs, most of which contrast unfavourably with the pathetic simplicity of
one, which recalls those of the early Christians at Rome.

"LYTTLETON, D.D., SU&E IN VICINIA SEPULTAE FILIOLUS OB. 1662."

A suspicion also rests, in many instances, on the heraldry of some of the more re-
cent monuments; but this is a question apart from the collection.
There are two inscriptions which perhaps require special notice in these remarks,
the one published by Sir Hans Sloane* is thus described as then still existing, at
Sevilla D'Oro, a few miles from St. Ann's Bay (Jamaica), and where, it is said, many
Spanish mortuary memorials still remain concealed by the encroaching turf:-


Sir Hans Sloane mentions in his work on Jamaica (published in 1725, but written from notes made in 1688,
while he was physician to the Governor, the Duke of Albemarle), a number of little incidents and names of per-
sons residing in that island, which are, in connection with the present work, not altogether uninteresting.
He alludes to his own account of the destruction of Port Royal, published in Philosophical Transactions,"
No. 209, p. 77.
His description of the asthmatic Sir Francis Watson and his plethoric "lady" is graphic. "The Lady
Watson, aged 5o, and very fat." Sir Francis Watson, aged 55, wheezing and asthma." Sir Henry Morgan is
depicted in I688, when he was about 45 years of age, as "lean, sallow coloured," his eyes a little yellowish, and
belly a little setting out or prominent-Mrs. Banett, aged 45, as of a spare body-Dr. Cooper, aged 45, of a
yellowish swarthy complexion."
Major Thomas Ballard is aged 35," is said to be much given to extravant drinking," that he is plethoricc
and of sanguine complexion. Mrs. Aylmer, a lean woman of 35."
Amongst other names of residents, he mentions D--, an English physician who lived at Guatemala, and
who had been taken prisoner by the Spaniards; Captain Hemmings, living near Seville; Captain Harrison, a
planter in Liguanea; Colonel Ballard; Mr. Barnes, a carpenter living at Guanaboa; Mr. Rowe, in Spanish
Town; one Captain Gough; Colonel Crew, Captain Groves, Captain Powell, Mr. Rhadish, Mr. Lane, a child of
Colonel Fuller, Mr. Anthony Gamble, a cook; Colonel Walker, Mr. Rayney, Colonel Needham, Mrs. Pain,
Colonel Ryves, Mr. Halstead, Mrs. Cope, Mr. Molines, John Parker, a lusty fellow; Roger Flower, a baker;
Rev. Mr. Lenning, Mr. Wm. Kay, Dr. Rose, Stephen Legs, a wheelwright; Rob. Nichols, Mrs. Barrett, Mrs.
Duke, Geo. Thrieve, a bricklayer; Harris, a joiner, &c.
On his way from St. Ann's to Orange River, Sir Hans Sloane returned from the North side of the island, by
a road on the ridge of hills called Archer's Ridge, near the Orange River, probably alluding to a place so called
after a certain John Archer, who received various grants of land in the time of Charles II., and who, one is strongly
disposed to believe, is the person mentioned by Sir John Archer, judge of the Common Pleas, in his unpublished
Diary, as his son by his first wife.










8 YAMAICA.
"There were two coats of arms lay by not set up; a ducal one, and that of a
Count, I suppose belonging to Columbus, his family proprietors of the Island."
(D. of Varaguas.)
"Over the door" (of the old Spanish church at Sevilla) ... "was our Saviour's
head with a crown of thorns, between two angels; on the right side a small round
figure of some saint with a knife stuck into his head; on the left a Virgin Mary or
Madonna, her arm tied in three places, Spanish fashion. Over the gate, under a coat
of arms, this inscription" (in Roman capitals)-
"'PETRUS. MARTIN. AB. ANGLERIA. ITALUS. CIVIS. MEDIOLANEN. PROTHON.
APOS. HUIVS. INSULE. ABBAS. SENATUS. INDICI CONSILIARIUS. LIGNEAM. PRIUS.
AEDEM. HANC. BIS. IGNE. CONSUMPTAM. LATERICIO. ET. QUADRATO. LAPIDE. PRIMUS.
A. FUNDAMENTIS EXTRUXIT.'
The words are entire except Mediolanensis, which I supplied because this Peter
Martir, a famous man, wrote himself of Milan."

The other is the spurious epitaph, written by the historian, Edwards, and in-
scribed on a piece of ordnance set up as a monument near Martha Brae.* As it has
been the source of much local error, it is here given-

"STRANGER !-ERE THOU PASS, CONTEMPLATE THIS CANONI-NOR REGARDLESS
BE TOLD-THAT NEAR ITS BASE LIES DEPOSITED THE DUST OF-JOHN BRADSHAW-
WHO, NOBLY SUPERIOR TO ALL SELFISH REGARDS-DESPISING ALIKE THE PAGEANTRY
OF COURTLY SPLENDOUR-THE BLAST OF CALUMNY-OR THE TERROR OF ROYAL
VENGEANCE-PRESIDED IN THAT ILLUSTRIOUS BAND OF HEROIC PATRIOTS-WHO
FAIRLY AND OPENLY ADJUDGED-CHARLES STUART-TYRANT OF ENGLAND-TO
A PUBLIC AND EXEMPLARY DEATH-THEREBY REPRESENTING TO THE AMAZED
WORLD-THE MOST GLORIOUS EXAMPLE-OF UNSHAKEN VIRTUE AND LOVE OF
FREEDOM-AND IMPARTIAL JUSTICE-EVER EXHIBITED ON THE BLOOD-STAINED
THEATRE-OF HUMAN ACTIONS-O, READER I-PASS NOT, TILL THOU HAST BLESSED
HIS MEMORY-AND NEVER NEVER FORGET-THAT REBELLION TO TYRANTS-IS
OBEDIENCE TO GOD."

Many of the monumental inscriptions recorded in the following pages have ceased
to exist, even since the compiler noted them nine years ago. Others, such as slabs,
which once occupied an honourable place, within the walls of the church, have from
time to time been cast forth into the churchyard, and could no longer be recognized.
In my task of restoration, I have been assisted by the Spanish Town Church Notes,
&c.," of the late Mr. Roby, whose work, however, I was not aware of when first I made
my collection. To it, also, many of the purely local annotations are due.
In the parish of St Andrew's are some of the oldest cemeteries in Jamaica; but it
so happens, that not always the oldest consecrated ground, contains the oldest existing

Trelawney, Jamaica.


M9, 70, AP "4l1INl. ~~'1










YAMAICA. 9

mortuary remains. So rapidly does nature in that warm climate, and rich soil, mask
the evidence of mortality, that even now tombs not dating a hundred years back, are
comparatively rare, concealed as they are in many instances under the turf, as at Half-
Way-Tree,* or enveloped in an impenetrable net-work of interlacing and often prickly
plants.
Again, although Kingston only rose on the fall of Port Royal, yet so effectually
have the sands of the Palisades swept over the tombs on that long and mournful,
though beautiful, spit of land which enclosed the harbour, that while the' former is
comparatively rich in these remains, few are to be met with at the latter, and these
few have for the most part been despoiled of their tablets for the sake of the value of
the marble.
The compiler trusts that his labours as a pioneer in a comparatively new field
may be taken up by some one with better opportunities, who, from this starting-point,
might undertake to show the connection between these remote abodes, and the parent
homes in England-and, entering into the domestic life of those early emigrants, un-
fold their schemes, trace their steps to local power and affluence, and, gradually com-
mencing with individuals, proceed to communities, and then, overtaking those writers
who have already ably written the political history of the West Indies, move onwards
with them, in showing the course of declining and reviving prosperity in the present
century.t
Retracing his steps homewards, such an author would find in the records of the
State Paper Office, Diocesan Registries, and archives of the great Guilds of London,
&c., many of those lost links which are still wanting in several instances to connect
the colonial families, with those of the political exiles of the most troublous period of
our modern national history.

It is said that the foundations of an old Spanish chapel still exist in Half-Way-Tree Churchyard, and that
underneath the present turf there are many Spanish monumental slabs.
t See Private Diaryof Richard, Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, K.G." (London, 1862), under Feb. 28,
1828.
















CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE.


Date. Events. Governors.


1494



to



1504.
1509.
1526.



I538.


1605.
1645.
1655.





1656.



5 June,
1656.


Dec.,
1656.


Jamaica discovered by Columbus.
Columbus on his discovery of Jamaica in
1494, May 3, landed at the present Ora
Cabessa.
In June, 1503, during his fourth voyage,
was shipwrecked on the spot now known
as St. Ann's Bay.
Governed by Indian Chiefs.
Spanish Colony commenced.
Towns of Sevilla d'Ora, Melilla, and Oris-
tan built.
Indians nearly exterminated-7oo,ooo, in
13 years, perished.
St. Jago de laVega (or Spanish Town) built,
-gave the title of Marquis to the heir of
Diego Columbus.
Island plundered by Sir A. Shirley.
,, ,, by Col. Jackson.
The Flibustiers and Bucaneers. Oristan
destroyed, and Sevilla d'Ora and Melilla
abandoned.
Penn and Venables conquer it; when it
became a British colony.
Council of State in England ordered Iooo
young men and Icoo girls to be sent
from Ireland to people the island.
Commander-in-Chief Sedgwicke died, and
the command devolved on Colonel D'Oy-
ley, who executed Major Throgmorton
for mutiny.
Spaniards flee to Cuba, leaving their slaves,
who regained freedom, and became the
Maroons.


D'Ojeda and Nicuessa.
Don Juan de Esquimel,
and others.







Don Pedro de Esquimel,
and others.

Don Sasi.
Serle and Winslow,
and Butler.

Sedgwicke and D'Oyley.











CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE. I1


Events.


Date.

Dec., 1656.

Sept., 1657.
Aug., 1660.


1661.





x662.

Aug., 1662.





Aug. I,
1662.






Oct., 1662.
1663.









1664.
1671.


Governors.



Lt.-General Brayne.


General Stokes with 60oo men from Nevis,
arrived and settled near Port Morant.
Settlers arrive from Nevis and Barbados.
Conspiracy of the Parliament men de-
feated-D'Oyley at the head of the
Royalists.
Island divided into 12 parishes-St. David,
St. Andrew, St. Catherine, St. John, St.
Thomas, St. George, St. Mary, St. Anne,
St. James, St. Elizabeth, Port Royal, and
Clarendon.
200oo Settlers arrived from the Windward
Islands and elsewhere.
Spaniards return under Don Sasi, are de-
feated by D'Oyley-Rise of Port Royal,
Rendezvous of Bucaneers Revolt of
the planters, and execution of 2 officers,
Raymond and Tyson.
Thos. Windsor Hickman, Lord Windsor,
afterwards Earl of Plymouth, arrived as
Governor.
Several extensive grants of land. The
whole of Liguanea (Kingston) divided
between Col. Archbould, Major Hope,
and Sir W. Beeston.
Expedition to Cuba.
First General Assembly-viz., Robt. Free-
man, Edw. Waldron, Richd. Lloyd,
Edw. Mullens, Jno. Colbeck, Humph.
Freeman, Lewis Ashton, W. Beeston,
Saml. Long, Rob. Byndloss, Anth. Col-
lier, Wm. Clee, Thos. Freeman, Richd.
Bryan, Wm. Ivy, Southwell Adkins, and
Abraham Rutter.
Speaker of Assembly-Rob. Freeman.
First Members of Council-Maj.-Gen. Jas.
Bannister, Col. Sir Jas. Modyford, John
Cope, Thos. Freeman, Thos. Ballard, Wm.
Ivy, Robt. Byndloss, Chas. Whitfield,
Thos. Fuller, Anth. Collier, and Capt.
Helder Molesworth.


2-2


SLord Windsor.





Sir Chas. Lyttleton.











12 JAMAICA.

Date. Events. Governors.,


1675.


July, 1678.
,,
1684.


Apl., 1688.
Oct., 1688.
Jan., 1691.

June 7,
1692.



March, 1693
July, 1694.


1700.


1702.





Jan. 9,
1703.

Feb., 1703.
1711.





1716.
Aug. 1718.


Privateering suppressed.
Census taken-7768 Whites.
9504 Negroes.
Forts Carlisle and Charles burnt.
Rupture in Assembly.
Privateering recommended.
Sir H. Morgan died in a Spanish prison.
First great Insurrection among the slaves.
Attempt to revive Roman Catholicism.
Another Insurrection -Attack of French
on North Coast.
Port Royal destroyed by Earthquake;
3000 perished-President White died of
injuries threat, and was succeeded by
John Bourden.
Island in distress from late Earthquake.
French Invasion-Commencement of Ma-
roon war under Cudjoe, which lasted 37
years.
Usher Tyrrell, who had been expelled the
Assembly by Governor Beeston, re-
elected for St. James.
Brig.-Gen. Selwyn, Colonel of 22nd Foot,
and Governor, died.
Adm. Benbow encountered and defeated
M. Du Casse-mortally wounded-buried
in Kingston church.
Rise of Kingston.
Col. Thos. Handasyd, 22nd Foot, appointed
Lt.-Governor.
Port Royal again destroyed by Fire.
Great dissensions.
Admiral Lord Archbd. Hamilton, son of
Wm. Douglas, 3d Duke of H., and Anne,
Duchess in her own right, arrived as
Governor.
Great dissensions.
Insurrections-Hordes of Pirates.


Peter Heywood.


} Col. Lynch.
Sir Hen. Morgan.

Lord Vaughan.
Lord Carlisle.
Sir Th. Lynch.

Sir H. Molesworth.
Duke of Albemarle.

Sir F. Watson.
Earl of Inchiquin.
President of Council,
John White.

John Bourden.
Sir Wm. Beeston.













Major-Gen. Selwyn.
Col. Beckford.
Earl of Peterborough.

Genl. Handasyd.


Lord Hamilton.











CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE. 13


Date.

1721.

Aug. 22,
1722.
1724.


1734.

1738.

,,




1739.
1744.

1756.

1758.

1759
to
1762.

1764.


1766.




1767.





1768.


Governors.



Sir Nich. Lawes.




Gen. Hunter.

John Ayscough.
John Gregory.
H. Cunningham.


Edw. Trelawney.


Event*.

The parish of St. Anne suffered severely
from fire.
Hurricane.
Attorney-General Monk expelled the As-
sembly for "infringing the liberties of
the people."
Coffee introduced from St. Domingo, by
Sir N. Lawes.
White soldiers defeated by Rebel Negroes,
I5o killed.
Governor Edwd. Trelawney-was after-
wards Colonel of 4oth Foot.
Col. Grant, of Jamaica, killed at the storm-
ing of Fort de St. Lazan, Carthagina.
Maroon war terminated by negotiations.
Hurricane and Earthquake, Oct. 20.
Guinea grass introduced by Ellis.
Henry Moore, Governor, and afterwards a
Baronet.
Io8 families of Immigrants arrive, most of
whom soon die.
Rebellion; loss of 90 whites and 400 negroes
-King's House, S. T., completed.
Thos. Raffles introduced that pest-the
formica omnivora.
Thos. Wilson, a Marshal's deputy, levied on
the carriage of John Oliphant, Esq., a
Member of Assembly; it was resisted.
Vast treasures brought from Havana,
which had been plundered by the British.
Magazine of Fort Augusta struck by light-
ning; 300 persons killed.
Sir Wm. Trelawney, Captain in Royal
Navy, Governor.
Col. John Dalling, afterwards Baronet, Lt.-
Governor.
Sir Basil Keith, Capt. R.N.
Census-Whites, I7,ooo.
Blacks, 167,ooo.
Negro Conspiracy discovered.


Wm. Lyttleton.


Lt.-Governor Elletson.

Sir Wm. Trelawney.


Admiral Knowles.
Lt.-Governor Moore.
Haldane.
Moore.


1772.











14 JAMAICA.

Date. Events. Governors.


1775
to
1777.


1780-1.


1784.



1790.
1791.

1795.


1798.


1806.

Mar., 1808.





1812.

1815.




1829.

1831.


Lt.-Gov. Dalling.


Peaceful and prosperous Hutchinson's
terrible murders.
Conspiracy of negroes in Hanover and
Westmoreland discovered, and 30 exe-
cuted.
Savanna La Mar destroyed by fire-Earth-
quakes and hurricanes nearly ruin the
island.
The notorious Three-Fingered Jack lived-
Lord Rodney's victory over the French.
Dreadful earthquake and hurricane, July Io




Bread-fruit, Mango, China orange, Cocoa-
nuts, Plums, &c., brought from East In-
dies.
Montego Bay burnt.
Second Maroon war terminated by blood-
hounds-Slave insurrection.
Slave trade abolished by Great Britain-
Kingston made a city.
Conspiracy amongst Coromantee negroes;
their chief executed.
Mutiny in West India Regiments, March
27, at Fort Augusta,-15 killed.
Conspiracy amongst negroes.
Hurricane, Oct. 12, followed in a few hours
by Earthquake.
Port Royal destroyed by fire, July 13.
Hurricane, Oct. 18-19.
Conspiracy in Portland, St. George's, and
St. Mary's.
Colony declines.

Rebellion in Cornwall-Slaves executed-
Caused by Missionaries.

Sir W. Anglin Scarlett, Kt., Ch. Just., died
Oct. 6, at Cedar Grove, Manchester.


Sir Basil Keith.


Lt.-Gov. Dalling.

Maj.-Gen. Campbell.


Genl. Clarke.
Earl of Effingham.

Maj.-Gen. Williamson.




Earl of Balcarres.
Lt.-Gov. Nugent.

Sir Eyre Coote.



Duke of Manchester.
Gen. Morison.
Maj.-Gen. Conran, acting
for Duke of Manchester.




Sir John Keane.

Earl of Belmore.











CHRONOLOGICAL TABLL

Date. Events.


1833-4.

Aug., 1836.
Sept., 1839-
to
May, 1842
Nov., 1845.
1846.
1850.
1852.



1859.

1864.


7. 15

Governors.

} Hon. G. Cuthbert, pro-
visional.
Earl of Mulgrave.
Lord Sligo.
Sir Lionel Smith.

Sir C. Metcalfe.

Earl of Elgin.
Gen. Berkeley.
Sir C. Grey.

Sir H. Barkly.
C. H. Darling.

E. J. Eyre.


The particulars of these transactions, alike discreditable to the Government and its agents, have not yet
been published, although references to them will be found in the "Examiner," Aug 2, 1873 ; the "Broad Ar-
row," 28 Dec., 1871, Jan. 7 and 27, 1872, April 19, 1873, &c. ; the "New Monthly Magazine," Oct., 1873, &c.
It is a singular fact that the public has never required the production of the balance-sheet of this corps, on its final
extinction, as such a document would throw a valuable light on a system by which the public funds are not the less
squandered, because the accounts are formally balanced.
t See an article on the subject, by the author, in Fraser's Magazine," Feb., 1866, &c.


Abolition of Slavery-Apprenticeship.

Compensation for slaves, 20,000,o000.
Complete Emancipation.



Coolies introduced.
Coolie Immigration.
Ravages of the Cholera.
Epidemic of the Yellow Fever.
The Hon. R. Hill,-a patron of local litera-
ture, and himself an author.
Soulouque, ex-Emperor of Hayti, seeks an
asylum in Jamaica-Riots.
A 5th W. I. Regiment raised-Its disor-
ganisation and ultimate disbandment.*
Insurrection at Morant Bay-Gallantry of
the Volunteers-Captain Hitchins, and
the brothers William, Norman, and
Richard Harrison, &c.
Murder of the Baron von Kettleholdt, &c.
Maj.-Genl. O'Connor, Commanding the
Forces.
Captain De Horsey, R.N.
Bogle's rebellious proclamation.

G. W. Gordon, an instigator of the Insurrec-
tion, executed under unsatisfactory cir-
cumstances.
-The Insurrection "stamped out."t


Oct. I I
1865.


Oct. 17,
1865.
Oct. 23,
1865.


Nov. I,
1865.










16 JAMAICA.

Date. Events. Governors.


A Commission appointed to inquire into
its causes and results.
The Legislative Assembly abolished by
its own act.

Disendowment of the Established Church
-A new system of judicature intro-
duced.
Supreme authority practically vested in
the Governor, assisted by a Privy
Council of six, and a Legislative Coun-
cil of twelve.

[Revenue, 434,564.
Expenditure, 430,154.
Public Debt, 619,353.]


Sir H. Storks (ad interim.)



Sir J. P. Grant.


Nov. I,
1865.
Jan., 1866.

1866.
1869-7o.









1870.











CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE. 17




GOVERNORS AND LIEUT.-GOVERNORS OF JAMAICA.

WITH THE YEARS WHEN THEY COMMENCED THEIR ADMINISTRATION.

1655 to i658......Searle ....................
W inslow .................
Butler ..................... Administered the Government.
Sedgwick and D'Oyley
Brayne .................. J


Governors.
Colonel D'Oyley ....................
Lord Windsor .....................
Sir T. Modyford ...................
Lord Vaughan .......................
Earl of Carlisle .......................
Sir Thos. Lynch .....................
Duke of Albemarle .................
Earl of Inchiquin ...................
William Selwyn, Esq. .............
Lord A. Hamilton...................
Peter Heywood, Esq. ..............
Sir N. Lawes, Knt ..................
Duke of Portland ...................
Major-Genl. Hunter* .............
Edwd. Trelawney, Esq...............
Charles Knowles, Esq ..............
Geo. Haldane, Esq. ................
W. H. Littleton, Esq. ..............
Sir W. Trelawney ....................
Sir Basil Keith ........................
Major-Genl. Dalling ................
,, A. Campbell....................
Earl of Effingham ...................
Duke of Manchester ................
t ,,9 ...................
9,, ..................
Earl of Belmore........................
Earl of Mulgrave ...................


I66o
1662
1664
1675
1678
1682
1687
1690
1702
1711
1716
1718
1722
1728
1738
1752
1758
1762
1767
1773
1777
1782
1790
S8o8
1813
1822
1829
1832


Lieut.-Governors and Presidents.
Sir C. Lyttleton, Kt..................
(P) Colonel T. Lynch .............
Sir T. Lynch, Kt. ...................
Sir H. Morgan, Kt. ................
1# to ,, ..................
,, ,, to ..................
Colonel H. Molesworth ............
(P) Sir F. Watson ....................
(P) John White, Esq ................
(P) John Bourden .....................
Sir W. Beeston, Kt. .................
P. Beckford, Esq ...................
T. Handaysd, Esq ..................
(P) John Ayscough, Esq. ..........
(P) John Gregory, Esq..............
Henry Moore, Esq. .................
o to 9 .). ..... "
R. H. Elletson, Esq. ................
Lt.-Col. Dalling .....................
Br.-Genl. Alured Clarke ..........
Maj.-Genl. A. Williamson ........
Earl of Belcarres .....................
Lt.-Genl. Nugent ...................
Sir Eyre Coote .....................
Lt.-Genl. Morrison ..................
Maj.-Genl. Couran....................
Sir John Keane ........................


* Henry Cunningham appointed governor in 1735, but not regularly inducted.


1662
1664
I671
1675
1678
168o
1684
1688
1690
1692
1693
1702
1702
1722
1735
1756
1759
1766
1771
1784
1791
1795
1801
i 8o6
i811
1821
1827










18 YA MAICA.


Governors.
Marquis of Sligo ...................
Lt.-Gen. Sir Lionel Smith .........
Sir C. T. Metcalfe, Bart. ...........
Earl of Elgin and Kincardine ......
Sir C. E. Grey, Kt. ................
Sir H. Barkly, Kt....................
C. H. Darling..........................
E. J. Eyre .............................
Sir H. Storks .........................

Sir J. P. Grant .....................
7


1834
1836
1839
1842
1846
1853
1857
1864
1866
1868
to
1873


Lieut-Governors and Presidents.
(P) George Cuthbert .................
,, ,, .......... .*** **. .
Sir A. Norcott ....................
Sir W. M. Gomm ....................
Maj.-Genl. Berkeley ................
,, ,, Bell .......................
Edwd. J. Eyre ......................


SPEAKERS OF "THE ASSEMBLY."

DATES OF ELECTION.


Robert Freeman .................... 1664
Sir Thos. Whitestones .............. 1664
Samuel Long.......................... 1671
Thos. Colbeck ..................... 1671
Wm. Beeston .......................... 1677
Samuel Bernard..................... 1680
George Nedham .................... 1686
R. Elletson............................ 1688
T. Sutton ............................. 1691
A. Langley............................. 1693
James Bradshaw .................... 1694
Thos. Sutton ......................... 1698
Andrew Langley .................... 1701
Francis Rose ......................... 1702
A. Langley............................. 1703
Edwd. Stanton ..................... 1704
M. Gregory............................. 1705
Hugh Totterdell .................... 1706
Peter Beckford ....................... 1709
Wm. Brodrick ....................... 17I 1
Peter Beckford ....................... 1713


Hugh Totterdell' ..................
John Blair ............................
Peter Beckford ......................
Wm. Nedham...........................
Edmd. Kelly .........................
Geo. Modd ............................
Fr. Melling ...........................
Thos. Beckford ......................
John Stewart ..........................
Wm. Nedham.. .......................
Chas. Price .............................
Edwd. Manning.......................
Charles Price .........................
C. Price, Junr. ....................
W. Nedham ...... ....................
Edward Long..........................
Nicholas Bourke .....................
Chas. Price .............................
Ph. Pinnock .......................
S. M. Houghton .....................
William Blake ....................


1830
1834
1834
1839
1846
1856
1862


1714
1715
17 16
1718
1719
1721
1727
1727
1731
1733
1746
1755
1756
1765
1766
1768
1770
1770
1775
1781
1793











THE ASSEMBLY Y. 19

D. Campbell ......... ................ 1797
Keane Osborne ....................... 1799
Ph. Kedwood .......... .............. 1802
James Lewis ........................... 1809
D. Finlayson ......................... 1821
Richd. Barrett ....................... 1830
R. Allwood............................. 1832
Edwd. Panton ...................... 1839
S. J. D allas.............................. 1842
C. M. Morales ...................... 1849


THE FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF JAMAICA,
IN 1663, .WAS COMPOSED AS FOLLOWS :-
Robert Freeman, Edward Waldron, Richard Lloyd, Edward Mullins, John
Colbeck, Humphrey Freeman, Lewis Ashton, Wm. Beeston, Samuel Long, Robert
Byndloss, Anthony Collyer, Wm. Clee, Thomas Freeman, Richard Bryan, Willm. Ivy,
Southwell Adkins, Abraham Rutter.* Speaker-Robt. Freeman.


1671. FIRST PRIVY COUNCIL:-
Major-General Jam's Bannister, Colonel Sir James Modyford, John Cope,
Thomas Freeman, Thomas Ballard, William Ivy, Robert Byndloss, Charles Whitfield,
Thomas Fuller, Anthony Collier, Captain Sir Helder Molesworth.


CLERGY IN THE DIOCESE OF JAMAICA.
PARISHES, 22.
2 Bishops-of Jamaica, and Kingston (I Coadjutor); 2 Archdeacons; 2 Com-
missaries; 6 Chaplains to the Bishop; I Secretary; I Registrar and I Assistant;
I Clerk; I Apparitor; 22 Rectors of Parishes; 70 Island and other Curates and
Chaplains.

SECTARIANS HAVING PLACES OF WORSHIP.
Presbyterians, Wesleyans, Moravians, Baptists, Roman Catholics, American
Mission, Independents, Wesleyan Association, United Methodist Free Church,
English and German Synagogue, Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue, Spanish Town
Synagogue, Montego Bay Synagogue.'

There was but one representative for the whole of the north side of the island, viz., Abraham Rutter, Gent.
In the next Assembly Mr. Samuel Jenks was added.
t The island is 150 miles long by 50 at the broadest part, and had a population, according to the census of
1861, of Whites, 13,816; Blacks, 346,374; Coloured, 81,o74-Total, 441,264, showing an average of 31,519 to
each denomination.
3-2




, ,


26 CIVIL LIST.


CIVIL LIST.*
I Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief.
I Lieut.-Governor.
I Secretary, I Private Secretary, and A. D. C.
Privy Council-- President and 15 Members (styled "Honorable").
Executive Committee-3 Members (styled Honbles.), and I Secretary and Clerks.
Legislative Council-I President and 16 Members (styled Honbles.), Secretary, &c.
Honble. House of Assembly-- Speaker and 42 Members; Clerk, Sergt.-at-Arms,
Chaplain, Clerks, &c.
Public Ofices I. Governor's; 2. Island Secretary's; 3. Receiver-General's,
Board of Audit, &c., &Ci

LAW DEPARTMENT.
Court of Chancery-Court of Ordinary-Court of Vice Admiralty-Vice Ad-
miralty Session-Court of Judicature-the Circuit Courts and Courts of Petty
Sessions.

CROWN OFFICE.


ARMY.
Commander of the Forces.
I Military Secretary; I A. D. C.; I Assist. Adjutant-General; I Assist, Quarter-
master General; Fort Adjutant; Engineers; Artillery; i Regiment of the Line;
I West India Regiment; Militia; Volunteers; Clerks.

As constituted prior to 1866 (see Chronological Table). This note refers also to the Church Establishment.


























d Clerks.
retary, &c. PARISH OF ST. CATHERINE.
.-at-Arms,
THE CATHEDRAL.
-General's,
THE cathedral church of St. Catherine stands in the south-east part of St. Jago de la
Vega,* more commonly called Spanish Town, and occupies the site of the
Spanish church of the Red Cross, which, together with an abbey, and another church,
Vice Ad- called the White Cross, was destroyed, at the capture of the town by Venables, in
of Petty May, 1655.
On the outside of the west end of the cathedral tower, over the door, and under a
pointed window, is this inscription, on a white marble tablet:

"D. O. M.
"This Church Dedicated to ye Service of Almighty God was thrown down by
ye dreadfull Hurricane of August ye 28th Anno Domini MDCCXII and was by ye
Divine Assistance, through ye Piety and at ye expense of ye Parishioners, more beau-
Quarter- tifully and substantially rebuilt upon its old foundation in ye thirteenth year of ye
the Line; Reigne of our most gracious Sovereigne- Queen ANN and in ye Government of his
Excellency the Lord Archibald Hamilton, in the year of our Lord MDCCXIV
Matthew Gregory, Esqr
tablishment. & Church Wardens"
Mr. Beaumont Pestell f

Below this, on another marble slab,

"THIS TOWER WAS ERECTED,
And the above Tablet removed from the inner wall,
In the year MDCCCXVII.
His Grace the DUKE of MANCHESTER Governor.
JOHN LUNAN, FRANCIS SMITH, Churchwardens."


S'. yames of the Plains, so called from the patron saint of Spain, and its champaign situation. Long and
Edwards agree in the probable correctness of the tradition, which ascribes its foundation to Diego, son of Christo-
pher Columbus, about 1523, on the decay of New Seville, the former capital of the island, near the present village
of St. Ann's Bay. Lewis, eldest son of Diego, was created Duke de Veragua, with the second title of Marquess
de la Vega, derived from this town.-Edwards' West Indies.



















YAMAICA.


On the east wall is the following tablet of-

"Benefactors to the Poor.
"Matthew Gregory Esq M. D. in the yr 1765, granted (under the direction of the
Honble the Chief Justice, the Honble the Custos of this Precinct, and the Revd. the
Rector of S. Catherine as Trustees) a yearly income to the amount of ;230 for the
following benevolent purposes, viz To relieve any distressed Object of this island
coming to St. Jago de la Vega, To bind out poor children to trades, and to portion
orphan girls at Marriage.
Honble R. Welch Esq Ch Jus:
Erected I779 Honble W. P. Browne Esq Cs Rm
Revd J. Lindsay D. D. Rr Treasr."*


Arms, Argt., three chev-
ronels Gu.


TO THE MEMORY OF-ANDREW ARCHDECKNE, ESQ., A
NATIVE OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND, MANY YEARS BAR-
RISTER AT LAW AND REPRESENTATIVE OF THIS TOWN IN
THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE ISLAND. HE DEPARTED
THIS LIFE ON THE I7th DAY OF AUGUST, 1763, AGED 72
YEARS, LAMENTED BY HIS FRIENDS, AND REGRETTED BY HIS
RELATIONS. HIS CHILDREN, IN TESTIMONY OF THE GREAT
LOVE AND AFFECTION THEY BORE HIM WHEN ALIVE, AND IN
GRATITUDE FOR HIS PATERNAL TENDERNESS, HAVE ERECTED
THIS MONUMENT TO THEIR FATHER, FRIEND AND BENE-
FACTOR.


HE was of Gleveny Hall, Suffolk, and married a daughter of Francis Love Beckford,
Esq., of Basing Park. For an account of the ancient family of Archdeckne, vide
Banks' Baronia Anglica Concentrata, and Yournals of the Kilkenny Archwolo ical Society.
Mr. Archdeckne was returned M.A. for this parish so early as 1718.
The city of Kilkenny appears, as well as Galway, to have had its own "ten
tribes," thus recapitulated-


By indenture, dated 22nd March, 1765, Dr. Gregory conveyed a house and land in Spanish Town to Mr.
Edward Aldred, surgeon, upon trust for the Hon. Thomas Fearon, Chief-Justice, the Hon. William Wynter, and
the Rev. Samuel Griffith, rector of the parish, and their successors, "for and towards the maintenance and sup-
port of poor persons in or from any part of the said island, and in and for putting poor boys and poor girls appren-
tices in the said island, and for giving portions in marriage with any poor girls in or from any part of the said
island." But in the year 1792, the House having fallen into decay, an Act was passed (33 Geo. III. c. 14) vesting
the message and land in the Hon. William Jackson, Chief-Justice, the Hon. William Mitchell, Custos, and the
Rev. Robert Stanton Woodham, rector, for the purpose of sale, and for investment of the remaining proceeds and
the interest therefrom to the charitable purposes before mentioned.
Of the subscribers to this tablet were Richard Welch, Chief-Justice, and William Patrick Browne, Custos.
It is somewhat remarkable that of the numerous rectors of this parish there is not to be found a single memorial
in the church or churchyard.












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


"Archdekin, Archer, Cowley, Langton, Ley,
Knaresborough, Lawless, Ragget, Rothe and Shee."

Of these, Archdekin was of more note in the county than in the city.
According to Banks (Baronia Anglica Concentrata), the male line of Thomas Ie
Archdekne (summoned to parliament, 14 Edw. II.) expired in the person of his grand-
son, Warine, who married Elizabeth, daughter of John Talbot, of Richard's Castle.
2.
JOHN ATKINSON, OBIIT. IOth OF NOVEMBER IN YE 28th \
YEAR OF HIS AGE ANO DO 16(83). \
HERE LYETH INTERR'D THE BODY OF ITHAMAR THE WIFE
OF THE HONBLE ROSE FULLER ESQ WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE
THE 22d DAY OF APR11 1738 AGED 17 YEARS. ... ..
HERE LYETH INTERRED, THE BODY OF THE HONBLE
RICHARD MILL, ESQ MEMBER OF THE COUNCIL, RECEIVER
GENERAL AND LATE CHIEF JUSTICE OF THIS ISLAND, WHO
M. Slab, with a brass plate
DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 16th DAY OF JUNE 1739 AGED 60 on which are engraven
YEARS. armorial ensigns; Arms,
Ermine a fess (or) between
3 pheons (argt.); Crest, A
pheon. These are a narration of the arms assigned to Atkinson or Atchinson of Newark and Yourkshire. (Burke's
Genl. Arm.)
3 A.
C.Y. MR. FRANCIS ARCHER DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 8th OF FEBRUARY
1824 AGED 35. (Ten verses follow) *

FRANCIS ARCHER appears to have been of an Irish family, connected with the
Commissariat department of the army. There were other families of this name
in Jamaica during the 17th and 18th centuries, viz.-i. Archer from Swindon, co-
Wilts; 2. Archer of Wexford; 3. Archer of Wicklow; 4. Archer of Essex; 5. Archer
from Barbados, but previously from Suffolk (Q. Bury St. Edmund's and Sudbury ?).

3 B.
TO THE MEMORY OF ANNA MARIA ALDRED-DAUGHTER OF
DANIEL BROADBELT ESQR. AND ANNA MARIA HIS SPOUSE-
AND WIFE OF MR. EDWARD ALDRED SURGEON-WHO DIED
IN CHILDBED ON THE 2Ist DAY OF DECEMBER I761-AGED
19 YEARS AND SIX DAYS. THIS STONE IS ERECTED AND IN-
SCRIBED-BY HER AFFECTIONATE HUSBAND-(Verses).

IT appears that a Mr. Rigby Pennoyre Broadbelt was a trusteeM. Monument, sculptured
r M. Monument, sculptured;
to a deed executed in Jamaica in favour of a Mrs. Elizabeth On a bat's wing a skull.
Crowder Nixon, &c.


See advertisement in the Times-" To Genealogists, &c. Address care of Mr. F. May, 9, King Street,
St. James', London. (1867.)
4-2





















YAMAICA.


Captain Rigby, of whom a beautiful mezzotint portrait still exists, was an officer
of the Navy on the Jamaica station, but for some reason a veil has been drawn over
his memory. (See proceedings of his trial.)


1 *4 *
S* *f








B. M.; Arms, Ermine on
a fess, 3 pheons. Crest, A
pheon. (These are the
arms assigned to Atkinson
of Newark.)


HERE LYETH THE BODY OF CHARLES ATDKINSON ESQ: A


GENTLEMAN THAT BY A GENEROUS AND PUBLIC SPIRIT, PUR-
CHASED NO INCONSIDERABLE ADDITIONS OF HONOUR, TO HIS
GOOD EXTRACTION, BEING SECRETARY SUCCESSIVELY TO THE
HONOURABLE SR. THOMAS LYNCH, AND THE RIGHT HONOUR-
ABLE THE LORD VAUGHAN. THRICE EMPLOYED IN FORRAIN
NEGOTIATIONS HE ACQUIT HIM SELFE WITH HONOUR AND
PUBLIC SATISFACTION. AFTER ALL, BEING READY TO EM-
BARK ON AN EMBASSY FOR ENGLAND WAS SEIZED BY AN IN-
VIDIOUS AND MALIGNANT FEAVER UNDER A PAROXISME
WHEREOF HE DEPARTED THIS LIFE NOVEMBER YE 20th.

ANNO. AETATIS SUAE, 31
SSALUTIS 1678.


WILLIAM ASSAM DIED IN 1730 IN HIS 45th YEAR. HIS
WIFE MARY "LATE THE WIFE OF LAWRENCE PEAT" DIED
1734, IN HER 76th YEAR.
B. M. Slab; Arms, ....
A fess between three asses
passant. .... 6.
6.
RICHARD BATTY, ESQRE-DIED APRIL IOth 1796 AGED 53 YEARS-THROUGHOUT
THY SHRINE BENEVOLENCE ENDEAR'D I-AFFECTION'S TRIBUTARY LAMP IS REARED;
-YET VAIN THE RECORD WHICH THE SCULPTUR'D STONE-WOULD RAISE TO
THOSE PRE-EMINENTLY KNOWN-HIS STERLING WORTH AND VIRTUES STAND CON-
FEST-GRAVED ON TIE WORTHY AND THE VIRTUOUS BREAST.
W. and gray M. Sculp. J. Bacon, London, 1798.


ON this monument is represented a female figure leaning over an altar tomb, on
which appears in relief, a pelican feeding her young, &c. The deceased was Cust.
Rot., and Member of Assembly for "Vere parish.

7.
HERE LYETH BURRYED ELIZABETH BEESTON DAUGHTER OF SR. WILLIAM BEES-
TON KNT. (PRESENT GOVERNOR OF THIS ISLAND) BY ANN HIS WIFE, WHO DYED YE
8I OF AUGUST ANNO DI. 1693 AND IN YE 18 YEAR OF HER AGE.
"B. M. Slab.











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


WILLIAM BEESTON, "Gent.," who had obtained large grants of land in Liguanea
from Lord Windsor in 1662, was returned a member for "Cagua (the present
Port-Royal), in the first Assembly of the island, 20th Jan., 1663-4. He was four times
elected Speaker of the House, viz., 9th April, 1677 ; 4th September, 1677 ; 3rd Sep-
tember, 1678, and I9th August, 1679, having been each time returned for Port-Royal.
-yournals. He was distinguished in that office, by his resistance to the attempt of the
Governor, the Earl of Carlisle, to enforce "Poynings law" (of Ireland) on the island;
and his successful vindication of the privileges of the Assembly is fully detailed in the
histories of Long, Edwards, and Bridges. On the 9th of March, 1692-3, having been
knighted by William III., he arrived at Port-Royal with the commission of Lieut.-
Governor of the island. In this situation he repelled a formidable invasion from St.
Domingo, under Du Casse, who, after some predatory attacks about Port-Morant,
landed 15oo men in Carlisle-Bay, but was compelled to retreat to his ships, with a loss
of 700 men, after several encounters with the militia of the island, in July, 1694. In
1701 Sir William was appointed Governor, which office he held about one year, when
he was superseded by Major-General Selwyn.


8.
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF COLL-JOHN BOURDEN-
BORNE IN THE CITY OF COLRAIN-IN THE KINGDOM OF
IRELAND, IN YE-YEAR 1633 ONE OF HIS MAJESTIES
COUNSEL OF-JAMAICA, AND SOMETIME PRESIDENT-A
LOVER OF JUSTICE-A LOVING HUSBAND-A FAITHFUL
FRIEND AND A GOOD MASTER- DYED THE I8th DAY OF
AUGUST-1697.

BOURDEN* was first returned to the Assembly as Member B. M. Slab; Arms, 3 haut-
boys, 2 and I, between a
for Vere, 26 April, 1675. He afterwards represented many crosses crosslet.
St. Catherine in five Assemblies. He was then called up to
the Council, where, resisting the Arbitrary measures of Christopher (Monk) 2d Duke
of Albemarle, he was displaced by that Governor, but restored, on the accession of
William and Mary, Feb. 22, 1688-9. On the death of the Governor, William (O'Brien)
2d Earl of Inchiquin, Jan. 16, 1691, the Government devolved upon the President of the
Council, John White, who was killed at Port-Royal, in the earthquake which destroyed
that place, June 7, 1692; when Bourden succeeded to the presidency of the Council,
and, as President, to the chief command of the Island. In the latter he was super-
seded by Sir William Beeston, who arrived at Port Royal as Lieut.-Governor, on
March 9, 1692-3.


*There was a Governor of the Bermudas between 1612 and 1622, of this surname, but whether of the
same family as the above, is uncertain.













YAMAICA.


B. M. Slab; Arms, On a
bend, 3 escallops. In the
Sinr. Ch. a mullet.


M-: Arms. Argt.on a bend


9.
HERE LYES THE BODY OF-SAMUEL BERNARD, ESQRE.,
CHIEF JUSTICE OF THIS COUNTRY FOR THE SPACE OF TEN
YEARS, IN WHICH TRUST HE ACQUITTED HIM SELF AS
BECAME A JUST AND PRUDENT MAGISTRATE, TO HIS OWN
HONOUR THE GOOD OF YE COMMUNITY AND YE SATISFAC-
TION OF ALL HONEST MEN-HE DYED MARCH YE 29th 1695,
IN YE 59th YEAR OF HIS AGE.


Io.
HERE ALSO LIES THE BODY OF JOHN THE SON OF THOMAS
BERNARD WHO DIED JULY 24th 1720.-HERE ALSO LIES THE
BODY OF SAMUEL ELDEST SON OF THE SAID THOMAS BER-
NARD ESQR. WHO DIED NOVBR. YE 17. 1720 AGED 2 YEARS
AND II MONTHS.

I1.
MARY WIFE OF THOMAS BERNARD ESQR. WHO DIED
AUGUST 13. 1724, IN THE 25th YEAR OF HER AGE.


az., 3 escallops of the field;
impaling checquy,arg and gu. a saltire ermine. Crest, a demi-lion arg. holding in his jamb a serpent sable.


W. M.; Arms, On a chev.
betw. 3 martlets, an eagle
displayed. Crest, A heron's
head erased, holding a fish
in its bill.


12.
(All on the same.)
HERE LYES INTERR'D THE BODY OF THE HONBLE COLLLL
PETER BECKFORD LATE PRESIDT. OF YE COUNCIL, SOMETIME
LIEUT.-GOVR. AND COMMANDER IN CHIEF OF THIS ISLAND,
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE YE 3d APRLL 1710, IN THE 67th
YEAR OF HIS AGE.

ALSO THE BODYS OF WILLM THE SON OF GEORGE BECKFORD,
LATE OF DEALING, IN YE COUNTY OF MIDDX, ESQ WHO DYED
YE IIth DECR 1708 IN THE I8th YEAR OF HIS AGE. AND
PHILLIS THE DAUGHTER OF PETER BECKFORD YE YOUNGER
ESQ WHO WAS BORN YE 21st OF MAY 1708 AND DYED THE
28th DAY OF JULY FOLLOWING.


ALSO THE BODY OF PETER BECKFORD ESQR SON OF THE
HONBLE COLLLL PETER BECKFORD ESQR WHO DIED THE 23d
OF SEPTEMBER 1735 IN THE 62d YEAR OF HIS AGE.

LIKEWISE THE BODY OF PETER BECKFORD ESQ. JUNIOR
HIS SON, WHO DYED THE I6th OF AUGUST I737 IN THE 32d
YEAR OF HIS AGE.

ON the death of Governor Major-General Selwyn, on April 5th, 1702, when the
Legislature was sitting, Colonel Beckford, who had a dormant commission of











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


old date, caused himself to be proclaimed Lieutenant-Governor. In his speech to the
Assembly he said, I have gone through most of the offices of this island, though with
no great applause, yet without complaint," and Bridges adds, "He carried on the
business in a manner which redeemed the pledge he had given." He was succeeded
in the office of Lieutenant-Governor by Lieutenant-General Thomas Handasyde, the
same year. The cause of his death is thus graphically described by Bridges. During
a warm debate in the Assembly, on June 8, 171I, on the right of adjournment for a
longer period than de die in diem, Peter Beckford, the Speaker (son of the President),
repeatedly called to order, and was at length compelled to enforce it by adjournment.
But irritation had gone so far that, when he rose to quit the chair, the Members drew
their swords and held him there while the obnoxious questions in debate were put and
carried. The doors were barred; the uproar was alarming; and the Speaker's father
heard the disturbance in the Council-Chamber. He recognized the voice of his son
crying aloud for help, and rushed into the Governor's apartment. Thomas Han-
dasyde seized his sword, ordered the sentinels to follow him, forced the door of the
Court-House, and dissolved the Assembly in the Queen's name. But the fray was
fatal to the elder Beckford; in his agitation his foot slipped, and he was precipitated
down the staircase, and the effects were deadly on his aged frame. His personal pro-
perty amounted to 478,00o, and his real estate to as much more !"
The second Peter Beckford, son and heir of the first, was elected Member of
Assembly for Port Royal in 1704, and in the next Assembly, 1705, was chosen for
three parishes, St. John, Westmoreland, and St. Elizabeth, but made his election for the
last. He continued to serve as a Member in every Assembly of the island until his
death-in the earlier Assemblies generally for St. Elizabeth, in the latter for St. Cathe-
rine. As Member for the former parish he was five times chosen Speaker, viz., 29th
December, 1707, when he was also returned for three parishes; January 4, 1708-9;
IIth April, 1711; 26th November, 1713; and I7th September, 1716. He was also
Comptroller of his Majesty's Customs in this island. On the 3rd of February, 1730,
he gave "for a school and poor house-keepers" in this parish 2000. He married
Bathshua, daughter of Julines Herring, Esq., of this island, and in the Gentleman's
Magazine for December, 1735, he is said to have died worth 300,000.
Besides the "Peter Beckford, Esq., junior," who was M.A. for Westmoreland in
1728, the Speaker left a daughter, Elizabeth, wife of the second Earl of Effingham, and
mother of the Governor of this island, and also a son, William, the celebrated Lord
Mayor and M.P. for the City of London, who, in his second mayoralty made the
memorable reply to George III., on May 23, 1770, which the citizens thought so worthy
of commemoration as to inscribe it on a most magnificent monument in their Guild-
hall. Medals were struck on the occasion, having on their obverse the head of "WIL-
LIAM BECKFORD, ESQ., LORD MAYOR OF London," in a large wig, with the civic robe
and chain. On the reverse a female figure, seated on a pile of books, one of which is
opened, and inscribed MAGNA CHARTA," her right hand holding the balance," and
her left a staff, with the cap of liberty thereon; motto, "TRUE TO HIS TRUST." On











YAMAICA.


the exergue, 1770." He married Maria, daughter and co-heir of the Honourable
George Hamilton, second surviving son of James, sixth Earl of Abercorn, by whom
he had issue William Bcckford, Esq., author of "Vathek (which he wrote and pub-
lished originally in French, and afterwards translated into English), and proprietor of
Fonthill. In right of his mother, who was descended in a direct line from James,
second Lord Hamilton, by Mary Stuart, his wife, eldest daughter of James II. of
Scotland, Mr. Beckford bore, under grant of the Earl Marshal, in addition to his
paternal coat (Per pale gules and azure, on a chevron argent, between three martlets or,
an eagle displayed sable), on a bordure or, a double tressure flory counter flory,
gules, as in the arms of Scotland. William Beckford, of Fonthill, had by his wife
(daughter of the Earl of Aboyne) a daughter, Susanna Euphemia, who married the
Ioth Duke of Hamilton, and was grandmother of the present Duke.
His cousin, William Beckford, Esq., formerly of Somerly, in Suffolk, was the gen-
tleman to whom Brydone addressed his very amusing "Tour in Sicily and Malta,"
and was himself the author of Remarks on the Negroes in Jamaica," I vol., 8vo., 1788,
and "A Descriptive Account of Jamaica," 2 vols., 8vo., 1790. Another of this family
was author of "Thoughts upon Hare and Fox Hunting."
[For other notices of this family see the Peerages of Ancaster, Rivers, &c.]

13.
O O NEAR THIS PLACE LIES THE BODY OF-JOIN BLAIR ESQl.
-ONLY SON OF THE LATE-COLL JOHN BLAIR ESQR. DECEASED
--WHO DIED THE 22D DECR. 1742-AGED 26.


S(On the same.)
HERE LIES NIDEME, THE WIFE OF JOHN BLAIRE, ESQR
Sb AGED 29 YEARS, DIED YE 5th MARCH, I707.
Arms, A chevron between
three roundles, all within
a border. Crest, A (love
rising. Aottlo, Virtute
tutus. (On the same.)
HERE LIES THE BODY OF JAMES HAY, ESQ., ONE OF THE
JUDGES OF THE GRAND COURT, AGED 39 YEARS, WHO DEPARTED
THIS LIFE THE 7th DAY OF OCTOBER, 1735.

TIHE Blairs of Jamaica are supposed to have been descended
\ from the family of Balthyock, Perthshire; this, however, is
a mere conjecture, the first of the family in the island having
been John Blair, a Darien refugee, who, in 1701, was elected
Arms, On a cross five Member for St. Thomas in the East, and filled many other offices
escallops. Crest, A lion
rampant. of trust.












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


14-
HERE LYES INTERR'D THE BODY OF ELIZABETH THE LATE
WIFE OF JOHN BLAIR ESQR WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 7th
OF 7BER 1721 AGED TWENTY SEVEN YEARS-LIKEWISE THEIR
FOUR CHILDREN, JOHN, THOMAS, CHRISTIAN AND MARY-HERE
ALSO LIETH INTERR'D YE BODY OF THE HONBLE JOHN BLAIR
ESQR. WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE YE 27th DAY OF JUNE 1728
AGED 6o YEARS.


W. M. Monument; Arms
On a cross five escallops
Crest, A lion rampant.


THE Honourable Colonel John Blair (see epitaphs of his first wife and son, already
transcribed), was a surgeon, and one of the Scotch colonists of Darien.
There is a large collection of interesting wills and administrations of many of
these Darien refugees, preserved in the Register House, Edinburgh, some of which
would repay the trouble of publishing.



15.

HERE LYETH THE BODY OF HEARCEY BARRITT, WHO DE-
PARTED THIS LIFE THE 5th DAY OF MARCH 1726 IN THE 76th
YEAR OF HER AGE.


B. M. slab; Arms, ...... A
chevron between three eagles' talons [Q. lion's jambs] erased and reversed. Crest, A talbot's head erased, collared.




I6.

HENRY BARHAM, SEN: ESQR. DIED 1726 IN HIS 56th YEAR.




B. M. Slab; Arms,.... On
a fess betw. three boars statant; a fleur de lis betw. two ducks, close...... Crest, A heron among reeds, close.



17
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF THE HONBLE WILLIAM BLAKE ESQR. SPEAKER
OF THE HONBLE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. HE DIED 24th JANUARY 1797 AGED 56 YEARS.

Stone Slab.











30 JAMAICA.

DURING the illness of Samuel Williams Haughton, Member for Hanover, the Speaker
of the House, Mr. Blake, was twice elected pro tempore. He was re-elected for West-
moreland in the Assembly of 23rd March, 179o, and on the death of Mr. Haughton,
(by a fall from his horse in August, 1793,) -Mr. Blake was unanimously chosen Speaker,
22nd October, 1793. He was again elected for Westmoreland, and again unanimously
chosen Speaker on Oct. 28th, 1796. He was succeeded in that high office by Donald
Campbell, Esq., Member for St. George, who was elected 25th July, 1797.-yournals
of House of Assembly.
In 1755 we find the will of Nicholas Blake, of Jamaica, and in it mention made
of his brother Benjamin, and his son Nicholas Allen Blake, &c.
In 1766 is recorded the will of Samuel Blake, in which occur the names of his
sons and daughters-Joseph, William, Samuel, Bonella, and Margaret.
The will of Nicholas Allen Blake, the nephew of Nicholas as above, is dated
July 16, 1789, and contains bequests to his son Matthew Gregory Blake, his brother
William, and his cousins the Burkes of Loughrea, in Ireland.
A few years earlier, in the will of Benjamin William Blake (1785), his nieces are
named Jane Gregory and Helen Haughton, his brother-in-law Samuel Williams
Hlaughton, and his brothers William and Nicholas Allen Blake, &c.
The first entry of this name in the parish registers of Jamaica'is in 1671, and in
1717 is recorded the birth of Benjamin, the son of Benjamin and ........ Blake. In
1743 is recorded the marriage of Alexander Blake* and Hagar Williams (probably
a daughter of Williams of Carowena) ; and still later, in the Hodges family the bap-
tism of an Alexander Blake Hodges, the nephew of Robert Francklyn Hodges, who
married a daughter of the Hon. Hugh Lewis (Ch. Justice).
Robert Francklyn Hodges, younger, of Maxfield, was so named after a Mr.
Francklyn, who married his aunt, Margaret Blake.t
In so extensive a family as that of Blake, it is natural to suppose that even un-
common surnames will be frequently adopted instead of ordinary Christian names, to
distinguish individuals; but when we find a double combination of this description, we
attach more importance to the coincidence (?).
A reference to the pedigree of the Aliens of Blackwell Grange, and a comparison
of the names of Blake and Burke therein, suggests some connection with the family of
Blake in Jamaica; and if so, of necessity it appears with that of Barbados, in the

*It may not be unworthy of attention, that in no other but the Taunton Blake
S pedigree, is the name Alexander Blake to be found. Colonel Williams, of Carowena,
married Elizabeth, daughter of Colonel John Guthrie. On his decease; she married
(1735) Colonel Richard Haughton. The above (Hagar) was, however, not the
daughter of this Colonel Williams.
t This gentleman's seal, now in the possession of Ann Archer, wife of Rev. John
Campbell, Rectory, St. Thomas in the Vale, bears on one side the initials J. F. ; on
the other a ship in full sail ; and on the third, Arg. on a bend engrailed gu., between
two dolphins naiant embowed, three lions' heads erased, of the first.











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


seventeenth century, and of another family of the name in Ireland, one of whose mem-
bers, Nicholas Blake, is described as of Barbados at the period to which we allude.
On referring, however, to the registers of Andover, we find that Nicholas Blake of
that town was also of Barbados ; while in the will of the wife of Nicholas Blake of
Barbados (1663), we discover that her husband was also of Bishop's Mead, near Cra-
ford, Kent."
Leaving, however, such branches of this family out of the question, and turning
to the pedigree of Bcnjamin, Nicholas, and Alexander, three of the younger brothers
of the celebrated Admiral Blake,* we find very strong presumptive evidence of its
being represented in Jamaica; and this is probable, moreover, from the interest which
Cromwell took in his valuable insular acquisition; and the date on the tomb of Alex-
ander Blake, at Eaton Socon, 1690, brings the record of the Taunton family close upon
modern times.
It is probable that there were two families of Blake in Jamaica, which became
united in one, about the commencement of the eighteenth century.
The will of Elizabeth Blake, wife of Nicholas Blake, merchant, of London,
entered (Barbados) Oct. 26, 1663, states:-" I bequeath unto my son Nicholas my
land called Bishop's Mead, in the parish of Craford, county of Kent, and bought of
Wm. Borman, and to his half-brother my son John Wilson, my cousins John Blake and
Nicholas Prideaux, &c. Witnesses: Nicholas Prideaux, H. Turvile, Thomas Morti-
mer, and Hercules Tervile" (sic).
(Vide also the Baronetage; and Pedigrees of Blake at the Heralds' College and
Brit. Mus., "Notes and Queries," &c. Very extensive private collections of Blake
records exist.)
The name is probably identical with that of Black, and therefore has had various
"centres of origin ;" although, so far as we know, its earliest appearance was in
Hampshire and Wilts, whence all the other recorded branches are assumed to have
been derived.
In Hardiman's History of Galway," (Dublin, 1820,) we find the following re-
marks:-" This family is of British extraction, and although the name seems derived
from the Saxon Blac, a colour; yet Debrett, in his 'Baronetage,' says, 'they are tra-
ditionally descended from Ap Lake, one of the Knights of King Arthur's Round
Table'(!). Nothing ought to surprise us after such an announcement.
In 1651 Government caused a map of this county to be made, and on the third
sheet are, amongst others, the Arms of Blake, and also, with other inscriptions, the
words ('Marilandia, Caroline, Verginia, et Yamaica,' being on the second sheet
with the name Marline) on the third sheet: 'Bermude, Barbude, Montserrat, et
Sancti Christophore.'"

It may be incidentally noticed that the late representative of this family, the Rev. II. J. C. Blake (de-
scended from Il.n.ihrey ]l3r.ke), assessedd the s~crd, and an interesting original portrait of the great Admiral.
The Admiral died in August, 1657, and his epitaph is given by Pettigrew.
5-2











32 YAMAICA.
The peculiar baptismal name (probably in compliment to some Spanish family)
of Bonella, seems to have been peculiar to certain families intermarried in Jamaica.
Bonella Hodges, mother to (Pennant) first Lord Penrhyn, (see Peerage,") gave her
name to the Blakes, Haughtons, Vassalls, and Archers. Through other ramifications
it passed into the families of Scarlett, &c.

From Pedigree of the Rev. Y. H. C. Blake.
Humphrey Blake [s. of Robt. & Margt., of Bridgewater] had, by his w. Sarah
Williams, 14 sons, & I dau.
The sons were in the following order [see Ped. Her. Coll. & Har. MSS., 1141]:-
I. Robert; 2. Humphrey; 3. William; 4. George; 5. George; 6. Nicholas;
7. Samuel; 8. Edward; 9. John; io. Thomas; i. ....... ob. inf.;
12. Benjamin. 13. ............; 14. Alexander.
Robert, the celebrated Admiral, Ist son, died s.p.
Humphrey, 2nd son, left issue, and was represented by the late Rev. J. H. C. Blake.
George, 4th son, ob. inf.
George, 5th son, had issue male: Benjamin.
Nicholas, 6th son, had issue male: Nicholas (viv. 1695), and the latter had-
I. Alexander; 2. John; 3. William.
Samuel, 7th son, had issue male: I. Samuel; 2. Robert.
John, 9th son, died s.p.
Alexander, 14th son.
Admiral Blake's uncle, Benjn. B., m. 1614, EliAth, d. of Sidrach Blake, Stepney, Middx.

18.
HERE LYES INTERR'D MR. GERALD BERMINGHAM OF
THE NOBLE AND ANTIENT FAMILY-OF ATHENRY-OF THE
KINGDOM OF IRELAND-HE WAS A MAN OF STRICT VIRTUE
-AND PRUDENCE ;-FAITHFULL TO HIS TRUSTS-AND SINCERE
IN HIS FRIENDSHIPS,--TO WHOSE MEMORY HIS RELICT-MRS.
S ANNE BERMINGHAM-ERECTED THIS MONUAENT.-HE DIED
M r DECEMBER THE IIth 1742-AGED 48 YEARS.
B. M. Slab ; Arms, Per pale
indented two spears' heads
always, head erased. otto, THERE was a great feudal family of this name, a branch
" Tout au Rien." of which settled in Ireland.
The Barony of Athenry de Bermingham was the premier Barony of Ireland,
and fell into abeyance on the death of Thomas, Earl of Louth, the 22nd Baron, in
1799, when the Earldom of Louth became extinct.
The Berminghams and Barnewalls were two powerful families, at an early period,
in the South East of Ireland. The Barony of Kingsland in the latter, was restored
in the person of a Dublin hotel waiter, but is again dormant.












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


There was a branch of this family, as may be seen by reference to the Inquis. P.
M. of Leinster, which was twice intermarried with that of Archer of Kilkenny, at an
early period ; hence their coat being now quartered with others of note in the armo-
rial achievement of The-O'Shee-of-Garden-Morris family. (Vide Notes and Queries,"
1867, voce O'S/ee.)
19.

SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-FRANCIS RIGBY BROADBELT
ESQRE. M D-WHO IN HIS PASSAGE THRO' THIS PROBATION-
ARY STATE-WAS EMINENTLY DISTINGUISIED-FOR PURITY
OF SENTIMENT, INTEGRITY OF LIFE-AND THE EXEMPLARY
DISCHARGE OF EVERY RELATIVE AND SOCIAL DUTY AND
WAS EQUALLY RESPECTED AND BELOVED-AS A PHYSICIAN
AND AS A MAN. HE WAS BORN OCTOBER 9th 1746; AND
DIED DECEMBER 9th I795-THIS MONUMENT WAS ERECTED BY W M.; Arms, Gu. three
bendlets wavy or. Crest, A
HIS SON-FRANCIS RIGBY BROADBELT-1799- double headed eagle dis-
played sa. Aotto, "Altius
ibunt, qui ad summa nitan-
J. Bacon Sculpt. tur."

ON this monument, the Genius of Medicine is represented supporting a figure of
Hope, beside an altar, on which is sculptured the parable of the Good Samaritan,
and beneath is the following couplet:
When the physician shares the patient's pain,
Medicine may well our fainting hope sustain."

Dr. Broadbelt, junior M. of C., gained the silver medal of the Med. Soc. London,
Feb. 23, 1795.

20.
THOMAS YE SONN OF THOMAS BRAY DIED 1699 AGED 7. ELIZABETH BRAY
BORN FEBRUARY 1698/9 DIED DECEMBER 1699.
Stone Slab.

21.

SUSANNA WIFE OF THOMAS BARRITT ESQ. DIED JANUARY
14, 1727/8 IN HER 36th YEAR, AND FOUR OF THEIR CHILDREN
THOMAS, THOMAS, SUSANNA, AND HEARCEY-ELIZABETH HIS
SECOND WIFE DIED 1740 AGED 47.

THE families of Barrett, Hodges, Haughton, and Molton were
connected with each other by various intermarriages.
The poetess Elizabeth Barrett Browning was of this family, B. M. Slab; Arms,...... A
having been a sister of the late Mr. Barrett, of Cinnamon Hill, chevron between threelions'
jambs erased. Crest, A tal-
Par. Trelawny. bot's head erased, collared
and langued...... [see p. 29.1











34 YAMAICA.

The name John Baret, 1463, St. Mary's, Bury St. Edmunds, occurs in Petti-
grew's work.


22.
HERE LYETI TIE BODY OF COLONEL ROBERT BYNDLOS
HE DYED THE I6th DAY OF JUNE 1687 IN YE 50 YEAR OF IIIS
AGE.

E was one of the original members of the first General
Assembly, and subsequently of the first Council."
By his wife, Anne-Petronella, daughter of General Edward
Morgan and his wife, daughter of Baron Pollnitz, he had a
G. M. Slab; Arms ....... daughter, who married Thomas Beckford, grandson of Colonel
Per cross, fesswise indented
......on a bend, a rose be- Peter Beckford.
tween two martlets......Im-
paling a chevron between There was a baronetcy in the family of Bindlosse of Bor-
three bucks' heads cabossed. wick, which became extinct, on the death of Sir Robert Bind-
Crest, A sagittarius.
losse, in 1688.




23.
WILLIAM BALDWIN ESQR. DIED 17 JULY 1755 AGED 54,
ALSO MARY HIS WIDOW WHO DIED I2th APRIL 1760 AGED 68.




M. Tablet; Arms, Arg. three oak branches, slipped, leafed, and fructed ppr.


24.

HERE LYETH BURIED YE BODY OF CAPT WALTER BREAREY SON TO THE
RIGHT WORSHIPLL MR. BREARY LATE LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF YORKE,
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE YE 29th DAY OF NOVEMBER ANO DOM 1681.
B. M. Slab.



25.
MR THOMAS BREWSTER SENR. DIED 1701 IN HIS 33d YEAR. SAMUEL HIS
SON DIED 1721 IN HIS 29th YEAR. JOHN BREWSTER SON OF JOHN & GRANDSON
OF THOMAS BREWSTER DIED 1733 AGED T. MRS JOYCE RAISBECK FORMERLY
WIFE OF THOMAS BREWSTER DIED 1734 IN HER 7ISt YEAR. SAMUEL SON OF










MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


JOHN BREWSTER DIED 1737 AGED 10 YEARS MRS JOYCE BREWSTER, DAUGHTER
OF JOHN BREWSTER DIED 1737 AGED 14 YEARS.
W. M. Slab.

THE Brewsters are frequently mentioned in connection with the affairs of New
England in the seventeenth century. (S. P. 0.) They were also numerous in
Barbados, where they intermarried with the family of Archer.*
There was a family of Raisbeck at Stockton, of which was Thomas, (temp. Carl.
II.,) who married Sarah, daughter of the Rev. T. Stapylton, son of Miles Stapylton,
Auditor to Cosins, Bishop of Durham (temp. Carl. II.).
See also Notes in Misc. Gen. et Herald., July, 1870, (No. 4), on the family of the
celebrated Maj.-Gen. Skippon.

26.

HERE LYETII INTERR'D YE BODY OF-FRANCIS BLACK-
MORE ESQ -ONE OF HIS MATIES COUNCIL OF JAMAICA- \
AND SON OF SIR JOHN BLACKMORE OF QUANTRIX HOUSE-
IN THE COUNTY OF SOMERSET KT-WIIO DEPARTED THIS
LIFE THE 24th -DAY OF OCTOBER 1697-AND IN YE 39th
YEAR OF HIS AGE
B. M. Slab; Arms, ......On
a fess between three Moors' heads, as many crescents...... Crest, An arm embowed, grasping a lance with a
swallow-tailed pennon.



27.

HERE LYETH INTERR'D THE BODY OF MAJOR GENERAL
JAMES BANNISTER LATE GOVERNOR OF SARRENHAIM WHO
DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE I0th OF NOVEMBER ANO DOMI
1674 IN THE 50th YEAR OF HIS AGE.

THE colony of Surinam was granted by Charles II. in 1662,
to Francis Lord Willoughby of Parham, and Lawrence B. M. Mont. Arms,......A
cross flory, impaling ......
Hyde (afterwards Earl of Rochester), second son of the great three battle-axes. Crest, A
Lord Chancellor Clarendon. In 1664 the English captured the griffin's head erased, ducally
New Netherlands, the present New York, from the Dutch. In
1667 Surinam was taken by surprise by the Hollanders, under Captain Abraham


SParish Register, Barbados. Richard Brewster and Sarah Archer married in 168t. Brewster is also
named in the will of Edward Archer, of St. Philip and St. Lucy, 1693.












36 YAMAICA.
Criuvon, but retaken the same year by Commodore Sir John Harman. By treaty, in
1673-4, it was finally agreed that Surinam should be the property of the Dutch, in
exchange for the province of New York.
Major-General Bannister appears to have been President of the Council of
Jamaica in 167 1, his name being first on the list of that body, as given by Sir Thomas
Lynch, on August o2; and he is the first named of the Council to John Lord Vaughan,
appointed by Charles II., April 3, 1674. The 5Ist Article of the Instructions to that
Nobleman, dated 3rd December, 1674, says, "Whereas we are now providing for the
removal of such of our subjects from Surinam, as shall desire to transport themselves
from thence under our obedience, in pursuance of the articles made at the surrender of
that colony, our pleasure is, that for the encouragement of such of our said subjects, as
shall be willing to remove from Surinam, you receive and use with kindness as many
of these as come to Jamaica, and take care that they be furnished with provisions
and other necessaries at a moderate rate, until they shall be able to get or procure
them themselves, and that you proportion out to them twice as much land as used to
be granted to other planters coming thither." Accordingly, in 1675, about 12co per-
sons from Surinam arrived in Jamaica, and were located in that district in the parish
of St. Elizabeth, which still retains the name of The Surinam Quarters." General
Bannister was murdered by a "Mr. Burford, who was tried and hanged for it."-
Stedman's Narrative, Appendix to journals, and Br idges' Annals.
Major-General J. Bannister was murdered by a Mr. Charles Burford, who was
tried and convicted on the 2nd December, 1674, and hanged three days afterwards.
The executioner, Edward Hackett, died the same day. (Vide Reg. of St. Cath. Parish,
Jamaica.)

28.
HERE LYETH INTERRED THE BODY OF MRS. MARY
LEWIS WIFE OF MR SAMUEL LEWIS AND DAUGHTER OF
MAJOR GENERAL JAMES BANNISTER WHO DEPARTED THIS
LIFE THE 2d OF JANUARY ANO DOMI 1676-7 IN THE 18th
YEAR OF HER AGE.

THAT DEATH MIGHT HAPPY BEE TO LIVE LEARNED I
THAT LIFE MIGHT HAPPY BEE I HAVE LEARNED TO DYE.
B. M.; Arms, Chequyon a
fess, three leopards faces; impaling a cross flory. Crest, A griffin's head erased, ducally gorged.


29.

ALEXR MACGREGOR MURRAY BURGE-THE INFANT SON OF-WM AND HELEN
GRACE MURRAY BURGE-DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE I6th OF JUNE 1822-AGED
7 MONTHS AND 3 WEEKS.


'-











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


(Also)
BENJAMIN MILWARD BURGE-DEPARTED THIS LIFE-ON THE 16th JUNE 1819,
AGED 23 YEARS.
(Also)
WILLIAM LEE BATSON BURGE-THE INFANT SON OF-WILLIAM AND HELEN
GRACE-MURRAY BURGE-DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON THE 19th NOVR-1819 AGED
ELEVEN MONTHS AND-THREE WEEKS.
C. Y.

THE first two were sons of the Attorney General; the third and fourth, brother and
daughter of the same.

30.
(Ab.) ALEX. BAYLEY ESQ. OF WOODHALL-ST DOROTHY-D. 14 JULY 1832, IN
HIS 60th YEAR.

31.
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF COLONEL THEODORE CARY,
ONE OF THE SONNES OF COCKINGTON HOUSE IN DEVON-
SHIRE, BROTHER TO SR HENRY CARY CAPTAIN OF HIS
MATIES FORT AT PORT ROYALL, ONE OF HIS MATIES COUNCIL,
AND ONE OF THE JUDGES OF THE GRAND COURT IN JAMAICA.
HE DIED JUNE 26th 1683 IN YE YEAR OF HIS AGE 63.


H E was also brother to Robert Cary, author of Paleologia B. M. Slab; Arms, On a
Chronic, born at Cockington. bend three roses, a mullet
in sinister chief for differ-
For an elaborate and interesting genealogy of this family, ence.
see the Herald and Genealogist, from which periodical the following is ex-
tracted :-
"William Cary of this family had a daughter, who was married to Dr. William
Helyar, and was buried in Exeter Cathedral, July, 1607. Dr. Helyar was a divine of
some eminence, and claimed (I presume through his wife) kinship with Queen Eliza-
beth. At any rate he was her Majesty's chaplain, and probably through her, if not
directly from her, received his other important preferments. He seems to have been
a great pluralist in an age of pluralism, and enjoyed a prebendal stall both at Exeter
and Chester, the archdeaconry of Barnstaple, the treasurership of Chelsea College,
and various livings in Devon and Somerset. He died in 1645, and was, I think, buried
in Exeter Cathedral; but at East Coker, in Somersetshire, he founded an almshouse
and built a handsome residence, Coker Court, which his descendants have occupied in
succession to the present day. The archdeacon's eldest son, Henry Helyar, formed
a second connection with the Cary family. According to the Visitation of Somerset,
1672 (confirmed by Cole's Escheats), he married in 1621, Christian, daughter of
William Cary of.Clovelly, co. Devon, and by her had several children, amongst whom












JAMAICA.


was Cary Helyar, who migrated as a merchant to Jamaica, and there died, in 1672,
aged 39. His monument is in the church of Spanish Town in that island, and in the
same church is another to Colonel Theodore Cary, 'one of the sons of Cockington
House, co. Devon, brother to Sir Henry Cary, a judge of the Grand Court.' He died
in 1683, aged 63, and was therefore contemporary with Cary Helyar; and, it is not
unreasonable to conjecture, was related to him. There can be little doubt that
Colonel Theodore Cary was one of the younger sons of George Cary of Cockington,
of whom Prince says, that his 'youngest sons became soldiers of fortune, and died, I
think, beyond the seas, without issue.' This last statement is perhaps open to
question, as the MS. I have quoted records the marriage, in 1676, of Colonel Theodore
Cary with Dorothy Wale; and, in 1679, of Penelope Cary with Thomas Edward.
The immediate cause of the rapid rise of the Cary family is to be found in its
close connection with Queen Elizabeth. William Cary (second son of Thomas Cary
of Chilton Foliot) married Mary Boleyne, sister of Queen Anne, and aunt of Queen
Elizabeth. From this marriage descended the Earls of Dover and Monmouth and the
Barons Hunsdon; while from Sir John Cary, William's elder brother, came the
Viscounts Falkland, whose fame is well preserved in the annals of our country."


32.
MR. JOHN CHILDERMAS DIED 1699 AGED 33: RACHAEL
4 OB: 1720 JET 15; & SEBRAN LARSON HER FATHER OB. 1725
JET 50.

N the Journal of the House of Lords, 17th August, 166o,
mention is made of the "Bill for Naturalizing Ren&e de
Sebran, an infant of 8 years."
B. M. Slab; sculptured Sebran Larson was governor of the Spanish Town gaol, &c.
dove and olive branch.

33.
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF-JANE COOPER-WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE-IN
THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1749, IN THE 86th YEAR OF HER AGE-
G. M. Slab.

PERHAPS related to the family of Major Christopher Cooper, who lost his life in
Jamaica, as appears by the petition of his widow in 1656. (Cal. S. P.)


34.
CHRISTIAN DAUGHTER OF RICHARD AND MARY CASTELL DIED 1720 IN HER
13th YEAR.
W. M. Slab.













MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


35-
ON THE I7th DAY OF JUNE-IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD-1780-DEPARTEI
THIS LIFE-UNIVERSALLY LAMENTED-GEORGE CUTHBERT ESQ-ONE OF THE
REPRESENTATIVES-IN ASSEMBLY-FOR THE PARISH OF-PORT ROYAL-AND
LATE-PROVOST MARSHAL GENERAL-OF THIS ISLAND-AGED 42 YEARS-UNDER-
NEATH THIS STONE-HIS REMAINS ARE DEPOSITED.
Stone Slab.



TWO brothers, Lewis (father of the Hon. George Cuthbert, sometime President of the
Council), and George (Provost-Marshal-General, whose epitaph is above tran-
scribed), descended from a family in the county of Inverness, came out to this island
and married two sisters of the Hon. George Pinnock, late President of the Council.
A third brother, a Roman Catholic, was consecrated Bishop of Rhodes (in partibus
infidelium).



36.


SACRED TO THE MEMORY-OF-ANNE THE DUTIFUL AND
AFFECTIONATE DAUGHTER OF JOHN CLEMENT OF PETERS-
FIELD IN THE COUNTY OF SOUTHAMPTON ESQUI. TRULY VIRTUOUS, MUCH BELOVED AND LAMENTED WIFE OF
GEORGE RAMSAY ESQ REGISTRAR IN CHANCERY AND CLERK
OF THE PATENTS IN THIS ISLAND. SHE DIED OF THE SMALL
POX ON THE I4th DAY OF AUGUST 1764 AGED 32 YEARS AND
WAS BURIED WITHIN THE COMMUNION RAILS OF THIS CHURCH
-AND ALSO OF-PETER RAMSAY ESQUIRE REGISTRAR IN
CHANCERY AND CLERK OF THE PATENTS ON THE RESIGNA-
TION 'OF HIS BROTHER IN THE YEAR I770, THE EASE AND
UNAFFECTED DEPORTMENT OF THIS GENTLEMAN IN PRIVATE
LIFE DID NOT MORE TRULY ENDEAR HIM TO HIS NUMEROUS AC-
QUAINTANCE THAN THE UNIFORMLY UPRIGHT AND ATTENTIVE
DISCHARGE OF THE PUBLIC TRUSTS REPOSED IN HIM JUSTLY
SECURED HIM THE RESPECT AND ESTEEM OF THE WHOLE
COMMUNITY-HE DIED THE 27th DAY OF OCTOBER 1781,
AGED 48 YEARS, AND WAS BURIED ON THE WEST SIDE OF
THE NORTH DOOR OF THIS CHURCH, UNDER A MARBLE
SLAB IN THE CHURCHYARD.-A SMALL TRIBUTE OF CON-
JUGAL AFFECTION-AND BROTHERLY REGARD.*


Arms, Suspended from the
crest,anunicorn'shead sable,
two shields : on dexter,
argent, an eagle displayed
within abordure sable. Im-
paling, gules, three garbs
or, for Clement. On sinis-
ter, Ramsay, as in pedigree.


* For Pedigree see following page.


6-2













YAMAICA.


Joseph Milward, Thos. Milward=Elizth. Crowder
born 1751, Nixon, born
mar., 1777, 1763, dau. of
Bridget John and Ele-
Brammer. anor Nixor.

Joseph Thomas Nixon Eliza=E. G. Barnard,
and Eleanor died M.T., of Gos-
unmarried. field Hall,
Essex.

Eliza Frances Barnard. E. G. Milward Barnard.


ARMS.
MILWARD.-Ermine on a fess gules three plates.
Crest, A lion's jamb sa., grasping a sceptre or.
HANSON.-Three mascles sable; on a chief of the
Second, as many lions rampant of the First. Crest,
A lion rampant, holding a muscle.
CLEMENT.-Three garbs within a bordure.
ST. JoHN.-The same as the Bolingbroke family.
Capt. St. John was the son of Lieut. St. John, of
Devonshire.

[Contrd. byE. G. M. B.]


John Brammer Bridget.

ce Milward=John B. Brammer. Elizth. Williams
Brammer,
mar. John Price.

th. Williams=John Hansom, left Sir Rose Price.
rammer seven daughters,
three of whom
married.
John Clement of Peters
Eliza= field, Hants
F. Mullett.
________________________________________________I


Clement. Ann mar. Ramsay,
= see monument


in Spanish Town

Anna Wilhemina, FrancesClement.
mar. Capt. James T
HumphreySt. John. -sons died unmarried.


Henry, Frances-Revd. Thos. Robinson,
a son now living. son of the Master of
the Temple.

I I I
Charles Grey. Celeste. Thomas. &c., &c.


37.


HERE LYETH YE BODY OF COLLNEL JOHN COLBECK OF COLBECK IN ST
DOROTHYES WHO WAS BORN YE 30 OF MAY 1630 AND CAME WITH YE ARMY
THAT CONQUERED THIS ISLAND YE IOth DAY OF MAY 1655 WHERE HAVING DIS-
CHARGED SEVERAL HONBLE OFFICES BOTH CIVIL AND MILITARY WITH GREAT
APPLAUSE HE DEPARTED THIS LIFE YE 22d DAY OF FEBRUARY 1682.

B. M. Slab.

IT is remarkable that the names of Colbeck, who "came with ye army that conquered
this island,"-of Freeman, "who was at ye taking of this island,"-and of Fuller
(buried in the Church of St. Dorothy), one of the first takers of this island," are alto-
gether omitted in the list of "some of the principal persons who held official situations
in the expedition under Penn and Venables, as given by Bridges, in his Appendix,
Note XLIX., although the circumstance of their being among the original captors of
Jamaica, is particularly recorded on their respective gravestones.-Roby.
In 1664, Captain Colbeck was distinguished during the negro rebellion of that
year.


38.
JOSEPH CRASSWELL ESQ LATE OF THIS PARISH, DIED 1768 AGED 39.
Stone Slab. (Vide HANSON).


-











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


39.
MR. FRANCIS COLEPEPPER BORN AT HOLLINGBOURN IN KENT DIED 1761
AGED 44.
W. M. Slab; Arms, A chev. engrailed in sinister chief, a crescent. Crest, A hawk rising (with a branch in
its talons).


THE Colepeper, or Culpeper family, of great antiquity in Kent, was, before the time
of Edward III., divided into two branches, the claim to precedence between which
has never been decided.
The above was a descendant of Walter, son of Sir John Culpeper, from whom
came "the Barons Colepeper, the Colepepers of Wiggshall and Folkington, and the
Colepepers of Hollingborn, &c." (Ext. Baronetage.)
This family was eminent in the seventeenth century.


40.
HERE RESTETH YE BODY OF ANTHONY COLLYER ESQ BORN IN TIE CITY 01
GLOCESTER ONE OF HIS MATIES COUNCIL FOR THIS ISLAND AND COLL OF A
FOOT REGMT IN YE SAME: WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON YE TENTH DAY OF
AUGUST IN YE YEAR OF OUR LORD GOD ONE THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED SEVENTY
AND SEVEN, AND IN THE FORTIETH YEAR OF HIS AGE.
B. M. Slab; Arms, A chev. between three bats volant proper. Crest, A wyvern passant.

ANTHONY COLLYER was one of the first Representatives of Jamaica, being returned
to the Assembly of 20th January, 1663-4, as Member for Seven Plantations."
He was probably called up to the Council soon afterwards, as we do not find his
name in the Returns of any future Assembly, and in 1671 Sir Thomas Lynch mentions
him as one whom he found a Member of the Council on his arrival in this island. He
was also "constituted and appointed" one of the Council by Charles II., in his Com-
mission to the Governor John Lord Vaughan, dated April 3, 1674.
Anthony Collyer bequeathed one thousand acres to Samuel Long. Collyer's
widow, Elizabeth, married secondly, Sir Francis Watson, Knt. (Major-General, Member
of Congress, and President of Council), who administered the Government from the
death of the Duke of Albemarle in 1688, until the arrival of the Earl of Inchiquin
in 1690.
Sir Francis was buried in the chancel of Spanish Town Church, 19th August,
1691, and Lady W. on 18th April, 1698.
Probably of the same family was "Giles Collier, of Bristol, clothier," who pre-
sented Joseph Collier to the living of Steple, Longford, Wilts, 1607.
1635. Henry Collier, p.m., J.C. 1703. Ann Collier, presented.
1670. Arthur Collier, p.m., H.C. 1704.
1698. Ann Collier, presented. 1732. Arthur Collier, died.













JAMAICA.


41.
HIC JACET ROSANNA UXOR DILECTA-ROGERI DAVIES MD-NATU MAXIMA
ET COHERES-THOMAE BROOKS DE BROOKSHALL-PAROCH STATE MARIAE IN HAC
INSULA ARMIG.-OBIIT 170 DIE XBRIS A.D. I753-AETATIS SUAE 30-
QUICQUID AMAS CUPIAS NON PLACUISSE NIMIS.
B. M. Slab.

42.
TO THE MEMORY OF-CAPTAIN GEORGE DYSON OF THE
ROYAL ENGINEERS, BORN AT WINCHESTER 12th OF MARCH
1783 DIED AT SPANISH TOWN 26th OF JUNE 1806.
YE WHOM THE RECORDS OF THE TOMB MISTRUST,
AND DEEM SEPULCHRAL PRAISE MORE FOND THAN JUST,
MAY IN THIS STONE'S SINCERITY CONFIDE
AND READ A SOLDIER'S PRAISE WITH UNCHECKED PRIDE;
HERE IN THE WORDS OF WARM BUT SOBER TRUTH
M. Mont. (Westmacott, AN HONOUR'D CHIEF EMBALMS A GALLANT YOUTH
Sculpt.); Arms, 2ndly, I
& 4. Per pale or and azure; HERE-SHALL NO FATHER'S FONDNESS INTERFERE
A sun in splendour, counter- TO CLAIM THE HOMAGE OF A GENERAL TEAR
changed. 2 & 3. Gules, on
a bend or, three mullets CONTENT TO HOPE HIS SON'S DISTINGUISHED PRAISE
sable within a border ar-
gent. Crest, A ram pas.* SHALL KINDRED FLAMES IN OTHER BOSOMS RAISE
sant gules. IN VIRTUE'S SERVICE, AS IN HONOUR'S BRAVE

AND BLEST WITH LAURELS WHICH SURVIVE THE GRAVE.

On the base of the monument:-
"SORRY, VERY SORRY AM I INDEED, THAT IT HAS FALLEN
TO MY LOT TO COMMUNICATE THIS LAMENTABLE LOSS TO
YOU OF A SON, WHOSE UNEXCEPTIONABLE PIOUS AND DO-
CILE DISPOSITION, SUPERIOR TALENTS, AND PROFOUND
KNOWLEDGE OF HIS PROFESSION, IN SHORT EVERY NOBLE
AND GOOD QUALITY, HAD ENDEARED HIM TO ME AS A
BROTHER.-EYRE COOTE, LIEUT GOVr. 28th JUNE 1806."

43.
UNDER THIS STONE LYETH BODYS OF EDMON DUCKE
ESQ ... [MARTHA] HIS WIFE SHE BEING MOST ... BAROUSLY
MURTHERED BY SOME OF THEIR ... SLAVES DEPARTED THIS
LIFE THE... OF APRIL 1678 AND HEE FOLLOW... I4th DAY
OF OCTOBER 1683]. .

HERE LYES THE BODY OF... EXCELLENCY HENRY CUN-
NINGHAM ESQR GOVERNOR OF JAMAICA WHO DEPARTED
B. M. Slab; Arms, On a THIS ...... 12th DAY OF FEBRUARY 1735-6 IN THE 59th YEAR
fess wavy three lozenges.
Crest, An anchor erect with OF HIS AGE.












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


EDMUND DUCKE was Attorney-General of Jamaica in 1671. He was probably a
near relative of Dr. Duck, Chancellor of London, whom the Privy Council de-
sired, in 1637, to settle some disputes among the inhabitants of, and others connected
with, the Island of St. Christopher.
There was a Sir John Duck created a Baronet in 1687, whose rise to fortune
deserves a place in the romance of the Baronetage. He had a brother named Robert,
and several nieces, but no issue.
Henry Cunningham, Esq., of Balquhan, Stirlingshire, was M.P. for that county
several times. He was appointed Governor of Jamaica in 1734, but did not assume
office before Dec. 22, 1735.
Henry Cunningham held the government only three months, and fell by an act
of his own intemperance at a public entertainment." He was a Scotchman, and
favourite of Sir Robert Walpole, whom he had rescued from the mob, during the
Excise Riots. (" Roby." Gentleman's Magazine. "Bridge's Annals.")

44.

TO THE MEMORY OF-THOMAS EARL OF EFFINGHAM
BARON HOWARD-CAPTAIN GENERAL, AND CHIEF GOVERNOR
OF THIS ISLAND 1790 AND I791-AND OF CATHERINE HIS
WIFE-THE LATTER DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON THE TIIIR-
TEENTH DAY OF OCTOBER 1791-IN A VOYAGE UNDERTAKEN ,_
FOR THE BENEFIT OF HER HEALTH IN HIS MAJESTY'S SHIP
DIANA:-THE FORMER ON THE 19th OF THE FOLLOWING
MONTH-THE THIRD WEEK AFTER THE MELANCHOLY RETURN
OF THE DIANA WITH THE REMAINS OF HIS BELOVED CON- This handsome monument
has been thus described:
SORT-WHOM HE SEEMED UNWILLING TO SURVIVE-AND Marble, and of a pyramidal
WITH WHOM HE WAS DEPOSITED IN THE SAME GRAVE- fome ftoonoedith floors.
An earl's coronet over the

THUS UNITED IN THEIR LIVES BY THE MOST TENDER AND following coat armorial.
Quarterly-I. Gules on a
EXALTED TIES- bend betw. six crosses cro-
let fitchte arnt., an escun.
HE-THE FOND AND INDULGENT HUSBAND of the fd. chd., with a demi
lion ramp. pierced through
SHE-THE CHEERFUL AND OBEDIENT WIFE- mouthwith an arrow; with-
ina d.tressure lly.c.fly. II.
IN THEIR DEATHS THEY WERE NOT DIVIDED! Gu. 3 lions pass. guard. in
pale or.; a label of 3 points.
TO PERPETUATE THE REMEMBRANCE OF SO ILLUSTRIOUS III. Checquy or and azurn.
IV. Gules: a lion rampant
A PATTERN OF CONJUGAL AFFECTION-TO MANIFEST THE argt. A mulletfor difference
in fess point. Supporters 2
PUBLIC SENSE-OF THE MANY PUBLIC AND PRIVATE VIRTUES lions rampant. Motte,
OF THEIR RESPECTED GOVERNOR, AND TO RECORD FOR THE "Virtus mille scuta."
A female figure emlble,
BENEFIT OF POSTERITY-THE CLEARNESS OF THAT SAGACITY, matic of Jamaica, and a
cherub or genius, the latter',
THE EXTENT OF THAT KNOWLEDGE-AND THE PURITY AND right hand resting on a
FIRMNESS OF THAT INTEGRITY-WHICH RENDERED HIS AD-shield, which bears the
arms of Jamaica, viz., Ar-
MINISTRATION THE BOAST AND SECURITY OF A GRATEFUL gentonacrossgulesfivepine-
apples or. To this shield
PEOPLE:-THE ASSEMBLY OF JAMAICA-HAVE CAUSED THE are supporters dexter.












44 YAMAICA.

a female Blackamoor, hold- REMAINS OF THIS NOBLE AND LAMENTED PAIR-TO BE
ing in her dexter hand a
basket of fruit.. Sinister, INTERR'D WITH FUNERAL HONOURS AT THE PUBLIC EX-
an Indian warrior holding
a bow, plumed proper. PENCE-THE WHOLE HOUSE ATTENDING EACH PROCESSION
Crest, An alligator. Motto, AS MOURNERS-AS A FURTHER TESTIMONY OF MERITED
Indus uterque serviet
uni." ESTEEM INSCRIBE THIS MONUMENT.

J. Bacon Sculptor, London,
1796.

THOMAS HOWARD, third Earl of Effingham, was born January 13, 1746-7. Married
October, 1765, Catharine (born Sept. 17, 1746), daughter of Metcalfe Proctor, of
Thorpe, near Leeds, co. York, Esq. Appointed Master of the Mint, January, 1784.
which office he resigned on his obtaining the Government of Jamaica. Dying without
issue, he was succeeded in title and estates by his only brother Richard. The Earl's
mother was Elizabeth, daughter of Peter Beckford, Esq.


45.
IN MEMORY OF
ELIZABETH MARY, COUNTESS OF ELGIN AND KINCARDINE, ONLY CHILD OF
CHARLES LENNOX CUMMING BRUCE ESQR, OF ROSEISLE AND KINNAIRD IN
SCOTLAND, MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT FOR THE COUNTIES OF ELGIN AND NAIRN,
AND OF MARY ELIZABETH BRUCE, GRAND-DAUGHTER AND REPRESENTATIVE OF
THE DISTINGUISHED TRAVELLER IN ABYSSINIA. BORN ON THE 13th APRIL 182I,
SHE WAS MARRIED ON THE 22nd APRIL 1841, AND HAVING ACCOMPANIED HER
HUSBAND, HIS EXCELLENCY JAMES EARL OF ELGIN AND KINCARDINE, TO JAMAICA
IN APRIL 1842, SHE DIED AT CRAIGTON, IN THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREWS, ON
THE 7th JUNE 1843: RESTING WITH ASSURED FAITH ON THE LOVE OF HER RE-
DEEMER, AMIDST THE UNSPEAKABLE SORROW OF DEAR RELATIONS AND FRIENDS,
AND THE DEEP LAMENT OF THE COMMUNITY THAT HAD WITNESSED THE RICH
PROMISE OF HER EARLY VIRTUES. THIS MONUMENT WAS ERECTED BY THE
LEGISLATURE OF THE COLONY, NOT AS A COLD TRIBUTE OF RESPECT DUE TO
EXALTED RANK, BUT TO MARK THE PUBLIC REGRET, FOR DISTINGUISHED WORTH
AND TALENT, SO EARLY LOST TO HER COUNTRY AND HER FAMILY.
"BLESSED ARE THE PURE IN HEART FOR THEY SHALL SEE GOD."

46.
HERE LYETH INTERR'D THE BODY OF ITHAMAR THE WIFE OF THE HONBLE
ROSE FULLER ESQ, WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 22nd DAY OF APRLL 1738,
AGED 17 YEARS.

JOHN FULLER, Esq., of Brightling, co. Sussex videe Fuller of Rose Hill, Burke's
L. G.), M.P., married Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of Fulk Rose, Esq., of Ja-
maica, by Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of John Langley, Alderman of London (she


-' -... IJ











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


married, secondly, Sir Hans Sloane), and had issue six sons, of whom the fifth,
Stephen Fuller, merchant, of London, and many years agent for Jamaica, married Miss
Noakes, and by her had, with two daughters, who died unmarried, three others, viz.,
i. Philippa, married W. Dickenson, Esq., M.P. for Somerset; 2. Elizabeth, married to
her cousin, Hans Sloane, son of William Sloane, of Stoneham.

47.
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF MERIDETH THE WIFE OF COLLNEL MODYFORD
FREEMAN-THE DAUGHTER OF COLONEL EDWARD STANTON AND PRISCILLA HIS
WIFE-WIIO DEPARTED THIS LIFE YE 19th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 1697 IN YE 20'h
YEAR OF HER AGE.

48.
HERE LYETH INTERRED- THE BODY OF HUMPHREY'

-HE DEPARTED TIIS LIFE TIIE 6th-OF AUGUST 1692 IN
THE 64th YEAR-OF IIIS AGE.

IN the first Assembly of this island, meeting January 20, 1692,
we find Humphrey Freeman, Gent.," a Member for Old
Harbour." In the third Assembly, 8th Jan., 1671-2, "Humphrey B. M. Slab; Arms, Three
Freeman, Esq." was returned "for the the town of St. Jago.' lozenges. Crest, A demi-
lion holding in his jambs a
-Roby.* lozenge.

49.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY-OF ALEXANDER FORBES ESQR
PROVOST MARSHAL GENERAL-AND ONE OF HIS MAJESTY'S
COUNCIL OF JAMAICA-BELOVED AND RESPECTED-FOR IIS
GREAT ABILITY-UNSPOTTED INTEGRITY-AND UNIVERSAL
BENEVOLENCE-HE WAS YE SECOND SON-OF SR DAVID
FORBES-OF NEWIIALL IN YE COUNTY-OF EDINBURGH- IN
SCOTLAND-BORN AT EDINBURGH-THE 27th JULY 168c,-
DIED AT JAMAICA-THE 13th NOVEMBER 1729. Arms (As Forbes of New-
hall), Azure on a chev. be-
tween three boars' heads
erased argent, as many unicorns' heads erased, gules. Crest, A cubit arm grasping a snake, gules.

5o.

(Ab.) BREVET MAJOR FITZGERALD 8th FOOT DIED 5th JULY 1835 AGED 57.


SThere was a Sir Robert Freeman connected with the affairs of Virginia, about the middle of the seventeenth
century. In 1671, William Freeman was Member of Council in Jamaica. Thomas, Robert, and Humphrey Free-
man were members of the first General Assembly of Jamaica in 1663. Robert was Speaker of the House of
Assembly in 1664. The arms on this monument appear to be the same as those of Freeman of Castle Cor.












46 YAMAICA.

51.
BARTHOLOMEW FAUTT DIED 1703 AGED 35.



52.

(Ab.) MR. JOSHUA FEAKE DIED 1684 AGED 33.

FEAKE or Feeke (Stafford; London; and Gadston, co. Surrey),
sa, a fesse dancette, in chief three fleurs-de-lys or.-
Burke's General Armoury."

I. M. Slab; Arms, a fesse
dancette, in chief three fleur-de-lys.


53.
TO THE MEMORY-OF MATTHEW GREGORY ESQR MD-
AND LUCRETIA HIS WIFE-SHE DIED THE 29th OF JANUARY
MDCCL-IN THE FORTY THIRD YEAR OF HER AGE-HE ON
THE 3Ist DECEMBER MDCCLXXIX-AGED EIGHTY SIX YEARS-
THIS MONUMENT WAS ERECTED BY THEIR DAUGHTERS-
MARY DEHANY AND ELIZABETH TROWER.*
B. & W. M. Mont., richly
sculptured as follows : A female figure resting on an anchor, and gazing on two urns, on which appear the arms of
Gregory, with an escutcheon of pretence......six fleur-de-lys...... a chief danzette.

54.
NEAR THIS PLACE-LIETH THE BODY OF-MATTHEW
GREGORY SENR. ESQ:-WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 6th
DAY-OF SEPTEMBER-IN THE YEAR-OF OUR LORD-1715
AND IN-THE 6oth YEAR OF-HIS AGE.

THIS family appears by its arms, to have derived a descent
from the ancient family, which is said to be now represented
Arms, Or, two bars, a lion by that of Stivic Hall.
in chief: passant gules. Archer Martin, and Matthew Gregory, the nephews of John
Crest, A boar's head or,
cold. and langd. gules. Archer, of St. Thomas-in-the-Vale (of a Wiltshire family), re-
ceived by the will of their uncle, (dated 1663, and recorded 1689), considerable legacies.


S"Matthew Gregory, the younger, was elected Member in Assembly for St. James, Ist August, 1718; re-
elected for the same parish, 14th June, 1722; and chosen for St. Ann, Ist March, 1726-7; after which he appears
to have declined the senatorial honour. By his will dated 24th December, 1778, he bequeathed his estate of
Swansey and other properties in St. John's, to his daughters, Mary, widow of George Dehany, Esq., and Elizabeth
Trower, the erectors of this monument."-"Journals of House of Assembly (Roby)."











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 47



HERE LYETH THE BODY OF JAMES GODDARD,* SECOND
SON TO JAMES GODDARD GENT OF SOUTH MARSTON IN THE
COUNTY OF WILTSHEARE IN THE KINGDOM OF INGLAND HIE
WAS SECRETARY TO ONE SR THO LYNCH GOVERNOR OF
THIS PLACE WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE TWENTY FIRST
DAY OF JULY 1691 IN THE THIRTY THIRD YEAR OF HIS AGE.
B. M. Slab; Arms,......A
chev. vair, between three crescents. Crest, A stag's head.

56.
(Ab.) ROBERT GIBBINS (OB) 1752.
C.Y.

57.
(Ab.) WILLIAM GRAY (OB) 1755.
C. Y.

58.

IN THIS CHURCH LYES INTERRED-TIHE BODY OF-THE
HONBLE JOHN HUDSON GUY ESQR.-WIIO DEPARTED THIS
LIFE-THE 7th OF FEBRY 1749-IN THE 52d YEAR OF HIS AGE
-HIS MERIT PROMOTED IIM TO SEVERAL PUBLIC OFFICES
-IN THIS ISLAND ;-WHICII HE EXECUTED WITH IIONOUR-
AND INTEGRITY-AND SUPPORTED THEM WITH DIGNITY-EIE
SERVED HIS COUNTRY AS A MEMBER OF-THE ASSEMBLY-
WAS MADE AN ASSISTANT JUDGE OF TIE COURTS OF LAW-
AND ACTED IN THAT STATION FOR NINE YEARS-WITH SO
STRICT AN ADHERENCE TO-TIE RULES OF JUSTICE-THAT A richly sculptured Monu-
A richly sculptured Monu-
HE WAS RAISED TO THE CHIEF JUDGE'S SEAT-AS A REWARD ment (Marble); Arms,
Azure, on a chev. argent,
FOR HIS UNIFORM AND STEADY REGARD-TO THE LAWS OF threefleurs-de-lysgules: be-
HIS COUNTRY. tween three leopards' heads
or.
AND ALSO OF MRS ELIZ: VOSSAL-WHO DYED SEPTBER
27 I725-IN THE 43d YEAR OF HER AGE-SHE WAS A GOOD
WIFE, AN AFFECTIONATE MOTHER-AND A SINCERE FRIEND.

Survey of Manors of the Prince of Wales. Temp. Jac. I. Albourne, &c.
Richard Goddard, Esq., I Messuage, 867 acres at 28 18s. 8d. 19 years, 13o.
Henry Martyn, Esq., ,, 276 ,, 8 3 4 58 ,, 7.
Henry Martyn, Esq., holds 2 yard lands mentioned in his lease, lying in Upham, called Pratt and Pomates,*
late in the tenure of William Goddard, by Copy, and after in the tenure of Richard Yate (Gate ?), which 2 yard
lands about 6o acres, &c. The land is expressed in a grant made by William Longspee to Lord Turbarde
without date.
SMention is made of the same grant to Edward Walrond.
7-2












48 YAMAICA.

59.
(Ab.) TO THE MEMORY OF CHARLES GRAHAM ESQ LATE OF THIS PARISH-DIED
9 MAY 1801 AGED 50-BY IIIS MUCH AFFLICTED WIDOW (A CENOTAPH).

B. and W. M. ; An urn, &c., inscribed in gold, on a black ground.



60.

SACRED TO THE MEMORY-OF-FRANCIS GRAIIAM* ESQRE OF TULLOCII
CASTLE-IN ST THOMAS IN TIE VALE-AND FOR SOME TIME MEMBER OF-THE
IIONOURAIILE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY-SON OF TIE LATE-ALEXANDER GRAHAM
ESQRE OF DRYNIE-BRITISII CONSUL AT FAYAL-BORN ON THE 17th OF OCTOBER
1773-DIED THE Ist OF FEBRUARY 1820-AND OF HIS INFANT SON-COLIN-
BORN ON THE 23d OF OCTOBER 1814-AND DIED ON TIE SAME DAY-ALSO OF
HIS DAUGHTER -AGNES-BORN ON THE 5th OF OCTOBER 1816-DIED THE 30th
OF DECEMBER ISI7--ALSO-COLIN GRAHAM-ELDEST SON OF-COLONEL COLIN
DUNDAS GRAHAM KW &C-BORN ON THE 31st OF AUGUST 18OI-DIED THE 21st
OF OCTOBER 1814.

C. Y.



61.

IN MEMORY OF-JOHN HEYLIGER-MAJOR-IN HIS BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S-
55th REGIMENT-WIIO WAS BORN-IN THE ISLAND OF ST. CROIX-AUGUST 23d
1782-AND DEPARTED TIIIS LIFE-OCT 8th 1808.
C. Y.



62.

(Ab.) JOHN HANSON ESQR. DIED 1745 AGED 27; HIS WIFE MRS FRANCES HANSON
1761 AGED 43-ELIZABETH HANSON OB 1786 AET 40 JOHN HANSON ESQ OB 1812
AET 70-JOSHUA CRASSEWELL ESQ OB 1768 AET 39.
( Vide Crasswell.)

W. M. Slab.


SMr. Graham was a large planting attorney, and Member for St. Thomas-in-the-Vale. Tulloch is a con-
siderable sugar-estate in that parish, which Mr. Graham purchased. The name is taken from Tulloch Castle, in
the county of Ross. Lieut.-Col. Colin Dundas Graham, K.W. (i.e., of the Order of William of the Netherlands),
and Lieut.-Governor of St. Mawes, in Cornwall, died at Cromarty House in Scotland, 7th July, 1828, aged 76.
His daughter was the wife of Francis Graham above noticed.











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


63.

HERE LYES-YE BODY QF YE IIONBLE ALEXR IIENDER-
SON-ESQR-ONE OF THE IIONBLE THE COUNCIL-AND IIIS
MAJESTIES ATTORNEY GENERAL--OF THIS ISLAND-OIHIT 13th
AI'RIL 1732-AETATIS SUAE 36.

MR. HENDERSON first came into the Assembly as Member for
St. John's (on the death of its representative, George Modd,
the Speaker of the Housc) Oct. 8, 1723. lHe was twice elected
Arms, On a chev. between
for St. Andrew and once for Clarendon, and was called to the three martles a manh y ceee-
Council on June 17, 1730.--ournals. He was succeeded in the 'cets. LCresAgiffui'shead
collared.
office of Attorney-General of this island by Matthew Concanen,
"damn'd to everlasting fame" in the Dunciad of Pope.-Roby.

64.

HERE LYETII TIE BODY OF MR. CARY IIELYAR MAR-
CHANT WHO DYED TIE 5th DAY OF JULY 1672 AND IN TIIE
39 YEAR OF IIIS AGE-REV 14th "BLESSED ARE TIE DEAD
TIIAT DIE IN TIE LORD. THEY REST FROM THEIR LABOURE."


SIR THOMAS LYNCH, in his Present State of the Government
of Jamaica, August 20, 1671," says of this Marchant":-" I
have appointed a Chief Treasurer, Mr. Cary Helyar; he is an ,
B. M. Slab; Arms, A c oa
honest gentleman, and an excellent accomptant; he has other pointed ,ate ila curious va-
riation of a cross urdce], be-
employs here, so does it at 8d. per pound." tween four mullets pierced,
A Thomas Helyar was Member for St. Ann's in 1675. a crescent for difference.
Crest, Behind a dlunghill
F3r a further account of this family see the Herald and cock a crobs crosslet patee
Genealogist," voce Cary family." fit
Cary Helyar married, 13th Oct., 1671, Priscilla Houghton, who re-married, loth
May, 1675, Colonel Edward Stanton.

65.
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF MARY HALL DAUGHTER OF WILLIAM HALL ESQ
IN WESTMORELAND, WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 25th DAY OF JULY 1735-
AGED 12 YEARS.*
W. M. Slab.

66.
NEAR THIS PLACE-LIES INTERRED THE BODY OF-JOHN HENCKELL ESQR
CHIEF JUDGE-OF THIS ISLAND WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON THE IOth-OF


See Hall of Arrow'sfoot ;" Burke's Landed Gentry ;" Peerage," voce Iarrington.










AAMlAICA.


DECI'EM5ER 1801 IN THE 50't YEAR OF IlIS AGE. AT IllS PARTICULAR REQUEST
HIS REMAINS ARE--DEPOSITED NEAR TIIE ASHES-OF IIIS MUCH VALUED FRIENDS
T HARRISON ESQR-AND) DR F RIGBY 1IROAD)ElI,.T.
W. Mt.

67.
(..) EL/.AIET1II WIFE OF CAPT JAS: IIALFIIIDE. (Date efraced.)
C. Y.

68.
HERE LIETII THE BODY OF HILL, LATE THE WIFE OF
SROBERT IIOTCIIKYN ESQ-OB, 1706, AET, 43; ALSO ROBERT
IIOTCIIKYN, OB, 1709. AET 42-

ROBERT HOTCIIKYN was Attorney-General of that Island. He
was the eldest son of Robert Hotchkin, Esq., and Mary his
wife, of Bradmore, Nottinghamshire. He was born in 1667. He
11 M i. : ..Arms. Per married Hill, the widow of Henry Brabant, Esq., Provost-Marshal.
1, le, antre and gules three He survived his wife, and died in 1709 without issue, leaving to his
lonsl rampant or. C'sft,
A lion's head erased du- brothers in England-Thomas Hotchkin, a physician, and the Rev.
cally crowned.
ay Jrowl. ohn Hotchkin, Rector of Abbot's Ripton, Huntingdonshire-a

very considerable property, both real and personal. Part of the former is still in the
possession of one of his brother's descendants. He left 60 to the poor of the parish of
St. Katharine, and desired to be buried by the side of his dear wife, Hill Hotchkin, in
that church.
Hill Hotchkin, the wife of .the Attorney-General, was probably of an Irish
family. Her maiden name was Bolton. She first married John Childermas, the only
son of a wealthy planter, also from Ireland; he died in 1699. In 1701 she again
married Henry Brabant, Esq., Provost-Marshal of the Island. On the death of the
Provost-Marshal she married the Attorney-General, and died shortly after, in 1706.
Her third husband was laid beside her in the grave in 1709. Only ten years elapsed
between the death of her first husband and that of the third, who survived her. (See
the Annual Register, Aug. 15, 1775.)

69.
EDWARD HALSTEAD ESQR. LIEUT. OF YE TROOP, SON OF LAWRENCE-DIED
25th DEC. 1744 AGED 26.
B. M. Slab.

LAURENCE HALSTEAD was connected with the family of Whitgyft Aylmer of
Jamaica.












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 51

70.
(Ab.) JOSEPHIl JORDAN )IEID 1715, IN IIIS 31st YEAR. IllS SISTER JANE, WI'l;
OF HENRY BARIIAM* DIED, 1717, IN HER 24th YEAR.
1B. M.


TiHE Jordans of Jamaica seem to have been a branch of the Barbadian family of the
same name videe Baronctage," voce Gibbes.)


71.

(Ab.) SACRED-1TO TIIE MEMORY-OF-MARY ANN JACKSON JAMES--DAUG;I1TI-I.
OF HUGO AND EMILY-WIIO DIED THIE IIIth JUNE 1820-AGEIA 2 YEARS 2 MONTIIS
AND 13 DAYS.

C. Y.

TiHE family of James, in Jamaica, derives from Robert James, who, in 1652, married
Margaret Dalton, by whom he had, besides other sons, Hugh, born 1669, ob. 1758,
who, by his second wife, Anne, daughter of the Rev. Gawen Noble, of Cockermouth,
had a son William, who, by his wife, Jane Senhouse, was mother of Hugh (born 1750),
who, by his second wife, Cargill, had a son, Hugo James, appointed Attorney-
General of Jamaica, who married /Emilia, daughter of Samuel Jackson, Member of
Council, &c., and had, with other issue, Hugh Recs James, C.B., Commission in the
Punjab, &c.


72.

...... ARCH ........ JOH.............
...... 2th .......... 16 .. ............
.................................. 167..

Fragment-perhaps "Archibald Johnston."
C. Y.


Dr. Henry Barham, author of Hortus Americanus," preceded Sir Hans Sloane, and was, therefore, a gatherer
of information as early as 168o. He had married into the family of "Foster," of St. Elizabeth's Parish, and
through it acquired a considerable fortune. It was the Foster family that introduced the Moravian Mission, to
which sect Dr. H. Barham belonged. Through the Fosters he was connected with the Stevenson" family. lie
retired to England in 1740, and settled at Staines, near Egham, where he died. He bequeathed his property to
the youngest son of Mrs. Barham, whom he had married when the widow of Thomas Foster. Joseph Foster wa
the father of Joseph Foster Barham, M.P., about 1793, and who married Lady Caroline, daughter of the then
Earl of Thanet. In 1794 Alexander Aikman published Dr. Barham's "Jamaica Botany," and dedicated the work
to the Hon. William Blake, Speaker of the House of Assembly. The present Mr. William Thomas March, Clerk
of the Crown, Jamaica, is of a family whose patronymic was Foster, who sought an asylum in the West Indies
about 1715, and acquired extensive estates in the Parishes of St. Catherine, and St. Thomas-in-the-Vale; these,
however, have long since been alienated. [R. Hill.]












52 YAMAICA.


73.
SSACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-SIR BASIL KEITH KNT.*-
4 GOVERNOR OF JAMAICA-WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON THE
15th DAY OF JUNE 1777-IN THE DUTIES OF HIS OFFICE HE
WAS ASSIDUOUS-WISE AND IMPARTIAL IN THE ADMINISTRA-
TION OF JUSTICE-A FRIEND TO MANKIND AND A FATHER
TO TIE PEOPLE-OVER WHOM HE PRESIDED-THIS MONU-
MENT WAS ERECTED BY THE ASSEMBLY-TO TRANSMIT TO
G. Marble Mont., richly POSTERITY THE GRATITUDE OF THE PEOPLE-OF THIS ISLAND
sculptured cenotaphh) IbyJ.
Wilton, R.A.; Arms, FOR THE HAPPINESS THEY ENJOYED-UNDER IIIS MILD AND
I & 4. Arg. a chief paly
or and gules, base and UPRIGHT GOVERNMENT.
sinister embattled of the
thirn. 2 & 3, Erm. a fetter lock proper. On a chief azure, three mullets ; a crescent for difference. Crest, A fox
trippt (?). Mtto, "Candore decs.' (N.B.-The House of Assembly on II Nov., 1777, voted three thousand
guineas for this monument.)

B RIDGES says, Keith, after a popular administration of less than two years, fell sick
and died." The duration of his government is incorrectly stated. He opened a
Session of the Legislature on the 8th Feb., 1774, and died 15th June, 1777, so that he
must have presided more than three years and four months.


74.
SARAH KELSALL DIED 1734 AGED 49. ALSO HER NIECE JOHANNA BOWER-
MAN 1729 A3ED 26.

Stone Slab.


75.
HERE LYETH INTERR'D-THE BODY OF-MR. SAMUEL
KNIGHT SON OF DOCTOR-SAMUEL KNIGHT DECEASED-WHO
DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 7th OF MARCH-ANNO DOMINI
1708-9 IN THE 24th YEAR-OF HIS AGE.

H rs father, Dr. Samuel Knight, was member for Kingston in
1691. See Kingston.
B. M. Slab; Arms,...... )n
a canton......a spur. Crest, An eagle displayed.


Keith of Powburn, Bart., cr. 4 June, 1663 (ext.). The Hon. John Keith, fourth son of William, second
Earl Marischal, had parts of the estates of Craig and Garrock from his father. These were sold by his descendant,
Colonel Robert Keith, whose son, Robert Keith, of Craig (ambassador to the Courts of Vienna and St. Peters.
burg), was father of Sir Robert Murray Keith, K.B., of Murray's Hall (ambassador at Dresden, &c.) and of Sir
Basil Keith, Governor of Jamaica; both of whom died without legitimate issue. See Burke's "Ext. and Dormt.
Peerage," in which, however, Keith is blazoned, azure on a chief or, three pellets gules."











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 53

76.
SAMUEL LONG
SPIETATIS ILLUSTRIS, INGENIO INCLYTUS
JUSTITIA ORNATUS, FAMA CLARISSIMUS
CORPORE RECTO, ANIMO VEGETO
PRAEMATURE.....................(obl.)
POST [QUADRAGINTA QUATUOR] ANNOS
QUOS VIXERAT PROUT VIRUM GENEROSUM, ET VERE
CLARISSIMUM DECUIT Slab; Arms,......A lion
pIassant collared. On a
TANDEM FATO CEI)ENS chief three crosses croslhl.
Cre(sl, Over an esquire' h hll.
QUOD IIABUIT TERRENUM, TERRA: REDIIDIT met, a lion's head langurd,
IGNE RECOCTUM-DIEI NOVISSIMO ...issuilg from a ducal cl
I'onct.
I)ENUO RESUME 'TURUS
DENUO RESUM'rURUS N.B. -The inscription
ET CALLITUS QUOD ERAT being half concealed by a
ew, thlie present is partly
ET PATRI, ET PATRIAE SPIRITUM, ET AM4T/E REDIT ASTREAE taken from a MS. of the
OBIIT ANNO DOMINI MDCLXXXIII late C. L. Long, Esq.
JUNII 28o.

T HE family of Long, of Longville, Jamaica, Hampton Lodge, Surrey, and originally
from Wilts, is descended from John Longe, of Netheravon, in the latter county,
who died in 1630. Samuel, the grandson of John, having subsequently participated in
the conquest of Jamaica by Penn and Venables, became a person of great considera-
tion in that Island, where his great-grandson, Edward Long, Esq., filled the office of
Chief Justice of the Admiralty Court.
77.
TIE CHILDREN OF SAMUEL LONG AND ELIZ: HIS WIFE
WHO DIED IN 1677.

TIHis family, so eminent, and distinguished in the earlier history
of Jamaica, gave to the Island its chief historian, namely,
Edward Long, eldest son of Samuel Long, the eldest son of
Charles Long, whose fourth son, Beeston Long, was father of
the first Lord Farnborough.-See Peerages of Orford, Rivers, Slab d rest,
B. M. Slab; Arms and Crest,
&c., and Burke's Landed Gentry." Long as above.
78.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-THE REV RICIARD BRISSETT LAWRANCE-
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE-THE 13th DAY OF OCTOBER 1821-AGED 31 YEARS
AND 3 MONTHS.
W. M. Slab. C. Y.

HE was the fourth son of James, third son of James Lawrence, of Fairfield. For a
fuller account of this family see History of Parish of St. James," the GeCnt'-
nan's Magazine, The Herald and Genealogist," &c.












JAMAICA.


79.
HERE LYETII INTERRED THE BODY OF JOHN LAWRENCE WHO DEPARTED
THIS LIFE JANUARY YE 7th 171- AND IN THE 46th YEAR OF HIS AGE.
B. M. Slab.

T ERE were, at any rate, four distinct families of this name at the period referred to,
settled in Jamaica. The first settled in the Parish of St. Catherine; the second
in St. James', is supposed to have been from St. Ives in Huntingdon. The next came
from New England, and originally, perhaps, from Iver. There were other Lawrences
in the Parish of St. Thomas-ye-East, who were of Irish extraction. The above was
a Buccaneer.

80o.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-THE HONOURABLE JAMES
LEE ESQR. M D-MEMBER OF IIS MAJESTY'S PRIVY COUNCIL
-OF THIS ISLAND WHO DIED IN TIE GULPH OF-FLORIDA
IN HIS PASSAGE TO ENGLAND, WHERE-HE WAS GOING FOR
THE RECOVERY OF HIIS HEALTH-ON THE 30th OF MAY 1821
AGED 68-TIIIS MONUMENT WAS ERECTED-BY HIS AFFECTION-
.M. yramidal,sclptred ATE FRIEND-FRANCIS RIGBY BRODBELT 1822.
I!. M. I'yramidal, sculptured
in relief on a sarcophagus
(Reeves & Son, Bath), a ship in full sail, with the legend, His body was committed to the deep." Armns (argent ?),
A chev. sable, between three leopards' faces. Crest, A leopard's face videe Lee of Quarrendon, "lHerald and
Genealogist ").

D R. LEE acquired a large fortune by his practice in Spanish Town. He was the
junior partner of Dr. Broadbelt, sen., whose epitaph, in the nave of this church,
has been already transcribed; and the senior partner of Sir Michael Benignus Clare,
Knt., Member of the Legion of Honour in France, Member of the Honourable the
Council, and Provincial Grand Master of Freemasons in this Island.-Roby.

81.
SACRED-TO TIE MEMORY OF-MRS. CHRISTIAN LANE-WIFE OF JAMES SETON
LANE--OF THE PARISH OF ST THOMAS IN THE VALE-SHE DEPARTED THIS LIFE
ON THE 28th DAY OF SEPTEMBER-IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1808-AGED 23
YEARS. THE EXQUISITE TENDERNESS OF HER ATTACHMENT TO HIM-WHO HAS
ERECTED THIS MEMORIAL-WAS THE GREATEST SOURCE OF HAPPINESS HE EVER
-YET ENJOYED-HER FERVENT PIETY TOWARDS ALMIGHTY GOD LEAVES HIM-
THE ONLY CONSOLATION, THAT BY ENDEAVOURING-TO IMITATE HER LIFE, HE
MAY IN DEATH BE-UNITED TO HER.
C. Y.

82.
SEBRAN LARSON DIED 1730 AGED 42-MARY HIS WIFE 1725 AGED 50-
RACHAEL THEIR ONLY DAUGHTER 1720-AGED 15.

SEIBRAN LARSON was keeper (qy. governor ?) of the gaol at Spanish Town.











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


RENEE DE SEBRAN-a bill for naturalizing this infant aged eight years.-Journal of
the House of Lords, 17th August, 1660.


83.
IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN-HERE RESTETII THE BODY
OF-ELIZABETH LATE WIFE TO THE IIONBLE COLL NICHOLAS
LAWS AND ONLY DAUGHTER TO SIR THOMAS MODYFORD
BARRONETT, DECEASED WHO WAS FIRST MARRIED UNTO THE
IIONBLE COLL SAMUEL BARRY AND DEPARTED TIIIS LIFE THE
I Ith DAY OF NOVEMBER IN TIE YEAR OF OUR LORD GOD
1694 AND YE THIRTIETH OF HER AGE.


~~4j a4i4


B. M. Slab; Arms, Erm.
on a bend...a lulljt...between two garbs.

SEE the pedigrees of Barry, Modyford, Lawes, and Long. Sir Nicholas Lawes was
one of the most eminent of the governors of Jamaica, and to him is due the credit
of having introduced the coffee plant, which has since become a staple product. His
monument in St. Andrew's Parish Church (see that Parish), affords further particulars.


84.
HERE LYES INTERRED THE BODY-OF TIE IIONBLE
IENRY LOWE-ESQR WIIO DEPARTED-THIS LIFE THE 15th
DAY OF-FEBRUARY ANNO DOMINI 1714-AGED 51 YEARS.

HENRY LOWE served in the Assembly of 9th June, 1691, for
Vere; and in that of 4th May, 1693, for Clarendon. In
1696, he was appointed a Member of the Council, which office,
together with a Colonelcy of Militia, he enjoyed until his death.
-Roby.
(Lowe of Goadby, Marwood, Leicestershire) Henry Lowe
had a daughter, Susanna, married to Theobald Taaffe.


*4*.


0


B. M. Slab; Arms, A fe.
ermine between two grey-
hounds courant. Impaling
...a lion passant. Cr'st, A
talbot's head.


HIC SITUS EST HENRICUS LYTTLETON D.D.-CAROLI LITTLETON ET CATIERINAE
UXORIS-SUAE IN VICINIA SEPULTAE FILIOLUS SEMESTRIS-OBIIT FEBR. I A.D. 1662.
B. M.

SIR CHARLES LYTTELTON, son of Sir Thomas Lyttelton, first Bart. of Frankley, co.
Worcester, and heir to his brother, Sir Henry, the second Bart., was distinguished
for his loyal and valiant activity in the cause of Charles I., and was engaged with Sir
George Booth in the unsuccessful Cheshire rising in 1659. In 1662 he was knighted,
and accompanied the Governor Thomas (Windsor) Lord Windsor, as Lieut.-Governor
and Chancellor of this Island. On his lordship's departure, October 28th of the same
8-2












56 7AMA ICA.

year, the command devolved on Sir Charles, who, as Deputy Governor," issued "an
Ordinance," dated at "Point Cagua, 23d October, 1663," addressed to Lieutenant-
Colonel Thomas Lynch, Provost-Marshal-General, "to have an Assembly fairly and
indifferently chosen by the votes of the inhabitants of the several precincts of this
Island." This Legislative Assembly, the first in Jamaica, met at the town of St. Jago
de la Vega, 20th January, 1663-4.
Sir Charles left Jamaica in May, 1664. On his arrival in England, he was ap-
pointed Colonel of the Duke of York's Regiment, and in 1673, Governor of Sheerness
and Languard Fort. He represented the borough of Bewdley, co. Worcester, in the
reign of James II.-Roby.
Sir Charles died at Hagley, May 2nd, 1716, and was succeeded by his only sur-
viving son, by his second wife, Anne, dau. and coheir of Thomas Temple, of Frankton.

86.
MEMORIAL SACRUM
IIIC JACET CATHERINA LYTTLETON FILIA DD GULIELMI FAIRFAX DE STEETON
IN COMITATU EBORACENSI EQUITIS AURATI, UXOR DD CAROLI LYTTLETON EQUITIS
AURATI, ET IN JAMAICA VICE GUBERNATORIS-OBIIT JANUAR 26 AD 1662.
B. M. Slab.

SIR WILLIAM FAIRFAX, of Steeton, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 1562. His
grandson, Sir William Fairfax, Knt., of Steeton, married Frances, daughter of
Sir Thomas Chaloner, Governor and Chamberlain to Prince Henry, and, being slain
in 1644, left, besides sons, two daughters, one of whom, Catherine, married, first, Sir
Martin Lister, Knt., and, secondly, Sir Charles Lyttleton, Bart., of Hagley.


87.
LYTTLETON, D. D. SUzE IN VICINIA SEPULT2E FILIOLUS, OB. 1662.

VIDE" Peerage," "Baronetage," &c.

88.
NEAR THIS PLACE ARE INTERRED-tIHE REMAINS OF-
HUGH LEWIS ESQR.-BARRISTER AT LAW HIS MAJESTY'S AD-
S VOCATE-GENERAL FOR THIS ISLAND-AND-REPRESENTATIVE
{j IN ASSEMBLY FOR THE PARISH OF PORT ROYAL-HE WAS
BORN THE 3d AUGUST I753-HE DIED THE 23d JANRY 1785
-EARLY AND ZEALOUSLY ATTACHED TO THE PROFESSION OF
THE LAW-WHICH NATURE HAD PREPARED HIM TO ADORN
M. Pyramidal, richly sculp- -HE CULTIVATED HER PARTIAL ENDOWMENTS-WITH UN-
tured Monument: a medal-
lionportrzitinrelief. Arms, REMITTING ASSIDUITY-TO A VOICE CLEAR AND STRONG-


CICllr~CC-rrrC~IPI~--ll-rml`~-












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


TO ACTION GRACEFUL AND AFFECTING-IIE ADDED KNOW- QuarterlyIaurc, l&4,7arurc,
a chev.argent, between three
LEDGE TIE MOST ACCURATE AND EXTENSIVE-SUPERIOR garbs. 2, Per clcv. azure
alln argent,incllh.two falcons
BOTH FROM INTEGRITY AND ABILITIES-TO TIE MEANNESS rising, or. 3 Arcgent on a
OF SOPHISTRY-HIS ARGUMENTS AT TIE BAR WERE NATURAL cross gulei five escallopor.
Crest, A Iion rampant.
AND FORCIBLE-IIS ELOQUENCE IN TIE SENATE DIGNIFII'I)
AND PERSUASIVE-THO' IIIS MERIT RAISE) IIIM WITI UN-
USUAL RAPIDITY-TO THE IIGIEST IONOURS OF IIIS PRO-
FESSION-YET SUCI WAS HIS LIBERALITY AND CONI)DESCEN-
SION-SO TRULY BENEVOLENT WAS IIE AND SINCERE-THAT
HE ENJOYED TIE UNCOMMON FELICITY-TO BE-UNENVIED
BY ANY-TIE DELIGHT AND ADMIRATION OF ALL.
M. T. C. Sculpt.


HUGII LEWIS was the son of John Lewis, Member for Port Royal in 1701. There
was a family of this name in Jamaica, last century, on whose seal is borne the
arms of Lewis, of Harpton Court.


89.

HERE LYETII INTERRED TIE BODY OF MRS MARY LEWIS
WIFE OF MR SAMUEL LEWIS AND DAUGHTER TO MAJOR
GENERAL JAMES BANNISTER-WHO I)DEPARTED THIS IIFE
THE 2d OF JANUARY ANO DOMI 1676-7 IN THE 18th YEAR
OF HER AGE.
THAT DEATH MIGHT HAPPY BEE, TO LIVE LEARNED I
THAT LIFE MIGHT HAPPY BEE I HAVE LEARNED TO DYE.
B. M. Slab; Arms, C'hec-
quy or and sable: on a fess, three leopards' heads affrontee. Impaling...a cross flory. Crest, A wyvern's head erased,
oucally gorged.

THERE is recorded in Jamaica, in 1686, the will of John Lewis, whose brother,
Richard Lewis, was of Shrewsbury, and of the ship Elizabeth," of Honduras.
Samuel Lewis appears to have been the father of John Lewis, who sat in the
first "Assembly of 1722.
John Lewis, of Clarendon parish, left a will, in I671, in which he mentions only a
daughter.
Thomas Lewis, by his will (i70o), leaves to his brother Hugh and his sister
Gwinn his real estate in the parish of Cwmr Toyddwr(?), Wales, called Nant
Lamptir.*


*Probably incorrectly copied. Of this family was the celebrated Matthew Gregory Lewis, whose West
Indian journal gives so graphic a picture of Jamaica, but which is less identified with his name than his novel
The Monk."












yAMAICA.


90.
HERE LYES SIR THOMAS LYNCH IN PEACE, AT EASE, AND
BLEST
WOULD YOU KNOW MORE-THE WORLD WILL SPEAK YE
REST.

SAPTAIN THOMAS LYNCH was very active in settling the
public affairs of Jamaica on the restoration of Charles II.
It was he who proposed that the Government of this Island
I. M. Slab; pams, Three should be supreme over all the others of the Caribbean Group.
lynx.es rampant. CLrest, A supr
l)nx statant. -Cal. S. P., Nov., 1660.
There was an extensive family of this name among the original settlers in the
province of Connaught, and another of the same name in Kent, to which latter,
perhaps, belonged the subject of this note.
Sir Thomas Lynch was Governor of Jamaica in 1684.*



91.
(Ab.) DANIEL MASTERS ESQ (OB) I7O (AET)
46.

ROBABLY of the family of Masters, connected in New England
with those of Allen, Penn, and Lawrence.

Arms, ... A lion rampant
guardant. In dexter chief a mullet of six points pierced.......Crest, Two serpents.


92.
(Ab.) THE SON OF THOMAS MASY (OB) 1693.


93.
(Ab.) MR. FRANCIS MATTHE DIED 1766 AGED ...5-FIVE OF HIS CHILDREN
BY HIS WIFE ELIZABETH DIED IN THEIR INFANCY.
Stone Slab.


SColonel Thomas Lynch, as well as Sir William Beeston, obtained extensive grants of fertile land in Liguanea
from Lord Windsor in free soccage in 1662.-Bridges. He held the patent office of Provost-Marshal-General of
this Island, and was President of the Council to Sir Charles Lyttleton, on whose departure from Jamaica, in May,
1664, he assumed the Government, but was quickly superseded by Colonel Henry Morgan, the famous Buccaneer,
captor oi Panama, Maracaybo, &c., who was appointed Lieut.-Governor. Lynch then proceeded to England,
where he received the honour of Knighthood, and came out again to Jamaica in 1671, as Lieutenant-Governor, hie
Commission being dated 5th January, 167o0.--Roby.












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


94+
HERE LYETH INTERRED THE BODY OF THE IIONBLE.
RICHARD MILL, ESQ., MEMBER OF COUNCIL, RECEIVER GENE-
RAL, AND LATE CHIEF JUSTICE OF THIS ISLAND, WHO DE-
PARTED THIS LIFE TIE I6th DAY OF JUNE, 1739, AGED 60
YEARS.
Brass. Arms, Ermine, a
fesse between three Iphens.


95.
(Ab.) MR. WILLIAM MERRICK DIED 1714 AGED 49-& IS 3 SONS & 3 DAURS
BY ANN HIS WIFE; AND A GRANDDR ELIZABETH DAUR OF JOHN & MARY, DIED
1728. AGED 2j YEARS.
W. M. Slab.



(Ab.) MRS. ANN MARCH, WIFE OF FOSTER MARCH ESQ &C
-OB 1739 AET 47-MRS SARAH SPENCER, WIFE OF MR. JOHN
SPENCER DAUGHTER OF AFORESAID FOSTER MARCH OB 1740
AET 21 MISS ANN SPENCER DAUGHTER OF JOHN AND SARAII
SPENCER OB 1724 AET 35.

GEORGE MARCII, a merchant, had a pass in 1652, to transport
himself and family, to the Island of St. Christopher.-C.S.P. M. Mont. Arms, Argent,
The family of Foster March was of some local distinction. a lros moliane etwe"tl f'",
lions' hea(Is erased gul1e, a
The name was originally Foster, March having been subsequently mullet for difference.
assumed. This family was related to that of Barham, as already shown.


97.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-DAVID MILLIGAN ESQUIRE
-SON OF THE LATE ROBERT MILLIGAN ESQUIRE OF LONDON
MERCHANT,-BORN IN THAT CITY THE 27th OF APRIL-1789
DIED IN JAMAICA AFTER A SHORT ILLNESS ON THE I6th OF
FEBRUARY I818.-HE LEFT HIS OWN COUNTRY TO ATTEND
UPON A BELOVED BROTHER,-WHO DIED AT SEA ON HIS WAY
TO THIS ISLAND FOR THE RECOVERY OF HIS HEALTH-AND
WHOM HE SURVIVED ONLY A FEW MONTHS.-HE WAS A MAN
OF STRICT INTEGRITY,-HUMANE, GENEROUS, DISINTERESTED
AND AFFECTIONATE, ESTEEMED' BY HIS FRIENDS, AND BE-
LOVED BY HIS FAMILY;-AT WHOSE DESIRE THIS MEMORIAL


W. M. Tablet. Arms,
2ndly, I & 4, between two,
spears in pale, a dexter hand
in chief, and a heart in base.
2 & 3, A lion rampant,
within a border engrailed











YAMAICA.


charged with rour mullets OF HIS WORTH-IS PLACED ON THESE SACRED WALLS, NEAR
and f ouro engesi alternately.
fourWngealternatly. ICH HE IS BURIED,-IN A LAND WHERE HE EXPERIENCED
UNBOUNDED HOSPITALITY AND KINDNESS.
Regnart, Sculpt.

ROBERT MILLIGAN, of London, merchant, was Deputy Chairman of the West India
Dock Company, when the first stone of that....'.,magnificent undertaking was
laid on July 12, 18oo, by the concurring hands of the Lord Chancellor (Wedderburn),
Lord Loughborough, the Right Hon. William Pitt, George Hibbert, Chairman of the
Company, and himself. Mr. Milligan was the principal promoter of the work, and a
noble bronze statue erected at the entrance of the dockyard, perpetuates his fame.
Mr. Milligan carried on an extensive and lucrative business in Kingston, Jamaica,
under the firm of Dick and Milligan."-Roby.

98.
MISTAKE NOT READER, FOR HERE LYES NOT ONLY THE
DECEASED BODY OF THE HONOBLE SR THOMAS MODYFORD
BARRONETT, BUT EVEN THE SOULE AND LIFE OF ALL JA-
MAICA, WHO FIRST MADE IT WHAT IT NOW IS. HERE LYES
THE BEST AND LONGEST GOVERNOR, THE MOST CONSIDER-
ABLE PLANTER, THE ABLEST AND MOST UPRIGHT JUDGE
THIS ISLAND EVER INJOYED-HE DYED THE SECOND OF
B. M. Slab. Arms, Ermine, SEPTEMBER 1679.
on a bend a mullet between
two garbs; the baronet's
badge in the dexter chief. HERE ALSO LYES SR THOMAS MODYFORD JUNR BAR-
Impaling a chev. between
threpalner' crip. Cretee RONETT, THAT HOPEFUL AND FLOURISHING BRANCI-WHICH,
A garb. TIE ROOT BEING DEAD, SOONE AFTER WITHERED, WHO AS
THEY LIVED IN CONTINUALLY UNITY WERE NOT EVEN IN-
DEATH TO BE SEPARATED. HE DYED THE NINETEENTH OF
OCTOBER 1679.

SIR TIOMAS, by his own sole authority, twice proclaimed war against the Spaniards,
but in so doing, and in his encouragement of the Buccaneers, he was countenanced
by Charles II., who empowered him "to commission whatever persons he thought
good to be partners with his majesty in the plunder, 'they finding victuals, wear and
tear,' So that his majesty entered very seriously into the privateering business, and
held this reputable partnership for some years."-Appendix to Long, vol. i.
Sir Thomas Modyford, like his brother, Sir James Modyford, Bart., was also
Governor of Jamaica. He was created a baronet March Ist, 1663-4; married Eliza-
beth, daughter of Lewin Palmer, Esq., of Devonshire; and died in Jamaica, according
to his epitaph, in 1679.
His successors matched with the families of Sir Thomas Norton, Bart., Guy of
Barbados, Hathenstall of London, and lastly, of Sir William Beeston, Knt., Governor










MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


of Jamaica, whose daughter and heiress, Jane, married Sir Thomas Modyford, fifth
and last Baronet, and on the death of the latter she married Charles Long, Esq., of
Jamaica.
Sir Thomas, the first Baronet, was one who moved with the times, and, although a
subscriber to the loyal defiance sent to the summons of Sir George Ayscue, we find him
the following year assuring President John Bradshaw that his master's counsels tend
to the good of the English nation (S. P. O. Cal., 1652), and that the "people of Bar-
badoes would delight to have the same form of government as England;" and declares
that the powerful regicide had "sweetly captivated" his mind by his unexpected
civilities."
He seems to have had strong prejudices against the Irish; and was a Member of
the Council of Barbados, in 1660, which decided that no Irishman was to be com-
mander, or sharer of any boat belonging to the Island. He was afterwards Governor
of Barbados.*


99.
HERE LYETII -THE BODY OF DAME ELIZABETH-THE WIFE .
OF SR. THOMAS MODYFORD BARRONETT-GOVERNOUR OF HIIS
MAJESTIES ISLAND OF JAMAYCA-WHO DIED THE I2th OF
NOVEMBER I668-BEING THE 29th YEAR OF THEIR-HAPPY
WEDLOCKE.
HER LIFE WAS PURE, AS CLEAR HER FAME
NONE ERE THOUGHT EVILL OF THIS DAME.
Arms, Ermine, on a bend
azure, between two garbs or, a mullet argent.

THIS was Elizabeth Palmer, daughter of Lewin Palmer, Esq., of Devonshire, who
died ... 1668. There was a large family of this name, in the parish of St. James,
one of whose monuments, by Flaxman, is in that parish.
John Palmer, Chief Justice of Jamaica, married Mary Ballard, daughter of Colonel
Peter Beckford.


100.
HERE LYETH INTERR'D THE BODY-OF JOSEPH MAXWELL ESQR-SECRETARY
OF THIS ISLAND, WHO-DIED THE 9th OF JULY I735-AGED 51 YEARS.
W. M. Slab.


"At Lord Berkeley's I dined with Sir Thomas Modiford, late Governor of Jamaica, and with Colonel
Morgan," &c.-Evelyn, 167I, Sept. 21. "I was at the wedding of my nephew, John Evelyn, of Wooton, married
by the Bishop of Rochester, in Henry the Seventh's Chapel. The solemnity was kept with a few friends only
at Lady Beckford's, the lady's mother."-Evelyn, 168r.











,7AMAICA.


I01.
(Ab.) .... MARY MCLARTY, ONLY DAUGHTER OF THE HON. CHARLES MCLARTY,
AND MARY MORALES, BORN ON THE 9th FEB. 1838 & DIED, I6th JUNE I857.

102.
(Ab.) .... BOSWELL MIDDLETON ESQ, LATE ADVOCATE GENERAL OF THIS
ISLAND, WHO DIED HERE, DURING THE GREAT CHOLERA EPIDEMIC, ON THE i6th
DAY OF MAY 1854 .. AN ABLE & SUCCESSFUL MEMBER OF THE BAR; AND
ONE OF THE MOST GENEROUS AND INDEPENDENT MEN OF HIS TIME..

1o3.
(Ab.) .THE SON OF THOMAS MASY OB. 1693.






Io04-

(Ab.) DANIEL MASTERS, ESQ. OB. I70- AET. 46



Arms,...A lion rampant guardant; in dexter chief, a mullet of six points pierced.
Ctest, Two serpents.

105.
NON PROCUL AB HOC MARMORE-CONDUNTUR CINERES
-GULIELMI NEDHAM ARMIGERI-QUI SPATIO VITAE FELICI
BENE PERACTO-)ETERNAM EXPECTANS BEATITUDINEM-RE-
CESS1T.-BEATUS IN HAC VITA FUIT-QUOD IN DEO SEMPER
ESSENT-SPES, AMOR, VENERATIO :-QUOD IN SE EUERIT
ANIMUS FELIX ATQUE PLACENS.-CONJUX AMANS, BENEVOLUS
PATER-ATQ IN SERVOS JUSTISSIMUS.-QUOD DOMUM SUIS,
VICINITATEM OMNIBUS-CONSERVAVERIT PLACIDISSIMAM-
MULTIS AMICITIAM, PLURIMIS AMOREM-NULLI INFERENS
INIMICITIAS-AUT ODIUM.-QUOD SERVUS PATRILE FIDUS-
SEMPER PARATUS, MAXIME VOLENS,-ET, QUANTUM POTUIT,
M. Mont.; Arms, Argent,
on abend engrailed,between UTILIS.-QUOD MULTOS ANNOS JUDICIS OFFICIUM-PLURIMOS
two deers' heads cabossed
sable, attired or...... Crest, SUMMI JUSTICIARII-INTEGER AGERET.-QUOD AB UNA PATRLE
A phoenix gules, in flames VOCE TER ELECTUS-PROLOCUTOR COMITIALIS-QUOD UNUS
proper.*
E CONCILIO A REGE SUO HONORATE AVOCATUS-ET PRIVATE
DIGNATUS FUERIT SIGILLO :-QUOD VIT)E VIGORE PENITUS
EXTINCTO-SERVITIUM PATRILE CUM VITA IPSA-TANDEM

See Burke's "Landed Gentry," "Peerage," and "Baronetage."











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


FINIERIT-PRIMO DIE JULII MENSIS-ANNO DOMINI I746-tETATIS 77.-HOC
MARMOR POSUIT FIDELE-IN MEMORIAL PARENTUM CARISSIMORUM-GULIELMI
NEDHAM, ET OLIVE MATRIS,-QU2E EODEM IN LOCO DEPOSIT JACET,-FILIUS
HAMPSONIUS NEDHAM.

o16.
(Ab.) GEORGE NEALE DIED MARCH YE 23d 1708-9.
Stone Slab.
107.
HERE LYETH H. N.
B. M. Slab.
N.B.-Supposed to be the burial place of Hampson Nedham.--Vide pedigree of
Long, &c.
Jo8.
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF ...... ORGILL SENR. WHO DEPARTED .......
THE Igth OF SEPTEMBER 168...
B. M. Slab.
MOST probably this was Andrew Orgill, who was Member of Assembly twice for
St. George, and three or four times for St. Mary. Andrew Orgill, probably the
junior, was returned for St. Mary, in the Assembly of 13th Jan., 1702-3.-Journal of
the House of Assembly. William Anderson Orgill, late Custos of St. George, was
probably a descendant.-Roby.

09.0
(Ab.) MR. GEORGE OSBORNE DIED 1695, IN HIS 6th YEAR. 0\

THERE was a John Osborne killed in the expedition under
Penn and Venables, in 1655; but it is more probable that
the family in question came at a later period from Barbados.

B. M. Slab; Arms, Quar-
terly ermine and ...... on a cross ... five annulets. Crest, A hippopotamus.



NEAR THIS PLACE LYES INTERRD THE BODY OF SAMUEL
OSBORNE ESQ, WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE MARCH THE 26th
1723, AGED 36. AND LIKEWISE YE BODY OF ELIZABETH
SPRUCE, WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE DECR 19 1725 IN YE
55th YEAR OF HER AGE.

IN the Calendars of State Papers, frequent mention is made, M. Mont.; Arms, Quar-
early in the seventeenth century, of a family of this name ter, or and aure, a
9-2












64 YAMAICA.

which was raised to the baronetage; and also of a Captain Christopher Osborne,
who does not appear to have been too adventurous.-Pet. of Capt. Squibb, July 5,
1626, Cal. S. P.
Roger Osborne, Governor of Montserrat, in 1654, (an Irishman, and probably a
member of the well-known Wexford family of the same name), was accused of a
"barbarous and inhuman murder in that year.

III.
FRAGMENT of armorial sculpture, probably on the tomb of a person apparently named
PALMER, as indicated by the sculptured arms.
Anns, A chevron between three rudely represented escallops or palmer's scrips.*





MARY WIFE OF DAVID PUGH ESQ, DIED 1710 IN HER
S 29th YEAR-HER MOTHER MARY WATSON DIED 1691 AGED
33-ALSO THE BODY OF MARY MARTIN, BESIDE ARCHER
MARTIN ESQR, HER FORMER HUSBAND, WHO DIED 1703.

B. M. Slab.; Arms,...A
lion passant between three fleurs-de-lys: impaling, on a cross between four fleurs-de-lys, a crescent. Crest, A demi-
lion, holding in his jamb, a fleur-de-lys.

113.
(Ab.) MR. ROBERT PITCAIRN DIED 22d JULY 1799 AGED 62 *
C. Y.

HERE LYETH INTERRED-THE BODY OF-ELIZABETH PESTELL-WHO DEPARTED
TIIS LIFE-THE 3Ist OF DECEMBER-ANNO 1710.
HERE ALSO RESTS INTERR'D YE BODY OF MR. BEAUMONT PESTELL WHO DIED
THE 4th DAY OF SEPR 1714 IN YE FIFTY-SIXTH YEAR OF HIS AGE AND YE SECOND
YEAR OF HIS CHURCHWARDENSHIP IN WCH OFFICE HE INDUSTRIOUSLY ASSISTED
TOWARDS YE REBUILDING OF THIS CHURCH.
ALSO BEAUMONT SON OF ALGR & JANE PESTELL BORN YE 23d DAY OF
OCTR 1721 AND DY'D YE 29th OF NOVR 1724.
B. M. Slab.

114.
UNDER THE PAVEMENT OF THE PEW-BENEATH THIS MONUMENT-ERECTED
TO HER MEMORY-BY HER AFFECTIONATE HUSBAND-THE HONOURABLE CHARLES
PRICE ESQR-SPEAKER OF THE ASSEMBLY-LIE THE REMAINS OF MRS ELIZABETH
HANNAH PRICE-DAUGHTER OF JOHN HUDSON GUY ESQR-AND ELIZABETH HIS

See these Arms impaled at No. 98, p. 6o.












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


WIFE.-ENDOWED WITH UNCOMMON SENSIBILITY-AND FORTITUDE OF MIND-
SHE EXHIBITED AN AMIABLE EXEMPLAR-OF CONSTANCY IN LOVE-AND SINCERITY
IN FRIENDSHIP.-SHE DIED JULY 5th I771-IN TIE 34th YEAR OF HER AGE.

THE Hon. Charles Price was second baronet, and married the widow of John Wood-
cock, Esq. He died s. p. in 1778, when he was succeeded by his brother, Sir
Rose Price, third and last baronet.
Francis Price, a captain in the army under Venables at the capture of Jamaica,
married the widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Rose, also one of the conquerors of that
Island, and the scion of an ancient family long settled in the counties of Dorset, and
Gloucester." By Sarah, daughter of P. Edmunds, Esq., of Jamaica, he was father of
Charles, the first baronet, whose son, as above, succeeded him.



"15.
HERE LYETH .INTERR'D THE BODY OF THOMAS PRICE
ESQ, SON OF THE HONOURABLE COLL CHARLES PRICE, WHO
DEPARTED THIS LIFE, THE 20th DAY OF MAY 1731, AGED 20
YEARS.

Arms,.. A chev. between
three spear heads.... Crest, A wyvern's head erased......




I16.
HERE LYES THE BODY OF THE HONBLE-FRANCIS ROSE,
ESQ-LATE PRESIDENT OF THE COUNCIL OF-THIS ISLAND,
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE-YE 20th OF NOVEMBER 1720 IN
THE 67th YEAR OF IIS AGE.

W. M. Mont.; Arms, sable,
on a bend argent, three roses gules.


FRANCIS ROSE represented St. Thomas-in-the-Vale in two Assemblies, 4th May,
1693, and 27th Sept., 1698; and St. Catherine in three, 24th June, 1701, 17th
March, 1701-2, and 6th Aug., 1702, on which last date he was elected Speaker of the
House. In the Assembly of Jan. 13, 1702-3, he was chosen Member for St. George,
and on the 27th of May, 1703, was called up to the Council, of which body he died
President. In 1714 he gave a .very handsome chandelier to this church.-Roby.
See, also, Burke's "Peerage" (Harrington), "Baronetage" (Buller East), and
"Landed Gentry" (Hall).












66 YJAMAICA.





117.
NEAR THIS PLACE-LYES INTERRED YE BODY OF-
THOMAS ROSE ESQR-WHO DEPARTED-THIS LIFE-YE 12th
OF NOV. 1724-AGED 35 YEARS.


M. Mont.; Arms, Sable,
on a bend argent, three roses gules: impaling, barry of six, argent and gules, a canton of the second.


tI8.
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF-MRS ELIZABETH ROSE-LATE WIFE OF-THE
HONBLE THOMAS ROSE ESQ-WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE-THE 8th DAY OF OCTOBER
-1722, AGED 25 YEARS.
W. M. Slab. Arms,......On a bend...three roses......: impaling, barry gules and argent a canton of the second.


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ROSE, the founder of this family in Jamaica, was one of the
officers under Venables at the conquest of the Island.


319.
(Ab.) HIC SEPULTUS EST JOHANNES VEZEY RENNALLS, ARTIS MEDICINALIS ET
CHIRURGICAE PROFESSOR. NATUS 9 DIES JULII 1743: OBIIT...DIE OCTOBRIS 1794.


12o0
HENRY RENNALLS DIED 1797 JOSEPH RENNALLS 1798: AMELIA VEZEY
RENNALLS 1804 THE OLDEST NOT 5 YEARS OF AGE.
Stone Slab.


121.
TO THE MEMORY OF-STEPHEN RICHARD REDWOOD ESQRE-WHO WAS BORN
IN SPANISH TOWN-ON THE Ist OF DECEMBER 1726, AND DIED ON THE-8th OF
DECEMBER 1781, AND WAS, FOR MANY YEARS, ONE OF THE-REPRESENTATIVES IN
ASSEMBLY FOR ST THOMAS IN THE VALE.
ALSO, TO THE MEMORY OF HIS SON-THE HONOURABLE PHILIP REDWOOD,
BARRISTER AT LAW,-WHO WAS A REPRESENTATIVE FOR ST CATHERINE-UP.
WARDS OF TWENTY FIVE YEARS,-WAS CHOSEN SPEAKER OF THE ASSEMBLY IN
I802,-APPOINTED CHIEF JUSTICE OF THIS ISLAND IN 1808, AND DIED-ON THE
9th OF FEBRUARY 1810 IN LONDON IN HIS 60th YEAR.











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 67

THIS MONUMENT IS ERECTED BY-SUSANNAH RENNALLS IN TESTIMONY OF
-HER AFFECTION AND GRATITUDE-TO A FATHER AND BROTHER.
W. M. Tablet.


122.

HERE LIES INTERRED THE BODY OF-THE HONBLE COLL: JAMES RISBY-WHO
DEPARTED THIS LIFE AUGT. THE 22d-I726 AGED 63 YEARS.-ALSO THE BODY
OF JANE HIS WIFE-AGED 19 YEARS.
HERE LIES THE BODY OF-CHARLES KELLY ESQ-WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE
OCT YE 7th 173I-AGED 32 YEARS-ALSO THE BODYS OF JANE, MARY-AND
EDMUND KELLY CHILDREN-OF THE SAID CHARLES KELLY ESQ.
Stone Slab.


IIARLES was probably the brother of Edmund Kelly, Attorney-General and
Speaker of the House of Assembly.


123.
SACRED-TO THE MEMORY OF-JOHN RODON ESQUIRE A NATIVE OF THIS
ISLAND-WHO FILLED FOR MANY YEARS THE PUBLIC SITUATIONS-OF REPRE-
SENTATIVE IN ASSEMBLY FOR THIS PARISH,-OF MEMBER OF HIS MAJESTY'S
PRIVY COUNCIL,-AND OF CUSTOS ROTULORUM AND CHIEF MAGISTRATE FOR
THIS PARISH AND PRECINCT.-HE WAS EMINENTLY DISTINGUISHED FOR THE
FAITHFUL DISCHARGE OF-HIS DUTIES BOTH IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE LIFE.-IN
BENEVOLENCE AND STRICT INTEGRITY HE WAS EQUALLED BY FEW.-HE DIED
IN LONDON-ON THE 21st DAY OF JANUARY 1808 AGED 63 YEARS-SINCERELY
AND DESERVEDLY REGRETTED BY ALL-WHO KNEW HIM.
W. M. Tablet.


MR. RODON was an Attorney-at-Law, and partner with Mr. Finlayson.


124.
(Ab.) FOUR SONS AND TWO DAUGHTERS OF JOHN AND SUSANNA SPENCER
WHO DIED FROM 1751 TO 1760 THE OLDEST NOT 13 YEARS OF AGE.
Stone Slab.


125.
(Ab.) SUSANNA SPENCER (OB) 1751 *










JAMAICA.


126.
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF COLONEL EDWARD STANTON.
HE DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 22d DAY OF JUNE ANO. DOMI.
1705 AND IN THE 65th YEAR OF HIS AGE.
ALSO PRISCILLA WIFE OF YE SAID EDWARD STANTON
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE YE IIth DAY OF SEPTEMBR ANO.
DOMI. 1709 AND IN YE 56th YEAR OF HER AGE.

R. M. Slab; Arms, Vair, EDWARD STANTON was chosen Member for St. David, 8th
on a canton, a cross pateE January, 1671. In twelve succeeding Assemblies he served
fitchie. Cest, A greyhound
sejeant. for St. Thomas-in-the-East, and in three for Kingston. When
representative of the last-mentioned parish, he was chosen Speaker of the House,
April I 1704.-Roby.
It is not improbable that this officer was a near relative of Serjeant Edward
Staunton, who agreed to train and exercise the inhabitants of Providence Island, in
the use of arms.-Cal. S. P., Col. S., March 9, 1636.
There was an ancient family named Staunton, settled in Notts. in the time of
Edward I.-Banks' "Baronia," &c.

127-
I TO THE MEMORY-OF THE RT HONBLE WILLIAM SELWYN,
/ESQR OF MATSON, IN YE COUNTY OF GLOUCESTER, COLONEL
SOF A REGIMENT OF FOOT, AND MAJOR GENERAL OF HER
MATIES FORCES, GOVERNOR OF GRAVESEND AND TILBURY
FORT, CAPTN GENERAL AND COMMANDER IN CHIEF OF HER
MATIES ISLAND OF JAMAICA AND YE TERRITORIES THERETO
BELONGING, AND VICE ADMIRAL OF THE SAME, WHO DIED
W. M. Mont., Sculpture, YE 5th APRIL 1702.
an urn, &c.; Arms, On a
bend cotised, within a bor- OSTENDENT INSULAE HUNC TANTUM FATA, NEQUE ULTRA
der engrailed, three annu-
lets. ESSE SINENT.

N 1703 Major-General Selwyn, Colonel Beckford, and the Earl of Peterborough
administered the government of Jamaica.

128.
AENEUS STUERT DYED 1734 AGED 24-MARY WIFE OF PETER WARD DIED
1740 AGED 55-MARY THEIR DAUGHTER, DIED 1734 AGED 6.
W. M. Slab.

129.
(Ab.) MR. GEORGE TAYLOR (OB) 1724 (AET) 52 *
Also
(Ab.) HIS WIFE MRS SUSANNA TAYLOR (OB) 1732 IN HER 53d YR.












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 69

130.
(Ab.) MARY TRUELOVE DIED 1749 AGED 29.
B. M. Slab.
TRUELOVE'S Company is mentioned, in the muster of the inhabitants of Virginia,
in 1625.
131.
DERBYE TOLDERBYE YE SONNE OF JOHN TOLDERBYE ESQR BY HANNAH HIS
SECOND WIFE-DIED-1682 IN HIS 15th MONTH.
B. M. Slab.
132.
HERE LYETH YE BODY OF CAPT JOHN TOLDERBYE, WHO
DYED YE SIXTEEN DAY OF DECEMBER 1682, AND IN YE
FORTIETH YEAR OF HIS AGE: AFTER HAVING GAYNED A
VERY FAIR REPUTATION IN YE WARRS OF YE FRENCH KING
AGAINST YE EMPEROUR.

HE DEATH OUTBRAVED ON MANY A BLOODY FEILD
YET DEATH AT LAST HAS MAD THE SOLDIER YIELD. B. M. Slab; Arms,...A
fess between three crosses
crosslet fitchde.... Crest, An arm embowed holding a wreath.
DERBYE TOLDERBY. This peculiar surname seems to be identical with Toldervey.
In 1604 (Cal. S. P.) there is a notice of Christopher Toldervey being continued
as collector of tithes in London, on the translation of the Bishop of Chester to that
see. See the pedigree of Manjoy or Mangye.

I33.
MARY TAAFE. (Neither date nor remark.)*
C. Y.
SHE was probably the wife of Michael Taafe. The Taaffes of Jamaica were ap-
parently allied to the noble house of the same name in Ireland. However the
local tradition may have originated, there is still enough to be gleaned from the wills
of the family, in both islands, to justify a respect for it.
Towards the close of the seventeenth century and earlier part of the eighteenth, Ireland was in so unsettled
a state, that there are few parochial registers there, which may be referred to, for the confirmation of pedigrees;
and the remarkable vicissitudes of the family in question, would make such difficulties insurmountable, were it not
for the comparative rarity of the name itself forming a useful clue. The earliest will on record in Jamaica of this
family, is that of Arthur Taafe, dated in 1750, and entered Jan. 30, 1752. In it. the testator leaves legacies to
his father Christopher and his mother Mary, of the kingdom of Ireland, "if still alive." Arthur Taafe also men-
tions his brother, the rector of St. Thomas-in-the-Vale, Henry Taafe, and his nephew Henry Gordon. The ques-
tion is, who was this Christopher Taafe? A Christopher Taaffe, of Mansfields Town, co. Louth, was attainted in
1691 at Ardee. He was an adherent of James II., in whose own regiment of infantry he was a lieutenant. I
find," says the author of a valuable work on a kindred subject,* "the chattel property of a Christopher Taaffe "
(probably the above lieutenant), "sold in 1725, who, dying in Dublin in 1736, made a will, which is recorded there,
from which I think that he is identical with the Christopher named in the will of Arthur Taafe of Jamaica. The
latter had sons, Arthur and Henry, and I am inclined to think, that he had also a son George, who passed into
S"King James II.'s Army List annotated." It is not shown how the author came by the knowledge of Christopher, the attained
officer, having left two sons, for there is no mention in his will either of wife or children.


IPI~P~;~C~;i~.~?~~* "~-'~ 'T;'?'T~T"r;"~'-~L;:~'":
i.'












70 JAMAICA.


134.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-ANNE,* THE BELOVED AND
LAMENTED CONSORT OF HIS EXCELLENCY-SIR ADAM
WILLIAMSON K.B.-CAPTAIN GENERAL, OF HIS MAJESTYS
POSSESSIONS IN ST. DOMINGO-AND FORMERLY LIEUTENANT
GOVERNOR OF THIS ISLAND-SIIE WAS THE ORNAMENT OF
SOCIETY, & A PATTERN OF HER SEX-POSSESSING ALL THOSE
M. Mont., sculpture-a
female figure leaning on a VIRTUES, AND EXERCISING THAT BENEVOLENCE-WHICH
column, ormounte d wathV
column, surmounted with RENDERED HER LIFE A BLESSING-HER DEATH AN IRRE-
an urn bearing the initials
A. W., &c.; Arms, Quar- PARABLE LOSS-TO THE COMMUNITY-SHE DIED THE 19th
terly, I & 4, or, a chev.
gulesbetw.threetrefoilssa. OF SEPTEMBER 1794, IN THE 48th YEAR OF HER AGE-DE-
2nd, sable, three lozenges
argent, on ahev or, three PLORED BY ALL;-BUT BY NONE WITH MORE HEARTFELT
fleurs-de-lys. 3rd, quar- ANGUISH-THAN THE DESOLATE, THE INDIGENT, AND THE
terly. I & 4, argent, on a
fess, three mullets.. in chief AFFLICTED :-WHOSE SORROWS HER TENDERNESS ANTICI-
a boar's head couped. 2 &
3, azure, three garbs. Im PATED, AND HER BOUNTY RELIEVED-TO SUCH DISTIN-
paling, quarterly, I & 4, GUISHED EXCELLENCE, THE ASSEMBLY OF JAMAICA COULD
sable, a lion rampant within
a border engrailed or. 2 & NOT BE INSENSIBLE-WITH GENERAL ASSENT, AND THE
3, gules, a cross on three
greeces, argent (i.e., in UNIVERSAL APPROBATION OF THEIR CONSTITUENTS-THEY
a'derls") crownet Ou, a VOTED THIS MEMORIAL-OF PUBLIC GRATITUDE AFFECTION
wyvem's head or. Motto, AND ESTEEM.
Adsum." Supporters, two J. Bacon, Sculpt. London, 1798.
lions rampant (tinctures im-
perfect).
MAJOR-GENERAL WILLIAMSON was sworn into office as Lieut.-Governor, and an-
nounced in General Orders as Commander-in-Chief, in November, 1790, during

Connaught and settled there."* It seems, however, more probable that he was the Christopher, son of George
Taaffe (Corballa, co. Meath) mentioned in the will of Stephen Taaffe, 173o. The next will is that of Henry Taafe
(entered May 3o, 1771). He was rector of St. Thomas-in-the-Vale, Jamaica. His sons are named: I. Arthur
Rodger, 2. John Armistead, 3. Richard Brownrigg, 4. Thomas Wheeler. He appoints John Gordon the guardian
of his sons. Atine, the sister of Henry Taaffe, was married to Mr. Gordon,t said to have been originally of
Enniskillen, and who was father of the Henry Gordon mentioned in the will of Arthur Taafe, his uncle. Henry
Taafe names, among other bequests, "his gold watch and tortoise-shell box set in gold." In the record of his ma-
triculation, in 1740, at Trinity College, Dublin, Henry is described as being then seventeen years of age, and the son
of Christopher Taaffe.-" Generosus in Com. Derriae." In the will of William Gordon, of St. Elizabeth, Jamaica
(Nov. 27, 1759), there is a bequest to Susanna, daughter of Harry Gordon, of St. James's; and in the will of
Henry Gordon, of St. James's, Jamaica, dated Jan. 18, 1788, we find references to his (mother's, Anne Taafe)
claims to real and personal estate in Ireland. The next Taafe will, is that of Michael Taafe (dated May 19, 1761),
of St. James's, Jamaica, in which the testator mentions his mother Anne residing at Dromisken, co. Louth.
N.B. -Theobald Taafe, Earl of Carlingford, had a grant of land, in 1668, in the parish or townland of Dromisken,
co. Louth. In 1762 is entered the will (dated in 1754) of Susanna Taafe, "wife of Theobald Taafe, of Hanover
Square, in the parish of St. George, Middlesex, England, and youngest daughter of Henry Lowe.":
SHer death announced in the Gentleman's Magazine, Dec., 1794, vol. lxiv. p. 1150.
SHe bequeaths his sword and pistols to his relative Theobald Taaffe (1736).
t He was twice married; his first wife is said to have been Mary Jones, a lady of the Ranelagh family. But there is another lady
of this name, and the widow, about 1710, of Penn, who had inherited his father, William Penn's, Irsh estate. There was also a connec-
tion by marriage between the Taaffes of Smermor, and the founder of Pennsylvania's family, while again the above-mentioned Henry
Gordon married a very near relative of the Penns.- See History of the Taaffe Family," Vienna, 1856 ; Ntes and Qutrirs, 1873-4;
Ulster Records," &c.
SNot Ljng," as given in the Long pedigree.-Vide the Peerage," &c.










MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS.


the Government of the Earl of Effingham. On that nobleman's decease, 19th Nov.,
1791, he assumed the Government of the Island, in virtue of the dormant commission
before mentioned. He had been previously joined by his wife, who arrived in Jamaica,
from London, on Oct. 31, 1791. He continued in the government until the arrival of
Alexander (Lindsay), 6th Earl of Balcarras, at Port Royal, on April 15, 1795, and on
the 21st of the same month, he was invested by the hands of the earl, his successor, as
Commissioner, with the ribbon and badge of the Order of the Bath. On May 9, in
the same year, he left Jamaica for Port-au-Prince, having been appointed Governor-
General and Commander-in-Chief of such parts of St. Domingo as then were, or here-
after might be, under the Government of Great Britain. Sir Adam died at Avesbury
House, co. Wilts, Oct. 21, 1798, from the effects of a fall. He was Colonel of the
73rd Regiment.
Mrs. Williamson (for the Knighthood of the Bath was not conferred on her
husband till after her death) was buried in this church, and an Act (as in the cases of
the Earl and Countess of Effingham) passed the Legislature, to indemnify the Rev.
R. S. Woodham, the rector, from the penalties imposed by the Law of 1789, for
burying in churches.


135.
HERE LYES THE BODY OF THE HONOURABLE COLLONELL
JOHN WALTERS, LATE CHIEF JUSTICE OF THIS ISLAND, AND
ONE OF HER MAJESTIES COUNCIL HERE. BORN AT ASH-
PRENTON* IN THE COUNTY OF DEVON, THE 6th OF APRIL 1659,
AND DYED THE 5th OF NOVEMBER 1706, AGED 47 YEARS

B. M. Slab; Arms,...A
fess dancette between three eagles displayed. Crest, On a cap of maintenance, a lion's head erased....

136.
(Ab.) ELIZABETH WALTERS DIED 1690 *

137-
(Ab.) CAPT WILLIAM WALTER, OB. 1701, AET 36--HIS TWO SONS BOTH NAMED
WILLIAM OB. 1692 & 1701.
WILLIAM WALTER was Member of Assembly for St. George, 27th Sept., 1698.-
Roby.
138.
THREE INNOCENTS, THE DEARLY BELOVED CHILDREN OF JOHN AND ANN
WRIGHT ... ROBERT, BORN I786-MARY FRANCES, BORN I791-AND EDWARD BORN,
1790- ... WHO ALL DIED IN 1792-

Ashprington on the Dart (?).
10-2










YAMAICA.


(These uncouth rhymes follow):
AH I DEAR BABES YOU HAVE LEFT YOUR PARENTS HERE
FOR HEAVEN'S ABOVE NOT WANTING O' THEIR CARE
BLEST NOW SUPREMELY SO YOU MUST BE
FOR EVERMORE AND ALL ETERNITY.
G.M. Slab,


139.
DOCTOR JOHN WIGAN-OBIIT 5 DECR 1739 AETAT. 43.
B. M. Slab.


140.
MR JOHN WELCH DIED 17 APRIL 1798 AGED 40.


141.
HERE LYETH INTERRED THE BODY OF MR HENRY WILLIS, JUNIER, WHO
DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 4th DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1702, AGED 26 YEARS.
HERE ALSO LYETH INTERRED THE BODY OF MARY ELYES, DAUGHTER OF
GERSHOM ELYES, ESQ, AND MARY HIS WIFE. SHE WAS BORN THE 30th OF
JANUARY, I715, AND DEPARTED THIS LIFE, THE I4th DAY OF APRIL, I716.
AND ALSO THE BODY OF MARY ELYES, LATE WIFE OF GERSHOM ELYES, ESQ,
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE SIXTEENTH DAY OF OCTOBER, ONE THOUSAND
SEVEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY SIX, IN THE THIRTY SEVENTH YEAR OF HER AGE.
B. M. Slab.

COLONEL GERSHOM ELYES was Colonel of the St. Ann's regiment, and Member for
St. Mary, in the first Assembly of 1711,




1421
CAPT. WILLIAM WORLEY DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE
ELEVENTH DAY OF APRILL, ANNQ.. DOM. 1690, AND IN THE
TWENTY NINTH YEAR OF HIS AGE-ALSO ELIZABETH HIS
WIFE DEPARTED .... THE 22d DAY OF AUGST ANN. DOM.
1696 AETATIS SUAE 330.

G. M. Slab; Arms,...A
chevy. between three birds close... Crest, A wolfs head erased.


CAPT. WORLEY was chosen Member for this parish 2oth July, 1688,










MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 73

143.
(Ab.) TIMOTHY WAKELING OB. 1741, AET. 44
W. M. Slab.

144.
(Ab.) RACHAEL WILSON DIED 1736 AGED 16. SAMUEL KING DIED 1742 AGED 41.
Stone Slab.





145.
(Ab.) EDWARD YOUNG DIED, 1710-HIS WIFE MARY, 1696.




B. M. Slab; Arms, Lozengy,
on a bend, three heraldic antelopes' heads erased....



FORT AUGUSTA,

FORT AUGUSTA, the principal defence of the harbour of Kingston, was built, for the
greater part, under the immediate direction and superintendence of the Governor,
Rear-Admiral Knowles (afterwards Sir Charles Knowles, of Lovel Hill, co. Berks,
Bart.; and Rear-Admiral of England).

i.
DEPARTED THIS LIFE DECEMBER 25th 1807-MAJOR GEORGE CRAWFORD-OF
THE 2d W. I. REG-SON OF JAMES CRAWFORD OF AUBURN IRELAND ESQ,-WAS
MAJOR OF THE 33d REG.-IN THE EAST INDIES;-SERVED UNDER SIR RALPH
ABERCROMBY ;-WAS AT THE CAPTURE OF THE DUTCH FLEET-BY LORD KEITH
AND SIR JAMES CRAIG;-WAS AT THE SIEGE AND STORM OF SERINGAPATAM ;-
AND WAS FROM HIS EARLIEST YEARS-ALWAYS ACTIVELY EMPLOYED IN THE-
SERVICE OF HIS KING AND COUNTRY (&C).
W.M,

2.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF LIEUTENANT JAMES CAMPBELL MACLACHLAN
OF THE 82d REGT, SON OF CdLONEL MACLACHLAN H.P. 69th REGIMENT, AGED
20 YEARS,










JAMAICA.


3.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-ANDREW ROBERT CHARLESTON, MAJOR IN
THE 92d HIGHLANDERS WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE, MONDAY AUGUST ISth, 1825,
AGED 30 YEARS.
4.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-JOHN SANKEY DARLEY-
MAJOR OF THE 2nd WEST INDIA REGMT-WHO BRAVELY
LOST HIS LIFE-IN THE ZEALOUS DISCHARGE OF HIS DUTY-
ON THE 27th OF MAY 1808-HIS CONDUCT AS A MAN AND A
SOLDIER, ENDEARING HIM TO ALL,-HE DIED BELOVED AND
REGRETTED-BY HIS FAMILY-FRIENDS AND BROTHER OFFI-
SSn; C CERS-WITH THE DEEPEST SORROW THIS LAST SAD TRIBUTE
B. Stone; Crest, A uni-
corn's head couped, bridled, IS PAID-BY HIS AFFECTIONATE FATHER-GEORGE DARLEY--
with crescent on breast.
Motto, Dure. OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN-AGED 80 YEARS NOV 12th ISIO.
THE LORD GAVE AND THE LORD HATH TAKEN AWAY,
BLESSED BE THE NAME OF THE LORD.
Job, Ist Chapter, 2ist verse.

AJOR DARLEY'S death is thus related in the "Continuation to Edwards' West
Indies:" "Fifty-four Chamba and Koromantyn negroes, who had been purchased
to serve in the Colonial corps, broke out into mutiny at Fort Augusta, while under
drill, and massacred two of their officers, Major Darley and Lieutenant Ellis,
who rode up to them to inquire into the cause of the tumult. They were speedily
chastised for their disobedience and barbarity. Fifteen of them were killed on the
spot, five were wounded, and seven were afterwards executed. The reason which they
assigned for their conduct was, that they were too often drilled, and that they were
desirous of returning to their native country." The date is incorrectly stated as
August instead of May, I8o8, and the Report of the Committee of Assembly says
"that the mutiny was not by any means confined to the recruits, but that many of
the old soldiers, if not openly and directly concerned in it, did persuade and excite
the troops to mutiny." The "Chronology" of the "Jamaica Almanack" is more
correct in its detail: 808, May 27. Recruits of the 2nd West India Regiment
mutinied on parade: Lieutenant and Adjutant Ellis was killed, and Major Darley
died of the wounds he received. Nine of the mutineers were killed; one died of
wounds; fifteen were tried by a court-martial, and found guilty; seven of them were
shot." The reader, desirous of further particulars, may consult the 12th vol. Journals
of House of Assembly, where the examination of many witnesses is given at length. The
"Violation of the privileges of the Assembly, in the case of Major-General Carmichael,
commanding his Majesty's forces in this island," (who had directed the officers under
his command not "to answer any questions that the Legislative Body of this island
might put upon the subject of a late mutiny, or upon the government or discipline of











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 75

his Majesty's forces,") has been inserted by Mr. Aikman, sen., in an Appendix to his
re-publication in 181o of "The Privileges of Jamaica vindicated," in the case of John
Olyphant, Esq., a Member of Assembly.
The major was brother to Alderman Darley, of Dublin, of Orange notoriety.-
Roby.

5.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF CAPT JOSEPH GREENWOOD OF HM'S 22d REGT.,
WHO DIED AT FORT AUGUSTA, 31st OCTR, 1828, AGED 32 YEARS.


6.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF J. HINDS, ADJUTANT 2nd WEST INDIA REGT.
OF FOOT WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE, MONDAY AUGUST 13th, 1825-AGED 30
YEARS.

7.
BENEATH THIS STONE-LIE THE REMAINS OF-COLL. CHARLES HILL-WHO
DIED 31st OF AUGUST 1819-AGED 57 YEARS. IN THE COMMAND OF-THE 50th
REGIMENT OF FOOT.

HE is honourably mentioned in the "Percy Anecdotes," under "Humanity."


8.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF ARTHUR J. JONES, CAPTAIN OF H.M'S R.E, WHO
DEPARTED THIS LIFE, ON THE 18t OF MAY, 1816, AGED 50 YEARS.


96
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-CAPTAIN GEORGE ROSS MUNRO-LATE OF THE
85th REGIMENT-WHO DIED NOVEMBER THE IIth I802-AGED 19 YEARS--THIS
MONUMENT WAS ERECTED BY HIS BROTHER-OFFICERS AS A TESTIMONY OF
THEIR SINCERE ESTEEM-FOR HIS AMIABLE CHARACTER.
W. M.

C APT. GEORGE ROSS MUNRO was the only son of Duncan Munro, Esq., of Culcairn,
in the county of Ross, in Scotland, the nephew of Sir Hugh Munro, of Fowlis,
Bart., and the presumptive heir to his title and estates."-Royal Gazette, 1802.


10.
HENRY STANLEY MONK, CAPTAIN IN THE I3th REGT OF FOOT, WHO DIED
9 JULY 1791, IN HIS 32d YEAR.
Dilapidated Tomb.




ujw I' w '-*


YAMAICA.


II.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF J. W. PARKINSON OF THE ROYAL ENGINEERS
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE, ON THE I7th OF JUNE 1819. AGED 40 YEARS.


GREEN BAY.

I.
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF CAPT EDWARD JAMES, A LATE EMINENT MER-
CHANT OF THIS ISLAND, WHO WAS ALWAYS LOYAL TO HIS PRINCE, FAITHFUL
TO HIS FRIEND, KIND AND CHARITABLE TO HIS RELATIONS, READY UPON ALL
OCCASIONS OF DOING GOOD OFFICES TO HIS ACQUAINTANCES. DEPARTED THIS
LIFE THE 28th DAY OF APRIL I720, IN THE 50th YEAR OF HIS AGE, MUCH LA-
MENTED BY ALL WHO KNEW HIM.


Brick tomb with Marble
Slab; Arms, A cock be-
tween two mullets in chief
and a crescent in base
Crest, Over an esquire's
helmet, a plume. Motto,
" Dieu sur tout."


HERE LYES THE BODY OF LEWIS GALDY ESQR, WHO
DEPARTED THIS LIFE AT PORT ROYAL, THE 22d DECEMBER
1739 AGED 80 YEARS. HE WAS BORN AT MONTPELIER IN
FRANCE, BUT LEFT THAT COUNTRY FOR HIS RELIGION, AND
CAME TO SETTLE IN THIS ISLAND, WHERE HE WAS SWAL-
LOWED UP IN THE GREAT EARTHQUAKE IN THE YEAR 1692,
AND BY THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD, WAS BY ANOTHER SHOCK
THROWN INTO THE SEA, AND MIRACULOUSLY SAVED BY
SWIMMING UNTIL A BOAT TOOK HIM UP: HE LIVED MANY
YEARS AFTER IN GREAT REPUTATION, BELOVED BY ALL THAT
KNEW HIM, AND MUCH LAMENTED AT HIS DEATH


THIS remarkable inscription is copied from a note in Edwards' "West Indies," and
in the text of Bridges' Annals." Both writers have incorrectly transcribed the
date of Galdy's death, stating it to have occurred in 1736 instead of 1739. Mr. Galdy
was an affluent merchant of Port Royal, Member of Assembly for St. Mary, 29th
December, 1707; for Port Royal, 4th January, 1708-9; for St. George, 17th April,
1711; for Port Royal, 17th September, 1716, and for St. Anne, August I, 1718,
besides sitting in other Assemblies for which there are no returns.-Journals; Roby.
Mr. Galdy probably exaggerated the circumstances of his escape, especially as
there was no one left to contradict his statement.


3.
HERE LYES THE BODY OF CAPTN ROBERT SHORTING, COMMANDER OF HIS
MAJESTY'S SHIP DEALE CASTLE, WIO DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON THE ELEVENTH


* -r *,.r-











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 77

DAY OF MAY 17... IN THE ... YEAR OF HIS AGE. HE WAS SON OF THOMAS
SHORTING ESQ. ................... CLOUDSLY SHOVEL, REAR ADMIRAL OF GREAT
BRITAIN.
Stone Altar Tomb: Sculpture, A man of war in full sail.

4.
HERE LYETH YE BODY OF CAPT. WILLIAM WAKELIN, LATE COMMANDER OF
HER MAJESTY'S SHIP YE SUFFOLK, WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE, YE Ith OF OCTOBER
1705. AGED 46 YEARS.

THOSE, WAKELIN, WEEP AND WANT, AND MOURN THEE MOST
WHO, HAPPY, COULD THY HONEST FRIENDSHIP BOAST.
SEAS MAY BE KIND, AND EARTH MAY RICHES LEND
TO SEARCHING MAN, BUT CANNOT GIVE A FRIEND.


















PARISH OF KINGSTON.

KINGSTON CATHEDRAL CHURCH.

INTRA MURAL MONUMENTS.

x.

NEAR THIS SPOT, IN THE ADJOINING CEMETERY, ARE DEPOSITED THE REMAINS
OF EDWARD BAKER, MIDSHIPMAN IN THE ROYAL NAVY OF GREAT BRITAIN, SECOND
SON OF WILLIAM BAKER OF BAYFORDBURY, IN THE COUNTY OF HERTFORD, BY
SOPHIA, THIRD DAUGHTER OF JOHN CONYERS, LATE OF COPPED HALL IN THE
COUNTY OF ESSEX. A YOUTH WHOSE RARE ENDOWMENTS BY NATURE, IMPROVED
BY EDUCATION, AND CONFIRMED BY THE EXAMPLE AND INSTRUCTION OF HIS
COMMANDER, COMMODORE JOHN THOMAS DUCKWORTH, GAVE THE FAIREST PROMISE
TO HIS COUNTRY (HAD IT PLEASED THE ALMIGHTY TO SPARE HIS LIFE), OF A
DISTINGUISHED CHRISTIAN HERO, AND TRUELY VALUABLE MAN, INITIATED IN
THE PROFESSION OF HIS CHOICE. WITH THESE ADVANTAGES, HE SERVED ON
BOARD THE ORION, IN THE MEMORABLE ACTION OF THE 3d OF JUNE 1794, AND
SHARED, WITH SINGULAR MERIT, IN THE GLORIES OF THAT IMPORTANT DAY.
WITH EQUAL GALLANTRY, BUT LESS PROPITIOUS FORTUNE, UNDER THE SAME
RESPECTABLE OFFICER, ON THE 21st OF MARCH 1796, HE WAS ENGAGED IN THE
ATTACK MADE BY THE LEVIATHAN, AND AFRICA, ON THE FORTS OF LEOGANE, IN
THE ISLAND OF ST DOMINGO, BUT YIELDING ALASI TO THE FATIGUES OF THAT
DISASTROUS SERVICE, SUCCEEDED BY THE PREVAILING MALADY OF THE CLIMATE,
HE CLOSED A BRILLIANT CAREER OF HONOUR AND VIRTUE, IN THE I7th YEAR
OF HIS AGE.
IF HARD INDEED HIS LOT, AND PREMATURE HIS FALL, DEPRIVED IN THAT
AWEFUL MOMENT OF THE CONSOLING CARE OF HIS DEAREST RELATIVES, YET
HAPPY AT LEAST IN THIS, THAT WITH FACULTIES UNIMPAIRED, AND HOPEFUL OF
THE BLISS WHICH AWAITED HIM, HE BREATHED HIS LAST IN THE ARMS OF HIS
PROTECTOR AND FRIEND, AND WAS ATTENDED TO THE GRAVE, BY THE UNFEIGNED
TEARS, AND HEARTFELT SIGHS OF THE COMPANIONS OF HIS NAVAL FORTUNES-
THE ZEALOUS ADMIRERS OF HIS EXCELLENCE AND CHARACTER.
NAT. Vo DIE SEPTEMBRIS MDCCLXXIX OB. XXI DIE APRILIS MDCCXCVI.
OSTENDENT TERRIS HUNC TANTUM FATA NEQ. ULTRA
ESSE SINENT.
SI QUA FATA ASPERA RUMPAS
TU MARCELLUS ERISI











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 79


2.
IN MEMORY OF-MRS. FRANCES INGLIS-WHO DIED
THE 9th OF JANY 1791-AGED 66 YEARS-ALSO OF JOHN
SUTHERLAND ESQRE-WHO DIED THE 12th OF FEBY. 1796:-
AGED 62 YEARS-AND OF MRS. ANN SUTHERLAND-WHO DIED
THE Ist OF DECR 1797; AGED 51 YEARS.

Mural, Gray Marble-gild-
ing and blazonry; Arms, Or, within a pressure flory counter flory gules, three mullets or. Impaling, or,
a lion rampant (facing to the sinister side) azure, on a chief of the first, three mullets of the last.
N B.-It is clear that in transferring these coats to the marble, the sculptor reversed
Them. A remarkable instance of the same error is to be seen on the tombs of
the O'Shee family, in Kilkenny.


3.
(Ab.) ELIZABETH CRICHTON, WIFE OF WILLIAM LAMBIE
ESQR. OF THIS ISLAND; DAUGHTER OF PATRICK CRICHTON ESQ.
OF THE CITY OF EDINBURGH; WHO DIED IN KINGSTON, ON
THE 20th DECR 1821, AGED 23 YEARS.

Mural, W. Marble; Arms,
Per fess, argent and azure; in chief three spears,...and in base a saltire.... Impaling, argent, a lion rampant,
within a border engrailed, azure.

SIXTEEN eulogistic lines follow, in which she is described as a daughter, wife, sister,
and mother.



4W
(Ab.) JOSEPH FITCH ESQR OF THIS TOWN-MERCHANT,
WHO DIED ON THE 21st OCTOBER 1778 AET 43 (ERECTED
BY HIS BROTHER.)


Mural, W. & G. Marble,
&c., gilding and blazonry; Arms, Vert, three leopards' heads affront or. Crest, A leopard's head affront, or.

5-
SACRED-TO THE MEMORY OF-BARTHOLOMEW SAMUEL
ROWLEY ESQRE-ADMIRAL OF THE BLUE-AND COMMANDER
IN CHIEF OF HIS MAJESTY'S FLEET-AT JAMAICA-WHO DIED
ON THE 7th OF OCTOBER A.D. ISII-AGED 47 YEARS. THIS
MONUMENT IS ERECTED-AS A TRIBUTE OF AFFECTION BY
HIS WIDOW-ARABELLA.

Mural, G. & W. Marble;
Arms, Argent, on a fess azure, between two Cornish choughs, three escallops. Impaling, argent, two bars gules.
Crest, A rowel pierced.
11-2










So MAMAICA,

SE was second son of Sir Joshua Rowley, cr. Bart, in 1786.

6.
HENRY ROBARTS HIBBERT, YOUNGEST SON OF GEORGE HIBBERT ESQ., OF
LONDON, AGENT FOR THIS ISLAND, DIED ON THE I4th DAY OF JULY 1825.
Mural, W. M., plain.
7.
(Ab.) MARK O'SULLIVAN ESQR. OB 3d NOV: 1825, AET 74; & 47 YEARS A
RESIDENT.
Mural, W. M., plain.
8.
IN MEMORY OF THOMAS T. GITTINGS, OF BALTIMORE, M.D. U.S.A. WHO DIED
HERE, JUNE 6th 1857, AGED 21 YEARS & 5 MONTHS.
Mural, very mean appearance, though W. M.



9.
TO THE MEMORY OF-GEORGE HINDE ESQR-WHOSE
FAITHFUL SERVICES-ENDEARED HIM TO HIS COUNTRY-
AND HIS SOCIAL VIRTUES TO-HIS FRIENDS-HE DIED A
REAL LOSS TO BOTH-JULY 21. 1756-AGED 46-YEARS.

Mural, a sumptuous Monu-
ment of white and coloured marbles, with gilding and blazonry; Arms, Gules, a chev. between three hinds or.
Impaling, barry of eight, or and gules.
so.
(Ab.) JOHN DANIEL ORRETT ESQ., A NATIVE OF THIS CITY, WHO DIED AT
NEW YORK, DEC 6. 1858. AET 59. (Six verses follow.)
11.
(Ab.) VIRGINIA FAIRFAX, WIFE OF PETER ALEXR. ESPEUT ESQR, OF THIS CITY,
AND DAUGHTER OF COLONEL ROBERT MUNROE HARRISON, CONSUL GENERAL OF
THE U.S. OF AMERICA, FOR THIS ISLAND-BORN 28th AUGT 1821 : DIED 5th NOVR
1841, AGED 20 YEARS & 2 MONTHS &C. ALSO.-VIRGINIA MARGARET GROSETT,
2d DAUR. OF THE ABOVE, BORN 28th OCT 1839, DIED 7 JANY. 1841, AGED 14
MTHS & II DAYS. ALSO-CHARLES ALLEN BANCROFT, 2d SON OF P.A. ESPEUT
ESQ., BY HIS 2 WIFE MARIANNE AUGUSTA, THIRD DAUGHTER OF THE LATE
EDWARD NATHANIEL BANCROFT, ESQ. M.D. DEPY. INSP. GENL: OF ARMY HOSPITALS
IN THIS ISLAND-DIED OF CHOLERA, 12 NOV 1850, AET. 5 YRS, & 6 MTHS.
Mural, G. M., surmounted by a cross, &c.

THE Espeuts were a French refugee family, from St. Domingo.


1i1 ,' r











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 81

12.

(Ab.) HENRY RODON, OF FRANKFIELD, & CRAWLE RIVER ESTATES, PAR: CLA-
RENDON. OB. 6 FEB. 1835, AET 33.
Mural, W. & G. Marble.

13-
(Ab.) ELIZABETH WIFE OF ANDREW DUNN, M.D. & 2d DAU. OF W. S. TONGE, BAR-
RISTER AT LAW. OB. OCT. 26 1852. AET 44 YRS. 5 MTHS, & 10 DAYS.
Mural, W. & G. Marble.

N the lines that follow, she is described as wife and mother. It is unnecessary to
give.them, as they are poetically discreditable.
14.
(Ab.) MRS ANNE SMITH WIFE OF MR. W SMITH OF THIS CITY, MERCHANT, AND
SECOND DAUGHTER OF JOHN LUNAN ESQ. OF SPANISH TOWN-OB. II DEC. 1825.
AET 21. ERECTED BY HER AFFLICTED HUSBAND.
Mural, B. & W. Marble ; curious sculpture of Death drawing her bed-curtain, while an angel lifts her up, to receive
the visitation.

SIx highly eulogistic lines in rhyme, follow.
IS.
THE HONBLE JOSEPH BARNES, LATE MAYOR AND CUSTOS OF THIS CITY, AND
PARISH: MR. OF ASSLY., &C-OB. 6 MAY 1829, AET 66. ERECTED BY THE CORPOR-
ATE BODY.
Mural, G. & W. Marble.
16.

SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF AUGUSTUS LEVESON GOWER, CAPTAIN IN HIS
MAJESTY'S NAVY, BORN THE 21st OF JUNE 1782. HE GAVE EARLY PROMISE OF
BEING AN ORNAMENT TO HIS PROFESSION, AND AN HONOR TO HIS COUNTRY,
AND DIED MUCH LAMENTED, AT PORT ROYAL IN THIS ISLAND, ON THE 3d OF
AUGUST 1802, BEING THEN CAPTAIN OF HIS MAJESTY'S SHIP SANTA MARGARETTA
Mural, gray-white and reddish-brown Marble and Stone; a naval trophy, inscription on a boat's square sail of
W. Marble.

CAPT. A. L. G. not found in Burke's Peerage."
17.

SACRED TO THE MEMORY-OF-SIR ALEXANDER LEITH BART.-LIEUT. COLL
OF THE 88th REGIMENT-WHO DIED OCTOBER THE 3d I781-AGED 40 YEARS-
THIS MONUMENT WAS ERECTED, BY HIS AFFECTIONATE SON SIR GEORGE LEITH
BART-OF BURUGH ST PETER'S-NORFOLK.
Mural, W. Marble.

SIR ALEXANDER, Cr. Bart. in 1775, married Margaret, eldest daughter of Thomas
Hay, Sen. Coll. of Jus., Scotland.












'82 YAMAICA.





i8.
(Ab.) THE REVD GEORGE WATSON ASKEW B.A. OF QUEEN'S
COLLEGE OXFORD. OB. 27th OCTR 1831. AET. 31. 1O. IO.



Handsome mural sarco-
phagus, W. & G. M.; Arms, A fesse between three horses passant.

19.
(Ab.) ERECTED BY HIS WIDOW, TO THE MEMORY OF MR JOHN BURROWS,
MERCHANT OF KINGSTON, WHO DIED 12 FEB, 1807, AGED 39.
Mural, W. Marble.

20.
(Ab.) WM. JAS. STEVENSON ESQ., BORN 29 OCT 1764; DIED 15 APRIL 1830,
AGED 66. ERECTED BY THE MERCHTS OF KINGSTON
Mural, W. Marble.

HE was Receiver-General of Jamaica, and grandfather of the late Sir W. Stevenson,
Governor of Mauritius.

21.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY-OF THOMAS STOPFORD ESQR LATE COMMANDER
OF H.M.S. CARNATION-WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE-ON THE I I DAY OF OCTOBER
I824-AGED 32 YEARS
Mural, W. & G. Marble (chaste design).

22.
(Ab.) EBENEZER REID, SENIOR, A NATIVE OF SCOTLAND OB: 25 MAY 1843
AET 66. HE WAS ELECTED HEAD MASTER OF WOLMER'S FREE SCHOOL IN 1815,
AND RESIDED ALTOGETHER 43 YEARS, AS A TEACHER IN JAMAICA.
Mural, Black Marble, gold lettered.

HE is described as a husband and father. The tablet was erected by his pupils.

23.
(Ab.) BARTH OWEN WILLIAMS ESQRE-A KIND HUSBAND AFFECTIONATE
FATHER, TRUE FRIEND, AND SINCERE CHRISTIAN. OB. IO APRIL 1830, AET 66-
ERECTED BY HIS BRETHERN OF THE SUSSEX LODGE OF FREE MASONS, OF WHICH
HE WAS THE FOUNDER-
Mural, W. & G. Marble.











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 83

24.
(Ab.) ROBERT MC CLELLAND OF THE ROYAL LODGE NO. 250. PROVL NO. I.
GRAND REGISTRAR OF THE PROVINCIAL LODGE OF EAST JAMAICA-HE DIED 15
SEP, i860 -ERECTED BY THE BRETHERN OF THE LODGE-
Mural, Black Marble Tablet, Royal Archmasonic devices.

25.

SACRED-TO THE MEMORY OF-MARY CARR-WIFE OF DAWKINS CARR ESQRE.
-COMMANDER OF-THE JUPITER-WHO DIED JUNE 4th I798-AGED 28.
Mural, W. & G. Marble; a sculptured urn.

a6.

(Ab). MR NATHANIEL MILWARD, A NATIVE OF THE CITY OF BRISTOL; AND
LATE OF THIS PARISH, MERCHANT-HE WAS A TRULY HONEST MAN, &C &C.
OB. JUNE 6th 1775 AET 37. ERECTED BY FRIENDS
Mural, W. & Coloured Marble.

27.

(Ab.) ALEXANDER EVANS-ALDERMAN OF KINGSTON, OB. 8 JANY 1858. HE
WAS 27 YRS IN THE MAGISTRACY. ERECTED BY THE CORPORATION OF KINGSTON.
Mural, W. Marble.

28.

(Ab.) GEORGE MARTIN, ELDEST SON OF WILLIAM MARTIN, ESQR. OF HEMING-
STONE HALL, IN CO: SUFFOLK--BORN ISth SEP: 1796 & DIED, OFF ST JAGO DE
CUBA, ON BOARD H.M.S. BUSTARD 13th JANY. 1822.
Mural, W. Marble.


29.

(Ab.) THE REVD FRANCIS HUMBERSTONE, CHAPLAIN TO THE CORPORATION
OF KINGSTON; OB AUGT. 9th 1819. AET. 28-AFTER ONLY 9 MTHS RESIDENCE IN
TIE ISLAND.
Mural Monument, W. & G. Marble; the Bible encircled by a snake.

E was one of the first stirring men, after the emancipation. He died of tetanus,
caused by preaching a sermon, immediately after the extraction of a tooth.


30.
(Ab.) THE REVD ISAAC MANN, B.A. ONE OF THE CHAPLAINS TO THE LORD
BISHOP OF JAMAICA, AND FOR FIFTEEN YEARS, THE BELOVED & RESPECTED










yAMAICA.


RECTOR OF THIS PARISH. HE DIED, OCTOBER 3Ist 1828, AGED 5I YEARS. ERECTED
BY THE MAYOR & COMMONALTY.
Mural, Black & White Marble.


31.
THIS MARBLE-INTENDED AS A MONUMENT OF-PUBLIC GRATITUDE-TO A
-PUBLIC BENEFACTOR-IS SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF-JOHN WOLMER, GOLD-
SMITH-FOUNDER OF A FREE SCHOOL AT KINGSTON. OBT. 29th JUNE 1729

Mural, G. & W. Marble; J. Bacon, R.A., Sculpt., 1789. A life-size female figure, subscribed Liberalitas."


32.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF EMANUEL THOMAS POE, MAJOR OF HIS MAJESTY'S
50th REGT., BORN I2th NOVR 1782; DIED 7th JANY 1822.

Mural, B. & W. Marble.


33.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF CAPTAIN EDWARD ROWLEY, THIRD SON OF SIR
WILLIAM ROWLEY, BART. OF TENDING HALL, IN THE COUNTY OF NORFOLK;
WHO DIED AT NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE, ON THE 8th OF JULY I817, WHILE
COMMANDING H.M. BRIG SHEARWATER, AND WAS BURIED AT THAT PLACE, ON THE
ISth OF THE SAME MONTH-BORN, THE I6th OF APRIL 1792.

Mural, B. & W. Marble.


34.
IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM BROWN OF LEESTHORPE, IN
THE COUNTY OF LEICESTER, ESQUIRE, A REAR ADMIRAL OF
THE RED, & COMMANDER IN CHIEF AT JAMAICA, WHERE TO
THE REGRET OF THE WHOLE COLONY, HE DIED ON THE 20th
DAY OF SEPTEMBER 1814; IN THE FIFTIETH YEAR OF HIS
AGE. HE MARRIED FIRST, CATHERINE, DAUGHTER OF JOHN
TRAVERS ESQUIRE, A DIRECTOR OF THE EAST INDIA COM-
Mural Monument, B. & PANY; AND SECONDLY, MARTHA VERE, DAUGHTER OF JOHN
W. Marble sculptured;
Arms, On a fess, between FOTHERGILL OF HANDSWORTH, IN THE COUNTY OF STAFFORD,
three mallets sable, a cres- ESQUIRE, WHO HAS ERECTED THIS MONUMENT, AS A FAINT
cent argent. Impaling,
vert, a deer's head couped RECORD OF HER UNBOUNDED AFFECTION, AND AS A SLENDER
at the shoulder, within a
border engrailed, argent. TRIBUTE, TO HIS UNSHAKEN AND ACKNOWLEDGED WORTH.
Crest, A demi-eagle dis-
played, its neck entwined by a snake.











MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 85

35.
NEAR THIS MARBLE LIE INTERRED THE REMAINS-OF
MALCOLM LAING ESQUIRE-WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE
Ist OF AUGUST 1781- AGED 63 YEARS-ALSO THE REMAINS
OF ELEANOR HIS WIFE-THE DAUGHTER OF MRS MARY
SHARPE-WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 29th OF SEPTEMBER
I747-AGED 35 YEARS.
THIS MONUMENT IS ERECTED IN GRATITUDE TO THEIR
MEMORY, AND AS A LASTING TESTIMONY OF THEIR WORTH, Fine Marble Mont., bear.
BY JOHN JAQUES ESQRE ing a sculptured female
BY JOHN JAQUES ERE figure, beautifully designed
and executed by J. Bacon,
R.A., 1794; Arms, Argent, three piles azure.

36.
(Ab.) IN MEMORY OF LIEUT. BURTON ROWLEY, SECOND SON OF REAR ADMIRAL
SIR CHARLES ROWLEY, COMMANDER IN CHIEF IN THE WEST INDIES, WHO DIED
ON THE ISth OF SEPTR. 1822, ON BOARD H.M.S. SIBYLLE, AT CARTHAGENA, IN THE
20th YEAR OF HIS AGE.
Mural, White Marble.



37.
(Ab.) SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF ENSIGN JOHN SKIN-
NER, 58th REGT., SECOND SON OF LIEUT. GENL: SKINNER, WHO
FELL A SACRIFICE TO THIS CLIMATE, 28th NOVEMBER 1821,
AGED 19 YEARS & 3 MONTHS-


Mural, B. & W. Marble,
sculptured; Arms, Sable, a chev. or, between three eagles' heads erased, a mullet in chief.
TWELVE eulogistic lines follow.-These arms appear as a quartering in the escutcheon
of Skinner, of Carisbrooke.-Burke's Landed Gentry."

38.
(Ab). JEAN DAUR. OF SAMUEL GREGORY, MERCHANT, BORN NOV. 30, 1753: DIED
OCT 12. 1776. ERECTED BY HER HUSBAND, HUGH POLSON ESQRE.
Mural, W. Marble.

39.
SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF MRS. ANN NEUFVILLE, DAUGHTER OF MRS.
FRANCIS DWARRIS, BY HER FIRST HUSBAND, JOHN DUNSTON ESQRE., SHE DEPARTED
THIS LIFE ON THE I5th AUGUST 1782, AGED 24 YEARS.
"MANY DAUGHTERS HAVE DONE VIRTUOUSLY BUT THOU HAST EQUALLED
THE BEST."












86 JAMAICA.

LIKEWISE, THE HONORABLE FORTUNATUS DWARRIS, ESQR. M.D., AND CUSTOS
ROTULORUM FOR THE PARISH OF ST. GEORGE, IN THIS ISLAND. HE DEPARTED
THIS LIFE, ON THE 5th OF FEBRUARY 1790, AGED 63 YEARS

WITH JUST APPLAUSE EACH STAGE OF LIFE HE RAN,
AND DIED LAMENTED AS AN HONEST MAN.

THIS MONUMENT (A JUST TRIBUTE DUE TO DEPARTED MERIT) IS ERECTED
BY THE AFFLICTED PARENT, AND DISCONSOLATE WIDOW, MRS. FRANCES DWARRIS
IN TENDER REGARD TO THEIR RESPECTIVE MEMORIES, AND MANY VIRTUES

Beautiful W. Marble Mont., by J. Bacon, R.A., Sculptor, London, 1792. Figures in bas relief, and on an urn
in the arm of the principal these lines :
Ascend to Bliss ye gentle spirits
Where yon angel soars above
There, virtue her reward inherits
Crown'd with Heav'ns Eternall Love."


40.
IN THE CEMETERY OF THIS PARISH LIE INTERRED THE MORTAL REMAINS
OF COLONEL CHARLES HILL, LIEUT. COLONEL OF THE 50th REGIMENT OF FOOT,
AND A COMPANION .OF THE MOST HONORABLE MILITARY ORDER OF THE BATH.
AS MAJOR, AND AFTERWARDS AS LIEUT COLONEL COMMANDING THIS BRAVE AND
DISTINGUISHED REGIMENT, HE WAS HIMSELF EMINENTLY CONSPICUOUS IN THE
NUMEROUS ACTIONS OF THE WAR, IN WHICH IT WAS ENGAGED, AND ASSISTED,
IN PLACING ON ITS COLOURS THE GLORIOUS DISTINCTIONS OF VIMIERA, VIT-
TORIA, PYRENEES, AND PENINSULA. COVERED WITH WOUNDS, AND WITH HONOR,
HE MIGHT, AT THE PEACE, HAVE RETIRED TO THE ENJOYMENT OF HIS COUNTRY'S
BLESSINGS AND APPLAUSE; BUT ANXIOUS TO SEE HIS OLD REGIMENT RESTORED
TO ITS WONTED FORCE, AND DISCIPLINE; AND THEN UNWILLING TO QUIT IT
WHEN AGAIN ORDERED ON DISTANT DUTY, AND AN UNFAVOURABLE CHANGE OF
CLIMATE, HE ULTIMATELY FELL A VICTIM TO HIS EVER ANXIOUS SOLICITUDE
FOR THOSE WITH WHOM HIS BLOOD HAD BEEN SO OFTEN SHED; AND, TOGETHER
WITH A NUMEROUS BAND OF HIS GALLANT OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS, PERISHED
BY A DESOLATING FEVER, ON THE 31st OF AUGUST 1819, IN THE 57th YEAR OF
HIS AGE, & THE 4Ist OF HIS MILITARY SERVICE. THIS STONE IS ERECTED TO
HIS MEMORY BY HIS AFFECTIONATE WIFE ANNE HILL.

Mural, White Marble; a military trophy, in relief.


41.
(Ab.) COLONEL HENRY CAPADOSE, DIED AT UP PARK CAMP, 29th FEB: 1848,
AGED 70-ERECTED TO THEIR LATE COMMANDING OFFICER, BY THE OFFICERS OF
THE' Ist W. I. REGT.

W. M. Mural Sarcophagus.












MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS. 87

42.
MEMORIAL SACRUM-JOANNIS BECHER ARMIGERI APUD
ANGI.OS-INDIGENAE PROBI JURISPERITI; QUI QUUM-IN HAC
INSULA MULTOS ANNOS COMMORATUS -FUISSET, ARTEMQ
SUAM FIDE SUMMA-JUDICIO SUMMO EXERCUISSET, PRAE
PROPERE-NIMIS AMICIS ABREPTUS EST, NUNQUAM-SATIS
DEFLENDUS SATIS DESIDERANDUS-OBIIT 27 SEPTR 1762
AETAT SUAE 35.
White Mural Mont., with
an obelisk of yellow variegated marble; Arms, Vair, or and gules, on a canton of the first, a deer's head ca-
boshed azure. Impaling, azure, a less nebula, between three lions' heads erased, argent.

43.
TO THE MEMORY OF-GEORGE ORLEBAR, FRANCIS W HODGES, JOHN SMITH
HANDCOCK, CECIL F.P. HALE, & HENRY DYSON, MIDSHIPMEN ON BOARD H.M.S.
SANSPAREIL, WHO IN THE BLOOM OF YOUTH-& WITH EVERY PROMISE OF-
ADORNING THEIR PROFESSION-OF BEING USEFUL TO THEIR COUNTRY-AND A
BLESSING TO THEIR FRIENDS-PREMATURELY PERISHED-IN I8OO, & ISOI-BY
THE FELL FEVER OF-THE WEST INDIES.
Mural, White Marble Tablet ; oval on gray.
G. ORLEBAR, born 1782, was son of Richard Orlebar [O. of Hanwick], by his second
wife, Charlotte Willing. See Hale, of King's Walden, pedigree. Of the Hodges
family a notice will be found farther on.

44.
MEMORIAL SACRUM CAROL LLOYD ARMIGERI QUI E
FAMILIAR GLOCESTRIENSI ORIUNDUS ET LIBERALIBUS HUMA-
NIORIS VITAE STUDIES IN ANGLIA PROBE EXCULTUS. HIC
MATUR`US SEDEM FIXIT UBI MERCATURAM FELICITER EXER-
CENS INTEGERRIM/E VITAE EXEMPLAR SE PRAESTANS, ET
OMNIUM QUIBUSCUM VEL COMMERCIUM VEL CONSORTIUM
HABUIT, FAVOREM SIBI CONCILIANS, IN HAC PROVINCIA
PRAEFECTUS AERARII COOPTATUS EST: QUO MUNERE SUMMA
CUM PROBITATE. SUMMO OMNIUM PLAUSU PERFUNCTUS
EST; POST FACULTATES SATIS AMPLAS HONORIFICE ACQUI-
SITAS QUAS (PAENETOTAS) SINGULIS SUIS NEPOTIBUS EX
AEQUO LEGARAT. LANGUORE CORREPTUS OBIIT DIE SEPTEM-
BRIS 280. A.D. MDCCLI ET AETATIS SUAE LX. ralrs, Argent, a saire
HOC QUALECUNQUE AFFECTS ET DESIDERII TESTI- gules.
MONIUM P.P. NATHANIEL LLOYD ARMIGER NON MINUS COM-
MERCII QUAM FRATERNITATIS VINCULO OLIM CONJUNCTISSI-
MUS: JOHANNES LLOYD S.T.P. & THOMAS CRAWLEY BOEVEY
ARMIGER.
E NEPOLITIUS ET TESTAMENTI HAEREDIBUS.
12-2




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