• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 In this issue...
 Geoffery Dahl appointed chairman...
 Fall Hay and Forage Outlook
 U.S. beef in short supply...
 Bronson announces import restrictions...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. September 2006.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00021
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. September 2006.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: September 2006
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Geoffery Dahl appointed chairman of UF/IFAS Animal Sciences Department
        Page 2
    Fall Hay and Forage Outlook
        Page 3
    U.S. beef in short supply in Japan
        Page 3
    Bronson announces import restrictions of animals dues to vesicular stomatitis
        Page 4
Full Text



M


September 2006


1 Dates to Remember

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In this issue...


Geoffrey Dahl Appointed Cha inman
of UFLIFAS Animal Sciences
Departm ent .. .... .. .. .


Fall Hay and Forage Outlook..... 3


U S Beef in Short Supply in Japan 3


Bronson Announces Import Restrictions
OfAnimals Due To Vesicular
Stomatitis ..... ..... ...


114


Dr. Don Sloan

Don L. Sloan, died Monday at Shands at University of Florida; his was 62. Born in Wesley,
Arkansas. Don moved to Alachua from Plant City 20 years ago. He was a graduate of the
Univ. of Arkansas and received his Doctorate from the Univ. of FL. He was a Professor of
Animal Science at the Univ. of FL. He was a member of the Alpha Zeta and Farmer House
Fraternity, Poultry Science Association, 4 H, FFA & Habitat for Humanity. He was a
member of the Forest Grove Baptist Church of Alachua where he served as Deacon and
was a Representative for the Florida Baptist Children's Home. Don is survived by his wife
of 33 years. Betty Jo "B.J." Sapp Sloan, two daughters, Alexis Sloan of Miami, FL. and
Sara Sloan Standridge (Shaun) ofArcher, FL. 1 Granddaughter, Jessie Standridge -Archer,
FL. Sister, Ruby Linda Berry, 7 Brothers, Leonard Sloan, Walter Sloan Bill Sloan, John
Arthur Sloan, Lawrence Sloan, Louis Sloan, and Roy Sloan.


E lDr. Martin B. Adjei

SO L X Dr. MartinAdjei, our friend and colleague, was killedAugust 15, 2006, in a tragic
S- n automobile accident on his way home from work. Please keep Dr. Adjei's family in your
2 thoughts and prayers during this very difficult time.

If you would like to send a card to Dr. Adjei's wife Gloria, please send it to: PO Box
Lu4 556, Ft. Ogden, FL 34267.


The Institute ofFood andAgricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmatve Action Employer authorized to provide research educational information, and other
services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension pubhcations, contact your county
Cooperative Extension Service office.


6
(i


2.1
24
2I
2~I











Geoffrey Dahl
Appointed
Chairman of UF/
IFAS Animal
Sciences
Department

Bovine Reproductive
Endocrinologist Geoffrey
Dahl, a Professor of Animal
Sciences with the University of Illinois, Urbana-
Champaign, has been appointed Chairman of the UF/
IFAS Animal Sciences Department. The appointment
became effective July 28, 2006.

Dahl succeeds Glen Hembry, a UF/IFAS Animal
Sciences Professor who became chairman in 2000
when the department was created by merging the UF/
IFAS Animal, Poultry, and Dairy Science Programs.
Hembry also led the Animal Science Program from
1990 to 2000.

As Chairman, Dahl will initially focus his energies
on enhancing the department's teaching, research, and
extension programs in beef cattle, dairy cattle, and
equine production.

"One of the things that will be a help to me is, I
have experience in all three mission areas of the
department research, teaching, and extension," Dahl
said. "We're already recognized as one of the top 10
(Animal Sciences) departments in the country, but
there's a real opportunity for us to be recognized as
the best in the country."


Dahl is perhaps best known for his work on the
effects of photoperiod the amount of daylight in a
24-hour day on milk production, growth and health
in dairy cattle.

His other interests include food security, the
effect of milking frequency on lactation, and mastitis,
an inflammatory disease that reduces milk production
in dairy cattle.

Prior to his UF/IFAS appointment, Dahl was a
faculty member with the University of Illinois, Urbana-
Champaign'sAnimal Sciences Department from 2000
to mid-2006. While at UI he was named Director of
the Cross Campus Food Security Initiative and an
affiliate of the University's Beckman Institute for
Advanced Science and Technology, which cultivates
cutting-edge interdisciplinary research.

From 1994 to 2000 he was a faculty member
with the University ofMaryland's Animal andAvian
Sciences Department, and also served as the
Department's Undergraduate Coordinator. He began
his professional career as a research fellow with the
University ofMichigan's Reproductive Sciences
Program, from 1991 to 1994.

Dahl received a bachelor's degree in Animal
Science from the University of Massachusetts in 1985,
a Master's Degree in Dairy Science from Virginia
Polytechnic Institute in 1987 and a Doctorate in
Animal Science from Michigan State University in
1991.


SOURCE:


Jimmy Cheek, UF senior vice president for
agriculture and natural resources, said he was
impressed by Dahl's experience and vision.

"We believe that through his leadership we will
build on our strengths and achieve even greater
successes in the future," Cheek said. "Dr. Dahl will
help this become one of the best departments in the
world."


Geoffrey Dahl
Email: gdahl@ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 392-1981
Jimmy Cheek
Email: jgcheek@ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 392-1971
By: Tom Nordlie
Phone: (352) 392-0400
UF/IFAS News, Gainesville, FL
http://news.ifas.ufl.edu
Release September 7, 2006


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Fall Hay and Forage Outlook


Despite recent rains and brushes with Tropical
Storm Ernesto, pasture conditions and hay production
remain a potential concern for many Florida livestock
enterprises. Soil moisture survey results released by
the NAS S indicate that 3 8% of the topsoil is short or
very short of moisture and 75% of subsoil is short or
very short of moisture. This has resulted in 45% of
pasture conditions being rated fair or worse. By in
large, these moisture shortages are being reported in
the Central, Northern, and Panhandle regions of the
state. As a result many of the hay producing areas of
the state were 40-50% behind normal in hay harvest
entering the month ofAugust. To compound this,
USDA national forecasts of decreased hay and alfalfa
production have been reported. The mid-August
USDA hay forecast was down by 15% compared to a
year ago. Likewise, alfalfa production is predicted to
be down 6% from last year. The reduction in hay and
alfalfa production can be directly related to very dry
conditions during the spring and early summer across
much of the Great Plains and other hay producing
areas of the country.

What does that mean for Florida producers? In
many areas of the state, winter feeding of hay was
extended into the late spring because of dry condi-
tions. This lengthened hay feeding severely impacted
hay reserves for many producers. Likewise, the dry
summer has reduced local hay production significantly.
Coupled together, this could mean an overall reduction
in stored forage supplies for producers as we enter the
fall and winter supplementation periods. Another
potential set-back could occur if below normal
temperatures and early frost set in this fall. Factoring
our local hay scenario with the national hay scenario of
reduced production, greater production costs, greater
transportation cost, and increased demand from
drought stricken areas may mean tight hay supplies at
premium costs.

Now is the time that cattle and horse producers
need to start thinking about their winter forage needs.
In some instances alternative roughage sources could
be examined for beef cattle enterprises, while the
absolute hay quality requirement for horses should be


investigated. Regardless management practices to
stretch hay and roughage sources need to be consid-
ered. Remember animals have requirements for
nutrients, not particular feedstuffs. Cattle have a
requirement for roughage in their diet, that minimum is
about 6% of their total daily intake. Energy and
protein to meet the animal's requirements can come
from any number of sources. From a supplementation
standpoint, hay is an expensive source of energy and
protein compared to many other feedstuffs. Investigate
alternatives feedstuffs to supply energy and protein to
animals and compare feedstuffs on a cost per unit of
energy or protein basis. Contact your local Extension
agent to discuss alternative management systems and
feedstuffs available in your area.


SOURCE:


Dr. Matt Hersom
Email: hersom@animal.ufl.edu
UF/IFAS, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, Gainesville, FL
http://www.animal.ufl.edu
Release September 1, 2006


U.S. Beef in Short Supply in
Japan

Apart from shipments to
Costco Wholesale Japan, U.S.
beef is hard to find in Japanese
restaurants and retail stores,
according to Japanese press
reports.


Restaurateurs interested in adding U.S. beef to
their menus can't find adequate supplies, and retailers
on the whole say their customers don't want the
product. Only 17.6 tons of beef arrived by air in the
first 10 days since Japan reopened its market, as U. S.
producers scramble to find a source of beef from
animals 20 months of age and younger, and Japanese
wholesale customers nervously gauge consumer
interest.

At about $11.70 a pound on average, U.S. beef
costs a fraction of Japanese-raised beef, which often
retails for over $50 a kilogram, butAustralian beef is
nearly matching the price and is shifting production


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Fall Hay and Forage Outlook


Despite recent rains and brushes with Tropical
Storm Ernesto, pasture conditions and hay production
remain a potential concern for many Florida livestock
enterprises. Soil moisture survey results released by
the NAS S indicate that 3 8% of the topsoil is short or
very short of moisture and 75% of subsoil is short or
very short of moisture. This has resulted in 45% of
pasture conditions being rated fair or worse. By in
large, these moisture shortages are being reported in
the Central, Northern, and Panhandle regions of the
state. As a result many of the hay producing areas of
the state were 40-50% behind normal in hay harvest
entering the month ofAugust. To compound this,
USDA national forecasts of decreased hay and alfalfa
production have been reported. The mid-August
USDA hay forecast was down by 15% compared to a
year ago. Likewise, alfalfa production is predicted to
be down 6% from last year. The reduction in hay and
alfalfa production can be directly related to very dry
conditions during the spring and early summer across
much of the Great Plains and other hay producing
areas of the country.

What does that mean for Florida producers? In
many areas of the state, winter feeding of hay was
extended into the late spring because of dry condi-
tions. This lengthened hay feeding severely impacted
hay reserves for many producers. Likewise, the dry
summer has reduced local hay production significantly.
Coupled together, this could mean an overall reduction
in stored forage supplies for producers as we enter the
fall and winter supplementation periods. Another
potential set-back could occur if below normal
temperatures and early frost set in this fall. Factoring
our local hay scenario with the national hay scenario of
reduced production, greater production costs, greater
transportation cost, and increased demand from
drought stricken areas may mean tight hay supplies at
premium costs.

Now is the time that cattle and horse producers
need to start thinking about their winter forage needs.
In some instances alternative roughage sources could
be examined for beef cattle enterprises, while the
absolute hay quality requirement for horses should be


investigated. Regardless management practices to
stretch hay and roughage sources need to be consid-
ered. Remember animals have requirements for
nutrients, not particular feedstuffs. Cattle have a
requirement for roughage in their diet, that minimum is
about 6% of their total daily intake. Energy and
protein to meet the animal's requirements can come
from any number of sources. From a supplementation
standpoint, hay is an expensive source of energy and
protein compared to many other feedstuffs. Investigate
alternatives feedstuffs to supply energy and protein to
animals and compare feedstuffs on a cost per unit of
energy or protein basis. Contact your local Extension
agent to discuss alternative management systems and
feedstuffs available in your area.


SOURCE:


Dr. Matt Hersom
Email: hersom@animal.ufl.edu
UF/IFAS, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, Gainesville, FL
http://www.animal.ufl.edu
Release September 1, 2006


U.S. Beef in Short Supply in
Japan

Apart from shipments to
Costco Wholesale Japan, U.S.
beef is hard to find in Japanese
restaurants and retail stores,
according to Japanese press
reports.


Restaurateurs interested in adding U.S. beef to
their menus can't find adequate supplies, and retailers
on the whole say their customers don't want the
product. Only 17.6 tons of beef arrived by air in the
first 10 days since Japan reopened its market, as U. S.
producers scramble to find a source of beef from
animals 20 months of age and younger, and Japanese
wholesale customers nervously gauge consumer
interest.

At about $11.70 a pound on average, U.S. beef
costs a fraction of Japanese-raised beef, which often
retails for over $50 a kilogram, butAustralian beef is
nearly matching the price and is shifting production


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








from grass-fed to grain-finished to provide the fattier
beef Japanese consumers prefer. Western Australia's
largest packer, Harvey Beef, announced this week that
it will shift its production to grain-fed beef to cut costs,
increase sales and stimulate the production capacity of
the nation's feedlots.

Fast-food restaurant chains in Japan are eagerly
awaiting the arrival of U.S. beef, but they need huge
quantities and lower prices they can achieve once beef
arrives chilled and frozen by sea. Yakiniku and
Yoshinoya, two maj or chains, have announced they
will reintroduce U. S. beef as soon as supplies in-
crease.

Retailers, however, are another matter. Even
Wal-Mart's Seiyu stores have ignored U. S. beef to
date, and other chains say there is absolutely no
demand for the product. One chain, Aeon Stores, told
the AssociatedPress that it has not received a single
call asking for U.S. beef, adding that it is regularly
overwhelmed by callers requesting various products
the chain doesn't carry.

Various surveys conducted this summer in Japan
found that between 54 percent and 90 percent of
Japanese consumers said they would not buy U. S.
beef, at least for now. Suspicion lingers that the
Japanese government caved to pressure from the
United States, reopening the market prematurely as a
favor to Washington.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release August 23, 2006


Bronson Announces Import
Restrictions Of Animals Due To
Vesicular Stomatitis

FloridaAgriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson announced the
placement of restrictions on the importation of animals
from states affected with Vesicular Stomatitis following
a confirmed case in Wyoming, the first such case
reported in the United States this year.


Vesicular Stomatitis is a highly contagious, viral
disease that affects horses, cattle, swine, and
occasionally sheep, goats, and deer. The virus can also
cause flu-like symptoms in people working with
infected animals. Signs of Vesicular Stomatitis include
blister-like lesions in the mouth, on the tongue, lips,
nostrils, hooves, and teats. While the virus is rarely
fatal, it does result in significant weight loss and milk
production loss. It is also difficult to distinguish
between this virus and foot and mouth disease, a
devastating livestock disease found outside the United
States. States and other countries often impose
movement restrictions on animals from Vesicular
Stomatitis affected areas.

Earlier this week, the USDANational Veterinary
Services Laboratories confirmed the finding of a
positive horse, with clinical signs on a ranch in Natrona
County, Wyoming.

"I'm pleased to see that Wyoming has taken
immediate action to hold animals on the affected
premises," Bronson said, but the possibility that this
disease could be in other areas makes it imperative
that we have rules in place to prevent the disease from
being imported into Florida."

Florida requires veterinary inspection of
susceptible animals coming from states affected with
Vesicular Stomatitis. Hoofed animals entering Florida
from Wyoming will require prior permission for entry
and must be accompanied by an official certificate of
veterinary inspection. The certificate of veterinary
inspection must state that the animals are free of
clinical signs of Vesicular Stomatitis and have not been
exposed nor located within 10 miles of a positive
premises, within the previous 30 days. In addition, any
hoofed livestock from states that are affected with
Vesicular Stomatitis are required to have
documentation to show they have been tested and
found negative within 10 days of movement to Florida.


SOURCE:


Dr. Thomas Holt
Email: holtt@doacs.state.fl.us
FDACS, Tallahassee, FL
http://doacs.state.fl.us
Release -August 22, 2006


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


4




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