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 In this issue..
 Century pioneer family farms
 Genetic tests beef up cattle...
 Agreement with China signed on...
 Expanded market programs have increased...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. May 2006.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00017
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. May 2006.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: May 2006
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00017
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue..
        Page 1
    Century pioneer family farms
        Page 2
    Genetic tests beef up cattle breeding
        Page 2
    Agreement with China signed on food safety and plant and animal health
        Page 3
    Expanded market programs have increased sales of Florida products by over $1 billion
        Page 3
        Page 4
Full Text













May 2006

, ) In this issue...
4.) Dates to Remember
iB-lB'


May
2 .'' Florida Dair, Prod;juctiojn Cionferernce -
Gainesiille FL
3-5 CC" nr.,al E l I:- alll 'Sr.:rl I :-.:,i r' G-ar-_ il
FL
4 Ser. at&' Gaines.lle FL
11 F.:.raq anr1 r i.Irli.:ir \.rk ri. : r I.:. r 'Sn'all R.,n'iari l
:,. 'prr FL
18-21 NC.BA Region i r.leelin Pigeon Forge TN
20 Heari ,:i Fl.:.ria nrir.ial I.. i all 'Sale la-,ri.ia FL
25 2006 Corrn Silage Forage Field Da, C LIra FL

June
1 Ser.Safe '' Gaines.ill FL
4 Horsemanship School Welaka, FL
11 Horsemanship School WVlaka FL
18 Horsemanship School Welaka, FL
19 Fljorida Catll~en-en s College Marco., Island FL
20 Heart of Florida Annual Club Calf Sale Alachua, FL
20-22 FCA Annual Con.enlion & Alledl Trade Snov, -
r.arco Island FL
23 State 4-H Horse Events Gainesville, FL
25 Horsemanship School Welaka FL
27-29 4-H Hog & Ham Gainesville, FL


55th Annual Beef


-,^_ -
:~ &&4ra72ii


North Florida Properties Recognized
as Century~ Pioneer Famil\ Farms ... 1

Genetic Tests Beef Up Cattle
B reed ing ... ... ... .... ... 2

Agreement \With China Signcd on Food
Safet\ and Plant and Animal Health .. 3

E\panded Marketing Programs Ha\ c
Increased Sales of Florida Products
b\ O vcr$ 1 B million .... ... .... ....



North Florida Properties
Recognized as Century Pioneer
Family Farms

Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson announced that
two more families have qualified for recognition as a
Century Pioneer Family Farm. They include properties
in Madison and Suwannee Counties. Recognition in
this program means the families have maintained
continuous ownership of the property for at least 100
years.

The families who qualify are Steve and Susan
Wood in Suwannee County and Dewayne Leslie in
Madison County.

continued on page 2


Cattle Short Course


May 3-5, 2006
Hilton UF Conference Center
Gainesville, FL


Visit http://www.animal.ufl.edu/ for more information.


I~
2:

zH


The Institute of Food andAgncultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity -AffirmativeAction Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and other
services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color sex, age, handicap, or national orgin For information on obtaining other extension publcations, contact your county
Cooperative Extension Service office.








Century Pioneer Family Farms

continued from page 1

"These families have been able to retain owner-
ship of their land through the depression, diseases,
droughts, freezes and the urbanization of Florida,"
Bronson said. "That is a great tribute to the many
generations of these families.

Agricultural products that have been produced
on these properties ranged from cattle, corn, cotton
and tobacco on the Wood property, to beef cattle on
the Leslie property.

Since the program began 25 years ago, 87 family
farms have received the Century Pioneer Farm
designation. The program is administered by the
Florida Department ofAgriculture and Consumer
Services with assistance of the FloridaAgricultural
Museum.

For more information about the program or to
apply for membership into the program contact
Richard Gunnels at gunnelr@doacs.state.fl.us or call
850/488-3022.

SOURCE: Richard Gunnels
Email: gunnelr@doacs.state.fl.us
Phone: (850) 488-3022
FDACS, Tallahassee, FL
Release -April 13, 2006


Genetic Tests Beef Up Cattle
Breeding

Geneticists with the Agricultural Research
Service (ARS) in Clay Center, Neb., are improving
traditional cattle breeding methods with marker-
assisted selection, a process that incorporates DNA
tests into traditional genetic evaluation systems.

Traditionally, breeders have used visual appraisal
to estimate cows' genetic merit. By carefully recording
the characteristics of herd members and their


descendents, animal breeders can calculate an animal's
Expected Progeny Difference, or EPD. This is a figure
estimating the average performance of specific traits
for an individual's offspring.

More recently, geneticists have developed DNA
tests associated with important traits in cattle. These
tests might someday be incorporated into the
established selection process.

According toARS geneticist R. Mark Thallman,
incorporating DNA tests in breeders' calculations
could improve the accuracy of their EPDs and place
the appropriate degree of emphasis on the DNA tests.

With geneticist Mark F. Allan, he is testing that
theory, using a herd selected for producing twins as a
prototypical population. Previous research located
three genetic regions linked to the twinning trait. This
information has been incorporated into the scientists'
calculations since 1998, enabling them to make more
accurate genetic predictions, or "marker-adjusted
EPDs."

The twinning experiment is simply one example
of marker-assisted selection's potential. In similar
work, researchers from Corell University, ARS and
Iowa State University incorporated DNA test results
into a genetic evaluation of Simmental cattle for
tenderness, allowing Simmental breeders to use
marker-assisted selection for tenderness.


Angus cattle on pasture.
Photo by Scott Bauer


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Century Pioneer Family Farms

continued from page 1

"These families have been able to retain owner-
ship of their land through the depression, diseases,
droughts, freezes and the urbanization of Florida,"
Bronson said. "That is a great tribute to the many
generations of these families.

Agricultural products that have been produced
on these properties ranged from cattle, corn, cotton
and tobacco on the Wood property, to beef cattle on
the Leslie property.

Since the program began 25 years ago, 87 family
farms have received the Century Pioneer Farm
designation. The program is administered by the
Florida Department ofAgriculture and Consumer
Services with assistance of the FloridaAgricultural
Museum.

For more information about the program or to
apply for membership into the program contact
Richard Gunnels at gunnelr@doacs.state.fl.us or call
850/488-3022.

SOURCE: Richard Gunnels
Email: gunnelr@doacs.state.fl.us
Phone: (850) 488-3022
FDACS, Tallahassee, FL
Release -April 13, 2006


Genetic Tests Beef Up Cattle
Breeding

Geneticists with the Agricultural Research
Service (ARS) in Clay Center, Neb., are improving
traditional cattle breeding methods with marker-
assisted selection, a process that incorporates DNA
tests into traditional genetic evaluation systems.

Traditionally, breeders have used visual appraisal
to estimate cows' genetic merit. By carefully recording
the characteristics of herd members and their


descendents, animal breeders can calculate an animal's
Expected Progeny Difference, or EPD. This is a figure
estimating the average performance of specific traits
for an individual's offspring.

More recently, geneticists have developed DNA
tests associated with important traits in cattle. These
tests might someday be incorporated into the
established selection process.

According toARS geneticist R. Mark Thallman,
incorporating DNA tests in breeders' calculations
could improve the accuracy of their EPDs and place
the appropriate degree of emphasis on the DNA tests.

With geneticist Mark F. Allan, he is testing that
theory, using a herd selected for producing twins as a
prototypical population. Previous research located
three genetic regions linked to the twinning trait. This
information has been incorporated into the scientists'
calculations since 1998, enabling them to make more
accurate genetic predictions, or "marker-adjusted
EPDs."

The twinning experiment is simply one example
of marker-assisted selection's potential. In similar
work, researchers from Corell University, ARS and
Iowa State University incorporated DNA test results
into a genetic evaluation of Simmental cattle for
tenderness, allowing Simmental breeders to use
marker-assisted selection for tenderness.


Angus cattle on pasture.
Photo by Scott Bauer


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







In the future the technique could be used to
improve other desirable traits, such as efficiency,
fertility and growth rate.

Marker-assisted selection will allow breeders to
increase the speed and accuracy of traditional
assessment methods, but its advantages extend
beyond the seedstock industry. Commercial cattle
producers would be able to purchase bulls with
superior genetics. The desirable characteristics in the
livestock would ultimately translate into better
products for consumers.

ARS is the U.S. Department ofAgriculture's
chief scientific research agency.

SOURCE: LauraMcGinnis
Email: lmcginnis@ars.usda.gov
Phone: (301) 504-1654
USDA/ARS, Washington, D.C.
Release March 22, 2006


Agreement With China Signed
on Food Safety and Plant and
Animal Health

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has signed a
memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Minister
Li Changjiang of China's General Administration of
Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine to
improve bilateral cooperation on animal and plant
health and food safety.

"China is an increasingly important market for
U.S. food and agricultural products," said Johanns. "In
2005, U.S. farmers and ranchers sold more than $6
billion in agricultural products to China, making it our
fifth largest export market. This memorandum of
understanding will create a structure to enable us to
address sanitary, phytosanitary and food safety issues
before they become barriers to the thriving agricultural
trade between our two countries."

Under this MOU the two countries will exchange


information on food regulations and standards,
inspection and quarantine procedures, and other issues
such as pests and disease, harmful residues, and food
certification.

The MOU was signed in conjunction with the
17th meeting of the U. S.-China Joint Commission on
Commerce and Trade (JCCT) plenary held in
Washington, D.C. The JCCT provides the United
States and China with an opportunity for high-level
discussions on bilateral trade issues, and a means to
strengthen commercial relationships. The JCCT last
met in China in July 2005.

Johanns participated in the 17th U. S.-China Joint
Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT)
meeting held in Washington. The forum was co-
chaired by Vice Premier Wu Yi for China and on the
U.S. side by U.S. Trade Representative Rob Portman
and Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez.

The JCCT provides the United States and China
with an opportunity for high-level discussions on
bilateral trade issues, and a means to strengthen
commercial relationships. The JCCT last met in China
in July 2005.


SOURCE:


Ed Loyd
Phone: (202) 720-4623
Harold Kanarek
Phone: (202) 720-0328
USDA/ARS, Washington, D.C.
Release- April 11, 2006


Expanded Marketing Programs
Have Increased Sales of Florida
Products by Over $1 Billion
Four-year expansion effort benefits
Florida's farmers and economy, Bronson
announces

Marketing programs conducted by the Florida
Department ofAgriculture and Consumer Services
have increased sales of Florida-grown products by
more than $1 billion during the past four years.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







In the future the technique could be used to
improve other desirable traits, such as efficiency,
fertility and growth rate.

Marker-assisted selection will allow breeders to
increase the speed and accuracy of traditional
assessment methods, but its advantages extend
beyond the seedstock industry. Commercial cattle
producers would be able to purchase bulls with
superior genetics. The desirable characteristics in the
livestock would ultimately translate into better
products for consumers.

ARS is the U.S. Department ofAgriculture's
chief scientific research agency.

SOURCE: LauraMcGinnis
Email: lmcginnis@ars.usda.gov
Phone: (301) 504-1654
USDA/ARS, Washington, D.C.
Release March 22, 2006


Agreement With China Signed
on Food Safety and Plant and
Animal Health

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has signed a
memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Minister
Li Changjiang of China's General Administration of
Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine to
improve bilateral cooperation on animal and plant
health and food safety.

"China is an increasingly important market for
U.S. food and agricultural products," said Johanns. "In
2005, U.S. farmers and ranchers sold more than $6
billion in agricultural products to China, making it our
fifth largest export market. This memorandum of
understanding will create a structure to enable us to
address sanitary, phytosanitary and food safety issues
before they become barriers to the thriving agricultural
trade between our two countries."

Under this MOU the two countries will exchange


information on food regulations and standards,
inspection and quarantine procedures, and other issues
such as pests and disease, harmful residues, and food
certification.

The MOU was signed in conjunction with the
17th meeting of the U. S.-China Joint Commission on
Commerce and Trade (JCCT) plenary held in
Washington, D.C. The JCCT provides the United
States and China with an opportunity for high-level
discussions on bilateral trade issues, and a means to
strengthen commercial relationships. The JCCT last
met in China in July 2005.

Johanns participated in the 17th U. S.-China Joint
Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT)
meeting held in Washington. The forum was co-
chaired by Vice Premier Wu Yi for China and on the
U.S. side by U.S. Trade Representative Rob Portman
and Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez.

The JCCT provides the United States and China
with an opportunity for high-level discussions on
bilateral trade issues, and a means to strengthen
commercial relationships. The JCCT last met in China
in July 2005.


SOURCE:


Ed Loyd
Phone: (202) 720-4623
Harold Kanarek
Phone: (202) 720-0328
USDA/ARS, Washington, D.C.
Release- April 11, 2006


Expanded Marketing Programs
Have Increased Sales of Florida
Products by Over $1 Billion
Four-year expansion effort benefits
Florida's farmers and economy, Bronson
announces

Marketing programs conducted by the Florida
Department ofAgriculture and Consumer Services
have increased sales of Florida-grown products by
more than $1 billion during the past four years.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml






4


"In partnership with Florida's agricultural
producers, our department has drastically expanded
the scope of marketing promotions throughout the
United States and abroad," Florida Agriculture
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson said. "During the
last four years, our marketing initiatives have helped
increase sales of Florida agricultural products by
$1.13 billion. That's good news for our state's
economic health and for our growers."

Bronson's Division of Marketing and
Development continually conducts trade missions and
events to develop and enhance business relationships
that benefit Florida agricultural producers. In addition
to these ongoing initiatives, the division has also
dramatically expanded its premier annual produce
marketing campaigns that promote fresh Florida fruits
and vegetables harvested during the winter and spring
months when Florida is the dominant U.S. supplier.

These campaigns with names such as
"Northern Exposure" I and II, "Greetings From Your
Florida Farmer," "PowerGrid," and Storming Across
North America" capitalize on the division's
partnerships with produce buyers for large grocery
chains throughout the United States and Canada.
Participating chains increase their orders of Florida
produce and include the "Fresh from Florida" logo in
their advertising, ultimately leading to increased sales.

Bronson said that the billion-dollar increase in
sales has helped fuel impressive growth throughout
Florida's entire agriculture industry. He cited a recently
released report by the University of Florida's Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences that shows the
agriculture and natural resource industries' overall
impact on the state's economy grew from $62 billion
in 2000 to $87.6 billion in 2003. The UF report also
shows that direct employment by the agriculture and
natural resource industries rose 15 percent from
338,253 jobs to 388,916jobs, while the total
employment impacts grew by 16.7 percent from
648,550 jobs to 756,993 jobs.

Bronson's Division of Marketing and
Development routinely partners with government
agencies, grower associations and agricultural


companies to help finance the division's marketing
initiatives and promotions through funding assistance
and in-kind contributions. Maj or partners include:
Florida Farm Bureau, Florida Tomato Committee,
Florida Strawberry Association, Florida Department
of Citrus, Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association,
Florida Watermelon Association, Florida Forestry
Association, Noble Tangerines, SealdSweet
Corporation, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and
U.S. Livestock and Genetics Export Inc.

From fiscal year 2001 though 2005, the division
received $2.46 million in outside funding and $3.8
million in in-kind contributions from partners. During
the same period, the division's marketing initiatives
generated $1.13 billion in sales and 34.7 billion
consumer impressions. In addition, retailers provided
$19.4 million in free advertising to promote the "Fresh
from Florida" logo and Florida-grown products.

The Florida Department ofAgriculture and
Consumer Services is statutorily mandated to provide
professional marketing services to Florida's
agricultural community through its Division of
Marketing and Development. These marketing
promotions are part of the ongoing "Fresh from
Florida" campaign, an identification and promotional
program designed to boost the image of Florida
agriculture and increase sales by helping consumers to
identify Florida-grown agricultural products at retail
stores. The "Fresh from Florida" campaign also helps
increase public awareness of the importance of
Florida's agriculture industry.

Marketing Promotion Results,
fiscal year 2001 to 2005
Sales generated: $1.13 billion
Consumer impressions generated: 34.757 billion
Outside funding received: $2.461 million
In-kind contributions received: $3.8 million
Ad value obtained free: $19.386 million


SOURCE:


Dan Sleep
Email: sleepd@doacs.state.fl.us
Phone: (850) 487-8908
FDACS, Tallahassee, FL
Release March 29, 2006


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml




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